Skip to main content

tv   U.S. House of Representatives Legislative Business  CSPAN  February 11, 2016 4:00pm-6:01pm EST

4:00 pm
4:01 pm
4:02 pm
4:03 pm
4:04 pm
4:05 pm
4:06 pm
the chair: on this vote, the ayes have 184, the nays are 234. he amendment is not adopted. the unfinished business is the request for a recorded vote on amendment number 5 printed in part a of house report 114-420 by the gentleman from wisconsin, mr. duffy on which further proceedings were postponed on which the noes prevailed by voice vote. the clerk will redesignate the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 5 printed in part a of house report number 114-420, offered by mr. duffy of wisconsin. the chair: the recorded vote has been requested. those in support of the request for a recorded vote will rise and be counted. a sufficient number having risen, a recorded vote is
4:07 pm
ordered. members will record their votes by electronic device. this will be a two-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
4:08 pm
4:09 pm
4:10 pm
the chair: on this vote, the ayes have 240 the nays are 176. the amendment is adopted.
4:11 pm
the unfinished business is the request for a recorded vote on amendment number 7 printed in part a of house report 114-420 by the gentleman from arizona, mr. grijalva, on which further proceedings were postponed and on which the noes prevailed by voice vote. the clerk will redesignate the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 7 printed in part -- in part a of house report 114-420, offered by mr. grijalva of arizona. the chair: a recorded vote has been requested. those in support of the request for a recorded vote will rise and be counted. a sufficient number having risen a recorded vote is ordered. members will record their votes by electronic device. this will be a two-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
4:12 pm
4:13 pm
4:14 pm
the chair: on this vote, the ayes are 171, the nays are 245. the amendment is not adopted. the unfinished business is the request for a recorded vote on amendment number 8 printed in part a of house report 114-420. by the gentleman from california, mr. takano on which further proceedings were postponed and on which the noes prevailed by voice vote. the clerk will redesignate the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 8 printed in part a of house report 114-420, offered by mr.
4:15 pm
takano of california. the chair: a recorded vote has been requested. those in support of the request for a recorded vote will rise and be counted. a sufficient number having risen, a recorded vote is ordered. members will record their votes by electronic device. this is a two-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
4:16 pm
4:17 pm
4:18 pm
the chair: on this vote the eas are --
4:19 pm
the chair: on this vote the yeas are 190 and the nays are 227. the amendment is not adopted. there being no further amendments, under the rule the committee rises. the speaker pro tempore: mr. chairman. the chair: mr. speaker, the committee of the whole house on the state of the union has had under consideration h.r. 3442. pursuant to house resolution 609, i report the bill back to the house with sundry
4:20 pm
amendments adopted in the committee of the whole. the speaker pro tempore: the committee of the whole house on the state of the union reports that the committee has had under consider h.r. 3442 and pursuant to house resolution 609 reports the bill back to the house with sundry amendments adopted in the committee of the whole. under the rule, the previous question is ordered. is a separate vote demanded on any amendment reported from the ommittee of the whole? if not the chair about thought them engross. the question is on adoption of the amendments. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. the ayes have it. the amendments are agreed to. the question is on engrossment and third reading of the bill. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. the ayes have it. >> mr. speaker. the clerk: a bill to provide further means of accountability
4:21 pm
of the united states debt and promote fiscal responsibility. the speaker pro tempore: the ouse will be in order. the house will be in order. members, please clear the well and take your conversations off the floor. he house will be in order. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i have a motion to recommit at the desk. the speaker pro tempore: is the gentleman opposed to the bill? >> i am, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman qualifies. the clerk will report the motion. the clerk: mr. doggett of texas moves to recommit the bill h.r.
4:22 pm
3442 to the committee on ways and means with instructs to report the same back to the house fort with with the following -- forthwith with the following amendment. page 4, strike line 2257bd all that follows line 25 and insert the following -- c, an analysis of the following -- i, long-term revenue loss from tax avoidance and evasion resulting from tax loopholes exploited by businesses including corporate inversions, base erosions, unlimited deferral of foreign earnings and loopholes that encourage the offshoring of jobs and profits. double i, long-term revenue from tax avoidance and evasion resulting from the tax loopholes used by the wealthy, including carried interest, estate tax rules, capital gains rates and deductions and exemptions that widen income wealth and income inequality for individuals. iii, long-term revenue loss due to policies of the internal
4:23 pm
revenue code of 1985 which contribute to tax income avoidance by american businesses and individuals who are increasingly more discouraged by corporations and wealthy individuals not to being required to pay their fair share of taxes. the speaker pro tempore: is there objection? without objection, the reading is dispensed with. he house will be in order. the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. mr. doggett: thank you, mr. speaker. to address a problem that has impacted our country for generations, some of our problem solving colleagues have devised a sure fire remedy. they're demanding another government report. instead of actually voting to prevent more debt when they had the opportunity, they want a
4:24 pm
report. approval of this motion will not kill the report. it will not kill the bill, nor will it send it back to committee. rather, the bill will immediately proceed to final passage, as amended. but it will be a more complete report that more completely describes the problem with which we're dealing. some of our republican lleagues have a near insat yabble desire for -- insashable desire for tax cuts. insatiable desire for tax cuts. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. members will clear the well and remove your conversations from the floor. the gentleman will continue. mr. doggett: thank you, mr. speaker. some of our colleagues have a near insatiable desire for tax cuts that don't pay for themselves. they don't mind borrowing from foreign sources to provide more tax preferences to wall street
4:25 pm
or the privileged few. this motion will simply expose the cost of this false ideology. it will add a requirement that the public just find out how much these special interest tax loopholes costs. specifically, this report will be expanded to include inversions. these are schemes by which some multinational corporations are renouncing their american charter, their american citizenship in order to dodge taxes while continuing to remain in america and claim the benefits of being american paid for by their business competitors and other taxpayers. we've had a recent string of these inversions which are really per versions of our tax -- perversions of our tax code by those who refuse to pay their fair share of national security. johnson controls, for example, has announced its intent to merge with tyco.
