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tv   U.S. House of Representatives Legislative Business  CSPAN  April 18, 2016 4:00pm-6:01pm EDT

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the country to hire illegals? guest: yes, it is. whoemployers to hire people are not in the country legally. caller: ok. why would >> you can see the rest of this segment on c-span.org. the house is coming in to debate eight bills. live coverage on c-span. today suspend the rules on which a recorded vote or the the yeas and nays are ordered or on which the vote incurs objection under clause 6 of rule 20. record votes on postponed questions will be taken later. for what purpose does the gentleman from south carolina seek recognition? >> i move the house suspend the rules and pass the bill s. 1638, department of homeland security headquarters consolidation accountability act of 2015. the clerk: an act to direct the
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secretary of homeland security to submit to congress information on the department of homeland security headquarters consolidation project in the national capital region and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from south carolina, mr. duncan and the gentlelady from new jersey will be recognized each for 20 minutes. mr. duncan: i ask that members may have five legislative days and include extraneous materials on the bill under consideration. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentleman is recognized. mr. duncan: thank you, mr. speaker, i rise in strong support of s. 1638. since construction began in 2006, the department of homeland security's consolidated headquarters on st. elizabeth's historic washington, d.c., campus has been riddled with construction delays at times to be more than $1 billion over budget and 12 years behind
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schedule. as the former chairman of oversight, management and efficiency, i conducted oversight of the project including a hearing in september of 2014. i saw the immense challenges that lie ahead. while we are encouraged by the updated plan, we still believe that increased oversight will help ensure accountability in the efficient use of taxpayer dollars, especially considering this project was fully funded through fiscal year 2016 appropriations. and d.h.s. has requested $225 million for fiscal year 2017. this bill we are talking about 1640, a companion to h.r. which was passed by the house unanimously in june of last year will require the secretary of homeland security and in coordination with the administrator of general
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services to submit a report on the updated plan for the headquarters consolidation including estimated costs. with a project of this magnitude, increased transparency is paramount. . our constituents expect their representatives to hold a government accountable. s. 1638 does just that. i wish to thank senators johnson and carper for their hard work in passing this bill through the senate and i urge all members to join me in supporting this important bipartisan legislation, and i'll reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentlewoman from new jersey is recognized. mrs. watson coleman: i rise in support of s. 1638, the department of homeland security headquarters consolidation accountability act of 2015, and i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized. mrs. watson coleman: thank you, mr. speaker.
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mr. speaker, since the 2006 decision to establish a department of homeland security headquarters at the former site of st. elit beths hospital in washington, the project has significant shortfalls and cost and scheduled performance. the government accountability office reports that between the start of construction at st. elizabeths in fear 2009 through the fiscal year 2014 appropriation, the project received $1.6 billion less than the funding amounts requested over this period. the impact of this funding gap is far reaching. in fact, g.a.o. has found this gap resulted in cost escalation, exceeding $1 billion and delays up to 10 years. mr. speaker, the senate bill we consider today is a companion to h.r. 1640, a bill that the house approved by voice vote last june. s. 1638 directs d.h.s. and the g.s.a. to provide information
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to congress within 120 days of enactment of this bill to establish if the data has been collected and analyze to support the current direction for this high profile investment. in addition, mr. speaker, s. 16 38 specifies that the information provided to congress by d.h.s. and g.s.a. include updated costs and scheduled estimates for the project. finally, mr. speaker, s. 1638 directs g.a.o. to report to congress on the quality and reliability of these estimates not later than 90 days after they have been submitted to congress. mr. speaker, d.h.s. headquarters operations currently are dispersed around the national capital region and -- in facilities that are in many cases inadequate, as the case with the nebraska avenue complex. to support the government's effective stewardship of public resources and to deliver a headquarters that d.h.s.
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desperately needs, i ask my colleagues to join me in supporting this legislation and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves. the gentleman from south carolina is recognized. mr. duncan: mr. speaker, i have no other speakers, and if the gentlelady from new jersey has no other speakers, i'm prepared to close should the gentlelady do so. mrs. watson coleman: having no other speakers, mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized. mrs. watson coleman: thank you, mr. speaker. 16 -- s. 1638 is virtually identical to the house-passed legislation that my subcommittee advanced last year. the bill's provisions acknowledge the need for g.s.a. to be engaged at a high level as the construction manager for the department's headquarters consolidation project and to help d.h.s. develop realistic and achievable outcomes. i would be remiss if i did not acknowledge that up to 69% of the department's commercial leases in the national capital region are slated to expire between fiscal years 2016 and 2020. as such, the department will be forced to engage in the
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expensive process of recompeting and possibly relocating its operation and personnel. i would -- it would behoove the department and the g.s.a. to move more of d.h.s.'s headquarters activity to st. eliz belts as soon as possible and thus avoid the -- st. elizabeths as soon as possible and thus avoid the expense in the d.c. market. mr. speaker, i do again urge the adoption of s. 1638 and yield back the balce of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back the balance of her time. the gentleman from south carolina is recognized. mr. duncan: mr. speaker, i once again ask my colleagues to support s. 1638. i thank the gentlelady from new jersey for her words of support. this is the right thing to do. being good stewards of taxpayer dollars and fulfilling our oversight role, so i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the question is will the house suspend the rules and pass senate 1638. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 having responded in the
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affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed, and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid on the table.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from florida seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i move to suspend the rules and pass h.r. 4618. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: house calendar number 99. h.r. 4618, a bill to designate the federal building and united states courthouse located at 121 spring street southeast in gainesville, georgia, as the sidney oslin smith jr. federal building and united states ourthouse. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from florida, mr. curbelo, and the gentleman from indiana, mr. carson, each will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the
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gentleman from florida. mr. curbelo: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and tend their remarks and include extraneous material on h.r. 4618. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. curbelo: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. curbelo: mr. speaker, h.r. 4618 would designate the federal building and united states courthouse located at 121 spring street southeast in gainesville, georgia, as the sidney oslin smith jr. federal building and united states courthouse. following his service in the united states army during world war ii, judge smith received his law degree and went into the private practice of law. in 1965 he was appointed to the federal bench as a judge for the u.s. district court for the northern district of georgia by president johnson, and he served until his retirement until 1974. given his commitment and dedication to our nation and the law, i think it is fitting to recognize his service by
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naming this courthouse after him. i want to thank my colleague from georgia, mr. collins, for his leadership on this legislation. thank you, mr. speaker. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from indiana is recognized. mr. carson: thank you, mr. speaker. 4224, support h.r. 46 -- which designates the united states courthouse in gainesville, georgia, as the sidney oslin smith jr. federal building and united states courthouse. judge smith served as a federal district court judge in the northern district of georgia and was a world war ii veteran. judge smith graduated from harvard university and the university of georgia law school. after graduating from law school, judge smith went into private practice, as was noted, and he practiced until 1962 and was later elected as the superior court judge in georgia. in 1965, mr. speaker, judge smith was appointed as a
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district court judge and was later elevated to chief judge. judge smith stepped down from a federal bench in 1974, as was noted, and returned to private practice as a partner in an atlanta law firm. in addition to his long and distinguished career, judge smith was an active member of the educational member in georgia serving as chairman of the gainesville board of education. chairman of the state board of regents and as a trustee of a university for 35 years. judge smith was well-respected in his community and it is very appropriate to name the building in gainesville, georgia, the sidney oslin smith jr. federal building and united states courthouse. i also support this bill, mr. speaker, and urge my colleagues to join me in voting for this important piece of legislation. i reserve the balance of my time, sir. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from florida is recognized. mr. curbelo: mr. speaker, i wish to yield such time as he may consume to the gentleman from georgia, mr. collins. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from georgia is recognized. mr. collins: thank you, mr.
