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tv   Key Capitol Hill Hearings  CSPAN  April 20, 2016 1:00am-6:51am EDT

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senator sanders: and in my view, in my view, we have a moral responsibility to make certain that the planet that we leave our kids and future generations is healthy and habital. [cheers and applause] senator sanders: and what that means politically, what that means politically is we have got to stand and take on the fossil fuel industry and tell them that their short-term profits are not more important than the profit of our planet! [cheers and applause] senator sanders: and by the way if we are prepared to think big
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and think of a clean sustainable system where our homes are efficient and our transportation is energy efficient, where we move aggressively to talk about solar, wind, geothermal, and other sustainable technologies, we can create millions of good-paying green jobs! [cheers and applause] senator sanders: let me repeat now what i have been criticized for saying on many occasions. let me be crystal clear and say it again. and that is, it is my view, that health care is a right of all people, not a privilege.
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[cheers and applause] senator sanders: now, the corporate media does not talk about this a whole lot. they are too busy getting as from the insurance and the drug companies. let me tell you what they may not see on tv. we are the only major country on earth that does not guarantee health care to all all as a right. they do it in the u.k., france germany, scandinavia, holland. i live 50 miles away from the canadian border, they do in canada. right now, as a result of the gains of the affordable care act, we have made some progress.
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we have 17 million americans who now have health insurance, who previously did not. we have done away with pre-existing conditions. many young people are now able to be on their parents' insurance plan. [cheers and applause] [cheers and applause] senator sanders: all of that is good, but it is not good enough. today, 29 million people have no health insurance. even more, including many here tonight, or underinsured, with high deductibles and copayments, and every person here is getting ripped off by the drug companies who charges higher prices. [cheers and applause] senator sanders: and despite all of that, we end up spending much
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more per capita on health care then do the people of any other major country. in my view, and this is thinking outside the box, envisioning a new america, in my view, we need to pass a medicare for all single-payer program. [cheers and applause] think of an america where every person has health care as a right. think of an america where you can quit your job and start your own business and not worry about having health insurance. and if you're a small business person, you don't have to worry about how you will provide health insurance to your employees, because they will already have health insurance. [cheers and applause]
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senator sanders: everybody here understand that what american history has been about is the understanding that real change real change never takes place from the top down, always from the bottom up. [cheers and applause] senator sanders: that is the history of america. think back 100 plus years ago. workers in this country, forced to work seven days a week, 12 hours a day. children working in factories. people could be fired arbitrarily, they had no rights on the job. and workers stood up and said we are not beasts of burden, we are not animals, we are human beings. we want dignity, we will form trade unions and negotiate contracts.
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[cheers and applause] senator sanders: think back several hundred years ago. with the abomination of slavery, african americans and their allies said, we will struggle for as long as it takes, to end racism and segregation and bigotry in the united states of america. [cheers and applause] senator sanders: millions of people stood up to fight for an america not based on racism. think about 100 years ago. not a long time from a historical perspective. 100 years ago today, women did not have the right to vote, to not get the education they wanted.
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could not do the work they wanted. but women stood up. [cheers and applause] senator sanders: they stood up and they said, the status quo ain't good enough, it is unacceptable. and women and their male allies said in this america, women will not be second-class. [cheers and applause] senator sanders: and on and on it goes. that is how change takes place. think about this, if we were in this room 10 years ago, which is no time at all from a historical perspective. 10 years ago, somebody jumps up and says bernie, i think that gay marriage will be made legal in this country in 50 states by the year 2015. do you know what the person next
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to her would have said? you are crazy. you are thinking too stupid. it can't happen. but what happened is the gay community -- [cheers and applause] senator sanders: the gay community and their straight allies made the claim that became impossible to argue against, and that is that people have a right to love each other regardless of their gender. [cheers and applause] senator sanders: that is how change takes place. always takes place when people stand up and reject the status quo and come together.
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i will give you one more example, five years ago. if we were in his room five years ago, somebody jumps up and says bernie, this $7.25 an hour minimum wage is an outrage people cannot live on it. we have got to raise that to $15 per hour. person next to him would have said, $15 an hour, you want to more than double the minimum wage? you are nuts. you are thinking to make. -- too being. you are too radical. maybe eight dollars, maybe $10 you cannot go to $15 an hour. but workers in the fast food industry went out on strike. and they said to the american people, we can't make it on $7.25 an hour.
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and then you know what happened? in seattle, washington, they passed a $15 an hour minimum wage. and then in los angeles, san francisco california, new york state -- here is my point. the major crisis we face, it is not the crises themselves, it is the belief held everything will day -- every single day by the establishment, the media, the congress, that you cannot make change. this is the status quo, the way it is, and the way it always will be. it does not matter what you believe -- and that is what this campaign is challenging.
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[cheers and applause] senator sanders: and that is why we are going to win this election. [cheers and applause] senator sanders: because change takes place when people look around them and say, what is going on, this is not acceptable. and that is what is happening in america today. people all over the country see that the grotesque level of income and wealth inequality, it is going to the top 1% unacceptable. people are beginning to see that it is absurd that we are the only major country on earth not
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to provide paid family and medical leave. people are asking, how come every other major country on earth can somehow provide health care to all of their people, but we can't do it? unacceptable. people are asking, how does it happen, why does it happen at that our infrastructure continues to crumble? why does it happen that we have the highest rate of childhood poverty of any country on earth? why do we have a corrupt campaign finance system that allows billionaire to buy elections? why do we have more people in jail than any other country on earth? why are kids graduating school $30,000, $50,000 in debt? those are the questions that people are beginning to ask. [cheers and applause] senator sanders: and as soon as
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they ask those questions, they quickly realize that establishment politics and establishment economics are not going to solve those problems. [cheers and applause] senator sanders: i am the only candidate for president to tell you a simple truth, and that is that no president, not bernie sanders or anybody else, can solve these crises alone. we need a millions of people including many people who have given up on the political process, who have turned away from the process in disgust. we made them back into the system to reclaim american democracy. [cheers and applause] senator sanders: we need young people. [cheers and applause]
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senator sanders: many of whom may have not voted yet in their lives, to say, excuse me, the decisions you make now will impact me and my kids for many decades. you better listen to what we have to say. [cheers and applause] senator sanders: but what this political revolution is about is the understanding that no president, not bernie sanders or anybody else, can do it alone. the only way we go forward and rebuild america, and create the economy that works for all of us, the environment that works for all of us, is when millions of people stand up and say loudly and clearly, enough is enough! [cheers and applause]
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senator sanders: and if we do not allow the donald trump's of >> the world to divide us, if we understand that our strength is in our diversity, and if we stand together, and if we demand a government that represents all of us, and not just the 1%, when we stand together, there is nothing that we cannot accomplish. [cheers and applause] senator sanders: next tuesday here in pennsylvania, there will
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be an enormously important democratic primary. what i have learned so far from this campaign, is when voter turnout is high, we win. [cheers and applause] senator sanders: when voter turnout is low, we lose. so next tuesday, let us have the highest voter turnout in pennsylvania history. [cheers and applause] senator sanders: and let pennsylvania go forward and tell the world, you are going to lead this country into a political revolution. thank you all. [cheers and applause]
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♪ >> ♪ i had to phone someone so i picked on you hey, that's far out so you heard him too! switch on the tv we may pick him up on channel two look out your window i can see his light if we can sparkle he may land tonight
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don't tell your poppa or he'll get us locked up in fright there's a starman waiting in the sky he'd like to come and meet us but he thinks he'd blow our minds there's a starman waiting in the sky he's told us not to blow it cause he knows it's all worthwhile he told me: let the children lose it let the children use it let all the children boogie starman waiting in the sky he'd like to come and meet us but he thinks he'd blow our minds there's a starman waiting in the sky he's told us not to blow it cause he knows it's all worthwhile he told me: let the children lose it let the children use it
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let all the children boogie ♪ ♪ [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2016] [captioning performed by the national captioning institute, which is responsible for its caption content and accuracy. visit ncicap.org]
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♪ >> ♪ we've got a thousand points of light for the homeless man ♪ ♪ >> c-span's "washington journal" live every day with news and policy issues that impact you.
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wednesday morning, north carolina republican congressman rob pittenger in the role of the congressional task force on terrorism and unconventional he will tell us whether he thinks the 2016 presidential candidates are well-versed on the issue. then california democratic congressman brad sherman talks about president obama's trip to saudi arabia and national park service director jonathan jarvis joins us to talk about the 100th birthday of the national parks service, trends in visitor ship, and the budget challenges facing the service. c-span's "washington journal" begins live at 7:00 a.m. >> during campaign 2016, c-span takes you on the road to the white house as we follow the candidates on c-span, c-span radio, and c-span.org.
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>> next, ohio governor john kasich campaigns for president in annapolis, maryland. governor kasich spoke about the national debt, the economy, and job training. maryland primary voters go to the polls next tuesday. [applause]
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>> thank you. my name is mike and i'm the mayor of annapolis maryland. i want to thank you all so much for coming out and supporting john kasich to be our next president. [applause] >> it is only a cheat if i need it. well governor, where only proud of the work you've done as a governor, as a congressman and of the work you're going to do as president of the united states on day one. [applause] >> i was coming here and somebody asked me, why are you supporting john kasich for president?
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i told them, because the country needs a strong leader to take us forward. i said the national debt, taxes we are on an unsustainable path. when you look at someone who has the leadership to do it, we've seen that with governor kasich. let me put this in perspective. the last time the federal government was balanced was when john kasich was the budget chairman. [applause] >> we need someone who can be a commander in chief. america used to have a lot of respect and prominence in the world and some of that has gone away. i was speaking to the service academies. i was congratulating them on two new majors, cyber operations and nuclear engineering. the challenges we face in america are historic and unprecedented. the country has never seen a
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threat like we face before. people from other countries are able to hack our bank accounts steal our records, and can even take control of a nuclear reactor. who is the one person running that has more experience than everyone combined? this man right here, john kasich. [applause] >> a lot of evil ask -- people ask, what is someone going to do? in ohio, he took away an $8 billion deficit and created a surplus. he cut taxes, he cut regulations, and he put people back to work, which is what he's going to do for america when he's president. [applause] >> thank you. haven't cheated yet.
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>> you don't need it. [laughter] >> so a man who's ready to be commander in chief standing in this room, kind of looks like a boxing match, we need somebody who is ready to take it on. the challenges we face we've never seen before. we've got a man with leadership, with vision, with passion, and a proven track record. i want you to make some noise get excited for the next president of the united states, governor john kasich! [applause] gov. kasich: wow, i've got to tell you, you guys have a great mayor here, don't you?
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young, articulate, a good leader. how old are you? >> 32. gov. kasich: and what is your experience that it took you to the mayor? >> i sent out a five-year plan. i had worked on campaigns. i managed political campaigns worked for a software company selling management software, other things, had a five-year plan, i set out what i want to accomplish, and it has been a blessing. gov. kasich: how many people do you represent estimate -- represent? >> 38,000. gov. kasich: i think you've got an up and comer. have a seat. well it's such a nice -- who made these signs? i thought somebody might have paid you for them.
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resist the rage. research, think. that is like a think tank or something, isn't it? research? no, we like the signs. you are all very nice to come out here and cram in here and we want to make sure that we take your questions. i had a really interesting day. i flew into pittsburgh last night. and this morning, i went to this place called the duquesne club. when i was a very fancy schmancy --when i was a kid, we used to take a bus to downtown pittsburgh and then we would kind of walk to the different stores, my buddies and i, and we would go past this duquesne club , and there was always a red carpet in front of the duquesne club, and there was a general was always station there.
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and we would walk by and we would look like this, like, wonder what goes on in there. and then we would all salute the general. i found out 25 years later he was the doorman. [laughter] [applause] gov. kasich: honestly. so now i've been there a couple times and we had some events and then we went to this place called the oyster house, which has been there for 125 or 130 years. they wanted to take me to some retail place, so i said the oyster house. i got to see some people who i literally hadn't seen in about 30 years. they came and gathered and i looked around, and what a country we have.