4:26 pm
tyco was once an american citizen before it became a citizen of bermuda, before it switched to become a citizen of ireland. all the while being managed in new jersey. and pfizer, the largest pharmaceutical company. it's seeking the luck of the irish. the irish taxes, that is. but it certainly refuses to charge americans lower, more reasonable irish pharmaceutical costs. these are the same companies that are insulted by the notion that they ought to pay a higher rate on their earnings than the people that clean up the board room at night. the republican chairman of houston oil services company wrote me a long time ago rejecting this notion as unfair and unpatriotic. he said, quote, we're proud of our country and we're willing to paes taxes to receive the wonderful benefits of u.s. citizenship -- pay taxes to receive the wonderful benefits of u.s. citizenship. if some company wants to be health quartered in some tax haven, then they should give up
4:27 pm
their own citizenship and move there. i agree with him. that's not what happens. with our current tax loopholes, they don't have to move much more than a mailbox and a few staff members. since the u.s. supreme court thinks that corporations are people, i agree with former secretary hillary clinton's proposal to treat these chartered changing corporations as individuals, like the superrich american individuals who turn in their passports and leave america. apply an exit tax to previous profits that these corporations want to take out of the country. there's much more that the treasury department can and should do now since what it's done so far under existing legal authority does not accomplish very much. but today, let's just get a report about it, about a giant ripoff of america. corporations, which are shipping their jobs and their profits overseas while paying their lobbyists and their chief executive officers more than they pay the united states
4:28 pm
treasury in taxes in any given taxes, that's a pretty good investment for them but it's not too great for the rest of us. they could not do it without enablers in this congress. american companies that stay in america and contribute to building this america, contribute to build america, manufacturing in america, they deserve to have a level playing field. they help keep us secure at home and abroad, and they deserve to be treated fairly. in order to create more opportunity for all, we need more responsibility from all. let's at least get a report about it. that's all that this motion to recommit does is to ask for a report to go along with the report that they're seeking from the treasury department to tell us what's happening, how our middle class, our working americans are having to pay more because some others won't pay their fair share. and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the entleman yields.
4:29 pm
he house will be in order. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? mr. marchant: mr. speaker, i rise in opposition to the motion to recommit. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. mr. marchant: mr. speaker, i strongly urge the house to reject this motion to recommit and adopt the debt management and fiscal responsibility act. it's a commonsense solution to washington's debt crisis mentality. r. 3432 creates a process to bring -- 3442 creates a process to bring transparency, consistency to the debt management process. regardless of whether a person supports raising the debt ceiling or not, everyone should support a process that gives us more information to make an educated decision. the debt management and fiscal responsibility act requires the administration to report on the
4:30 pm
state of the national debt before the debt ceiling's reached. it also requires the administration to make recommendations and report information about how to reduce the debt and how america can meet its future obligations. this accountability will give congress the information it needs when considering the debt limit, and all of this information will be made public online. h.r. 3442 is a strong first step to move government away from its current crisis approach and changes the focus into coming up with solutions for our debt problem. i'm a firm believer in h.r. 3442. i urge all the members to reject this motion to recommit and support the legislation. thank you and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields. without objection, the previous question is ordered on the motion to recommit. the question is on the motion to recommit. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no.
4:31 pm
in the opinion of the chair, the noes have it. mr. doggett: on that i would request a recorded vote. the speaker pro tempore: a recorded vote is requested. those favoring a recorded vote will rise. a sufficient number having arisen, a recorded vote is ordered. members will record their votes y electronic device. pursuant to clause 8 and clause 9 of rule 20, this five-minute vote on the motion to recommit will be followed by five-minute votes on the passage of h.r. 3442, if ordered, ordering the previous question on house resolution 611 and adoption of the house resolution 611, if ordered. this is a five-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
4:32 pm
4:33 pm
4:34 pm
4:35 pm
4:36 pm
4:37 pm
the speaker pro tempore: on this vote, the yeas are 179, the nays are 238. he motion is not accepted. the question is on passage of the bill. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. the ayes have it. the bill is passed and without objection -- >> mr. speaker, i ask for a recorded vote. the speaker pro tempore: a recorded vote is requested. those favoring a recorded vote will rise. a sufficient number having risen, a recorded vote is ordered. members will record their votes by electronic device. this is a five-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
4:38 pm
4:39 pm
4:40 pm
4:41 pm
4:42 pm
4:43 pm
the speaker pro tempore: on this vote, the yeas are 267, the nays are 15ses without objection, the motion to re-- to reconsider is laid on the table. the unfinished business is the vote on ordering the previous question on house resolution 611 on which the yeas and nays are ordered. the clerk will report the title of the resolution. the clerk: house calendar number 90, house resolution 611, resolution providing for consideration of the bill h.r. 2017 to amend the federal food, drug and cosmetic act to clarify certain disclosure requirements for restaurants and similar food establishments and to amend the authority to bring proceedings under section 403-a and
4:44 pm
providing for proceedings from february 15, 2016, through february 22, 2016. the speaker pro tempore: the question is on ordering the previous question. members will record their votes by electronic device. this is a five-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
4:45 pm
4:46 pm
4:47 pm
4:48 pm
4:49 pm
4:50 pm
the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the yeas are 237. he nays are 178. the previous question is ordered. the question is on adoption of the resolution. those in favor say aye. those opposed say no. the ayes have it. the resolution is adopted. >> mr. speaker, on that i request a recorded vote. the speaker pro tempore: a recorded vote is requested. those favoring a recorded vote will rise. a sufficient number having arisen, a recorded vote is ordered. members will record their votes by electronic device. this is a five-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or
4:51 pm
commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
4:52 pm
4:53 pm
4:54 pm
4:55 pm
4:56 pm
the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the yeas are 237. the nays are 174. the resolution is adopted. without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent that the clerk be authorized to make a technical correction in the engrossment of 3442. mr. marchant: to include corrections in spelling, punctuation, section numbering, cross-referencing and the insertion of appropriate headings. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. for what purpose does the gentleman from rhode island seek recognition? mr. langevin: mr. speaker, i
4:57 pm
rise today to correct the record regarding my vote during yesterday's consideration of the democratic motion to recommit on h.r. 3293, roll call 69. while my vote was recorded as a nay, it was my intention to vote yea as i strongly support scientific research into causes and prevention of gun violence. and i ask the record be corrected. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman's statement will appear in the record. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from texas seek recognition? ms. granger: i sks my name be removed as a co-sponsor of h.r. 571. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the chair will now entertain requests for one-minute speeches.