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speaker. i appreciate my friend from florida for yielding me the time. mr. speaker, i rise today in support of h.r. 4618, legislation that i introduced to name the federal building and united states courthouse in gainesville, georgia, after judge sidney oslin smith. sidney smith, as we know him. judge smith passed away but his influence in my hometown in gainesville is still felt. he was born and raised here in gainesville and committed to the law and furthering education. judge smith dedicated his life to serving the public. he would join the army in world war ii and would later have a distinguished legal career after receiving his law degree at the university of georgia. and he was in private practice for many years and served as superior judge before the federal bench by president johnson. he was chief judge from 1968 to 1974. after leaving the bench, judge smith served in the community in many other ways. he served on the board of bernau university and played a pivotal role in helping the
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school obtain university status. his legacy is one that deserves to be honored. his son said serving others was a vocational calling. the federal building and courthouse in gainesville, judge smith dedicated his life to the high ideals of justice, honor and family and the naming of the courthouse after him will keep his legacy alive for years to come. it will serve as a reminder of the judge's commitment to his community and i believe help inspire others to public service. you know, mr. speaker, as we just heard from my two friends and colleagues here about this man, judge smith, it goes beyond the resume and it starts to talk really about the law degree and the private practice and the superior court judge. in fact, my father was a georgia state trooper and remembers judge smith before he was on the federal bench, but i think what is most special for me in doing this and working with my friends and fellow
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senators from georgia in the senate to name this building is not only did he do his service but then he would come back to the community. he came back out of the federal practice and served our community and it is now expanded this program and reached to literally all across the world. recently expanding to china and having an influence there. but also that commitment to business and commitment to his hometown. when we name buildings, and i don't take that lightly, it should be in honor of someone who touches all aspects, not just federal service or maybe their private service, but a combination of the two, because when we go into high schools and i know when my colleagues do, we speak in schools all the time and talk about pride and public service. and judge smith is one we can
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point to and say here this gentleman served his country and the people of georgia. they knew him in the restaurant and knew him on the town square. that is someone we can look to and take pride in by saying that is someone who identifies of the very ideals of american life. for that reason, it is easy for me to say someone who earned it through his hard work, his dedication and his commitment to his fellow man and to our beloved community in gainesville. i ask my colleagues to join me in supporting this legislation by naming this building in gainesville and with that, mr. speaker, i yield back. mr. carson: i reserve -- i yield
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back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from florida is recognized. mr. speaker, i want to thank my colleagues for coming to the floor today in support of this legislation. clearly we are taking the opportunity and the house has the opportunity before it to honor a man who inspired his community, who served with honor and who, quite frankly, is a role model, was a role model to so many in the state of georgia. so i would respectfully ask all my colleagues to support this legislation and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill h.r. 4618. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no.
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in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 being in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed and without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. for what purpose does the gentleman from florida seek recognition? mr. curbelo: i move to suspend the rules and pass house concurrent resolution 119. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the concurrent resolution. the clerk: house concurrent resolution 119, concurrent resolution authorizing the use of the capitol grounds for the greater washington soap box derby. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from florida, mr. curbelo, and the gentleman from yeab, mr. carson, each will control 20 minutes. mr. curbelo: i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days and include extraneous material on house concurrent resolution 119. the speaker pro tempore: without
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objection, so ordered. mr. curbelo: i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. curbelo: mr. speaker, house concurrent recent like 119 would authorize the use of the capitol grounds for the greater washington soap box derby on june 18. i want to thank the gentleman from maryland, mr. hoyer, for introducing this resolution and his long time support for this event. this annual event is designed to encourage children to show off their work, ingenuity and creativity as they compete for trophies. these races have been run nationally since 1934. today, they are held throughout the country and a few are held throughout the world. the winners of each division are then qualified to compete in the all-american soap box derby in akron, ohio, in july. i support passage of this resolution. and i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time.
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the gentleman from indiana is recognized. mr. carson: i yield myself such time as i may consume. i thank my good friend, representative hoyer, for introducing this resolution on behalf of the washington regional delegation. this annual competitive event, mr. speaker, encourages boys and girls, ages 9 through 16 to construct and operate their own soap box vehicles. the event has become a great tradition in washington, d.c.,, the metro area, over the last 20 years. it provides a terrific opportunity for children to appreciate the workmanship necessary to build vehicles and enjoy the thrill of competition. the greater washington soap box derby organizers will work with the architect of the capitol and the capitol police to ensure the rules and regulations are in place and that the event remains free to the public. i support this resolution and urge my colleagues to vote for
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this resolution and this legislation because it is critically important for the future of our children. and mr. speaker, i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from florida is ecognized. mr. curbelo: i continue to reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from indiana is recognized. mr. carson: i yield as much time as he may consume to my very good friend, the distinguished, mr. hoyer from maryland. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. hoyer: i want to thank both mr. curbelo, the chairman of the subcommittee and the ranking member for moving this resolution forward. i think this is the 25th year that i have sponsored this resolution and have had great support throughout and i thank them both. i'm proud to rise, mr. speaker, in support of this resolution, which i sponsor each year on behalf of the washington
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metropolitan delegation to promote the race on the grounds of the capitol building. this is a very special year, mr. speaker. it celebrates its 75th anniversary. for three qures of a century, people across the area have assembled at the capitol for a fun, educational and exciting event. rst run in 1938, when norman rocha sped past his racers to capture the first soap box derby victory. the race business together those between 8-17 to compete in three divisions, stock, superstock and masters. the winner of each division will race against winners across the country later this year at the
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all-american soap box derby in ohio. this year's race here in washington will take place on june 18. there's a reason why the soap box derby has been called quote, the greatest amateur racing event in the world. not only because it is a thrill to watch on race day, but because everything that happens before race day as well. weeks in advance, the young drivers and their parents and yes, sometimes grandparents gather in garages and basements to build, test and improve their soap box racers together. it is a process that brings the generations together and teaches valuable lessons about hard work, science and engineering, sportsmanship, leadership and pride of achievement. mr. speaker, many of the skills learned in building these soap box racers are the same ones that help students succeed at the science, technology, engineering and math or stem
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subjects that will prepare them for success in college and careers. in addition to bringing families together, it brings entire communities together, with civic groups, police and fire departments, service organizations sponsoring participants in whom they see the future leaders of their communities and of our country. mr. speaker, i said before this is the 75th anniversary of the greater washington soap box derby and marks the 25th year that i have had the honor of sponsoring this resolution. i have done so because i am incredibly proud of the tradition and all the young people from maryland's 5th district who have participated year after year. in fact, mr. speaker, i say with some degree of pride that the 5th district has been home to many champions including the winners of 2007, 2008, 2009, 2012, 2013 and 2014, which is to
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say recently we have done pretty well, mr. speaker. racers even brought home national championship victories in 2007 and 2008. i want to thank all of those who made the greater washington soap box derby possible and i thank the co-sponsors of this resolution, representative chris van hollen, eleanor holmes norton, deborah edwards and barbara comstock. show support for this great american past time and the young people and those families who participate and i yield back and i thank the two gentlemen for their leadership. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from florida is recognized. mr. curbelo: i would like to grat late the gentleman for bringing this resolution. the gentleman from maryland respects the traditions of this
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house and through his example teaches newer members and i'm proud to support this resolution and urge my colleagues to do the same. i reserve. mr. carson: i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from florida is recognized. mr. curbelo: i would like to yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the question is will the house suspend the rules and agree to house concurrent resolution 119. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 being in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the concurrent resolution is agreed to and without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from illinois seek recognition? >> i move that the house suspend the rules and pass h.r. 4570. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 4570 a bill to amend the department of agriculture policeman for research and extension grants to increase participation by women and underrepresented minorities in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math to redesignate the program as the minority women in stem fields program. the speaker pro tempore: the members will each control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from illinois. >> i yield myself such time as i
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may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. >> i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five days to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous material on the bill under consideration. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. . mr. davis: i rise in h.r. mr. davis: mr. speaker, i rise in support of h.r. 4570, the 100 years of women in congress act. this names an important agriculture research program as the jeanette rankin women and minorities stem fields program. this competitive research grants program is designed to increase participation by women and underrepresented minorities from rural areas in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics. i can think of no better person to identify with this person program than former representative rankin who was the first woman to serve in the united states house of representatives. an achievement made even more significant by the fact that
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ms. rankin was elected to congress several years prior to the ratification of the 19th amendment, granting women the right to vote. i urge all of my colleagues to support this legislation and reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentlewoman from washington is recognized. ms. delbene: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized. ms. delbene: mr. speaker, i also rise in support of h.r. 4570, the 100 years of women in congress act. this is bipartisan legislation on a topic that's critical for our country and personally important to me. this would honor the first woman elected to congress in 1916, jeanette rankin, by renaming usda's women and minorities in stem fields program as the jeanette rankin women and minorities in stem fields program. jeanette rankin graduated with a degree in biology, long before women were considered scientists and was elected to
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congress before women had the right to vote. as a fellow pacific northwester, she continues to be an inspiration today. but there's no doubt that we need more women and especially more women leaders in the stem fields. the year i graduated degree, they got 37 pst of the science degrees. one explanation for this is that in the early days of p.c.'s, computers were seen as toys and were marketed heavily to boys, not girls. eventually young women considered computer science and showed up on college campuses and found themselves alone in computer science classrooms dominated by men. before congress i had a long career in the technology sector and i worked with a lot of developers in the early days of email, so i know what it's like to be the only woman in the room. thankfully i had a strong female role model, my mother, who showed my sisters and me that we could do anything we wanted in our careers. so i know firsthand how important it is that our kids develop the skills they need to
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have bright futures and help make sure the united states remains a loord in technology and inowe -- leader in technology and innovation. children and especially young women need more role models like jeanette rankin so they can see themselves in stem fields. i urge my colleagues to support this legislation, and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves. the gentleman from illinois is recognized. mr. davis: thank you, mr. speaker. i'd like to take a brief moment to thank my colleague, ms. delbene, for her kind comments and for helping to ensure that this great bill is going to make it through with a very bipartisan majority. now i'd like to yield as much time as he may consume to my colleague from the great state of montana, one of the most courageous members of congress, somebody who served our nation in our u.s. military for many years and deserves our thanks, mr. zinke from montana. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from montana is recognized.