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what an amazing country. [applause] gov. kasich:s a mailman. he carried mail on his back. his father was a coal miner. he died of black lung and as he was getting older, he was losing his eyesight. there was nobody to stick up for my grandmother. my mother's mother could barely speak english. i remember the night she was taken from our home and she didn't survive the attack she had. she could barely speak english. my mother was one of four kids and she was the only one to have regulated from high school -- have graduated from high school and really the only one to have gotten out of the eighth grade. my mother and father are gone, but i had some relatives there today, and we all look at one another and we are amazed. and i have to tell you that to have a beautiful crowd like this, to have people come and
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listen and eight signs and whatever, i'm really humbled by it. and i want you to know that i'm just like a normal guy in a big office ok, and i will be a normal guy in even bigger office if i would become president. [applause] gov. kasich: so i happen to believe that what i have been given in my life is -- i don't want to get anybody to sue uptight, -- too uptight but the lord has given me grace to do many things in my life. [applause] gov. kasich: so when that happens, if you recognize it, then you have to always try to honor that grace. and so for me, the thing that i've always been committed to is making sure that people like my
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grandfather -- there was a guy that lived catty corner from our house. he would go up in the morning and he would always have clean clothes and he would get in -- i don't remember, it was a van or a truck. he had a couple kids and a wife. she worked at the little bakery down the road, trying to make some money. he would come home at night usually later than my father or the other fathers in the neighborhood. he was basically a fix it man. he would come home and he would dirty. i think about how hard they worked. i think about how they need somebody to speak up with them. there's two things that bother people in our country right now. one is, people are worried about their jobs. can they keep their jobs and wages? can their wages go up?
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the other thing they worry about is their children's future. can our kids get an education and have a better life than what we have? many of you have sent your kids to school. they have an education but they are still at home. they can't seem to find their way. this is not that hard to fix. if we can remember that we are americans before republicans and democrats. [applause] gov. kasich: the problem that we have is, we have not had the leadership to get people to rise to a higher level than how they would normally warm -- normally perform if they have a governmental position. leaders get people to do better. if you think about some of the great leaders in our history if
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you take somebody was not even american, winston churchill, he would make these addresses when the bombs were basically falling on every neighborhood in london. somehow, he would say, we're never going to give up. people would come out of their homes. things would be destroyed. they would sweep the streets and weight for the next bombing. he had a magic about him where he could get people to rise to a higher level. we think about reagan, saint orn. [laughter] gov. kasich: i actually knew saint ron. we have created this caricature or this image of him that isn't true. he was a guy that was practical. he was a conservative but he could figure out a way to get things done and he could get people to lift themselves higher than what we normally do. anytime you think about great
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leaders, you think about sports figures, you talk about soldiers -- no matter who it is, they are people that can get people to perform at an extraordinary level. what i've noticed in government here for a wild is that we don't have the leaders to get people to do that. when you do that, it is like a flock without a shepherd. and if the shepherd doesn't guide the flock, the flock wanders around and things never work out the right way. there's another thing that i think we have to think about. i'm going to leave plenty of time for questions. and that is us. today in pittsburgh, because pittsburgh is like baltimore they are two sides to the same coin -- it is neighborhoods. it is ethnicity. there's a connection, a
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closeness to them. when i was a kid, and i've mentioned this before. our hero wasn't some politician. we had a lot of politicians that really didn't do a good job. a number of them where i grew up, a couple of them went to jail. they did. i went to my high school reunion and i had become a congressman. i was like, you know, you wear your best clothes , maybe youdye -- clothes, maybe you dye your hair. so i go to my reunion and i'm a congressman, pretty proud of myself. so i go in, the guy walks up to me, he says, johnny, i hear you are a congressman. i said, yeah. he said, i voted for you to be one of the most likely to
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succeed. what went wrong? [laughter] gov. kasich: now in the little neighborhood, our hero, one of them, was roberto clemente. he was a great baseball player. [applause] gov. kasich: in fact, i think clemente was on the team and we might have beat the orioles that time in the championship. i can't remember. [laughter] gov. kasich: but we love that guy. and i only saw my mother in her lifetime probably a couple times and one of them was the morning she came in to tell me that clemente had been killed in a plane crash headed to help people in nicaragua who had been victims of an earthquake. we think about what ails us and we have some politicians that want to talk about our worries and anxieties, and they want to feed them, say that america's
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losing on everything. are you kidding me? our economy is bigger than the japanese and chinese together. think about our life expectancy. think about our health care. think about nutrition. think about invention. the rest of the world tries to steal all of our stuff. but here's the thing that i want us to think about. the leader has to allow the people and the government to rise higher. when you take somebody like churchill or reagan, unique moment in time when they've been able to inspire the public to do better, to live life better than themselves -- i think i was flying here in new york. i can't remember. but i met these guys. they had an airplane. it was a small airplane. they got to talking to me. they were from long island.
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i had eaten my way all of us new york. they started talking to me. i said, what brings you here? they said, we do this young child who has cancer for treatment. there really was no way to get this done any other way. here, let me show you a picture. i said, why are you doing this? do you get paid? no. when you fly them down here, does somebody cover your expenses? we just take it out of our pocket. i said, why are you doing this? he said, i probably made 25, 30 flights for different people. is this your job? he said, it is not my job, but this is what i do. really touched me to listen to this guy talk. i always talk about us needing to live a life bigger than ourselves. let me get to the point.
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the spirit of our country doesn't lie in politicians. the spirit of our country lies in us. and somehow, over the last two years, -- few years, i don't know whether it is because we pay taxes or we lost confidence in ourselves, whether we have thought that, if i can't change the whole world, i shouldn't change any of it -- see, i happen to believe that we've all been made special and we all have a special gift. some people find that when they are 90. other people find it when they are young. but it is important we find it. when we find it, it has been given to us specially to do something special. so, folks, if we want better education for our kids, and i'll send all the federal money back here, but that is not what stops
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us from having great education. great education is in your hands. you have to ask yourself, are we preparing our young people for the jobs of today and tomorrow? people yelp about common core, about the department of education. there's nothing stopping you from being able to fix your schools if you want to. it is really hard to do, though. because as a school reformer, i can tell you, the first thing you have to do is to stand here and run as hard as you can into that wall. [laughter] gov. kasich: but whether we want to fix our schools is not up to -- it may be up to the mayor a little bit, but it is up to us. if you want to deal with the problem of drugs -- and there isn't anywhere in this country where i don't hear some -- it is more acute than it is in other places but the drug problem is unbelievable. it is in every home.
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not in every home, but every type of home. it is in every kind of neighborhood. it is in every city. you want to get rid of the drug problem? go do it. what are we waiting on. if a community decides to wipe out the drug problem, they will. speaking of pittsburgh, when i was a kid, you would come out in the evening and there would be a fine layer of dirt on every car. did you grow up there? you know what happens? the people of pittsburgh said, we are going to live like this anymore. there wasn't even a federal epa. they just made up their mind they were going to do it. they cleaned up the city. when you go there, it is a shining city. it is unbelievable. they didn't wait for the government. they just went and did it. the same is true about poverty.
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you have people are hungry. what we've got to do is get them trained. you've got to bring the business in the welfare office. when a person gets a welfare check, they get trained for a job. this is not hard. you want to fix your kids? you want to get your kids believing in something? mentor them. you don't have to wait to do this. in my city of cincinnati, they claim there is a 63% graduation rate. the businesses in cincinnati, in a high school in that system, they send their employees in for an hour a week a year. the graduation rate in that high school is 97%. [applause] gov. kasich: so if nothing else gets accomplished tonight, i
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want you to think about what you're supposed to be doing. maybe it is an entrepreneur that creates a small business that hires our families. maybe it is an entrepreneur that has the pressure to let somebody go that doesn't. is that changing the world is to mark i think it is. if you are a schoolteacher, the most underpaid people we know, they do this -- is he a schoolteacher? do you even have a drivers license? [laughter] gov. kasich: you are a schoolteacher? you look more like one. you know what the effect is? he gives up salary and he's doing it because he's changing a life. you are trying. or a nurse. how about these nurses? how many times ma'am, did you get done with your shift and put in another 20 minutes because there was a family down the hall? how many times? >> a lot.
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gov. kasich: a lot. you did it, right. the most important thing that a nurse needs, patience. don't ever forget that. [applause] gov. kasich: i'll be here all night. let me tell you one other thing. then we're going to get to the questions. so let's take -- i made this woman up as an example. a woman who's been married for 50 years, lost her husband. i made that woman up, and guess what, she's shown up a couple times now. she has. nobody calls her anymore. so you decide you're going to take that lady to dinner on saturday. what do you think she does on thursday? where does she go?
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oh no. there it was. >> she goes and gets her hair done. gov. kasich: and then when you see her on saturday, i don't know how they do it, there's not one hair out of place. and then when you pick her up, she wears a dress she hadn't worn in six months. did you change the world? i think you changed the world. so there's two levels, the leadership here, the leadership in the legislature, the school board and all that. we have to do our job. as president, my job is to raise everyone. i've done it before. we balanced the budget. why does that at her? we are $19 trillion in debt. when the debt goes up, the job opportunities go down. when the debt goes up, the job opportunities go down. any small business people here? what do you think?
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and he sits on his wallet? he can't hire anybody else. because he doesn't know what is going to happen. and you've got to get the taxes cut for small business. and you can't have crazy regulations killing this guy. you get to a point where you just say, i don't want to do this anymore. i'm trying to help people and the government is pounding me into the ground. 186-page federal -- boy, i wish i was your accountant. i could have made a lot of money on that. my view on small business, i hope the mayor is listening to this, open your doors. we will get to the rules later. just open up. that is what i believe. those are the people that can hire us. these things can be done. but it takes somebody to say, we have an obligation to improve
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people's lives. i've done it in washington and ohio area -- ohio. finally, a lot of people have said, why does he keep talking about what he did? well i'm a voter too. this person came to see me, wanted to be elected in my community, and i supported this person. i wish i hadn't. this person then turned around and raise all of our taxes. i think the best way you can tell what somebody is going to do is on the basis of what they've done. [applause] gov. kasich: so anyway, my guys are going to tell me i have to go sometime. i'm the only politician that says don't clap for me. anyway, that is about it.
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these things can be fixed. the country can be great, but it also rests in us. we've got to carve out a better future and more hopefulness for our kids and grandkids. let me take some questions. let me have some polite applause and then we can take some questions. [applause] gov. kasich: right here, sir. you bring there. >> [inaudible] gov. kasich: well, look, here is the thing that i really want you to know. let me tell you the greatest job is to be a pundit. let me tell you why.
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i was a little bit different and i'm going to explain to you mind if you just let me finish, ok? because you get paid for talking and it doesn't matter whether you know what you're talking about or not. it is the greatest job going. god created pundits to make astrologers look accurate. [laughter] [applause] gov. kasich: now, there are no for the convention. none have been created yet. even if they create rules, it doesn't matter, because you can be nominated for the floor at a national convention. here's what is happening. nobody is going to get enough delegates. the trump organization is complaining about all this and that because they know they are not going to get enough votes. so we are going to be deadlocked. and then what delegates are going to do is they are going to
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consider, i think fundamentally two things. this one is crazy. who can win in the fall? [applause] gov. kasich: now, i beat hillary consistently in every single national poll. [applause] gov. kasich: ok. and then they have this electoral thing, where these people, i don't know who they are, but they are apparently pretty respectable, they surveyed 40,000 people and charted out the electoral college. hillary smashed the two guys i'm running against and i beat hillary decisively. so they are going to look at this. if we pick somebody with very high negatives, which they have -- some people are angry, but
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ultimately, people don't like politicians who they don't like. they just don't. i've got to tell you, when i was governor, after my first year -- because i had to change everything -- when i was governor, we were 355,000 jobs down, $8 billion in the whole and i shook the state from top to bottom. people were like, what is this guy doing? i was at the end of my first year the most unpopular governor in america, but i didn't care about the polls. i didn't even want to go back into politics but i felt i had to. when i told my wife, she says, you were a congressman for 18 years, state senator for four years, you've been out 10 years and things are great. now you want to go back into the government.
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that is really just great, john. [laughter] gov. kasich: but the point is, it me a year to fix the negatives. then people began to see good results. we are now up for hundred 20,000 private sector jobs. -- 420000 jobs. the mentally ill, the drug addicted, all given a chance. i believe with economic growth comes opportunity for everyone. when the economy does better, we can help people who traditionally don't help. but when you have these skyhigh negatives, nobody is voting for you. it is interesting. my positives are the highest in the field, which is great. so i think the delegates are going to look and say, if we nominate somebody that is going to get crushed, we lose the supreme court, the senate,
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majorities in the state houses. it will be a wipeout. i know what it looks like when that wave comes at you. that is the number one thing they're going to think about. number two, this is even crazier than the first thing about can win in the fall. who can be president? they are going to think about that. [applause] gov. kasich: so i believe the delegates will look at that. i think they're going to my way. and there's one other thing. i'm the only one here with the positive message. i think the party ought to have a choice when it comes to that. [applause] gov. kasich: sir, let me recommend, if you like cooking, watch the cooking channel. if you like golf, watch the golf channel. keep off the news.