4:58 pm
for what purpose does the gentleman from new hampshire seek recognition? mr. guinta: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. guinta: mr. speaker, i rise in recognition of national court reporting and captioning week, taking place next week. court reporters and captioners are highly specialized professionals who record our most important public events and provide vital closed captioning services to nearly 48 million americans. my own parents met in court reporting school and went on to start a small successful business. the training is rigorous, certification requires one's ability to type at a rate of 225 per minute. a court reporter is transcribing this very moment in congress. the new hampshire court reporters association celebrated its 30th anniversary but it extends much further. because of court reporters we have an accurate record of the first days of our country, our founding fathers drafted the declaration of independence,
4:59 pm
and the constitution. i'd like to thank court reporters and captioners for their service, enabling public participation in our democracy. a cornerstone of representative government in the united states, and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania seek recognition? >> to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for one inute. >> thank you. mr. speaker, i rise today in honor of stanford harling iii, a widely known and well-beloved 12-year-old from norristown, pennsylvania. affectionately known as man man. mr. boyle: he tragically died as he dove back into the flames of his own burning home to rescue his father who was bedridden while recovering from hip surgery. unbeknownst to man man, his father had already escaped
5:00 pm
through a second story window. although this courageous 12-year-old never re-emerged from his home, his memory resonates well beyond his community thanks to this remarkable act of heroism. while the honor and recognition that sanford deserves cannot return him to the embrace of his family, perhaps his shining example will inspire other deeds of life-saving bravery and devotion. he will forever be remembered in our community and our country as a hero. i offer my deepest sympathies to the harling family to everyone who knew and cherished this young man's character and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from kansas seek recognition? . . without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> mr. speaker, every day hardworking american families are living with greater burdens placed upon them by their own federal government. mr. pompeo: as our -- mr. yoder: as our constituents
5:01 pm
struggle to pay their bill, they do so under a weight of taxes and burdensome regulations from washington. this week the working guy or gal actually got a reprieve from one of these costly burdens, when the supreme court placed a stay on president obama's so-called clean power plan. the $480 billion plan would increase electric rates for millions ever americans. in kansas, electric utility rates may spike by 30%. at town hall meetings i rarely have a constituent ask for a 30% increase in their electric rates. yet washington will make americans foot the bill once again. what do we get for the $480 billion in hidden taxes and higher electric utility rates, dedegree in temperatures. finally, a win for the little guy. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition?
5:02 pm
mr. poe: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute, revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. poe: mr. speaker, the n.s.a. is using a loophole in the foreign intelligence surveillance act to spy on americans without a warrant. under section 70 of fisa, government agents may seize information from databases on suspected foreign terrorists. but while seizing the information on these terrorists, n.s.a. also seizes data on americans without a warrant, data that includes emails, texts and voice communication. this is an unlawful interpretation of fisa. it was never the intent of congress that section 702 would be used to create databases of information that would later be searched for information on american citizens without a search warrant and without that individual's knowledge. i have introduced legislation that would prohibit warrantless searches of government databases for information that pertains to u.s. citizens.
5:03 pm
the n.s.a. has and will continue to violate the constitutional protections guaranteed to every american unless congress acts. until we fix this and make the law clear, citizens will never be sure or safe that their private conversations are secure from the eyes and spies of government. the bill of rights cannot be trampled upon in the name of national security, whether the n.s.a. likes it or not. and that's just the way it is. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> mr. speaker, today i would like to bring attention to the recent outstanding achievements of the university of texas at austin. this public university, which i represent, has continued to fulfill the texas constitution's mandate that u.t. be a university of the first class. mr. williams: i regularly meet with the president and chancellor. i would like to praise them for their continued dedication to uphold the core values of u.t., particularly the students and
5:04 pm
faculty's cutting edge research and development of new technologies. a top public university, u.t. has conducted 6 -- $650 million worth of innovative, scientific and scholarly research. in the past few years, the school of engineeringing has invented new technologies like inventing a device that will improve physical therapy for patients recovering from spinal cord injuries. the medical school is planning to reinvent medical education, health care thinking. they are transforming the way we learn about health. the students at u.t. are taught by some of the most brilliant minds in the country. more than 200 members of the national academies and 12 national medal of science recipients serve as u.t. professors. mr. speaker, i would like to congratulate the university of texas at austin on these impressive accomplishments. our country is proud of texas flagship university. what starts at the university of texas truly does change the world. i say hook 'em and in god we trust. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from minnesota seek recognition?
5:05 pm
without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. paulsen: mr. speaker, i rise today to honor claire benton of minute tonka for earning the congressional award silver medal. the congressional award is given by congress to recognize initiative, service and achievement in young people. in order to earn the silver medal, claire needed to complete over 400 hours in voluntary public service, personal development, physical fitness and expedition exploration. she served her community by volunteering at her local public library and spending time as a counselor at an adventure camp. she also reached her physical fitness goals by participating in cardiovascular and endurance activities that helped her increase her running distance from eight miles to 20. mr. speaker, the congressional award was established in 1979 in order to inspire young people like claire and recognize their efforts to better themselves. claire's hard work and dedication inspires other young people to become future leaders in service to their community. congratulations, claire. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the
5:06 pm
gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? weck, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, mr. speaker. yesterday we saw the supreme court reject yet another of president obama's executive overreaches. mr. lamalfa: the president's effort to unilaterally micromanage electrical power plants across the nation without any legal authority to do so would drive up energy costs in virtually every community. nearly half a trillion dollars in additional costs. in just the last few months the federal courts have rejected the president's amnesty plan, his e.p.a. waters of the u.s., power grab and now his power plant regulation. the message of these decisions is clear. the president should abandon his efforts to end run around congress which in nearly every case has caused these efforts have been found to violate the law and work with congress, the people's house, to address the issues facing our nation. mr. speaker, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the
5:07 pm
gentleman from pennsylvania eek recognition? without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> mr. speaker, i rise today on behalf of some recently laid off coal miners from somerset county, pennsylvania. for seven years, president obama has been targeting their jobs and in the process sacrificing the families and communities who depend on those jobs. mr. rothfus: the obama administration is using the e.p.a. to conjure up regulations to all but eliminate a major part of the energy industry in western pennsylvania. what do you say to a hardworking middle class dad who has a wife, three kids and a mortgage, whose livelihood has been taken away? this particular dad's job is one of 40,000 jobs that have been lost in control country. this assault is one of the reasons family average income has never fully recovered from the great recession. yesterday fed chair testified about headwinds facing the economy. i suggest there are a number of manmade headwinds and the
5:08 pm