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mr. zinke: i rise on behalf of he women of montana renaming the women and minorities in stem fields program as the jeanette rankin women and minorities in stem fields program. i'd like to also say she was a true montanan. she embodied it in her spirit. we know that we love her and she led the way in so many different areas to include -- she is one of the first to graduate from montana with a degree in biology. she voted against both wars because she could not fight. her spirit blazened the trails and gave us leadership. she was also a gifted scientific mind and an early pioneer. the grant program is an important tool for young women today to continue their education in stem and possibly break new grounds like jeanette
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rankin emblazed new trails for young women of tomorrow, today and our future. i'd also like to add that my own staffer, ms. jocelyn galt, is a relative of jeanette rankin and she, too, demonstrates the tenacity and determination that made jeanette rankin successful and feared among -- jeannette rankin successful and feared among her peers. renaming this program is the right thing to do because it's a reminder of those that had courage to break down the barriers. and the tenacity to not let go of their dreams and the courage to be a mentor and an inspiration to us all. i'm happy to partner with grace meng on this important endeavor. i thank her for her leadership and i yield back the remainder of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentlewoman from washington is recognized. ms. delbene: thank you, mr. speaker. i now would like to yield as much time as she may consume to
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the sponsor of this legislation, my distinguished colleague from the state of new york, ms. meng. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from new york is recognized. ms. meng: mr. speaker, i'm so pleased to be here today to celebrate the 100th anniversary of women serving in congress. thank you for allowing this legislation to the floor and thank you to my friend and colleague, representative zinke, for authoring this legislation with me. his support has been instrumental in ensuring the consideration of this bill, and i'm deeply grateful to him. 100 years ago this november, the people of montana elected jeannette rankin to the united states house of representatives. she was the first woman elected to congress and was elected before passage of the 19th amendment, which granted women the right to vote. jeannette rankin was a trailblazer her entire life. in 1902 she graduated from the university of montana with a degree in biology. afterwards she would become
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active in women's suffrage movement, moving to new york city and assisting in the founding of the new york women's suffrage party and working for the national american women's suffrage party. she would return to montana and was elected to office in the congressional election of 1916. upon winning, she declared, i may be the first woman member of congress but i won't be the last. i'm happy to say she was right. in recognition of congresswoman jeannette rankin's many accomplishments and in celebration of the centennial university of her election to congress, representative zince and i introduced the 100 years of -- zinke and i introduced the 100 years of women in congress act. because ms. rankin was a woman in science more than 100 years before our current push to have more women enter stem fields, we felt it appropriate to rename the department of agriculture's women and minorities in stem fields
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program after her. this program currently supports collaborative research projects at institutions of higher education which seek to increase the participation of women and minorities from rural areas in stem fields. it will continue to do so into the future, but now it will also recognize the many contributions jeannette rankin made to entire life. mr. speaker, thank you, again, for allowing this legislation to the nor today -- floor today and thank you, again, for congressman zinke for partnering with me. i ask my colleagues to support this measure and yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from washington reserves. the gentleman from illinois is recognized. mr. davis: i'd like to reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentlewoman from washington is recognized. ms. delbene: i urge all members to join me and all of us here in support of this bill and yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back the balance of her time. the gentleman from illinois is recognized.
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mr. davis: 100 years, 100 years since the first woman was elected to serve in this great constitution and now i'm -- institution and now i'm blessed to serve with so many great women on both sides of the aisle, mr. speaker. this is a recognition that's long overdue. i urge all of my colleagues, along what you already heard today, to support this important piece of legislation to give ms. rankin the respect and the honor that she deserves when she walked here 100 years ago, and yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the question is will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill h.r. 4570. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair -- mr. davis: mr. speaker, i'd ask for the yeas and nays. the speaker pro tempore: the yeas and nays are requested. all those in favor of taking this vote by the yeas and nays will rise and remain standing until counted. a sufficient number having arisen, yeas and nays are ordered. -- the yeas and nays are ordered. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, further proceedings on this question will be postponed.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from montana seek recognition? mr. zinke: mr. speaker, i move to suspend the rules and pass s. 719. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of
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the bill. the clerk: senate 719, an act to rename the armed forces reserve center in great falls, montana, the captain john e. moran and captain william wylie galt armed forces reserve enter. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from montana, mr. zinke, and the gentlewoman from guam, ms. bordallo, each will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from montana. mr. zinke: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and insert heir remarks and extraneous material on the bill under consideration. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. i yield : mr. speaker, myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. zinke: mr. speaker, i rise today in support of senate bill 719, my companion bill house honor captain to john e. moran and captain william wylie galt and rename
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the armed forces reserve center in great falls, montana, in their honor. captain moran was awarded the medal of honor in 1910 for fearlessly leading a mall body of troops under fire and through waist-deep water in the attack against the enemy. captain william wylie galt served in world war ii and was awarded the medal of honor in 1945 for gallantry above and beyond the call of duty. galt manned a machine gun on tank destroyer at the front 69 assault force. staying in his post, continuing to lead his men despite intense hostile fire. he was killed while manning his machine gun, and on february 1, 1945, was posthumously awarded the medal of honor. he was just 24 years old. i'm proud to have a member of the galt family on my staff. captain galt and captain moran
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are an inspiration to every montanan who was ever and will ever put on the uniform, myself included. montana has a strong heritage of military service with more veterans per capita than almost any of the states in the nation to include our indian nations. both captain moran and captain galt received the medal of honor. this nation's most distinguished honor for displaying such personal bravery that went well beyond the call of duty, and as a leader, they deserve our respect and honor. memorializing these two heroes by renaming the armed forces reserve center will provide a daily reminder to us all the service and sacrifice these montanans made to our country. i'd like to thank my friends, senators steve daines and senator jon tester for seeing this important bill through the senate. i'm proud to see this issue to completion. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentlewoman from guam is recognized.