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it will put you in a bad mood. [laughter] gov. kasich: i didn't really mean it. yes ma'am? >> thank you. what is your plan for low income health care, and what are you going to do to expand, improve or do anything about it as a republican? gov. kasich: that is a good question. if we say we are going to get rid of obamacare and it throws tens of millions of people who don't have any insurance, how do you think that is going to go over? i'll give you a story. i was in maine, looking for a restaurant, and i had gone to see the governor. so i saw this guy and i interrupted and i said, have you lived here your own life? he said, not yet. anyway -- [laughter] gov. kasich: so i went -- he told me where the restaurant was
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and i saw this little shop. i thought i could buy something for my wife. this lady looks at me and says, who are you? i said i'm just here on business. she says, ok. i said, by the way, what do you think of your governor? she said, i hate him. i said, why is that? she said, i spent my whole life trying to get health care and know that i have it, the republicans want to take it away. think about this for a second. could you imagine not having health care? you would lose everything you have if you get sick. but obama care is not the answer. there's three reasons why it is not. number one, the cost of medicine is still going through the roof. number two, the cost of health insurance has gone up by an average of 80%. number three, small business people don't want to expand because they are afraid they are going to get caught in it.
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i would get rid of it except for one provision. nobody should be denied health insurance because they have a pre-existing condition. [applause] gov. kasich: in addition to that, i think we can take some federal resources, combine it with medicaid, which i want to send back to the state, and you could create an exchange. you could get the working the health care that they need. but that is not the end of it. because we have to control these costs. this is very complicated, but here's what we are doing in a nutshell. we want total transparency. we want to know what our hospitals charge and we want to know their quality. we don't know any of this. we don't know why. i got a hospital bill the other day for high pressure in my eyes. i give it to my wife and said, we have the dead sea scrolls
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here. it would be easier for me to understand them than this hospital bill. we don't know what doctors are charging, or what their quality is. all we do know is our deductibles are going through the roof. what we are doing, actually doing in our state, the seventh-largest state in the country, is with this information, and the transparency of hospitals and doctors, we're going to force them to compete, the market system themselves, by making sure that we reward people who have lower prices and high quality. so if you have a primary care doctor and the primary care doctor keeps you healthy for a year, we will give him or her a financial payment for having driven down the cost of your health insurance. has to be high quality and lower prices.
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right now, all the pressure is to raise health care. if the pressure comes to be high quality at lower prices, then we begin to control these rising costs of health insurance. i didn't just create this out of the blue. we have every major hospital system and insurance provider in the state involved in this. while i told them is, we will have a meeting, but you decide. a hospital like the cleveland clinic is involved in these decisions. i want to make sure we put downward pressure on health care so one more time, you go to the hospital, you get quality service at a lower price. you don't know about the readmission rate. know becomes clear we become consumers. we control our health care better. the nobody's going on. that is the direction i think we need to go in this country. [applause] gov. kasich: alright are those
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crayons? >> i teach fifth grade. it was a gift from a student. i am in the teacher's lounge talking politics. gov. kasich: that is not a good thing to be doing. >> everytime i bring your name up, they say you pay the teachers lounge. my students want to know what your favorite topping on pizza. [laughter] gov. kasich: let me handle the hardest one first. [laughter] gov. kasich: pepperoni. [applause] gov. kasich: here is what i think, this is -- go back and thell -- tell them. i was at this education summit and somebody said if you
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hurricane, what would you do. i said i would eliminate teachers lounges. somebody said why? because teachers many times by a union that is hostile they pound the teachers down and say i will take a pay and your benefits. am i right? that is what you hear over and over again. we expect them to go out and teach our kids. i'm thinking, literally figuratively, if we didn't have those lounges, where people were just make each other feel bad. but there were going to lose their job, their pay, or everything else, then it would be better. i think we need to be able to measure howdoing. i think we need to hold our teachers up. that is because they are with our specials. i have two 16-year-old
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daughters. i was on anderson cooper with them -- [applause] gov. kasich: one of them anderson asked if she wanted to go into politics. she said may become a but i want to make a lot of money first. [laughter] gov. kasich: you see what i am saying this is all under your control. i will send a hundred four federal programs back to the state. i do not believe that we are currently having a flexible education system where we use common sense, get kids out into the community so they can sample occupations. i am not convinced we are training them for the jobs of today and tomorrow. i will give you a good example. i know you have to take a foreign language. i would have rather, instead of taking spanish rather have
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taken the language of the computers. that will be a lot more valuable. i'm not expected to be some sort of a spanish diplomat. i would love to learn how to use the computer. we are not very flexible in schools. to me, we have to shake the system. i will give you a story about something. we have a town in a file called youngstown that has had a very hard time. it is doing pretty well now. the youngstown city schools, and the last nine years, has had a college ready rate of all the students of 1%. so i passed through the legislature this provision that says of a school fails three years in a row than i can appoint a body that rides over the school board. school boards can be very political.
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to straighten this out, why did i do this? where did i get this from? the mayor of cleveland came to see me with the teachers union, and the business community. they asked me to make the superintendent of the school the ceo of the school. they said that this guy could change the whole operation because the schools were not performing. i liked that idea. i think we should put kids first. nine straight years that they had only 1% college ready when i passed this legislation. they sued me, to block this. what were they thinking? they lost the court case. we will move forward, and fix those schools. we will stick up for kids. that shouldn't be going on in our country. what happens to those kids that don't have a good education?
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i don't think we should let anything stand between us and our children when it comes to giving them the skills they need to get a job. and of story. [applause] -- end of story. [applause] gov. kasich: thank you. in these meetings, some of you are always lobbying for somebody. it was a lobbyist think take him, take him, go ahead. >> i can't a lot about renewable energy i know the maryland right now is thinking about increasing our renewable energy standard here. in ohio, the state legislature has actually put a freeze on the energy standard. i know you're not against it. i wonder if you will, as governor, keep supporting increasing energy standard. as president, how would you continue to do that? gov. kasich: i do believe there
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was climate change and i do believe that we impacted the climate. so do a lot of other countries a lot more than we do. what can we do about it? we can promote efficiency. greater efficiency in everything and all of our buildings. the second thing we can do is promote renewables, solar, wind geothermal. i love the tesla, the battery car. when we get battery technology that is really transformative it will transform our lives. let me tell you the other problem. you can mandate anything you want. that doesn't mean you can achieve it. you play golf? you play baseball? do you pitch? i want you to get out on the mound and mandate you throw the ball 100 miles power. can you do it?
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no, you can't [laughter] gov. kasich: well, i don't know. and somebody will say he was thing that came to down. [laughter] gov. kasich: but i did meet the next kyl -- cal ripken, is he here? come up here kiddo. [applause] gov. kasich: i will demonstrate something. what is your name, again? jake ok, i want you to take your stance. ok? see, he is in perfect position. he is the weight on the back foot, let's your follow-through. that is the next cal ripken. [applause]
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gov. kasich: so, i want to go back. you can't throw at 100 miles per hour. politicians that the standard at a level we cannot to meet. that means we would have to buy out-of-state power which will drive up the cost for heavy industry. i would like to get more manufacturing, we are up over 60,000 manufacturing jobs in ohio since i have come in. the problem was, legislature got carried away. our standard was to percent or 25% and they wanted to just get rid of it. i said we will reset it to fit the economy of ohio. i believe you can have environmental protection and economic growth if you just use common sense and try to figure it out. that is all that is going on now. if they try to kill it, we will
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go back to the unattainable number that was set. that is called leverage. i have leverage. i think it will work itself out. i don't want to worship the environment, but i do want to take care of it. we need to be picked for our children, and other grandchildren. we had this beautiful bay here, are you kidding? we are in an annapolis. nevertheless, this is great. this is a beautiful place. we don't want to lose it. i hope that answers your question. by the way, i have been told that the governor erlich, my buddy, is here tonight. where is bob? [applause]
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gov. kasich: i just want to write out that half the room did not stand. -- point out that half the room did not stand. [laughter] gov. kasich: he is a good friend of mine. another good friend of mine is here. [applause] gov. kasich: come here for one second. once in a while, even billy graham had testimony from someone else once in a while. this is my great pal and we served together on the budget committee when we balance the budget. this is unbelievable, he moved to new hampshire to help me campaign. he lives close to hear. he lives in saint michaels. he went to new hampshire and spent a month up there. then he had to go overseas. i was happy because his wife took his place.
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why don't you talk a little bit about our time together. >> the first thing i will say is, i have probably attended 50 town hall meetings. the thing i am most struck with john this is the most important town hall meeting for you. everything he says tonight is fresh, and alive. what you have done for him is make him feel so special. you make him feel so appreciated. i just love this town hall meeting, and love being here with all of you. the point i make to you is that john can get you to do things you don't think you can do. i'll number when i was in the budget committee, the first budget 30 of us supported. it just kept growing. he walks in with his arm around a democrat and says we're going to pass a balanced budget. we will do it with the help of the democrats. i thought yeah, right, john. we did it, and we did it four
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years in a row. the bondholders are used to sell were unhappy because we were buying them back. we were paying back a debt. the point i would make to you is , everything you see is for real. i ache thinking that he has to even explain to people why he should be president when i see who he is running against, and i said the opportunity we have. john, you are the best. [applause] gov. kasich: that was exactly the way that i wrote it. that was perfect. [laughter] >> hi governor kasich, thanks for coming to maryland to meet with us. the first thing i want to say is, thank you. for the last several elections
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i haven't felt like there has been a candidate with integrity. it is always we're voting for the lesser of evils. you're the first person in many years -- [applause] >> so -- [applause] gov. kasich: i am just a slob trying to make it through. do the best you can. the great thing about our lord is that we get a mulligan every day to clean up our act. i will do the best that i can. don't get carried away. [laughter] >> all right. i have questions. with health care, everybody focuses on low income health care, then there is the upper class that can afford to pay for health care. somewhere in the middle is the middle class. my husband is self-employed, we pay $14,000 or $15,000 a year
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just in premiums for an hmo that we don't use much. it seems like we are working to pay for the what if's in the health. my first question would be, what is your plan? gov. kasich: that will deal with downward pressure. because then your husband is going to be able to shop and a more effective way for better quality, at lower prices. that is what it really gets down to. we have had experience. you are right about this, particularly for the lowest income folks that get medicaid. the upper income folks get what they want. i have to tell you, i know a lot of people very wealthy and they have very bad health outcomes. i think some of it is connected that we really don't understand what is out there for us. the more transparency, the more clarity -- when we go to the store we know what everything
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costs. with health care, we don't know what anything costs, or if it works. why don't we just change that? > what are the top two or three things -- yes, that you would like to see as your legacy that you helped all levels of americans from low, middle, and upper? gov. kasich: first of all, we have to have economic growth. i was in baltimore, i guess last week. i was talking about so many of the problems that we have seen. somebody said to me, if we had job opportunities, most of these problems would go away. if i am the doctor of job growth, and you come to me and say what do i do to get job
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growth? i say don't over regulate and kill this guy's business, and cut his taxes. small businesses in ohio don't pay any income tax by the way. we just figured it out. thirdly, -- isn't that amazing? we cut taxes by $5 billion. now we have a $2 billion plus and up 300,000 jobs. this is not that complicated. you just have to figure it out. finally, you have to have a fiscal plan. you can put your budget together with bailign wire. -- bailing wire. that is what we did when we balance the budget. that formula works. if you come back to me and to you aren't feeling for about an say what did you do? and say i regulate you out of business and raise everybody's
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taxes and blew off the budget because everybody is doing things wrong and we don't know what went wrong. we have a lousy growth in this country, first is to get the growth. second you have to transform your schools. let me see, when this guy and i were in school, we had kids onin our classroom that put their heads down on the desk. remember that? they graduate, and they get a job in the steel mill. they make decent money. those jobs don't exist anymore. the question is -- are we training kids for the new type of jobs? i was in somewhere, and they were talking about utica, new york, where they are losing their oreo factory. isolate me ask you a question, what would you rather make oreo cookies, or computer chips?