e.p.a.'s regulatory assault is one of them. sacrificing the livelihood of hardworking americans for some personal political philosophy is unconscionable. i will continue to fight against the president's war on middle class jobs. i thank the speaker and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the chair lays before the house the following personal requests. the clerk: leave of absence requested for ms. bonamici of oregon for today and tomorrow, mr. hudson of north carolina for today and the balance of the week, mr. pallone of new jersey for today and tomorrow. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the requests are granted. under the speaker's announced policy of january 6, 2015, the gentleman from ohio, mr. chabot, is recognized for 60 minutes as the designee of the majority leader. mr. chabot: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, before i begin, i would ask unanimous consent that all members may have five
5:09 pm
legislative days in which to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous materials on the topic of this special order. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. chabot: thank you very much, mr. speaker. also, before i begin my remarks, i would like to also include into the record two eulogies that many of us actually heard personally given in finley, ohio, when we attended a very wonderful service for our colleague, mike oxley, recently. and these two specific eulogies are from his son, elvis, and from jim, his long-time devoted chief of staff. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. chabot: thank you very much, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, i rise today in honor of mike oxley, who served in this body for 25 years. and who sadly passed away from lung cancer the first day of this year, january 1. today would have been mike's 72nd birthday. and he'll be missed by those of us who had the pleasure and the honor of knowing him. i served with mike in this
5:10 pm
house for a dozen years. 12 years. from 1995 to 2007. and i will always remember that time very fondly. mike oxley was a lot of things. an attorney, an investigator, a leader, a competitor, an avid golfer and so many more things. he was dedicated to serving his community and serving the people of the state of ohio and the people of our entire country. mike graduated from miami university in oxford, ohio, in 1966. our speaker also, mr. ryan, paul ryan, also, and my son, and many other distinguished people are graduates of oxford of miami university. and mike graduated with a degree in political science and obtained his law degree from the ohio state university. following law school, mike was a special agent with the f.b.i. working primarily in washington and boston and new york. in that position, he learned a number investigative skills that he would later use here in
5:11 pm
congress. after his time with the f.b.i., mike returned to ohio and began a private law practice. but he was called to service once again when he was elected to the ohio house of representatives in 1972. he served in the ohio house until 1981 when he was elected to congress. in a special election to fill a vacancy upon the death of yer.ressman gu mike would represent the people of ohio's fourth congressional district for the next 25 years. upon his retirement from congress in 2007, mike continued to find ways to serve our nation when he was in the private sector. he was a member of the board of trustees for the university of finley. and he remained active at his alma mater, miami university. most recently he was a senior advisor on the board of directors of a group. after being diagnosed with nonsmall cell lung cancer, a type of lung cancer usually affecting nonsmokers like mike,
5:12 pm
he joined the board of directors of the lung cancer alliance. he would dedicate much of his remaining time in fighting lung cancer. including serving as chairman of the lung cancer alliance board beginning in 2014. mike was a very good man. he really was. he was a family man. in fact, his wife, pat, his son, elvis, his grandson, max, and other family members, as well as his chief of staff, jim, are with us in the gallery this evening. and as they know, he loved life and he had a very infectious laugh. he was a golf enthusiast. he loved sports of all sorts. and regularly played pickup basketball with other members. but for many who served with him, we will never forget his dedication to the congressional baseball team and the baseball game. he viewed the game as a chance for members from both sides of the aisle to put aside their
5:13 pm
differences and engage in a friendly contest of america's pastime, all while raising money for charitable causes. but that didn't mean he didn't want to win. he did. in fact, he was so dedicated to the game, that he was always trying to recruit new players to improve the republican prospects on the diamond. not surprisingly, in the eight games that ox managed the republican team, we beat the democrats seven times, we've gone downhill from there. at times, though, mike's competitive streak may have gotten the best of him. in the 1994 game, oxley was playing first base when then representative, now senator, brown, was racing to beat out a ground ball. as he reached for an errant throw, the two men collided and mike broke his arm. you'd think that might discourage him from playing in the future, but the very next year, there was objection, taking the field -- ox, taking the field again and leading the republican team. that's who mike oxley was. a true competitor who never
5:14 pm
backed down from a challenge. and yet he approached challenges, whether it was the congressional baseball team or a divisive fight here on the house floor, with a positive, optimistic demeanor, a smile on his face and usually a kind word for those in the opposition. put another way, he would disagree without being disagreeable. which is an admirable trait and an invaluable skill in all areas of life. here's what i will remember most about mike oxley. he was a friend and a colleague and, more importantly, he was a decent, genuine family man who was gracious and well liked by everyone who had the pleasure of serving with him. he will be missed. to mike's wife, pat, and his son, elvis, and his grandson, max, and the entire oxley family, please know that those of us who knew mike are saddened by your loss. but we appreciate the time you allowed us to spend with him here in the united states congress. you are in our thoughts and our
5:15 pm
prayers. god bless all of you. and there are many other members who will be sharing some of their remembrances here during this special order. and i would like at this point to turn to one of our colleagues, also from ohio, who was a very, very good friend of mike oxley's. and just a great american himself, mr. tiberi from the great state of ohio. mr. tiberi: thank you, mr. chabot. thank you, mr. speaker. how significant and beautiful that today, the day of mike oxley's birth, we celebrate his glorious and beautiful life. thank you, pat, thank chat, elvis, as mr. chabot said, for sharing mike oxley with us. it was really a special, special honor.
5:16 pm
i met the ox was i was a senior in college, congressional staffer for then congressman john case itch. i got -- case i can. i -- kasich. i got asked to staff here in washington, d.c. it was called a washington fly-in. and here's this congressman by the name of mike oxley and was as nice to me as he was his colleagues at this fly-in as a young guy who came in for this event from ohio. ironic 15 years later we'd know i would be his colleague. he treated me the same then and he way he treated people was kind of inspirational for a young guy and he led in that
5:17 pm
way too and his staff treated people, whether they be here in washington or back in ohio with the same type of respect that their boss treated people. so after that election in 2000, we had a freshman orientation. i replaced the man that i had worked for in the 1980's and early 1990's, john kasich and i was at this freshman orientation filling out this form for committee assignments. another congressman from our delegation, soon to be the chairman of the education and work force committee, came up to me and said, well, you know, just fill out that form and put financial services, a brand new committee to be chaired by mike oxley and education and work force, committee that's going to be chaired by me because that's what you're going to get. and i said to them, congressman boehner, well, financial services committee sounds really good. education and work force, not so much. so i filled out my form and i
5:18 pm
put financial services committee and among some other committees. i excluded education and work force. about 10 days later, i got my committee assignments. financial services and education and work force. so i said to my new chairman, mike oxley. i told them the story. was this thing wired? and in his glorious special way, he got that grin and he just laughed. as mike oxley often did. he was such a cheerful guy. and he was a special chairman. i didn't realize then how lucky i was to have mike oxley as a chairman for six years on this brand new committee. and every year that went by, more and more members wanted to be on this committee. obviously an important committee, but they also wanted to be on a committee chaired by mike oxley. his disposition was great but
5:19 pm
he also was such a team guy. he was just in his blood that wanted to get things done and he wanted to be a team, team being the congress, team being members of the financial services committee. i remember one day we were doing a sell gation meeting and during the meeting mike said, i'm going to do an event for one of the members of the financial services committee. if you don't have nothing going on, why don't you join me? i'm driving. we get into his car and out blares beach boys music which obviously was one of mike's favorites and as we're listening to the song i'm thinking, how ironic, right, this makes so much sense. it made sense then. it makes sense now. ing back to a simpler time and mike was pretty simple in how he was a congressman. and how he was a chairman. it wasn't about him.