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ms. bordallo: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized. ms. bordallo: mr. speaker, i am pleased to rise today in support of the montana congressional delegation's legislation to rename the armed forces reserve center in great falls, montana, to the captain john e. moran and captain william wylie galt armed forces reserve center. captain moran and captain galt were both awarded the medal of honor, the nation's highest honor, for their bravery in combat during the philippine american war and world war ii respectively. the recognition they earned through the sacrifices that they and their families made will be memorialized appropriately at the facility. as the congresswoman representing guam here in congress, i have a special appreciation for the service of our men and women in uniform and their families. having welcomed the marines in
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1944 after three years of brutal japanese occupation during world war ii, our island has a history of service and one that demonstrates an understanding of our role in the american community. guam has more veterans and service members and our national guard consistently maintains a force that is among the largest per capita in the nation, a fact i'm always proud to highlight. i commend congressman zinke and the senators for their work in recognizing the contributions of two of montana's own. and i'm pleased to support this bill and look forward to continuing to work to ensure that our brave service members get the recognitions they deserve and have earned. mr. speaker, at this time, i
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reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves. the gentleman from montana is recognized. mr. zinke: i'm prepared to close if the the gentlewoman from guam has no more speakers. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentlewoman from guam is recognized. ms. bordallo: i have no more speakers and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back. the gentleman from montana is recognized. mr. zinke: i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the question is will the house suspend the rules and pass senate 719. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 being in the affirmative, -- mr. zinke: i request the yeas and nays. the speaker pro tempore: the yeas and nays are requested. all those in favor of taking this vote by the yeas and nays will rise and remain standing until counted. yeas and nays are ordered. further proceedings on this
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question will be postponed. the speaker pro tempore: the chair lays before the house a commune cage. the clerk: the honorable, the speaker, house of representatives, sir, pursuant o section 803-a of the recognition, 2 united states
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code, i'm pleased to appoint debey dingell of recognition to the congressional awd board. thank you for your consideration of this appointment. signed sincerely, nancy pelosi, democratic leader.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman
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from iowa seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i move that the house suspend the rules and pass h.r. 3866, to designate the facility of the united states postal service located at 1265 hurffville road, in deptford township, new jersey. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk wilt report the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 3866 a bill to designate the facility of the united states postal service ocated at 1265 hurffville road in-depthford township, new jersey as the first lieutenant salvatore s. corma post office building. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentleman from iowa. mr. blum: i yield myself such time as i may consume. i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days in which to resize and extend their remarks
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and include extraneous material on the bill under consideration. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. . mr. blum: i rise in support of h.r. 3866 introduced by donald norcross of new jersey. h.r. 3866 designates the post office located at 1265 hurffville road in-depthford township, new jersey as the first lieutenant salvatore corma post office building. he gave his life while serving in afghanistan. lieutenant corma died on april 29, 2010 of wounds sustained from an improvized explosive device. he had visited his home on leave. he was a dedicated soldier, a dedication that was evident and man martial arts at three years old and won the silver medal at
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the junior national olympics. lieutenant corma was an excellent student and on the honor roll from kindergarten through senior year in high school. 2008 graduate of west point where his captain of his karate team. he was a dedicated friend and fellow soldier. he would call and check on his men every day while he was on leave. and e-mailed them 300 energy drinks. his dedication continued through his death, a death that came far too soon. we will be grateful for the services that first lieutenant salvatore corma made for his country. i urge members to honor his life and his sacrifice. and i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentlewoman from district of columbia is recognized. ms. norton: i yield myself such time as i may consume.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized. ms. norton: i'm pleased to join my colleagues in consideration of h.r. 3866 to designate the facility of the united states postal service located at 1265 hurffville road in deptford township new jersey as the first lieutenant salvatore s. corma post office building. following his graduation from west point, he attained his ranger badge serving as the first lieutenant in u.s. army's 82nd airborne division stationed . fort brag -- g. he served as a platoon leader, first lieutenant corma tragically lost his life while marking an i.e.d. in afghanistan.
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as his company commander noted when realming him for a valor award for marking i.e.d.'s is usually a soldier task, yet he displayed not only his bravery, but also his leadership in knowingly putting himself in danger rather than his men. as he once told his mother, you have to lead from the front. you can never lead from the back. first lat corma's leadership should be commended, his military awards include the bronze star and the purple heart. mr. speaker, we are pleased -- we all should be pleased to pass this bill to honor the valiant actions and steadfast leadership of first lieutenant salvatore corma, who put the lives of others before his even.
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i urge passage of h.r. 38866 and i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves. the gentleman from iowa is recognized. mr. blum: i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized. ms. norton: i'm pleased to ask the gentleman from from new jersey to yield him such time as he may consume. this is his bill. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. norcross: thank you, congresswoman. i take this opportunity to introduce to you a name that no one in this chamber had likely ever known. but a name and legacy you should know and need to know and it is my honor to share it with you. one of the reasons why we stand here today and join the many freedoms that we sometimes take
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for granted. the name is army first lieutenant salvatore corma ii. he grew up in south new jersey and attended karate class with my own children before receiving the nomination to attend west point. he graduated from west point in 2008 and that was while on active duty as a first lieutenant in the alpha company, fourth brigade combat team, 82nd airborne division out of fort bragg north carolina. he only stood 5' 6" but he was a telling figure among his own soldiers and that very leadership on that very dark day that stands out far from the safety of his home in the south jersey suburbs and one of the most volatile places on the planet, afghanistan.
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that day was april 29, 2010. sal was leading his company when hey spotted an i.e.d., improvized explosive device. he ordered his soldiers to back off. as they retreated, it detonated, it would take his life. he was just 24 years old. sal is credited with saving as many as 17 of his fellow soldiers in that selfless act. sam made history that day. we know he did. but it happens in ways that you'll never know because of his heroism, those who survive that day will protect the united states from threats and eliminate dangerss roobd the world. they will continue to protect us. they continue his fight, the fight carrying the spirit of sal corma and all living tributes
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and a living history to his actions. many of those soldiers will come home after service and start the american dream of a family. that was something denied sal. he will never get to marry or have kids. all because of his valor, sal corma ii is undenybly the american hero. and i present this legislation to rename the post office as first lieutenant sal corma post office building. sal deserves this honor in life not just in death. it is our duty to preserve his legacy and to remind citizens of his bravery. every person who crosses that threshold will see the name. if they don't know, i hope they
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will take a moment to read about his life and legacy and what he did for us as a country. i ask for your unanimous support in my legislation to rename the post office the first lieutenant salvatore s. corma ii post office and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves. the gentleman from iowa is recognized. >> i reserve and i'm prepared to close. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from district of columbia is recognized. ms. norton: i have no other speakers and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from iowa yields back. the question is will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill h.r. 3866. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed, and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid on the table.