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i would rather make computer chips, but we have to have a workforce that is trained to do it. what i said to is so critical. our education system, we need to honor the high school guidance counselor. the guidance counselor is supposed to find out what our kids are supposed to do and help them to get to where they want. in our colleges and universities, the need to have academic advisors that -- that consider young student, a young man or a young woman, what do you want to be? then you start directing them. did you get this class, did you take that class? these would transform education. then i think that on welfare -- look i will give you my philosophy. it was my mother's. it is equally a sin to keep helping somebody who needs to learn to help themselves. [applause]
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gov. kasich: listen, our inner cities -- it is tough. you know,w hat i say about education and lifting people is really critical. getting people trained for jobs and things like vocational education for those that don't want to go to a 4-year school. it is so important to lift those people. we need to have adult education education has to be all of our lifetime so we remain current. and we acquire skills. i have to also tell you in some of our homes, he will tell you in some of our homes there are kids that wake up in the morning and are afraid to go outside because they hear gunshots. that is a tough situation to fix. we are not giving up on those kids. those boys and girls deserve a future as well. you know, the problem of this
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deep poverty is a challenge we have to focus on. but he is the answer, the small business person that can come into the community. and, there is also an opportunity to push people out of the ditch. i like to say if you're driving on the road and it is snowy, you pull over and help somebody get out of a ditch. it every time you turn around there any ditch you kind of lose interest. but there is a time when you have to help push them out. i would like to see more engaged and spirited population. i would like to see all of us caring more about one another and getting back to an american consensus about our responsibility to ourselves, and our neighbors. i think that is important as well. you can't do that by writing laws. also, we have to lead the world. if we do not these barbarians
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are -- they are after us. we have to destroy them, and bring the world together will stop. so those kinds of people cannot prosper any longer. we have to rebuild the military and lead the world. [applause] gov. kasich: one other thing -- i know we have to go but i have to do more here. i was in new york. we stopped at this little deli. a woman said i saw that you were here. i said -- that's great. she came over and said that "i am sick of this foreign aid." so i asked her i said, when there is an earthquake, and a
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country gets destroyed, do you think we should help them? "oh, yeah." i said "okay." secondly, when we put our troops in japan and korea maybe do you think we're doing that for them? she said i never thought of it that way. i said that helps us. if we have troops in europe, and we will put more there, and are putting a message to putin that you will not invade any more countries, them or us? [applause] gov. kasich: these simplistic solutions to the problems that we have -- i was in pittsburgh today. you know what trump said? "i am going to bring the still
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and should back to pittsburgh." great, and everybody that goes to pittsburgh is going to be a billionaire. everybody here is going to on their own hotel, great, isn't it? what i worry about ifs the drift. if hillary or bernie would be elected, the debt would be $30 trillion. i tell these young people on the college campuses, ok, you want to get a job? $30 trillion in national debt, i don't think you're going to get a good job. the other have never accomplish anything. what are we going to do, drift? can we fix a security? piece of cake. you will still get social security, but you will not get as much as you thought your going to get. at the lady who totally depends
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on it you're going to get what she needs. that is number one, number two you want to balance the budget? let me show you something. let me have that. see this? my children a number of years ago, we were on vacation. they said what is that box over there? i said that is where superman changes his clothes. [laughter] gov. kasich: i said mom and dad used to put coins in that make a phone call. and they were like "no way." sopo think about this, everythign is changing -- everything is changing. a time comes when you will be monitored at home rather than going to the doctors. transportation, you can go from one part of manhattan to the other for nothing and you don't
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even go in a taxi anymore. you use uber or lyft or one of these other groups. they say will have flying cars, i completely believe it because i saw "chitty -chitty-bang-bang." we can complain about medicine my uncle george came to the duquesne club today to see me. he is 90 years old. i said that you walk today, he said yep, two miles. pick a but everything in our country. i mention this earlier. when business does not change, it dies. when government does not change, we get punished. we have to think about bringing innovation and excitement to the way the world works. that is the 21st century. all of those things put together can lift us. let me just tell you, we aren't going anywhere but up if we get
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this done. if we drift -- if we drift -- it is going to be a problem. and i get more phones htis way -- this way. [laughter] gov. kasich: let me just say to all of you, we are competing here in your great state. i even let the maryland basketball team beat ohio state a couple of times this year. [laughter] gov. kasich: depending on how the primary goes will look at the football program. i have got to go because i have to head into d.c. or somewhere. or -- look at this. >> thanks for fighting for us. gov. kasich: look at this. [applause]
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>> you voted against me on that 1 -- [laughter] gov. kasich: give me a high five. [applause] [chatter]
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>> i told them that you will be the next president. gov. kasich: thank you. >> can i take a picture with you? gov. kasich: oh yeah. we have to get them turned around. >> can i get one? >> thank you for fighting for us. gov. kasich: thank you, and i were veterans. >> i always voted for you. gov. kasich: thank you, i hope you enjoyed it.
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>> going door-to-door, that is all that matters. >> can you take a picture for us? >> i am from ohio. i am part of a grassroots, nonprofit organization. i want to know -- my son's treatment. we have been saving lives here. i want to know, the 60 million that you dedicated to heroin, is any of it going to organizations.
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we're doing more to help the addicts? i am here with my husband. i had a nervous breakdown. i am fighting. i am a mother that won't quit. that is why we are saving lives. i have been through three of these myself. gov. kasich: you know what? i know so many people like you. >> we need -- hey, you know, we can pray all we want to. until we get these doctors -- you knwo that a first year doctor can only have 10
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patients? after the first year, he can have 50. we have more than that. mcgovern county's number two in the country. gov. kasich: we are shutting down pill mills. >> good, good, but they are still dying. in the mcdonald's. gov. kasich: i know, let me tell you something. the number of prescriptions now of opiates has trapped. >> we know that, we know that, we have been there. will you speak at our rally? gov. kasich: here? >> in dayon ohio. gov. kasich: is this for me?
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>> i am a veteran of the navy. gov. kasich: where is he going to go? what i would tell you is we have to take down isis. i really want to come home. and let them sort it out once we get there. i can tell you this -- he is pro ud of what he is doing. >> i will hold ouyou to your word. gov. kasich: i understand. i have to go.
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>. for my class./ >> thank you real quick for my class. thank you for the question. >> thanks, governor. gov. kasich: i have a lot of people. >> did you get it? >> i would tell them all about you. gov. kasich: thank you, thank
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you. >> there you go. [indiscernible] gov. kasich: do you know her? i did, where? >> can i get a picture? gov. kasich: we have to get a picture here. of course. >> mr. governor? >> thank you very much. don't give up.
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>> go get them, governor. >> madam secretary, who proudly give 72 of our delegate votes to the next president of the united states. ♪ [chanting] [cheers and applause] ♪ [captioning performed by the national captioning institute, which is responsible for its caption content and accuracy. visit ncicap.org] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2016] >> this month we showcase our studentcam winner. it is an annual video
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competition for middle and high school students. this year's theme is word to the whitehouse. students were asked, what issues do a presidential candidates to discuss? one of our second prize middle school winners is from clinton new jersey. zachary kesselhaut, an eighth grader at clinton township middle school, wants president of candidates to discuss cyber warfare and cyberattacks. his video is titled "cyberwarfare: the next big problem.” >> ladies and gentlemen. >> you are not going to be able to insult the greatest presidency. >> the affordable care act. >> the candidate. >> for president. >> of the united states. >> we are going to. >> earn your vote. >> to make our country great again.
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>> the 2016 election is coming up fast. candidates are rising and falling quickly. their platforms mainly concentrate on social and economic issues, but none of them have mentioned what could be the biggest issue ever as a country. ♪ >> everyone agrees, computers have made our lives easier and we are more connected as a human race than ever before. computers are organizing our lives, connecting the world and even saving lives. however, are dependence on technology is not without risks. since the invention of computers, sump people have used them maliciously. the problems of gotten so bad there is a growing demand for specialists in the field of cyber protection and defense. >> there are many different types of cyber defense. they vary depending on the industry. >> most people have heard about cyber fraud, which attack the
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person individually through identity theft or invasion of private information, including but not limited to, bank accounts. every computer that is connected to the internet is vulnerable. one of the most common attacks is called a denial of service or eos attacks. these attacks shut down an individual computer's ability to access the internet. these attacks are more widespread and frequent. it's attacks can happen to anyone or anything at anytime. edos attacks shut down an entire network. there is a potential range of attacks that is huge. a good happen to your home, your friend's minecraft server, your business, or even our banking system. another type of attack is that the business for corporate level. >> small businesses need to be concerned because whether you are a pizzeria or you or walmart, technology drives just
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about everything within any company. >> in 1998, a 12 you a boy successfully hacked -- 12-year-old boy successfully hacked into computer systems. he could have opened the floodgates and dumped nearly 500 billion gallons of water on the arizona cities of mesa. fortunately, he did not. >> this is only one incident of how vulnerable our computer-based systems are. >> of your systems are a type of industrial control system. >> they are the core of many manufacturing processes. >> it is what you give to industrial systems or power plants, things that need to be regulated. it could be a dam, a power plant, a machine. >> in october of 2014, researchers found 25 vulnerabilities in the
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system, the most alarming of which is that most systems still use the default password sent by the manufacturer, which can be easily found by anyone who knows how to operate google. >> that was easy. >> according to "security week magazine" the number of attacks doubled. in 2009, the u.s. cyber command was formed. this group fights on a different battlefield, the internet. >> they have been given a responsibility to direct operate, and secure the department's networks, which are fundamental to the execution of missions. >> since 2014, the funding has dropped to about $460 million. that is the loss of over $80 million. the u.s. cyber command are becoming more important. because as technology evolves, so does the possibility of a cyber attack. >> when we look at the problem
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such as cyber security, as we go forward in time as we get more advanced, cyber security gets more complicated. a lot of the challenges our jurisdictional. it is all good for a u.s. president or a eu leader to make any changes they want in their own country. >> a computer worm allegedly developed by israel and the net united states shows that an international cyber war is now a very real possibility. >> such is a virus that is targeted towards data. again, think of the oil industry, the gas industry, all
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the different industries that use automated control processes to operate. what the attack against iran brought to attention is the realization that our critical infrastructure needs to be better protected. >> i think it is critical for our president and for any candidates and potential presidents to be familiar with cyber security. i don't think they need to be experts. you want to be knowledgeable enough about the topic to identify people who really know what they are talking about. >> the american public should know that all presidential candidates have a good and solid plan to defend our nation against these types of attacks. >> imagine if the grid was shut down with no access to your technology, how would it disrupt your life? cyber warfare is an effort to attack our way of life personal, national, and even on a global level.
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the possibilities could be catastrophic. cyber warfare has no geographic, cultural, or political boundaries and no moral compass. if we don't prepare, the future of the humanity is in jeopardy. this demands a basic understanding from our next american president. technology companies introduce new products and platforms as "the next big thing," but little attention is given to cyber warfare, the next big problem. >> to watch all the prize-winning documentaries, visit studentcam.org. >> president obama attends his
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final white house correspondents dinner at the end of the month. comedy central larry whitmore will be the featured entertainer. i would love coverage start april 30 right here on c-span. >> american history tv on c-span3 this weekend. on the civil war, discussing his book "the myth of the lost cause." he talks about the thames by confederates to justify their mission, and their defeat. >> southerners felt compelled to explain why it was that this devastation had occurred. for example, 25% of southern white men between the age of 20 and 45 were dead. not just casualties, they were dead as a result of the civil war. >> sunday morning in 1988
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campaign of democratic candidate gary hart that the gamut of former colorado senator announcing his candidacy in denver. then a new hampshire news conference where he faced questions about a potential extramarital affair. sunday evening at 6:00, on american artifacts. the life of civil rights activist and her involvement in the farmworkers movement. >> a reason to send anyone but her to negotiate the contracts. she was at the forefront of that effort for a reason. it is interesting. when you hear about this, they always talk about -- >> he just said those partners
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of mine did any of them invite me to play golf at their fancy country clubs? did any of them invite me to their club? he just goes on, and on. that is one of the few times that i was so close to him. he was a very well contained very disciplined demand. he even update then -- erupted tenhen. he hated them for it. >> a former nixon deputy associate reflect only former president's personality and policy from watergate to vietnam. for the complete american history tv schedule go to www.c-span.org.
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>> it has been reported that the extremist group isis has been selling cultural materials in the middle east. we hear from the director of the u.s. committee of the blue shields who is mission is to protect international cultural property during armed conflict. also testifying, the author of the book the monuments men and why heroes and the greatest treasure hunt in history. this is a house financial services task force meeting. it is investigating terrorist financing.