5:20 pm
it was never about him. that's why he was such a great mentor. he was -- it was about moving the issues forward and he put newer members and subcommittee members in charge of issues. he ignored ht shown it, shared it, put us out in front. it was about the team. as mr. chabot mentioned, he was a great manager for the congressional baseball team for the republicans. he was manager as their chairman. and he was a great manager as our chairman. we learned a lot. we learned a lot from mike oxley, not just members of the committee but staff members. so many people who come through this building, who have come through the rayburn building. he was a mentor. he made a lot of people who touched his life better. he made me better as a member
5:21 pm
of congress. he made me better as a person. and i appreciate that, pat. we thank you for sharing -- having you share him with us. mr. chairman, thank you. god bless you all. mr. chabot: i thank the gentleman and reclaiming my time. we greatly appreciate the gentleman's comments here this evening. i would now like to yield such time as he might consume to the -- another gentleman from ohio, mr. steve stivers. mr. stivers: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today to honor a fellow ohioan who had distinguished service in this body for 25 years and made a huge difference for everyday americans for 25 years. today would be his birth-day, chairman mike oxley, congressman mike oxley who made a huge difference. i didn't have the honor of serving with congressman oxley but what i did have was a
5:22 pm
chance to meet him and have him been an advisor and mentor when i got here and got on the financial services committee, committee he was formerly the chairman of. he took me you think his wing. he introduced me to hundreds of people. he helped me find my way here. he helped make sure i got on the path to being a good legislator and he did that not really knowing me before that. he became a great friend, a great mentor and a great advisor and i'm really thankful that he was willing to share his time and energy and talents with a guy like me. pat, to thank his wife his son chad, and all the whole oxley family for letting him share his life even after he left congress with folks who were coming in brand new trying to make a difference. you know, he'll be remembered as somebody who made a difference for all americans who wanted to figure out how to
5:23 pm
make sure they can invest their life savings and not be taken advantage of. obviously the famous bill that bears his name was part of a bipartisan response to the enron crisis, and he deserves the credit for saving our financial system and making sure it was safe and sound in the future for all americans. you know, he would always take on tough issues. he would always work with people across the aisle. that's who he was and what he did. he served the people of his district proudly and he worked to bring people together. he was loyal, optimistic, pragmatic and even though he was a strong republican, he'd work with republicans and democrats to get things done. i think there's a lot that we can all immolate from mike oxley's service and we can learn a lot today and in the future. my thoughts and prayers are with his wife, pat, and the entire oxley family during this difficult time. you know, he -- even during his time when he had lung cancer,
5:24 pm
he was optimistic and happy and helping other people, and i know he's got to be a tough guy to lose and not have around every day because he brightened everybody's day and i know i miss him and i know you'll miss him and america misses mike oxley and they should. i hope that in saying goodbye today we can honor his incredible legacy that he left and the difference he made for america into the future and i just want to remember mike oxley as the incredible patriot and friend and mentor that he was and say god speed, mike oxley. i yield back the balance of my time. mr. chabot: i thank the gentleman for yielding back and reclaiming my time. i'd now like to recognize -- this is a bipartisan evening. i'd like to recognize our colleague, mr. scott from georgia. mr. scott: thank you very much, mr. chabot.
5:25 pm
i, too, rise to say some words for a very, very, very good man , mike oxley. when i came to congress in the year of 2002 and i was assigned to the financial services committee and that's where i met mike oxley. and our lives intertwined and he was a tremendous help to me on that committee as i was breaking in. and i'm very delighted and open my eyes to a world in which i was only dimly aware when he asked if i would join him as one of the members to travel to scotland and to europe and to be able to visit and to sit with other bankers and financial people to learn the importance of finance, to learn how it is important for the united states to say totally in
5:26 pm
front and to maintain our financial system as the most powerful system in the world. in order to do that, you have to get across the world and to talk with other financial systems. and i found out and it took me going over there to the bank of scotland to realize why mike oxley wanted to do, because very few people knew, and i didn't know that the royal bank of scotland was the fifth largest bank in the united states. and then to go to europe and to meet with the finance ministers in europe and brussels and paris and the reason for that was because there was the emerging markets of diriff tiffs and swaps -- dirivitives and swaps and now is just a part of the burgeoning part of the economy, now is an $800
5:27 pm
trillion piece of the world's economy and i went and learned so much there learning. and we went to make sure that the united states had what would be seen as equivalency to be able to deal with these other nations and their financial systems and banking systems. nd then to come back and roughly eight, nine years later and i'm sitting now as the ranking member on the committee in congress that deals with -- subcommittee that deals with derivatives and swaps. and quite honestly, ladies and gentlemen, when i went with mike oxley, i did not know what a derivative was. now, mike and i became friends and when you travel with people, you get to know them. you get to share things with them. i come back and mike oxley
5:28 pm
comes to me one day and i'm wondering what this is about. he said, david, i got to see you. david, i got to see you. i said, mike, what is it, what is it? he said, well, i heard that your brother-in-law was home run king hank aaron. can i meet him? everybody knows that mike loved baseball. he loved baseball i'm sure as much as he loved politics. i know his family knows how much he loved baseball. i said, sure, sure. it was a great evening when hank came back up. i had dinner and i invited mike ley to join me and his guest with me and my wife and hank for , my wife's brother, dinner at the capitol grill. and, ladies and gentlemen, what an evening that was.