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for what purpose does the gentleman from iowa seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i move that the house suspend the rules and pass h.r. 2928, to designate the facility of the united states postal service located at 201 b street in perryville, arkansas, as the harold george bennett post office. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 2928, a bill to designate the facility of the united states postal service located at 201 b street in perryville, arkansas, as the harold george bennett post office. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from iowa, mr. blum, and the gentlewoman from the district of columbia, ms. norton, will each control 20 minutes. mr. blum: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. blum: i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous material on the bill under
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consideration. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. blum: mr. speaker, i rise today in support of h.r. 2928, introduced by congressman french hill of arkansas. h.r. 2928 designates the post office located at 201 b street in perryville, arkansas, as the harold george bennett post office. sergeant harold george bennett enlisted in the united states army in 1957 and he served heroically in vietnam. sergeant bennett was taken prisoner in that country and on june 25, 1965, he became one of the first american prisoners of war killed in vietnam. sergeant bennett fought corageously, thinking not for himself but for his fellow service members. i ask my colleagues and the representative french hill to share the incredible story of sergeant bennett. for now i'd like to urge members to support this bill,
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to name a post office after sergeant harold george bennett. mr. speaker, hearing the story inspires bravery in all of us and i hope that permanently naming the post office in memory of his sacrifice will inspire generations to come. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentlelady from the district of columbia is recognized. ms. norton: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized. ms. norton: mr. speaker, i'm pleased to join my colleagues in the consideration of h.r. 2928, a bill to designate the facility of the united states postal service located at 201 b, as in boy, street in perryville, arkansas, as the harold george bennett post office. born in perryville, arkansas, in 1940, harold george bennett followed in his father's footsteps by joining the army. sergeant bennett served in the nd and the 101st aaron borne
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divisions -- heir borne divisions and -- airborne divisions in vietnam. he was infantry advisor to south vietnam's 33rd ranger about a tailon. on december 29, 1964, sergeant ennett's unit was airlifted to benjia, a vietnam overrun by the viet cong. he was met about a firefight and a selfless man, he called off two separate helicopter pilots who attempted to rescue him by refusing to put their lives in danger to save his. with his unit overrun by viet cong, sergeant bennett was captured. sergeant bennett demonstrated his courage and tenacity by participating in hunger strikes and attempting three times to
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escape captivity. tragically, following his third attempt, sergeant bennett was executed, becoming the first american p.o.w. to be put to death during the vietnam war. sergeant bennett was posthumously awarded a silver star for his heroic actions in addition to receiving a prisoner of war medal, army good conduct medal and a purple heart. mr. speaker, we should pass this bill to commemorate the great sacrifices sergeant harold george bennett made for his country as he selflessly and repeated low put the lives of others before his own. i urge the passage of h.r. 2928, and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves. the gentleman from iowa is recognized. mr. blum: mr. speaker, at this time i'm pleased to yield two minutes to the gentleman from
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arkansas, mr. hill. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from arkansas is recognized for two minutes. mr. hill: thank you, mr. speaker. and i thank the gentleman from iowa and the distinguished delegate from the district of columbia. you know, a few weeks ago i had the pleasure of going to the 50th anniversary of the beginning of the vietnam war commemoration in little rock and to see all the hugs and emotion at that event. truly it was a tumultuous time in our world and it was so good to see the healing that those men and women experienced at that 50th anniversary and i looked at that table for the pow-mia set at that ceremony and, of course, i was thinking about sergeant harold george bennett from perryville, arkansas. sergeant bennett was born on october 16, 1940 in thornberg, arkansas, a very small town outside the beautiful wash at
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that national forest. a graduate of perryville high school, he enlisted in the united states army in 1957, served as an airborne infantry man with the 82nd and 101st airborne divisions, no finer units. he completed special forces training in 1963. from there sergeant bennett volunteered to go to south vietnam as a special forces advisor with the military assistance command. and on december 29, 1964, his unit was airlifted to a small victimage after it had been overrun by -- village after it had been overrun by the viet cong. his unit was confronted by enemy forces. extradition by military helicopters as he wanted to continue the fight against the enemy. after a furious and courageous battle, sergeant bennett was taken prisoner by the viet cong. like so many of his colleagues,
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he spent 179 days as a p.o.w. and attempted to escape three times at great risk. his captors executed him on june 25, 1965. only 24 years old, sergeant bennett was the first american p.o.w. killed in vietnam, and like so many other servicemen who lost their lives, his remains have never returned home. mr. blum: i yield the gentleman as much time as he needs. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for as much time as he may consume. mr. hill: after four decades, he was inducted to the ranger hall of fame in fort bennett. his family was presented with his an fan tree badge, the vietnam service medal, the army good conduct medal and the purple heart. and in 2010, sergeant bennett's family was presented with his
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silver star. today, we honor sergeant bennett's heroism, bravery and service by installing a permanent marker of his lasting contributions to his native state and to our nation. both that he loved so ably and served. duty, honor and country, his example is one that all americans and arkansans can admire, and i urge my colleagues to join me in supporting this bill. i yield back the balance of my time and i thank the chair. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentlewoman from the district of columbia is recognized. ms. norton: i yield back, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields the balance of her time. mr. blum: i'd like to tell delegate norton i have no other speakers and i'm ready to close. mr. speaker, i have no other speakers and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the question is will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill h.r. 2928. those in favor say aye.
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those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed, and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. for what purpose does the gentleman from iowa seek recognition? mr. blum: mr. speaker, i move that the house suspend the rules and pass h.r. 4605, to designate the facility of the united states postal service cated at 615 6th avenue southeast in cedar rapids, iowa, as the sergeant first class terryl l. pacificer post office building. -- pasker post office building. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 4605, a bill to designate the facility of the united states postal service located at 615 6th avenue southeast in cedar rapids, iowa, as the sergeant first class terryl l. pasker post office building. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from iowa, mr. blum,
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and the gentlewoman from the district of columbia, ms. norton, each will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from iowa. mr. blum: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and and their remarks include extraneous materials on the bill under consideration. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. blum: mr. speaker, i rise today to honor a constituent of mine who paid the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. the bill before us would designate the post office located at 615 6th avenue southeast in cedar rapids, iowa, as the sergeant first class terryl l. pasker post office building. this bill pays tribute to sergeant first class pasker who was unfortunately killed in afghanistan in 2011. mr. speaker, sergeant pasker was born february 26, 1972, in animosa, iowa, the son of david and mary pasker. he joined the army in 1990
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after graduated from high school, transitioning to the national guard in 1995. sergeant pasker served in afghanistan in 2004 and 2005, deploying again in 2011 with the 334th brigade support battalion, second brigade team. he served in pansher province where he was responsible for maintaining electronic equipment and mentoring afghan police and military leaders. mr. speaker, on july 9, 2011, sergeant first class terryl pasker gave his last full measure of devotion to his country when he was killed at the age of 39 at a checkpoint only days before the end of his combat tour. he's survived by his wife aircrafta, his parents, mary -- erica, his parents, and brother and two sisters.
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his family told me that he always said he would remember be a sermon than preach one, a belief i believed he exemplified throughout his life. admired by his fellow soldiers, pasker was known for his humility, sense of humor and selflessly serve others. away from service, terryl was a home builder, taught karate and was active in his local church. during his life, he would remind others that freedom is not free. so, mr. speaker, as we honor the sacrifice of sergeant first class pasker, i ask us to also remember the thousands of service members who sacrificed their time, their relationships and even their lives to protect the freedom of this great nation. i urge members to support this bill, and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentlewoman from the district of columbia is recognized. ms. norton: mr. speaker, i
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yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized. ms. norton: mr. speaker, i'm pleased to join my colleagues in consideration of h.r. 4605, a bill to designate the facility of the united states postal service located at 615 6th avenue southeast in cedar rapids, iowa, as the sergeant first class terry l. pasker post office building. born in animosa, iowa, terryl pasker joined the army in 1990 following his high school graduation. in 1995, he joined the iowa national guard, deploying to afghanistan from 2004 to 2005. six years later, sergeant first class pasker decided to return for a second deployment with the 34th infantry division. during his tour, he mentored afghan police force and military leadership. tragically, sergeant first class pasker was killed at a
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pansher province july 9, 2011, just days before he was to return home from his combat tutey -- duty. he was awarded the bronze star and purple heart for his sacrifice. he's remembered as an active member of his church who taught karate and served as a mentor to many in his community. . he had scombended to return to his trade -- intended to return to his trade and start a family with his wife, erica, who he married in 2016. mr. speaker, we should pass this bill to recognize sergeant first class terryl pasker for the bravery, currently and selflessness that he exhibited in his 20 years of honorable military service. i urge t passage of h.r. 4605 aped reserve the balance of my
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time -- and i reserve the balance of my me. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves the balance of her time. the gentleman from iowa is recognized. >> i have no further speakers and i'm prepared to close. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from the district of columbia yields back the balance of her time. the gentleman from iowa is recognized. mr. blumenthal: mr. speaker, i urge adoption -- mr. blumenthal: mr. speaker, i urge adoption of the bill and i yield back the balce of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 of those voting having responded in the affimative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed and, without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. pursuant to clause 12-a of rule 1rk the chair declares the house no recess until appro
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>> "the new york times" writing that, quote, much of the argument before the high court was technical but the justices kearnty paused to recognize realities outside the courtroom. a justice said the case had enormous political implications. justice society mike r.: said 11 million immigrants live in the shatows and they're here, whether we want them or not. the story says the case, brought by 26 states, may produce a significant ruling on presidential power and
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immigration policy in the midst of a presidential campaign in which both issues have been prominent. we'll have the oral argument on president obama's immigration policy after it's released on friday. 8:00 p.m. eastern right here on -span. >> tonight on the communicators, george ford, chief economist for the phoenix center for advanced legal and economic policies and mark cooper, research director for the consumer federation of america, debate the f.c.c.'s proposal allowing consumers to buy their own set top boxes. instead of renting them from cable providers. a move to open up competition in the set top box market. they're joined by a telecommunications reporter for bloomberg. >> we think we need competition in the set top box market. the 96 act says we want competition. some places it's worked, some places it hasn't.