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>> the title of today's meeting is called " preventing cultural genocide." all members who a five legislative days to submit extraneous measures for inclusion in the record. without objection, members of the full committee may participate in today's hearing for the purpose of making an opening statement and questioning the witnesses. the chernow recognizes himself for three minutes for an opening statement. i want to thank everyone for joining us today. agian, i would like to thank the chairman and the ranking members
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for their unwavering support as we continue to investigate the threat of terror finance. since it has surfaced, isis has remained different in its diversified revenue string pulling in funds from ransoms to oil production. one of the most discussed methods has been the selling of monuments from syria, and iraq. iraqi officials believed they could generate its much is $100 million from a sale and trafficking of antiquities alone. recent events have attributed this exclusively to them, but make no mistake the plunder of art and antiquities has rightly been utilized by transnational groups operating around the world. it has been estimated that the prophet of the traffic and sale of these cultural properties may range between $3.4 billion and
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$6.4 billion annually. this will continue to be a global problem which requires a coordinated international efforts to combat. this issue hits close to home. the fbi has credible reports d cultural property that has appeared to have been removed from syria. the united states must do its part to cover the demand for these cultural and artistic pieces by taking another look at cultural due diligence and improving coordination with our international partners. this is a revenue stream exploited by illicit acts around the world. it cannot continue unabated. i believe that today's hearing with its expert panel of witnesses will help illustrate the scale and severity of this issue as well as offering measures to best combat this despicable practice. this time a the to recognize the task force's ranking member mr. lynch from massachusetts. mr. lynch: thank you, mr.
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chairman. i would like to welcome and thanks our distinguished panel of experts this morning for helping our task force with this important work. today's hearing will focus on how the united states can counter the plunder and sale of prices cultural antiquities by the -- priceless cultural antiquities by isis and others. this is analogous to those we have seen concerns relating to trade based in money laundering. to cut off the flow of financing, we need better information sharing on all fronts. this includes improvement between government agencies countries, and the private sector. we need to track the owners of property whether it is an ancient artifact or a high-rise
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apartment building. we need to cut the trade routes that they use, and trade transparency for proper customs enforcement. that is the same strategy we need to combat antiquities trafficking can be used in a broader scale to also combat isis. the task force discussed the roots that isis used. we learned many of these routes run through turkey and jordan. yaya indicated isis is using similar roots, and in addition knows that lebanon as well as the balkan route are being used to smuggle antiquities and other illicit commodities. currently, there is ample opportunity for terroristic groups to exploit these with low risk of being caught. we need to do a better job of policing these roots so isis can no longer smuggle antiquities
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out of territory that it controls. furthermore, we must curtail the laundering of antiquities to make it out of isis controlled territory so these cannot be integrated into legitimate markets. as lawrence and patty mentioned isis's ability to profit is only because of his systematic problem of trade based money laundering in the art industry. we need to bring together greater rules of transparency to this industry so that antiquities trafficking is no longer profitable for terrorist organization. as the doctor suggests, we should require export declarations worth more than $10,000. also consider a tariff on imports of these items. i look forward to hearing the testimony of our witnesses.
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i yield back the balance of my time. >> i now recognize the vice-chairman of the task force mr. pittenger of north carolina. mr. pittenger: thank you for your diligence on these issues. as well as our professional staff, for assembling such an esteemed group of witnesses we have here today. over the last year, we have gained important insight into the threats facing our nation -- how they are funded, and the many obstacles we face. recently, i had the opportunity to travel to south america to witness firsthand the problems they faced with regard to illicit financing operations in the emerging presence of iran, hezbollah and others. i was inspired by the dedicated officials in argentina and paraguay combating sophisticated
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criminal networks. we must continue working with these countries, and sharing our on research and expertise to ensure these countries do not do -- become overwhelmed by criminal or terrorist and the stations. today, we addressed isis's benefit into antiquity sales. isis remains the world's most dominant and barbaric terror organization. it is the objective of the nine states to degrade, and the defeat isis. while this administrations overall strategy remains questionable, both parties can agree that stopping the flow of dollars to fund isis must remain a top priority. congress is signaling the important of identifying each element of the financing. whether it be extortion cross-border cash smuggling trade based money laundering, or antiquity sales. thank you, mr. chairman, for holding this important hearing. i yeild back.
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>> i recognize the gentle and from arizona. ms. sinema: terror is it is an underlying threat -- undeniable threat. they find new ways to fund the deadly operations. the islamic state is one of the world's most violent and well-financed terroristic groups. within the past yearm, amid greater pressure, they ratcheted up the extraction sale of antiquities to fund its militant violence. in 2015, it generated millions of dollars from trafficking antiquities. it also could require permits from criminal smugglers who operate in their territory. the impact of these actions goes beyond the financing of terrorism. it is also part of their apocalyptic worldview in which anything outside of its perverse and disgusting version of islam's must be destroyed.
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these historical treasures -- their loss is a tragedy. you must cut off funding and stop this. i look forward to hearing from our witnesses about this. i yield back. >> we now welcome our witnesses, mr. robert edsel is our first witness today. he is the author of many books. he is coproducer the documentary film "the rape of europa." most famously, academy award winner george clooney directed and starred in a film based on his book "the monument's men." raised in dallas, texas come he from st. mark's school of taxes in southern methodist university.
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he was awarded a texas medal of arts a board -- award. in 2014 he was presented with the records of achievement award from the foundation to the national archives which recognizes an individual whose work has fostered a broader national awareness of the identity of the united states through the use of original records. mr. yaya fanusie the director of the foundation for defense of democracies. he was a counterterrorism analyst in the cia were he regularly briefed white house of a policy makers, military personnel, and federal law enforcement. he works in a small consulting firm where he led a team of analysts working on a million dollar -- million dollar recovery effort involving a global corruption ring. his and operated his own
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specializing in judy chu analysis. yaya received an ma in international affairs. and a ba and economic from uc berkeley. dr. patty gerstenblith is a distinguished professor at the depaul university school of law. she is founding president of the lawyers committee for cultural preservation. and the director of the u.s. committee of the blue shield. senior adviser to the aba's art and cultural heritage committee. in 2011, she was appointed to serve as the chair of the president's cultural property committee in the u.s. department of state. previously, she was editor in chief of the journal of cultural property. she received her bachelor from bryn mawr college, phd in heart
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history -- art history from harvard university. -- i san associate professor at shawnee state university. he's an associate professor of history and apology, indicated in the u.k., reading archaeology of western asiatics in london and graduating with a doctoral degree in 1991. he was the director of scientific and conservation laboratories at the general department of antiquities in syria, and taught at the university of damascus until 2006. from 2006 till 2009, he was assistant professor at brigham young university. he's an active member of the syrian opposition and source on the executive committee of the day after project. mr. -- is chairman of the title insurance corporation, a division of the nasdaq traded arguo group.
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his corporation is the world leader andin securing ownership of non-real estate assets from multiple industry sectors. he regularly advises speaks, and writes internationally on legal title risks inherent in the global art and collectibles market for a range of industry stakeholders and participants. he holds a bachelors from the university of wisconsin madison and a juris doctorate from emory university school law. the witnesses will now webe recognized to give an oral presentation of your written remarks. without objection the written statements will be made part of the record. once each of the witnesses have finished presenting the testimony, members of the task force will have five minutes within which to ask questions. on your table, there are three lights. yellow means you have one minute remaining, red means your time is up.
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we'd ask the witnesses to make sure you please speak directly into it. with that, you're recognize for five minutes. >> thank you sir. >> can you turn the microphone on, please? >> i'd like to extend my thanks to mr. fitzpatrick, mr. lynch, and members of the task force for including me in these important deliberations. evidence that isis has sanctioned the looting of antiquities to generate terrorism is a game changer. it compels us to think about the ownership of art the responsibility of the art trade and the role of federal government differently than ever before. we cannot say we weren't warned. as recently as 1981, nathan hammond, the only monument officer to see duty in italy and germany, and an important advisor to general eisenhower, urged all those willing to listen "planners for future
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hostilities tend to think in terms of the last conflict, but any consideration of the different ways in which the first and second world wars were fought demonstrates the fallacy of such an approach. if this generation wishes to leave to his children the cultural treasures that it has enjoyed, such planning should be encouraged." his warning went unheeded, but as events in iraq in 2003 and more recently in syria have painfully demonstrated, he was right. the monuments men saw firsthand that the destruction of cherished artistic and religious treasures is the starter gun that precedes genocide and the human suffering the follows. it proved true enough to germany, in bosnia and al qaeda controlled areas of afghanistan and mali, and now in syria and iraq. ignoring this early warning sign denies our nation the chance to act.
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we can only react. organizations charged with conserving our cultural heritage are instead relegated to bearing witness to its destruction. steps we as a nation have taken to protect our homeland following september 11 have not kept pace with developments of the art world, nowhere near. today, art is synonymous with money. the global explosion of wealth has created more buyers with greater resources chasing prized objects. prices have skyrocketed. consider that a painting by picasso that sold by for $180 million. a sculpture went for $141 million. a drawing by rafael one for $150 million. the sums are staggering and yet regulatory authorities have not created and applied the same level of control procedures in art markets as we have in other
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areas of. this creates a weakness that isis and others, can exploit. the very profitability of art and antiques and sometimes they relatively small size, facilitates movement, sometimes into hiding places out of you by tax authorities. just last week, the panama papers leak revealed that a nazi looted painting worth upwards of $25 million, was among thousands of works of art stored in special tax zones. while this art does provide privacy for the honest the lack of transparency also cloaks thieves and those aiding isis's business operation of converting cultural treasures to cash to fund terrorism. the art trade is a largely self
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regulated, antiquated business model, operating in the digitized near invisible world. until the advent of the internet in the late 1990's, few in the art world paid attention to providenceenance unless that enhance the value of the object. looted art traded hands, some of it openly, although there has been improvement in the scrutiny of objects sold at public auction. but there remains a high degree of willful ignorance by some collectors eager to add to their collection. worse still is their lack of knowledge about the history of what they already own. some don't want to know. who can be against in fusing the world with increased transparency? tax cheats? those who possess stolen works of art? smugglers? terrorism networks? privacy alone cannot be an argument for doing nothing when the stakes for the common good are so high. in closing the policy of the
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western allies in the work of the monuments men established the high bar for the protection of cultural treasures during times of conflict. it was the source of pride for general eisenhower, who said it is our privilege to pass on to the coming centuries treasures of past ages. what then, will be our legacy? >> you're now recognized for five minutes. >> thank you, good morning. chairman, ranking member, members of the task force on behalf of the defense worse for defense of democracy, thank you for the opportunity to testify. before delving into the issue of islamic state antiquities trafficking, it's important to clarify how the trade fits into isis's overall economic goals. one way to understand the goals is to look at some of the strategies guiding the group's actions. one of isis's aims is to win over locals who may be on the fence about submitting to jihadist role. this gives context to the
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antiquities trade. although exactly how much isis earns from looting artifact is difficult to access,ssess, they encourage and facilitate the trade, which appears to be part of its economic strategy, not just for funding the group itself but for creating ways to bring funds to its subjective population whose hearts and minds they are trying to win. isis has been dubbed the world's richest terrorist army, and the illegal antiquities trade is one income stream which gives them significant strategic advantages against existing counterterrorism efforts. the trade's main target buyers are history enthusiasts and aficionados in the united states and europe. representatives of the societies which isis has pledged to destroy. this poses several challenges to policymakers, but there maopportunities as well. isis has access to roughly 5000 archaeological sites and has earned several millions of dollars from antiquities trafficking.