5:29 pm
i mean, to be there and to hear mike oxley and home run king hank aaron talk baseball, two great americans loving america's pastime. and so i remember one point mike oxley said, hank, can i ask you a question? and so hank said, sure. he said, who was the toughest pitcher that ever pitched against you? hank said, all of them. all of them. all of them. and we would carry that story many times in our conversations. he said, oh, man. i will never forget that. i fell out, hank said all of them. a great man. you know, we all live a life, and there are three things that are -- we all are going to sigh
5:30 pm
on that gravestone. the year we were born and the year we died. but then there's that other thing. there's that dash in the middle . and the question in everybody's life is -- what did you do with your dash, that period from when you were born to when the lord calls you home? . well, mike oxley did a tremendous amount. one of those things he did was he touched me and mike oxley helped me, mike oxley was my friend. and i know everybody joins me in saying, from the bottom of our hearts, to the family, to this congress, to the people of
5:31 pm
america, we thank god for ending mike oxley our way. mr. chabot: reclaiming my time. thank you very much, mr. scott, for that tribute to our colleague and friend, mike oxley. and i learned something here this evening. i did not know that i had your brother-in-law's picture up on my wall. because he was here in washington 15 years ago or so and i was like a kid meeting one of his heroes up there. and got a picture with him. it's hanging on my wall. thank you very much for that tribute. very moving. thank you. i would now like to yield to our colleague, also from ohio, mr. latta. mr. latta: thank you very much. i appreciate the gentleman for elding and, mr. speaker, pat and elvis, you know, again, you've heard such great tributes, not only here at the funeral, not too many weeks back, but at finley with the memorial service there and the folks here tonight. other members.
5:32 pm
but, you know, i go back, i can remember mike's first race, back when he first ran for the ohio general assembly. that was in high school -- i was in high school at the time. i used to drive my dad all around the district, so we'd run into each other quite often. we were out campaigning. and i know one of my aunts from over there thought that mike was just about perfect. and she used to rave about mike all the time. but that's the type of person he was. he had an infectious smile. he had a great laugh. and he could connect with people. as you've heard from many of the folks here tonight speaking, that's what made mike such a great individual. he knew how to reach out, how to touch people and how to get those people to work together. and to make things actually work. one of the things i'll never rget, back in 1981, during that time, the election was taking place that summer.
5:33 pm
i was studying for the bar at the same time. but i can still remember everything that was going on and the tough times and having gone through a special election myself and what those things are. but mike was one of those individuals that things didn't affect him he just went straight into it and got things done. and one of the things i mentioned just last week at the memorial service, what my dad taught me years ago, there are two type of people who get into public service. there are folks who want to be politicses and there are folks that want to be -- pogtigses and there are folks who want to be true -- politicians and want to be ks who a -- to be true public servants. a politician is someone who sees how much they can take from the people they represent for their own benefit. public servants see how much they can give themselves back to the people they represent. that was mike. he was that true dedicated public vearnlt. and as i go a-- servant. and as i go across, we have several counties, redistricting over the years, i have some of
5:34 pm
the counties that mike represented. and i can tell you that when i'm out, that it's quite often that when i'm out, i have people come up to me and tell me about something that mike did for them. mike, i don't care if it was social security or a veteran case or medicare, you name it, people remember those things. because mike was out there and a very caring person. he never forgot the folks back home. when you talk about the folks back home, he never forgot his roots in finley. hancock county. hancock county is my dad's home county. there are great people that live there. but mike and pat were very, very generous with for the university of finley, with one of the buildings. mike, as the chairman mentioned, served on the board of trustees and was very, very influential with his service there. he gave of his time. he wanted to make sure that he left things better than he found them. with his university, or the
5:35 pm
miami university, his alma mater, helping them. with the hancock-finley community foundation that mike and pat were so generous to in establishing scholarship. but i think that one of the things i would just like to really talk about is one of the things that mike really believed in, at the hancock historical society. what that was, they established the mike oxley government center. and i remember it was dedicated not more than two years ago. then speaker boehner came up. but it was one of those things, i think people need to go and see. because mike truly believed that -- again, he wanted to leave things better than he found them. and he also believed the best way to do that is to educate our kids. so there's an interactive center there now that people can go in, especially children, and learn about their government. because, again, mike said, this is the greatest form of government that the world's ever seen.
5:36 pm
make sure that you had that government go on to the next generation. you had to make sure that your kids and the children, those students, knew what to do when they became adults. because it's too late to get them. a lot of times once they turn an adult and they didn't learn these things. but at the oxley government certainty, they're into perpetuity now. the children in hancock county will have that opportunity to learn about the greatest form of government the world has ever created and to make sure that it does continue on. and he really truly believed that our children are our future. so, you know, one of the things that really people that get into it again, as my dad said, you want to make sure that you are a true public servant. to give of yourself, not 90 para, not 100%, but always 110%, to give more. and that's what mike did. and again, that legacy is going to continue on. because the people back home will never forget it. because as i'm out in the
5:37 pm
districts, that mike represented, as i said, i hear it from his former constituents, and the not that they just liked mike, they loved him. pat and elvis, from the bottom of my heart and marsha's, with our deepest sympathies again. but the world was a much better place because mike oxley was in it. and i yield back. thank you. mr. chabot: thank you very much. reclaiming my time. i'd like to thank the gentleman from ohio for his very nice remarks. and i'd like to now recognize and yield to the gentlelady rom florida, dr. ros-lehtinen. ms. ros-lehtinen: thank you so much, mr. chabot, for your leadership on this issue. and the funny that you should call me dr. ros-lehtinen. because i do have my doctorate from the university of miami. and one of the rivalries that i enjoyed with mike oxley is that he would wear this obnoxious miami shirt whenever we were in
5:38 pm
the congressional baseball team practice. i said, that's the fake miami. and i would wear my university of miami t-shirt and he would remind me all the time that miami university was the first. so -- but i am so pleased and so honored to be part of this special order that has been organized by my dear friend and he really is. we have such similar backgrounds. mr. chabot of ohio. in remembrance of a colleague and a dear friend, the late congressman mike oxley. i'm not from ohio, as you heard. i'm from florida. but mike and i served together here in the people's house for over 15 years. when i got here in 1989, mike had already been serving for a few years. so i looked upon him with great respect. he was a man who was driven by his commitment to his constituents and i was always very impressed with that. he served his great state of ohio and our nation with great
5:39 pm