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this is one place where it really hasn't. we think consumerers would have lower prices and more choices if we got some vigorous competition into that space. >> the first question is, is there a market forsett top boxes? the answer really is no, because the set top box is actually a component of the network. that's the most efficient way to design and deliver cable television service. so it's the cheapest way to do it, the most efficient way to do it. no market has developed. the companies would prefer a market if it was more efficient to do it that way. >> watch the communicators tonight at 8:00 eastern on c-span2. >> house budget committee chair tom price spoke today about the budget process. his remarks are followed by a discussion on the possibility of long-term budget reform. it's hosted by the committee or a responsible budget.
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>> thank you, everybody. welcome. i run the committee for a responsible federal budget. thank you very much for everybody who came today. we have a good expert audience with us. we're also on c-span live. hello, everybody, again. ok. so, we have c-span with us today live which is terrific. we have a broad audience and thanks to everybody here, because we have -- i pretty much see all the leading budget experts in the city in this room. so very thrilled to have you all with us. our topic today is fixing the broken budget process. this is a topic that anybody who knows the budget or the rules that guide it is familiar with, that there is a whole lot of improvement that we could do. whether it's the thinking about how hard it is to keep the budget on track and actually even get budgets done to fiscal outcomes that aren't always healthy for the country, to the fact that budgeting in our country is done in a way that's really very separate from any
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strategic economic thinking you might want to do. so whether the a small technical areas or the biggest, broadest, what's the objective of a budget question, there's a lot of improvement we could do to a budget process that has been in place for quite a number of decades without a really significant overhaul. so we have a great panel of experts today who are going to lead a discussion about a bunch of different topics of where we could look for reforms. what i'm really thrilled to do is introduce our key note speaker today, dr. price, who is the chairman of the house budget committee, who is not only shepherding the budget process along this year, he's also doing some really deep and important thinking about reforms to the budget and what they might look like in terms of process. so i'm very thrilled that he's joined us today to lead our discussion. thank you very much, dr. price. [applause] mr. price: thank you, thank you. thank you very much for the opportunity to be with you today and talk about something that's near and dear to everybody's heart, right?
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budget reform. how excite can it get? you know. probably nothing could be more important and less exciting than the budget process reform. so i want to thank all of you for coming out today to discuss and share your ideas about this incredibly important issue, as we try to move forward with something that i think has a process right now that clearly is failing, not just those participants in the process, but failing the country. and that clearly needs to be reformed. and so it's an exciting prospect for all of us, to kind of try to shape the way in which budget process reform moves forward. i also want to just commend the panelists who have spent incredible time and toil and labor in trying to assist folks in understanding what the budget process is and why it works and why it doesn't work.
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and they've got some i think wonderful contributions to make today to this conversation. what i'd like to do is just kind of lay out where we are right now, what the challenge is, and do so in a way that reason y highlights the for budget process reform. the need for budget process reform. and then talk about some of the things that can be done and kind of split the way forward in terms of policy and process. the budget does three things. in congress. it sets the 302-a number which is the discretionary number. the number that the appropriators can spend to on the discretionary side for the next fiscal year. it lays out in the budget window the 10-year window, it lays out kind of the vision for the challenges that we face. whether it's the majority budget or whether it's the minority budget or whether the another budget that's offered. oftentimes it's used as an
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opportunity to kind of say, this is how we would address the challenges that we face. and then finally, the third thing that it does, is something that isn't used terribly often but is an incredibly powerful tool, and that is the whole issue of reconciliation. reconciliation is a process that allows the congress to address spending or revenue or debt in a way that -- it doesn't make a whole lot of difference in the house to the process, but in the senate it allows us to move a piece of legislation forward with just a simple majority, doesn't require a supermajority, so you can get around the 60-vote margin in the senate. in a very, very important thing. so it's pretty straightforward. ought to be easy to do. right? last year we passed a budget that balances within a 10-year period of time and agreed to it with the senate. doesn't raise taxes and gets us on a path to paying off the debt. for the first time in 14 years. first time in 14 years. so, if you're keeping track on
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a scorecard now, that's one reason, that is the first time in 14 years, that we need budget process reform. and we'll go through some others. but the a red letter date here in congress, when we do something like that. it ought not be. it ought to be something that we do every single year. folks at home do balance their budget every single year and their businesses, they balance it, and communities and places of work or places of worship to make certain that they're on track and they correct course if they aren't. for those who are observant of the process and have been for the past number of years, you will recognize that this was the fifth year straight that the house of representatives passed a budget that balances within a 10-year period of time, without raising taxes, solves the challenges that we face, and gets us on a path to paying off the debt. so, the very cogent and curious among you will say, ok, how much closer are you to balancing the budget, paying
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off the debt, getting those programs reformed as we move forward? the answer is, not that much closer. if at all. and the reason that i would suggest to you that we're not that much closer is, again, another reason that we ought to have budget process reform, but it's because the budget enforcement, the thing that is able to allow us to make certain that the congress follows a budget that is adopted, is extremely weak. extremely weak. we'll talk about some of the things that can be done. so what's the evidence that this is an ineeffectual process? you all have your long list, i'm certain. but let's just tick through a few of them. the debt, $19 trillion-plus in debt, 76% of gross domestic product from debt to g.d.p. ratio, which wouldn't be necessarily that bad if in fact we were moving down, but in fact we're moving up, congressional budget office has projected that by the end of that 10-year window, 86% debt
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to g.d.p. ratio, and continuing to rise. so we're not addressing the challenge of debt. deficits, we had about $130 billion increase in deficit from last year to this year. about $544 billion that was revised downward just a little bit recently by c.b.o. but still a significant increase from last year. that's the annual deficit. that's what then gets added to the debt. and then increases that 19 trillion number -- $19 trillion number. growth in the economy. we've seen significant decrease in growth over the last number of years. and the projections aren't comfortable for the vast majority of the public. the average growth rate in our economy over the past 40 to 50 years has been about 3%, 3.2%. annualized growth, that's the kind of growth that it takes to continue to keep the economy moving and jobs being created and the like, the projection by the congressional budget office now is 2.1% annualized growth.
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that's a 30% to 35% reduction in the rate of growth in our economy. and the interest on the debt, we're now paying about $235 billion each year on interest on that $19 trillion. debt. and that's at relatively low interest rates, as you all well know. the projection within a 10-year period of time is that we approach over $00 billion in payment -- $800 billion payment in interest on the debt each year, approaching $1 trillion, $1 trillion. what difference does all that make? why do any of these numbers make any difference in i guess that's another -- difference? i guess that's another -- i guess that's another thing i'd like you to take home. these are not numbers on a page. these are numbers that affect real lives and real people all across our great land, so that every dollar that's spent in covering the interest costs is a dollar that can't be used to buy a car, to pay the rent, to buy a house, to send a kid to school, to start a business, to expand a business, all the
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things that the american people say that they want are harmed by the fiscal situation that we find ourselves in, that i would suggest is a result partly, if not in large part, of the budget process that we have right now. so, that's another reason that it's important to move toward budget process reform. the larger picture of governance, the power of the purse and the like, i think it must be talked about always. there's a sense across this land that the power of the purse has wayned, that executive branch has assumed more and more authority over the past number of years, through both republican and democratic administrations. the power of the purse is incredibly important. james madison wrote, this power of the purse may in fact be regarded as the most complete and effectual weapon with which any constitution can arm the immediate representatives of the people for obtaining a -- obtaining a redress of every grieve it's an ant -- grievance and for carrying into effect
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every justice and salutary measure. it means that if the folks closest to the people, representatives of the people, do not have in their armament, do not have in their quiver, the kind of opportunities to be able to hold the government to account, to be able to make certain that the hard-earned taxpayer dollars out there aren't going for things that the constituents, that the citizens of this great land don't want, if they can't use that power, then it's no longer the power of the purse. and consequently i would suggest we find ourselves where we are right now. so what's the way forward? from a policy side, to get things into better fiscal situation from having the numbers look better on paper, you can basically do three thifpblgts you can raise taxes to increase revenue to the federal government, that happens, that's a pet project of our friends on the other side of the aisle, it tends to increase revenue to the federal government for a short time and then decreases it because it
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decreases the economic activity out there. you can decrease spending, which tends to be what we believe ought to be the most appropriate way to proceed from a tax and spending standpoint. and that helps. but let me suggest to you that this congress has done a pretty good job of holding discretionary spending down over the last five years. in fact, we are spending on the discrerary side toe, total discrer agencies dollars less right now than we did in 2008. that's a flat line on total discretionary spending basically between 2008 and now. the total spending that's occurring at the federal government level is increasingsyly -- significantly because the mandatory spending. we'll talk about that in a minute. or the third way you can do it so grow the economy. get that 2.1% number up to the 3% or more number. every 0.1% growth in the economy results in a $325 billion reduction in the deficit.