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some of the looting appears to be conducted by local populations who sell amid an eco-lock ecologically devastated environment. the importance lies not just in the funding but in the market's strategic operational benefits. this illegal trade of artifacts generally doesn't risk provoking outside military attacks; it's not likely that the excavation sites will be bombed, or provoking local rebellion. the pipelines that move antiquities to market invariably transit states bordering syria and iraq. turkey and lebanon are the best documented. european border states also play an important role. the pipelines are well-known for other illicit commodities less understood in the context. the route into europe is a known path for drugs and migrants and probably plays a role in antiquities trafficking. the global annual trade in illicit art in antiquities is hard to stop. looted objects are hidden away;
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false documentation is routine; transactions are proving difficult to track with traditional enforcement and intelligence. the challenges are great in necessitating new means. the following are some recommendations that may help policymakers address it. one, imposing terrorism sanctions on artifact smugglers and dealers. even a handful of strategic terror financing designations imposed on the worst offenders would likely have a chilling effect on sellers and buyers, given the financial risks. two, making antiquities looting and intelligence law enforcement a priority. at present, it is unclear who was even responsible for countering antiquities trafficking. reform can only come by declaring this issue and national security priority. the u.s. government must designate a lead organization and provide adequate authorization and resources. three, incorporating cultural property crime awareness into the intelligence community and
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u.s. special operations special forces training. direct finances are already emphasized in courses taught at the joint special operations university but such courses do not appear to highlight antiquities, despite their role in terror finance. antiquities trafficking should be included in future coursework. four expanding registries of art and antiquities. they are commonplace but new technologies make it commonplace for art and artifacts to be tagged and tracked, even using dna markers. overtime, by tagging a large number of objects a better chain of custody can be created. these recommendations are just a few of the steps that will undoubtedly be a long battle. law enforcement and intelligence officials should pay close attention to the antiquities trade emanating from syria and iraq not just because they need to know how much money isis brings in. what's important is the trade reveal something about islamic state's operational infrastructure, its links of
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partners and middlemen, and how the group is exploiting the local population. all this is critical to understanding how the u.s. and its allies may defeat the group militarily financially, and ideologically. thank you. >> you're now recognized for five minutes. >> chairman fitzpatrick, ranking member lynch, members of the task force, thank you for this opportunity to speak with you. as was mentioned, i serve as the chair of the cultural property advisory committee and the state department however i'm speaking to you today in my personal capacity and on behalf of the u.s. committee of the blue shield. blue shield is a cultural equivalent of the red cross. it is used to mark protected cultural sites. among the current activities of our organization is the creation of a no strike list, a cultural sightless and repository. we liase with the department of defense to assist in international obligations to protect cultural heritage during armed conflicts.
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syria and northern iraq are rich in history stretching many millennia. this is where hammurabi ruled at the beginning of the second millennium bce and where the hebrew prophet jonas priest preached repentance a thousand years later. historic remains represent the successful cultures of the greeks romans, byzantines, and the islamic and ottoman period, as well as the fates of judaism christianity, and islam. minority groups like the yazidis, zoroastrians, and dr uids. when an archaeological site is looted, the contextual relationship is destroyed. it thereby criminally prevents us from fully understanding and reconstructing our past. unfortunately, the looting of archaeological sites is big business, often carried out in an organized industrialized scale, in response to market demand.
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many of these sites are unknown before they alluded. as cultural objects move from source transit, and destination countries, different legal systems create obstacles and prosecution of crimes, and they allow the laundering of titles for these artifacts. the united states is the single largest market for art in the world, with 43% of market share. the cause of the availability impacts -- and because of artistic preference, the united states is the largest ultimate market for antiquities particularly those from the mediterranean and middle east . antiquities freshly looted have no established value and no documented history. they can be mined from the ground as new commodities. therefore they are the perfect vehicle for moving funds and value around the world and for supporting illegal activity such as trade base money laundering,
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purchase of drugs and weapons organized crime, antiterrorism. -- and terrorism. databases of stolen arts are for the most part useless in regulating the trade. technologies that would tag cultural objects would, in my opinion, be similarly ineffective. both isil and the assad regime are participating in leading and are realizing income from their sale. studies of satellite images of archaeological sites reveal historic patterns of living pre-conflict. in this image located in eastern syria and still under isil control of the summer of 314 -- you can see some looters but not many. in the fall of 2014, i hope you can see the large numbers of looters, many of which are with the red circles, additional as well. we know that isil has several
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points of intersection with the channels through artifacts move. we also know that isil destroys on a large and public stage in movable structures like ancient temples and shrines. they also destroy artifacts in their documented museum collections that are well-known or too large to move. away from public view, it orchestrates the looting of antiquities taxing the smugglers and selling the artifacts for taxing the sale. he will hear more about this. yet there are steps that the united states can take that would cost little and pose no risk. that would also reduce the economic reward to isil. first of all, returning to the house next week i hope will be h.r. 1493. it will impose taxes on antiquities imports. second, take up h.r. 2285.
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third, encourage law enforcement to refocus attention away from forfeiture and repatriation of objects and toward criminal prosecutions with the criminal network that can be dismantled. foster greater transparency and accountability in the market, among other things required documentation of ownership for donation to charitable institutions. finally, we should be looking prospectively toward places where isil is moving, such as libya, which is also home to many archaeological sites. we need to develop a proactive rather than reactive way of dealing with the problem of antiquities, looting, and marketing. thank you for this opportunity to address the task force; i look forward to answering your questions. >> thank you, dr. bill. you're now recognized for five minutes. >> i'd like to begin by thanking the finance committee and its task force for inviting me to
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testify on such an important subject. i will focus my remarks on three key points; one, when isis took over large swaths of territory in 2013, it essentially took over pre-existing situation of living. isis did not start the leading it just carried on. moreover it institutionalized the process and intensified it to a great degree. in fact, what we can say is that isis sees cultural heritage as a resource to be exploited like any other, and we know this because isis has a dedicated department for the administration of the looting of antiquities. you can see here, for example this is one of their offices in the city of mumbai. it also manages oil revenues, taxation, and many other sources of revenues. through this office, licenses
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like this one are issued to looters, which i then gives them permission to go out and lived at archaeological sites. in fact, the purchase of a leading license is a source of revenue, as our extensions, as you see in this case. this looter, having dug up the site, decided he needed an extension, so he perches as an extension, and then heated heavy machinery, so in the second image on the right you can see that he purchases an actual extension to his license allowing him to use heavy machinery. the heavy machinery is being used to get out chunks of earth out of the site. if you don't think this is producing good material, here are some of the fines that came out of this one license site that was being looted. not only are these pieces of putty, but these bronze and mentaltal items coming from a
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bronze age to complex. we know that when isis licenses these sites, it requires the looter sell the items. if it fails to sell them, isis will take them back and use them at auction. we know there is a major auction in raqqa that operates on a regular basis sometimes as often as three times a week when necessary. thesse two items were recently looted from palmyra before isis was forced out of the city. they were sold about three weeks ago by auction. i believe the asking price was $150,000. i cannot confirm whether that was the price on the cheap, but that was the asking price. isis also destroys cultural heritage for propaganda purposes.
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it loots what it can sell; it destroys what it cannot. large monuments like these end up being destroyed because they allow isis to demonstrate their ability to act with impunity on the international community. it's a powerful propaganda tool; isis exploited and uses it to great effect. in terms of -- it's not just isis that loots. it was also done by the regime. these two items were looted under regime control, and they are currently also on sale in syria and about to be exported to turkey by the dealer who has been. he purchased them from an army officer one year before isis took control. what can we do about this? efforts are being done to protect cultural heritage inside syria. 70% of their cultural heritage is outside regime controlled areas and outside the reach of
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its government institutions, therefore it falls on nonstate actors and local activists using curators, archaeologists, to do something, and ngo's with their heritage protection initiative. we try to do a weekend and monitor the damage, monitor the destruction. we try to document any activity that occurs related to this. but at the end of the day, we're just civilians. we don't have the institutional support. we did get some help from organizations here in the united states like the american school of oriental research and the cultural heritage center. as does the antiquities collectors. this support is limited, and hardly addresses the scale of the catastrophe we are facing. i would also touch upon the importance of why it is necessary to say this cultural heritage, but i'm out of time, and would happy to be happy to answer.
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>> thank you. you are recognized for five minutes. >> chairman fitzpatrick, ranking member lynch, members of the committee, thank you for inviting me to testify. i would also like to thank the task force stelath for its work to highlight the nature of terrorism financing, including weekly news clips and tips. i submitted my more detailed written testimony for the record i will focus on two points. one, the problem with terrorism financing and conflict is alluding relating to money laundering and global art industry. representative lynch, you accurately pointed out that need to improve compliance and connection with art and cultural objects, which can only happen at the intersection of the art and financial industries. if we remove the ability of terrorists to loot art and cultural objects, we remove the economic motive to loot them,
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cut off a key source of financing and make great strides toward protecting important part of the world's cultural legacy. two, effective solutions are now within reach. with trade and financial regulators in the u.s., u.k., switzerland, luxembourg, and belgium, information-based technology solutions to bring transparency to global art and antiquities transaction. at home, they believe they have the ability to use their authority to bring greater transparency and information sharing to the art and antiquities market department purchases, which i will discuss in a moment. they share information on patterns of behavior the art industry's financial sector transaction. these patterns have identified terrorism and financing through looted art and cultural objects
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as well as trade base money laundering in the art industry generally. we lend on these issues and tend to -- servicing a broad range of stakeholders in the financial markets, blending in against the asset class,, capital market investing and -- the problem is the unregulated nature of the industry combined with the lack of record-keeping for transactions in the source of market nations, all of which it scares legal status and beneficial ownership. in the aml context, it prevents market citizens from identifying patterns of illegal schemes. when identifying patterns is the core of aml enforcement and compliance. compounding the problem is the prevalence of freeports which are tax-free zones designed to serve as a way station in valid transactions so that the path ultimately
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assigned is levied at the final destination of the object . in fact, these become locations where it is stored indefinitely, to add to the obfuscation in the art industry. the financial action task force on money laundering identified this problem as early as 2010. to be sure good faith, well intended, responsible operators of free ports in the market as a whole seek better systemic means to close the gap between aml's compliance regulations and practical barriers to enforcing them. simply put attacking terrorism financing using cultural objects and are is in heated by the inability to cross-reference independently reported and organized pieces of information to identify anomalies and suspicious activity. comptroller currency in march of 2015 the need is for more
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accurate and timely information and the use of technology to close the information gaps. we believe we have the authority to place our title insurance companies under the bsa for information sharing with department protection to ignite this kind of solution in the industry that would enable detecting effective patterns. lastly, i mentioned technology solutions, which are now underway to address the accurate information -- the lack of accurate information for artistic and cultural objects. currently, in albany, through nonprofit organization called the global center of innovation, standards-based solutions similar to iso anse, to enable technologies the equivalent of the nano scale identification number or cultural objects is
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now within reach to anchor objects so this information can be generated in the industry and provide the libel information. thank you. >> thank you. i think all the witnesses for their testimony. we will now move to the members questions. first, i am going to recognize the gentlelady from missouri, representative and and wagner, who has a unique perspective on the subject. the gentlelady is recognized five minutes. >> thank you. i thank the gentleman for his courtesy letting me jump ahead. thank you all for appearing before the task force today to discuss key elements that terrorists abroad are using in order to obtain illicit financing. antiquities smuggling and the sale of cultural artifacts has frankly been occurring since the 1980's and 1990's under the regime of saddam hussein, as you all know in order to avoid international sanctions.
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today, the islamic state is using it to raise financing to fuel their operations and expended terrorism worldwide. understanding the providence of this activity and how it intersects with our financial institutions and markets is critical to cutting off the source of funding for terrorists and aiding our efforts to eliminate isis. it's great to see you again. he came to meet with me and my office back -- i guess at the beginning of 2015 -- and we have been exploring this issue ever since. in your testimony, you note that any money laundering and counterterrorism financing laws are limited when it comes to the trade of cultural properties, because they are not explicitly covered in those laws' standards. how can we best address money laundering through the archery sir? >> it really comes back to organizing the information. we've heard a lot of testimony
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which is important about on the ground means to prevent the looting of the objects and once it leaves the ground and interest the trade it's the lack of a systemic system to monitor what is happening to that object. between gaps in information unreliability of information because of lack of means to verify and export document that may be forged -- what happens is there is a specific strategy in many circles of the industry to move up the ladder from less important trade sources to more important ones and each step of the way creates near credibility, so that when the object gets to the good-faith market, everything is out of control. a means that anchors information every step of the way would shut down the problem. >> great. i'm sure you keeping up with
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current events -- was there an issue with stolen art involved in the recent panama papers issue? and could you please briefly discuss the details of that? >> the panama papers situation highlights what effectively became the black hole in the industry because of lack of transparency. while none of us knows more than what has been reported in the media so far many objects that are implicated in that, the real problem is one doesn't know because of the lack of transparency. yes, stolen objects may end up in facilities anchored in panama which enables hiding that kind of information. >> so it uniform system that all can be a part of and buy into, cross the borders is what i'm assuming is necessary in this space. you mentioned briefly that your company submitted a request to send, i believe in 2014, that arts title insurance be subject to bank secrecy act.