dedication, with integrity, ith efficiency, and these were qualities that were seen in his work throughout his years of service here in the united states congress. as chair, as we heard, of the financial services committee, mike was known to reach across the aisle and you've heard speaker after speaker talk about how bipartisan he was. to ensure that every american could prosper. and he worked on bills ranging from the interests of the financial sector to the improvement of commerce to the enhancement of emergency management. always with the consumer, always with the american people in mind. and it was during his tenure that we were able to pass bills like the fair and accurate credit transaction act. that allows consumers access to free credit reports and reduces identity theft. and mike oxley was a born leader. a natural leader. and he was co-author of a bill that sought to fight corporate
5:40 pm
fraud and we thank him for that. he's been guided, he was guided by the principle of economic prosperity. what made america great. and his legislative record and legacy speak for themselves. and he was a kind man. he was so good to all of the members. and that's why so many of us are here saying good things about him. because he deserves that and more. he was enthusiastic about public service. he had a work ethic that is sorely missed in the people's house. and i had a special relationship with mike because, as i pointed out, he was a player and then manager of our congressional baseball game. which i fully -- foolishly joined many years back, when i was younger and thinner and fitter. and encouraged by mike, i actually became the first woman to get on base in this traditional game. and mike made sure that this charity, because it really is a charity game, was able to
5:41 pm
generate thousands of dollars to various charities around the great town. and though mike is no longer with us, we should not be mourning the loss of a life, but celebrating an extraordinary life lived and may mike's memory live forever in our hearts and in our minds. thank you again, mr. chabot, because you are doing the same things that mike oxley would do, by leading this great tribute to a great member of congress. thank you so much for your leadership, mr. chabot. and thank you to mike. i know that you're enjoying a good, cold beer and a great baseball game in heaven. thank you so much, mr. chabot, for the time. chobchob thank you. reclaiming my -- mr. chabot: thank you. reclaiming my time. thank you for your nice remarks this evening. i'd now like to yield to another buckeye, another gentleman from ohio, chairman of the freedom caucus, and a dear colleague of ours, jim jordan. mr. jordan: i thank the gentleman. normally i don't have prepared remarks when i come to the
5:42 pm
floor. but i thought, when you're honoring someone like former congressman oxley, the best to have this stuff in the written form. mr. speaker, i want to join my colleagues from ohio and across the nation in paying tribute to former congressman michael g. oxley. passed away at the beginning of the year. after a battle against lung cancer. i thank my colleague from cincinnati, mr. chabot, for putting together this special order in mike's honor, on what would have been his 72nd birthday. mike was one of the finest and most respected public servants ohio has ever known. he was tireless in his promotion of his hometown of finley, and of all of ohio's fourth congressional districts. its people, its businesses and institutions. his work on behalf of the joint systems manufacturing sent center, commonly known as the tank plant, helped preserve that vital facility and its skilled work force for a long, long time. ensuring that it remains open
5:43 pm
today, to make the armaments that our farmed -- armed forces need to keep our great country safe. i'm grateful to my colleagues who have already spoken about some of mike's many accomplishments. but i want to share something perhaps lesser known about this individual. his long-time connection to buckeye boy state. a week-long educational exercise for high school boys hosted by the american legion of ohio, mike attended this program as a young man and he always said that it helped prepare him for a career in public service. from 1986 through 2006, he was the key note speaker at the graduation ceremony. an event that he often said was one of his favorites of the year. in these speeches he encouraged boy staters to develop a clear vision, set high goals, work hard and act with integrity at all times. these life lessons no doubt inspired the many thousands of young men who have had the privilege of attending boy state during that time frame. mike took great pride in being
5:44 pm
inducted into the buckeye boy state hall of fame arnings honor shared by a select few. among them, neil armstrong. of course, the titles he held most dear were those of husband, father and grandfather. and our prayers continue to go out to his family who are joining us here today. we offer them our sincerest condolences at this difficult time. mr. speaker, we remain grateful that a decent man like mike oxley, a decent -- that decent men like mike oxley are willing to commit their lives to public service and to inspire others to do the same. thank you very much. i yield back. mr. chabot: reclaiming my time. thank you very much, we appreciate it very much. i would now like to yield to the gentleman from oklahoma, mr. frank lucas. mr. lucas: thank you, chairman chabot, for the opportunity to visit this day. about our friend and old colleague. i came to this body in may of
5:45 pm
1994, in a special election. i can't remember whether it was that day or the next day or the day after, but that's when i met mike. he had a way of charming and disarming you, a way of being warm. mike, from that very first moment, referenced me as big frank. i'm not sure whether he was representing height or girget, but that was his affection ath term. he noted to me that in that first conversation we had that he too had been a special election baby and that i was pursuing the route that he pursued, not coming in as a part of a big class, but coming in by myself as he had done in 1981. getting to know the members, going to the committees. he had an open arms sort of a fashion. now, i will confess that even
5:46 pm
at that point i understood in those days as a member of the energy and commerce committee, e. and c. guy, and when as a result of a great compromise actually a statement when we became a part of the majority then, not that many months later, because mike had served the minority from 2001 -- sorry, 1918 until we became the majority in 1995 in january. he served in the minority. he understood both sides of the perspective, and ultimately in the great compromise of 2001 when he became to be chairman of what used to be the banking and urban affairs committee, financial services, and brought substantial new jurisdictions to the committee, mike made a huge difference. suddenly it went from the committee that members wanted off of to one of those committees that everyone wanted to be on. suddenly it became a committee
5:47 pm
of action that wasn't just a constant battle of whether karl marx or adam smith was right but the way it would make a difference. the way he worked with republicans and democrats, the way he addressed with the crisis we dealt with, sarbanes-oxley a reform legislation that no one thought would occur. that was mike oxley. as my friends said before and my friends will say after me, an amazing fellow, a charming personality, a kind of an individual that i would describe as an old school member of congress, an old school chairman and what do i mean by that? someone who cared about this place and cared about the members. sometimes that's absent any more in what we do, but he cared about the institution and he cared about the membership. he cared about the country, and
5:48 pm
it was demonstrated in his work product. i'm a better person, a better member of congress for having served with mike from the day i walked in here in 1994 until his retirement at the end of 2006. a better member. i think this place is better for him having been a member. the only regret i have is there's not more mike oxleys out there. there's not more mike oxleys out there. but i think his legacy should be one that we should emulate the way he focused, the way we worked. if we do that, then his spirit will live on. again, chairman chabot, thank you for the opportunity to come and visit about my friend and the fellow that i served with for half of his career in congress. and to the family, thank you
5:49 pm
for having shared him with us for all those years. all those years. thank you. mr. chabot: reclaiming my time. i'd like to thank the gentleman from oklahoma for his tremendous remarks here this evening and we really do appreciate the time and his recollections of his time shared up here with mike. i'd like to now recognize the gentleman from pennsylvania, mr. meehan, to recognize mr. oxley and thank you. mr. meehan: i want to thank the gentleman from ohio, especially for taking the time to organize this very appropriate tribute to mike oxley. you ever get one of those people when you walk into a room and you make eye contact and you just get a smile on your face? that was mike oxley. and it was just that moment which that sense of fun was part of that original contact. and i can remember it as fresh