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every .1% increase in growth results in about a $325 billion reduction in the deficit. which means that if we grew at just 3.1%, it is likely we would decrease the deficit over the next 10 years by over $3 trillion. that's real money, real money that's staying in people's pockets as opposed to coming to washington to fund programs or to pay the interest on that debt. but let me suggest that the kinds of things that i just was talking about are the symptoms of a broader problem. and that problem is the process that we utilize to budget and to spend money here in washington. so i want to talk a little bit about budget process reform and the specific topic that will be addressed by the panelists here. we budget in this country under the 1974 budget act, which was written 42 years ago, written by a lot of folks who were well meaning, but the affect of the budget act has been in essence to spend more and to grow government.
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i would suggest to you that that's no longer the premise upon which we ought to budget. we ought to have a default that spends less and des the size of government, if we don't do our job. right now if congress doesn't do its job, then the spending continues. in fact, it increases more and more and more. let me raise some fundamental questions for budget process reform. the budget committee is going to be going through a process over the next number of months to come forward with a piece of legislation that will bring about what our goal is, a complete rewrite of the 1974 budget act. so that we have a default that actually spends less and decreases the size of government if congress is unable to -- or it's not possible to get them to do their job. what are some fundamental questions we need to answer? first, why is the majority of reached?unable to be
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those are the programs that continue to grow and grow and grow, unless congress and the president, congress and the administration, are able to reach an agreement about how to reform them. that might not be all bad, if it weren't for the fact that the majority of those programs are going broke. medicare, social security, other mandatory programs, unsustainable. at home i get this all the time. people say, well, aren't those programs unsustainable? i say, yeah, now think about what you just said. what does that mean? it means they will not be sustained. it means they're not going to continue. and so we believe that it's irresponsible and reckless not to address these unsustainable
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programs. so, we believe it's important to lay out a path for saving and strengthening and securing medicare and medicaid and social security. but the budget itself isn't able to touch those. because that's on the mandatory side of the budget. the only thing that's able to be enforced on the budget side is that discretionary number. what about the unauthorized programs? we've got a process right now where the majority of nondefense discretionary spending in this country, the majority, over $300 billion each year, is unauthorized. that means that the committees in the congress have not said to the appropriators, you ought to spend money on this. this is a priority. you ought to spend money on this. in fact, they haven't done -- most of them are programs that have lapsed. but significant programs. like the state department, for example. an unauthorized department. you can't not appropriate money for the state department. but we ought to at least have -- make certain that congress is looking at the spending that's going to the state
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department year after year after year and holding them to account. that's one of the responsibilities of the legislative branch. what role should the executive take? in all of this? begin fanfare every year when the president sends his budget up to capitol hill, we kill a lot of trees, chop down a lot of trees just to make certain that we're able to print that budget. and then where does it go? kind of sits on shelves. through both republican and democratic administrations, the presidential budget that has been put forward over the past number of years has fallen on deaf ears. and so what is it that we need out of the executive branch in order to have the legislative branch, the people's branch, be able to write an appropriate budget? is it just information or is it truly a budget? that's a question i think we need to be asking ourselves and come to some conclusion on. what are the forcing mechanisms that ought to be put in place to make certain that congress does our job? right now there's not any significant penalty for not
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getting a budget done. we're living that right now, as we see that the 302-a, the digscrer agencies number, was set with an agreement last october. and consequently there's not the kind of oomph or inergsia to have members of congress believe that gets a budget through is actually consequential. that ought not be, from our perspective. we ought to make certain that there ought to be forcing mechanisms to get the job done. what should the role of the congressional budget office be? are there inherent biases within the congressional budget office? many of us believe so. many of us believe that in so many areas it's almost impossible to get to the right answer with the information that the congressional budget office gives us. not because they're bad folks, not because they're ill-equipped, it's because, in many instances, the rules under which they operate almost make it so that we can't get to the right answer, so what should the role of the congressional budget office be? how often should we budget?
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that's a big push right now to create a biannual budget. for those folks who have been in congress just since 2010 this ought to shock you, since 2010, not a single appropriations bill of the 12 appropriations bills that are supposed to be done annually, not a single one has gone through the process and been conferenced between the house and the senate and passed and sent to the president. not one. that's 60 opportunities, 60 opportunities to do an appropriations bill in understand -- and congress has been unable to do so. so should we make that every two years? so that we decrease by half the number of times that we fail? or should we streamline the process to a greater degree and allow either more time or more focus on the work that needs to be done? what about the baseline? what should we measure our spending against? should it be current law? should it be current policy? should it be zero baseline like many states do?
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should we require the agencies to justify every single dollar that they spend every single year? is that possible? what baseline should we measure against? so often right now we measure against current law which means that if you decrease anything, then the increase, even though you're not spending less but you lower the rate of increase, that's considered a cut. which only in washington is that kind of rationale used to describe it as a cut. what should fiscal targets be? should we adopt fiscal targets? should we say that we can only tax this much, we can only spend this much, as a percent of gross domestic product? what should that ratio be? what kind of fiscal -- should we have a balanced budget? what kind of fiscal targets should we have? finally, the whole issue of a regulatory budget. we've done a lot of work exploring what we believe is now an important aspect of governance and government rules
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coming out of washington. the estimate right now is that the regulatory rules that are in place cost the private economy, cost men and women across this country in their jobs and in their business, $1.8 trillion a year. $1.8 trillion a year. that's about six times the amount of the corporate income tax revenue that comes into the country. that ought to be looked at. that's not looked at by and large at all by the legislative branch. so you've got this sense across the country that the bureaucratic system in washington is ever expanding ever increasing and coming out with more and more rules and regulations. those are just some questions that i think we ought to be asking ourselves as we move through this process. at the budget committee we're going to be holding a number of hearings between now and july 15 when we break for the conventions this summer. and to explore many of these questions, and i hope that you all will take the opportunity to communicate with me as chair, with budget staff, to
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let them know what you think we ought to be doing from a budget standpoint. this is a great opportunity. and i believe a very exciting time to be able to put in place positive reforms in the area of budget process. and it's a time when both parties ought to be able to join together and do so. nobody knows who the president's going to be, everybody knows and understands that the budget process isn't working as well as it should. so shouldn't we come to an agreement on what the reforms ought to be, that would make it so the process would move much more smoothly and allow us to fulfill our responsibility to our constituents across this great land? thanks for allowing me to share a faw words and a few -- few words and a few issues and perspectives with you this morning on budget process reform. i'm happy to -- you're certainly welcome to applaud though. [laughter] yeah. [applause] thank you. happy to take some
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questions. i think a microphone is coming. questioner: thank you. i heard your speech before. in congress, whether senate or house, they're busy to do legislation. but the state and local -- [inaudible] -- what i mean is, the not really orking for the general public. benefit a few. are ntly, if social issues there, nobody touch it, nobody care about it. a lot of crime, a lot of abuse, in other words, a lot of corruption. and including on the budget -- [inaudible] -- maybe they have fraudulent charges.