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could you please explain why you made that request comes or? >> it's a means to create information sharing in the financial sector. let's suppose one of the large banks is offered a basket of art objects, whether cultural heritage objects or art as we might normally think of it, for a loan transaction for $50 million. right now, because of the lack of information sharing, that financial institution would have no way of knowing whether that same basket of assets was presented around the world in the last 30 days, each of which have different information, none of which is accurate, because their lens is limited to the transaction in front of them and because of a title insurer's role the keystone to asset integrity and beneficial ownership information it becomes an effect the vortex to
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organize this information and take what would be fractured noise to any individual institution and turn it into reliable, privacy protected information that could be deployed back, then generate suspicious activity reports and so forth. >> thank you. doctor, the financial action task force in february, 2016 recommended that the private sector should improve efforts to prevent suspicious transactions. what progress has been made and what additional steps -- i've run out of time. can the private sector take to improve these efforts? >> i'd like to point out that it's not clearly illegal to bring integration into the net dates . -- illegal to bringa antiquation into the united states. >> that the huge hole. >> yes.
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we hope that will be plugged very soon. that is not a criminal provision; that is civil forfeiture. before we go to more advanced things we need to do that,. >> i thank you and i yield back the remainder of none of my time that is left and hope my colleagues will explore that further. thank you. >> ranking member of the task force, mr. lynch, is recognized for five minutes. >> thank you. following up on ms. wagner's, line of line of questions, in mighty profitable to look at the panama papers side of this. i know there has been some questions in the past on terrorist financing, and we have gone to jordan, to morocco other places where we have asked their legislature and their leadership to adopt anti-money laundering or antiterrorist financing legislation in those
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countries so we have a means of enforcement. i have a question. the committee regularly travels to iraq; we just came back from an barbar province and we spent many a lot of time on the syrian border. we had an opportunity to meet with rebel groups operating in syria against the charlotte bush are all ashar al-assad. many of the groups are using the social media program whatsapp. just going back to your question about the chain of custody on some of these artifacts coming out of syria and iraq, the source of origin that whole
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issue, is there a way to interdict? i know selling these antiquities are being sold on whatsapp that social media platform. is there any way for us to interdict that -- >> i'll say something -- >> please. >> go ahead. >> this is what we do on a daily basis. we track the sales. we have people on the ground who meet with these dealers. i regularly have on my whatsapp, i receive every day dozens of photos. the problem, however, is we receive this information -- what happens next is a big hole. we have no means of then moving
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this information on to be acted upon in any meaningful way. it's just information like it's backed up, and then it goes down the rabbit hole and disappears, never to be seen again. there is a complete breakdown in terms of how this information is used. i collect a lot of information every day; this was collected by people on the ground, who are standing there, photographing and passing it to us. what happens afterwards is really the big question. how it's used. >> there are three ingredients to make these solutions work. one is the means to anchor the object so everyone knows this is the exact object we're talking about. two, to then anchor verified information to that exact object. so one does the image actual -- so one knows the object belongs to the market.
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third, a means to organize that information, to identify the anomalies and the technology world, speaking in terms of predictive analytics and other things that can instantly go through information generated on a different timeline in a different part of the world the object that just came upon whatsapp is an issue. >> ok. >> i'll just add, there's an opportunity there with law enforcement social media, social media can be used to go after criminals and smugglers outside of antiquities. there actually are -- if whatsapp ebay, facebook, these platforms are being used to market antiquities, the interdiction can come from law enforcement getting involved on those platforms. >> right.
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we've had some issues of the encryption piece of that. that's probably why it's a platform of choice right now. i probably should have said this at the beginning -- thank each of you for your work on this issue. we have really benefited greatly from your expertise and your willingness to work with the committee. i yield back. >> thank you. i yield five minutes of the chairman of the house committee on foreign affairs, mr. royce. >> thank you. i want to thank you, and i also want to thank mr. lynch as well for your work on this issue. i just returned from the middle east where i was honored to speak at the iraq museum in baghdad about the need to counter isis's trafficking of priceless antiquities. one of the great shocks when you are in that part of the world is to realize just as the third reich in germany tried to destroy so much history with book burning and history of the
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german tribes, tried to restart everything by destroying evidence of what went before here you have isis and the taliban and groups like that, united in their concept of just trying to destroy all evidence of a syrian civilization, babylonian, any christian examples of churches or art in that region, and i think the appalling aspect of it, when you consider it, you see some of these isis spokesmen talk about taking the pyramid down brick by brick, you begin to realize, with what we saw in afghanistan, when they talk about wiping out evidence of buddhist civilization, they mean it. they really are committed to this goal. palmyra would be a case in point. at the same time, for the smaller antiquities that they can sell for the hard currency,
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they're not beyond engaging in that kind of criminal activity. i was going to ask the doctor, i know how much you have worked on this over the years, and we have the bill that elliott england and i have introduced, 1493, to try and address this. it's coming back from the senate this week. could you speak maybe about this concept of protecting and preserving cultural property through this kind of legislation? >> thank you, mr. royce, and thank you for your leadership on h.r. 1493. currently there is no legal mechanism clearly in place that would prohibit the import of antiquities from syria into the united states. i will say prospectively that the same situation applies to libya, where isil seems to be moving next. in order to prevent these objects for coming to the united
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states but perhaps more importantly to convince the middlemen and dealers and looters along the way that they will not eventually be able to sell these things in the united states it is important that they understand that the united states will not ultimately be a market for these looted objects. only by cutting down on market demand can we convince those middlemen that they will earn less money or no money and it works its way back the chain to the people on the ground. that way, if these objects are not salable then isil will also earn less money from the antiquities looting. >> we also were in north africa, tunisia, and we saw the results of the attack their on the museum indonesia. -- museum in tunisia. it comes over the border and carries out attacks specifically against museums and in libya also, they are destroying these cultural artifacts that date
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back to the carthaginian perio d, hellenic periods. maybe i could ask -- can you expand on why terrorist and criminal groups like isis are so attracted to antiquities smuggling as a means of getting that revenue, that hard currency,a and can we approach this the same way we did on the legislation we offered on blood diamonds, some methodology to shut down the ability to traffic? >> yes. i think there are some parallels. when the first part of your question, it's a unique strategic resource. if you like at isil, all the revenue they get, much of what they have gotten, they got early on from taking over territory. dispossessing the people they took over. let antiquities provides this opportunity for them to consistently continue to get new
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resources. there are so many sites. maybe not a renewable resource, but a flowing resource of revenue, and you have willing partners, willing people who were there to loot. that is a real strategic benefit. as someone said earlier, they institutionalize it and intensify it. in terms of blood diamonds, i think the parallel is that we have the ability and change the conversation, to shift the perception of the public that you should understand where diamonds were produced. i think we can learn from that approach, but also with the blood diamonds issue, there were some concerns about credibility and accountability. there are lessons learned on ways that didn't work well enough. >> chairman, that that will be coming back this week. we will have a chance to vote on the bill that we authored, and i appreciate this forum to discuss the need for us to act quickly. >> the look forward to it.
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thank you for your leadership on an important issue. legitimate for michigan is recognized -- the gentleman from michigan is recognized. >> thank you, mr. chairman. and they give for the panel of very interesting and important presentations. i wonder if i could ask if you would spend a minute or two expanding a bit on your comments on free port uses, of free ports, as a concerns to antiquities. the concern is that -- i guess the main question would be to what extent are we seeing free ports used as a method to cloak the transactions related to antiquities? are we seeing multiple transactions taking place in the dark that make it more difficult to track the chain of title? and what other difficulties do you see in terms of the way reports might be used in the
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context of this question? >> so within the category of free ports, there are also free zones. in our written testimony, there are several thousand free zones around the world that the art industry recognizes. they are all way stations, if you will, the movement of these assets. most of the industry is using those facilities for correct and legitimate purposes. the problem is the nature of the industry and the rapidity with which things move in the industry. they could make it very difficult for customs and border officials around the world to know whether the information being provided is valid. it becomes a blanket that obscures accurate information which then drives trade base money laundering in general, and the movement of cultural artifacts as well. i would estimate that the use of
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free ports right now is less for cultural artifacts than art in general, but it is also on the rise of people listening to the beating drums in the industry, because they become challenging, and as a result, there is a lack of clarity that enables the movement of the asset. >> would you be able to suggest any potential changes that would mitigate against the use of free ports or other tax havens in order to execute transactions related to antiquities, for example, extending safe harbor protections to brokers dealers other individuals involved in these forms transactions in order to provide information that could be helpful to law enforcement authorities? >> the real problem is no one of those parties has enough information to associate it with anything else. it becomes noise.
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that's why we have been focusing so much on the global initiative coming up with ways to organize the information. there are good pieces of a strategy but until you create a means to organize the information holistically, a very complex amalgam of information you will be driven by high mobility and international nature of the market, becoming the ultimate obstacle that has to be overcome. >> i guess one last question, directed to the doctor, oto what extent is satellite imagery available to those in academia in order to evaluate existing sites that might be currently under the control of isis or others, before and after? are you able to gain access to satellite imagery in order to
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make evaluations as to the extent of the work that is being done there? >> several groups, private groups, some in partnership with the state department, the american association of science, have had access through the government to satellite imagery. one question is there are gaps. we don't have satellite imagery or they have not been made public, or made available to researchers. for example, what the condition of palmyra was before the offensive. it has been difficult to assess how much damage was done by the russians and the assad regime, as they retook the site as opposed what was done earlier by isil. the satellite images that have to some extent been made available are important because people can't go in on the ground to find out what's happening. it's not perfect tool, but it is the tool we have accessible to us. from that, there is a group of the university of chicago that
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is working to quantify not only the numbers of holes in the ground, which of course are many but also to determine based on excavation reports of t those sites, and algorithms spread out and large quantities of data to come up with an actual assessment of how many and what types of objects have been looted under isil control. then an in-depth market strategy overlarge quantitative reasoning to come up with a large dollar figure of how much money we're talking. >> thank you. i see my time has expired. think the ranking member for holding this hearing. with that, i yield back. >> the chair no recognizes the vice-chairman of the task force the gentleman from north carolina, for five minutes. >> thank you, mr. chairman. what are the legal privacy laws
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that would impede us in our ability to, deal with our dealers deal with the transfer of information of suspicious activity? what can we do in that regard? >> i don't think the problem is the current state of the privacy laws, but rather getting the core information to then provide with the industry would refer to as privacy protected information. if we go back to the example i used a minute ago, the bank loan scenario where they now have a means to associate a series of transactions around the world with the same assets to provide a response back to the current financial institution, that would then trigger the aml suspicious activity reporting regime and all the privacy issues around that.
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what would then have been is the system would know there is suspicious activity around these particular objects that are being used potentially for some problem or another whether it is straightfaced money laundering or terrorist financing. consistently have in place would trigger under its existing rules and regulations. i don't think we need a change in what's private or not but organizing the information to provide curated privacy protection and effective information for intervening. >> thank you. so this deal would mostly be the transfer of information that would be compatible, that would have access to certain data? >> correct. from a high-level. so you would know, the bank would know for example, that the objects are at risk, and they would have the information -- >> thank you.
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targeted sanctions. give me some insight into that. how would we address that, considering the middlemen and private collectors that don't have anything to do with isis? how would we impose sanctions? >> i think sanctions could be imposed on imports. in other words the antiquities from syria should be listed on the sanctions list. we have been asked twice to do that and has so far refused. if i could go back for just a moment to the last question -- there is a great deal of secrecy. the name of the seller is never made public when sold through an auction house. there are agency and fiduciary agreements with the auction house; those names are not public. it would require a court order in court process to get the name. the buyers are also frequent not made public things are sold -- i think there is a huge amount of secrecy.
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maybe i am looking at it on a more microscale. >> that's a real scale. >> i think there's a lot could be done that requires the kind of information. >> i would add that most of the material coming out of the ground right now is not even making the market. it's just being sold in transaction and it never sees the main market. most of this is academic when it comes to currently material -- >> if you wish, i could clarify the privacy item. >> we would like to know if it would be necessary to the public for law enforcement to engage. >> as an insurance company, we function as the safe haven or safe harbor where the information is disclosed to us
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-- that information only becomes relevant if there is in fact the problem or suspicious activity, and that becomes the information sharing element under the bfa for example. we would agree that the industry in many respects operates for privacy reasons, many of which are legitimate, many of which are not, in that can be managed but is not as though the industry from our standpoint -- >> thank you. talk to me some more about money laundering and the art trade. what can be done there to address that issue? >> i believe that this is something like a bridge. militarily, to take a bridge, you have to take it from both ends. there is the buying and, the demand, and then there is also the supply. i can really only speak to you on the supply side, because that is the side i work with.