5:50 pm
today the first time i met mike oxley, but it wasn't as a member of congress that i really became aware of mike oxley. it was some years ago in a previous time when i had been a united states attorney serving in the department of justice. it was a very serious time for our country because it was in the immediate aftermath of the enron crisis. one in which americans all over the country and many small investors began to have a concern about the integrity of the very institutions which they had entrusted. some of their resources. as a member of the united states attorney's office, i was appointed by the president to be sitting with other u.s. attorneys and a number of cabinet members on something called the corporate fraud task force. it was the group under the auspices of michael chertoff, which was responsible for
5:51 pm
initiating the investigations and the prosecutions into those who had committed the corporate misdeeds. but at the same time we were aware that while we were going backwards and looking at conduct that had taken place, the real challenge was moving forward. how do you instill a sense of confidence back in the very institutions which people have lied on for their economic confidence? and it was a guy on a committee here in washington, d.c., who understood the essence of what this was all about and it wasn't a huge 2,000-page bill with all kinds of regulations and growth. it was a bill that was built on a very simple principle. i think in many ways it reflected who mike oxley was, as his days as an f.b.i. agent but somebody who knew that when you were in position of power
5:52 pm
or responsibility, you had that responsibility to those below you. and your obligation and your word needed to be connected with that. and when it really drilled down to it, that was the essence of what sarbanes-oxley was all about. the idea that you would certify if you were the fiduciary that you knew the accuracy but really the underlying integrity of that information because it represented the little people. and so when i came to see mike oxley for the first time and it was by the good fortune to become part of something called the rip-on society and his former chief of staff runs that program and i was invited in as a young freshman represented to become part of this organization which has a
5:53 pm
tremendous purpose. and you see a guy named mike oxley for the first time. you know of him, but you'd never really met him. i think with that reputation, geez, this guy, pretty important guy. what's it going to be like? but he's the kind of guy that sits you down and says, hey, why don't you sit here and have a cup of coffee with me? and it's a funny story about a golf game he may have had. a couple observations about some of the things you might be thinking about as a young member of congress. an arm around your shoulder and says, if you ever need me, let me know. happy to be there for you. anytime i ever saw mike oxley from that point forward, it was that same sense of a little smile, probably a little story about his last round of golf, and always a warm feeling. you know, mike is going to leave quite a legacy, but when you think about what it stands for, the two things that i saw
5:54 pm
in him in the very end, first and most significantly, the work he had done with that bill which will not only bear his name moving forward but forever leave that sense of responsibility and integrity associated with our fiduciary responsibilities in that financial space. but it was also this powerful guy, mike oxley, who used that influence that he had after he had contracted cancer to turn that into a positive and make that a part of his mission in life, to use that influence he had to gather other people around him who were powerful and wealthy and otherwise to focus on moving forward with finding the way that we can continue to treat and ultimately cure those with cancer.
5:55 pm
it's a tremendous legacy and one in which i would hope any one of us as one of my previous colleagues had said, we wish that we could fill that dash between the beginning of life and the end of life with such fullness, with such integrity and such fun. thank you, mike, for what you did for all of us. mr. chabot: thank you. reclaiming my time. thank you very much to the gentleman for his very poignant remarks this evening. and i would now like to yield to the gentleman from texas, mr. joe barton, and one of the things that joe is known for -- he's known for many, many things around here, but one of the things he's known for was when mike oxley was no longer the coach of the baseball committee, he turned over the reins to joe barton and we'd like to yield to the gentleman from texas, mr. barton, now.
5:56 pm
mr. barton: well, thank you. i appreciate being one of the euologist for mike oxley. i want to talk about mike oxley as a baseball player and manager of the republican baseball team. i didn't get here until 1985. i assume mike immediately became the starting first baseman for the republican baseball team when he got elected in the special election . the photograph to my left shows the baseball team from 1992, and in his beloved cincinnati reds uniform next to some skinny kid from texas is mike oxley. carl pourcel from michigan, was our manager. i was on that team. mike was on that team. dan schaefer, who later became the manager. jack fields, jim nussle. governor john kasich who is now running for president.
5:57 pm
chris smith who's still in the house. rick santorum who later became senator and presidential candidate. dean gallow. and the skinny guy on the very left is the current chairman of the energy and commerce committee, fred upton. mike was a hard-hitting first baseman. he was a very good player, and my favorite story on the baseball team, we were playing out in virginia at the old three mile run park. we weren't playing in the fancy nationals stadium like we are today. mike, customary position at first base, i was the pitcher and they hit a pop fly down the first-base line and the democratic runner who had hit the fly was running to first base and he ran into mike. and mike fell to the ground. he didn't catch the pop fly. and he began riding around on the ground holding his wrist.
5:58 pm
and, you know, we have to be honest, mike was known as somewhat of a jokester and a prankster. and i thought he was kidding. i didn't think he had hurt himself so i went over and kind of kicked him in the ribs and said, get up, let's get going. he said, no, no. i'm hurt. i'm hurt. they took him to the bench and we finished the inning and even when we got over onto the bench he was still holding his wrist. and i kidded him again. i said, mike, come on. you got to get back in the game. well, they took him to the emergency room and as his wife pat knows, he had broken his wrist. he actually broke his wrist. so from then on i never kidded him about things like that. when dan schaefer, who was the manager right before mike oxley retired, the tradition on the baseball team is that the current manager picks the next manager. so dan schaefer called mike and myself into his office and said
5:59 pm
, which one of you two want to become the next manager. and we both said we wanted to become the next manager. and mike had seniority on me by two years. maybe three years. and so i said, well, you know, i'll be the assistant coach and mike, you can be the manager if that's the way dan wants to do it. and mike looked at me and said, i'll only do it one time. i said ok. well, that one time turned out to be about 12 years. he was -- he was the manager for 12 years and every year he would say to me, joe, this is the last one, the last one. but about the time he became manager, we elect -- we became the majority, we elected a bunch of really good baseball players. j.c. watt who had been an all-american football player at
6:00 pm
oklahoma. chip pickering, zach wamp. just some really good players. and so we won like 10 or 11 games in a row against the democrats. d mike enjoyed being a winner. and so as those guys began to retire, mike decided it might be time to turn it over and i have right here the last trophy that the republicans won and it is true that we actually did use to win baseball games. we have lost six in a row but when mike was the manager we won i think 10 or 11 in a row and the trophy is my office but there's mike oxley as manager nd joe barton who is the assistant coach the last trophy that the republicans won. he was a great manager

7 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on