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many health services and maybe they have a lot of fraudulent s.e.c.s of public-private partnerships -- sections of public-private partnership or housing or transportation. another problem, people pay but not really -- mr. price: do you have a question? questioner: people are suffering, you can trim those costs and the budget and you don't do a legislative budget that way. ultimately they'll cut the budget down. price -- mr. price: this is a great point. many people don't feel like issues are being addressed by congress. the role of the budget committee is not a policy committee. that's one of the challenges that we have in trying to get across to folks why we are having the difficulty in getting a budget moving forward. y d why we're having difficult
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getting the budget process -- getting budget enforcement, so that the things that we have in our budget are actually being followed by the authorizing committees. so there are a number of authorizing committees, ways and means and energy and commerce and natural resources and education and work force, on and on and on, the committees that are responsible for the kinds of reforms that you've identified. the role of the budget committee is to identify the challenge, identify the problem, and say, these are some potential ways that you might be able to address them. but the budget committee is not the committee that puts in place the legislation or even proposes the legislation for the house, that then the house or the other committees work upon. but it's an important distinction. because for many folks, they aren't quite certain what it is that the budget committee actually does. so i appreciate the opportunity to explain. that -- explain that. yes, sir. questioner: one of the questions you had was whether there should be a spending target at all. including a balanced budget. i was hoping you could expand
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on that a little bit. a lot of the people i talk to, that's a no brainer for them. yes, it should be a balanced budget. why is that a question at all? mr. price: this is incredibly important. we run the gamut in this town from folks that don't think you have to have any spending restraint at all, hence we end up where we are right now for over a period of years with $19 trillion in debt. others who believe that there is a reasonable amount of deficit to carry year to year. the usual number that's provided is less than 3% of gross domestic product. and they say that that's able to be sustained over a period of time. and i might actually agree with that. if we weren't $19 trillion in debt and 76% of debt held by the public compared to g.d.p. or over 100% of gross domestic product in overall total debt. and not moving in the right direction. i believe strongly that we need
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a balanced budget, without a doubt. how do you get there is the challenge, what's the transition look like, what are the rules in place that enforce that. those are the kinds of things that i think we need to talk about. but fiscal discipline is absolutely imper five it -- imperative if we're to get our house in order. the reason is not so the numbers line up on a page and the bottom line it says that money in equals money going out. the reason is that when you're not doing that, you're taking away the opportunity from the american people to realize their dreams. the greatest amount of opportunity and the greatest amount of success for the greatest number of folks for the greatest number of american dreams to be realized in a fair and compassionate system is what we're after. that doesn't work if you're taking $1 trillion a year ultimately, within a very short period of time, to pay the interest on the debt. that's money taken from the american people to do nothing but pay the interest on the debt that has incurred. so absolutely.
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i think we must have a balanced budget and i think fiscal targets are appropriate. questioner: thank you, mr. chairman. my name's greg from the university of central florida. i was glad you talked about the g.d.p. growth. 2/3 of all g.d.p. growth since world war iic i has come from federal -- world war ii has come from federal investments in r&d. if you're talking about getting that to 3.1% or higher, it would seem like investments in research makes a lot of sense. if you can talk about that as part of the budget process and maybe also about federal student financial aid, if you can talk about how we might be able to address that, i would appreciate it. mr. price: these are two areas that ought to be prioritize -- priorities for the nation. these are the worse -- resources that we have. close to the top of that list ought to be money for research and development and to allow young people to realize their dream through an education process that works.
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sadly what we do is we get the list of things that we think we ought to spend money on the it just grows and grows and grows and grows and grows. then you get $19 trillion in debt and, again, resulting in a decrease in opportunity and a decrease in success and a decrease in the ability for those young americans to realize their dreams. precisely because we've not been able or not been willing to make the difficult decisions in this town, so should those things be a priority? you bet. without a doubt. are we making them a priority now in a responsible way? i would suggest to you that we are not. because we're not, those spending on those types of projects and so many others are actually threatened because we've got a growing mandatory side, growing automatic spending side, the mandatory spending that i mentioned, which is now 2/3 of the entire federal budget in less than 10 years, will be 3/4, 75% of the spending in this country will be mandatory spending. that's something that nobody has any control over unless we
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get an administration that's interested in reforming those programs. those ought to be priorities but they can only be priorities when we have a pool of discretionary moneys that we actually have control over and appropriate responsibly. i would suggest we're not doing that now. ne more. you've got some very bright people who are going to weigh in on all these things in just a moment. questioner: eric at bloomberg news. two of your question points that were intriguing know. the first one about, how do you link the budget with indictments, maybe you're talking about foreign sfwimets. is there a danger of creating a type of cliff, like an s.g.r. that you need a doc fix for every year, how do you enforce that? the second one was, how do you force a budget action. sort of institutionalizing no
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budget, no pay, and are you wishing that you had that this year in order to get your colleagues to go along with your budget? mr. price: i'm looking forward to the hear thags we have on these issues, but i think that it makes sense to have the mandatory spending for lack of a better term on budget. i think it's important for the people's representatives to be able to weigh in annually or at some interval to say, yes, this mandatory program, automatic program, is something that we think needs to be continued. and in this structure. so that we hold the agencies to account and make certain that the programs are actually working. there's so many things in our federal government where we measure the success of the program by the. a money going in, not by the -- but the amount of money going in, not by the output of the program. there's so many things on the social welfare side where we spend more and more and more money and we're not getting the outcome that any of us desire. so the answer for some of my friends here in town is to just spend more money.
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what that means is we're not doing our job holding to account the agencies that are responsible. and then in terms of budget enforcement, there are a lot of ideas, one that's been floated , folks s to say that if for example, i'm not endorsing this, but these are the kinds of things that have been talked about, if, for example, the congress doesn't appropriate the -- finish their appropriations process, and a continuing resolution, which is not a very responsible way to budget, but if a continuing resolution were to be put in place for the next fiscal year or portion thereof, which is simply spending at the rate that you spent last year, with all of the policies in place, then that ought to tick down over a period of time so there ought to be some increasing pressure on members of congress to actually do their job. i think that's something that makes some sense. let me thank you again for the opportunity to be with you. thank you, maya, and i appreciate it and i look forward to the discussion, the report on the discussion and also look forward to your ideas as we move forward in this incredibly important tooth opportunity. thanks so much -- important opportunity.
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thanks so much. [applause] ms. macguineas: there are additional seats to so we want to inis right people everywhere to come in you don't have to be standing room only. if you really run out of seats, there are a couple more in the front. you can take these big compy ones in the back. the panelists will turn around. but please don't feel like you ave to huddle in the corner. thank you so much. >> thank you again to chairman price for doing. this i am going to start out by introducing everybody and then each one of our panelists will have a few minutes to give a presentation. and then we will go to questions. o to start, we have paul pos ner. he also leads the university center on the public service. his most recent book was
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recently released and he was formerly with the g.a.o. we also have maya macguineas as the president of the committee for responsible federal budget who brought us here today. thank you, maya. maya is an expert in all things budget, tax and economic policy. and she's a political independent who has worked with many campaigns and with candidates and members in congress. we have dr. butler. a senior fellow of studies at brookings institute -- institution. he spent 35 years with the heritage foundation as director for center of policy innovation and earlier as the vice president for domestic and economic policy studies. he, i'm sure, is well known to many of you in this room. . also have dr. phaup
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he works at the george washington university. his research aims to improve performance of federal budgeting by the criteria of efficiency, equity and stabilization. and prior to that, until december 2010, he directed the federal budget reform initiative at the pew charitable trust. welcome to all of our panelists. as dr. price mentioned, i am reporter at "the washington post," i cover a budget and fiscal policy here in congress. mr. posner: thank you for all being here. i think there's one thing that we all can agree on, which is the budget process in some way shape or form is broken. we wouldn't be here if we didn't really believe that. i start off all of my lectures with my students on the federal budget saying, unlike social security, health care or food aid, the budget is the one thing that politicians have to do every year. well, apparently not every year.
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so, there's an exception right there. showing everything about the budget is the exception to the rule. but i think we can tick off a list of things that don't seem to work, the disproportion at attention paid to discretionary spending, even though it's a declining share of the total resources, the fact that the targets for spending are largely symbolic and don't seem to be adhered to by the rest of the congress, the fact that for the most part, most of the budget is off limits, there are walls around mandatory, tax ex pecksture -- expenditures anded like and there's no concerted review available to bring together how all those programs interact in areas such as higher education, low income housing and all the various other programs and policy goals that we care about. . we say we have a unified budget but we really don't. in some w

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