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the best thing we can do right now is to try and document as much as possible what is coming out of the ground, and that is a huge task, and that is what we are focused on. our problem is how do we then manage to pass this information on -- what mechanisms are available to us in terms of being able to share this information? more importantly, how the information is then used to pursue or retrieve, at some point, or even interject to prevent further transactions. >> thank you, my time has expired. >> the gentleman from pennsylvania is recognized for five minutes. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i thinkank the payroll for a very informative discussion. i'm wondering if the doctor answered this question or not. is there an estimate at all of
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the number of americans who may have purchased illicit artifacts or antiquities over the last 10 years from the middle east? can we quantify that in any way? >> i think that would be very difficult, partly because again, with antiquities because they are unknown and undocumented proving what is legal and what is illegal is extremely difficult. so you have to go object by object to make a determination on what is legal or illegal. but i would certainly say -- you are including estimates? >> we have estimates of the total value of the transaction. somehow we are getting those estimates. so i am trying to get some of the data behind the estimates. >> i would only say that the united states is the largest market for these kinds of antiquities. my guess would be that if you include everything, tens of
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thousands of people. >> and the value for the american purchasers? >> to you have -- do you have -- the art market overall is 43% in america. england is the second at 22%. we're double that this single market for art overall. the dollar value of art, fine art, is much higher than the value of antiquities. but the contours are probably similar. it's also a function of taste and tradition, that in the united states, that is what collectors collect -- middle eastern and mediterranean antiquities. >> i wasn't sure if you wanted to touch on customs data, which doesn't specifically get at the question of who, but it is possible and i think what we have done is look at that change in custom data around artifacts
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or antiques. again, that data is for legal purchases, or ostensibly legal purchases, that come in from elsewhere. that's just the data coming in that may have transited through various countries. you can look at the data to get a sense at how the tide has risen with certain categories in antiques. but again that is what we know and that is what people -- clients i imagine there is a separation in details. where they are provenanced in others. does the buyer need to know who
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seller is, i even if it is a private sale, we may not know who the buyer or seller is. is there any obligation to know who the seller is? >> there is no legal obligation to know the seller or buyer is as long as they are getting the finances they want out of the arrangement. just in the past month, at christie's top-and public auction, several pieces were picked up that came from southeast asia and they were classical antiquities. so even from the people you would be thinking would be doing the most provenance research, where the fault lies is a nether -- another thing perhaps. >> what can we be doing to
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prevent that from happening? >> we need better tracking of objects. tracking better what is coming into the country. does no tracking what is leaving the country. i think we could require these kinds of documents he maintained and made available for law and is meant to stop right now, they need a search warrant about was selling what and the provenance information. we need to make it a higher priority overall. the number of antiquities that are packages that are searched coming into the country through customs is minimal and it depends on what port you're coming from. some do not know anything about antiquities. in new york, you only declare above a certain value and they
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will look at it. it is not considered a hype regarding. especially on the customs side. as far as the legal customs act customs in general is happy if it can see, forfeit, and the patriots something. they have a beautiful repatriation ceremony. people are happy to give an object back. only if you have the threat of criminal enforcement and jail time would you perhaps reach the market. >> the gentleman from texas, mr. williams, is wrecking nice. >> i first want to say hello to a fellow texan. you are a texas treasure. , i was glad to see -- your contribution cannot be
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understated. it was long overdue and i was proud to support your effort. my first question is you said a major benefit was that non-combatants were great role to allied forces not only for liberating them but preserving his three. would you elaborate on that and would you believe the same would be true if we were better able to save antiques and other cultural object in the middle east? : thank you for your kind remarks. thank you for the legislation for the award. yes, i believe that the united states would be looked upon favorably by nations of goodwill throughout the world and i think the evidence is irrefutable. look at what happened in 2003 in the aftermath of iraq.
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it raises the issue of what is the responsibility of united dates are earning force when the are in a foreign country regarding the protection of foreign assets. our failure caused enormous damage to this country's reputation around the world. i know from x variant, during world war ii there was a great deal of skepticism because of much of the damage that took late in europe was a resulttime and again, the people expressed appreciation for the fact you had to get rid of the back guys. you had to get troops on the ground to stop when they saw efforts to affect temporary repairs in civilization returned 4 million, these men and women without tech knowledge or computers they managed to get 200 back stop so there's no question, i yes.
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>> what more can we do? mr. edsel: there is no reason for us to send these people into harm's way without force protection. it worked in world war ii because we at 3 million troops in europe. to say if we cannot put troops on the ground we cannot do anything, it is ridiculous. the united states as a leader in technology and we are not doing enough to put an end these things. there have been some big questions about steps that can be taken going forward. there are two realities that are inarguable that collectors. they love to show people what they have got. they hate losing money. if you do monetize illegally owned works of art that would be a problem.
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i am not just talking about objects the company's warzones, but going back to nazi artifacts. objects that are stolen from churches in italy. all over the world. these things do not get stolen unless there is someone to buy them. they do not get stored in these tax-free zones unless someone thinks eventually the spotlight moves way and there will be collected or two can buy them. if we have a process to register works of art. there should be a threshold where there is a clean will of sale. whatever it is, a small object. a painting. if it is known, there is no concern of it being something that was mother. it will be different for people out there with lots of money by these things knowing that, where short piece of paper? i do not want to buy this thing
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unless it has been cleared. is it a huge challenge for us from a technology standpoint? sure. it is worth. in a war the claim 65 million lives, monument i just found and returned 5 million objects. i am not interested in hearing the difficulties when we can't read a credit card from space. the technology there, is the will there? the determination of the sale of looted antiquities and this kind of increased reporting brings transparency. who is again against transparency? we will be cutting down on trafficking and sources for organized crime and for isis and other organizations. the internal revenue service will get more revenue it is to
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which will take the burden on taxpayers. it will return works of art to the places from which they were stolen. there is no downside. >> thank you for your testimony. you sound like a guy from smu. i yield back stop -- i yield back. >> thank you for your talk. i was at the ceremony for the congressional gold medal and it was great to see some of the remaining monument men and their families there. i want to talk about motivation. is it isis and other organizations in the distraction and -- in the destruction of these items?
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what drives them? looking at europe and world war ii didn't hitler want to demonstrate cultural superiority in capturing all of this art and having it and possessing it? mr. edsel: there is no question if you look over the 20th century, the genocide that happened in the holocaust and world war ii, jews were not captured and incarcerated immediately. that is the process of humiliation. we are born to detain you. we are going to put you in concentration camps. but while you are alive we are going to steal and destroy the respect define you as a civilization. yeah, we will kill you later on but we will not doing it. we have seen this in molly bang, the destruction -- we have seen
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this in mali, the destruction of treasured relics that define these civilization. the process begins by destroying them. now we have a modern twist, when you look back over. the nazis wrote the book on it. the amount of resources dedicated in in organized way. planes, trains, move around the cultural treasures. the church bells in the cathedrals, the paintings, the drawings, the statues was extraordinary and a distraction to the war. i may not have quite those resources are degree of organization, but there is a strong and sent to -- incentive for them to do it. things are destroyed, we saw that in america and we saw that
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with al qaeda. we have seen that evolve into things that can be sold. why destroy them when weekends will them and turn them into cash? >> this is a great tragedy and one that i think our administration has been behind the curve on for multiple years and others in europe and russia as well stop i am also interested in 1493. why limit this to dr. gershon lot? why don't we ban the importation of cultural treasures from other countries. how do we determine these are recent versus something that actually has been on the marketplace? are we hurting a legitimate antiquities trade potentially? aren't we enabling the assad of
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regime, which you have testified is just as destructive of these cultural treasures as isis ever was? why are we institutionalizing their control of these icons? they may sell them themselves, right? >> i do not think how institutionalizing is helping the assad regime. if they were forfeited at the order, maybe that's what you were thinking? first of all, title gets transferred to the united states government and the united states government would decide when to return them. i do not think that will happen us long as assad is an powerful who knows what government -- as long as assad is in power. i do not see this as helping out the assad regime. i agree they are doing lots of things, too.
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there is a normal process in place under the convention on cultural property implementation act. on imposing restrictions for countries to ask for our assistance. that has to start with a request from the country. syria, libya, morocco, none of them have done that. so, that is the reason why 1493 is needed. to bypass primarily that requirement of a request. 1493 is written so that at the point when relations are normalized between the united states and a syrian government in egypt that government is expected to bring a request under the normal process. it changes the burden of proof and what needs to be shown at the border. sophia shop at the border with
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an object that have come from syria, once it matches the designated list that the state department and homeland of national security promulgate, that helps law enforcement indefinitely. it does not impose a huge boarded on the importer because showing where -- it does not impose a huge burden on the importer. that documentation needs to be authored. there are other ways of showing documentation, but basically the object would be importable into the united states so i think this presents the best of both worlds. an attempt to not overly burdened the trade in an attempt to prevent those recently looted objects that aside and i sold my receiving funding from. >> thank you.
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the gentleman from kentucky is recognized. >> thank you for your leadership on this important hearing. there is nothing that to me as more disgraceful about what these terrorist organizations are doing that what we are hearing today. the international council of museums describes situation is the largest mass scale destruction of cultural heritage since the second world war. the director considers the islamic's date cause destruction of cultural heritage sites in iraq and syria to be an international war crime. the global financial group conservatively averaged and aggregate the gear of the trade of cultural property ranging between 3.4 and $6.3 billion annually.
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so mr. edsel, my question to you it is, the leaders themselves, the islamic eight fighters who are actually pillaging these historical and cultural antiquities site, really they are only taking -- taking about 1% off the top. most of the profits from this illicit trade of antiquities is coming to the benefit of the middlemen who are engaged in this. so my question is, obviously this is i'm source of revenue for the islamic state. but, is it's more a matter of wiping out the cultural and religious artifacts that are inconsistent with the twisted ideology of these terrorist
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organizations? are they equal motives or is one predominant? >> i am sure it is a slippery slope trying to be in analyst for isis and what is going on inside their head. i think we can say -- if we can find a way to disincentive by eliminating or reducing the revenue-making opportunity of doing these days, we at least are cutting down on one main reason it is happening. there is little we can do to address the ideological motivation or stealing or destroying things. i have people say, why do you have on human man -- why do you have monument man? it would be wrong to send them in without having doors protection.
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the world has changed. we have all sorts of nonmilitary weapons that we are not using. that i should say, are evolving. aerial photography to see developments on the ground, pioneering the use of 3-d technology to do imagery of these non-movable object so that if they are damaged or destroyed they can be rebuilt. people are thinking of these things now, this is a positive step. two of you mentioned in your testimony potential ways to disrupt the illicit trade of antiquities by the treasury office against antiquities smugglers and buyers. also the bill on restricted import of antiquities. what is the best approach to
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this ministry -- diminishing the demand for looted antiquities? mr. edsel: all of the above in the sense we have made white a few recommendations. when you talk about sanctions, what we're trying to get at is you know, there is a difference between the threat of prosecution and the threat of people close to you having your asset leave. it provides potentially greater incentives. it is a tool we use. you can debate how effective it is. >> and my remaining time if i could editorialize, i appreciate the advocacy for sanctions. i agree with you and support the legislation but because the motivation is not entirely i've
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driven and finance-driven and because it is an etiology we're talking about, the only way we will be able to protect these antiquities is to take back the territory these radical jihadist control. that's will have to happen in order for us to in the long run preserve and protect the sacred site will stop -- these sacred sites full stop. >> mr. edsel, let me ask you as more and more are sure is put on ice is to stop this horrible -- put on isis to stop this horrible pillaging of our human his three, do you think there is going to be -- there will be
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different avenues these folks will use to loot and to sell the antiquities? >> different than what they are doing now? >> yes stop can you look down the road and just happily -- and extrapolate what their reaction will be when it comes to sending terrorist act this source of funding? mr. edsel: our focus should not be on what we want to do now because we already gave that away when ice is to control. that is the wrong -- when isis took control. we should be thinking about what they are going to do next. if there is oil revenue, that is
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a simple and immediately profitable way to generate revenue but that does not mean that the majority of revenue may go to isis that we should not the concerned about these treasures. we are trying to figure out how to get along with 95% of the people in the world. the currency that connects people's cultural treasures. sports, music, works of art. we do not look at the world that way here. it is not wrong, we're just a younger country. but if we want to curry favor and don't united states up in the eyes of the world showing respect for the treasures of other countries, that is the hallmark. president eisenhower, what he did would do more than everything we have done.
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>> do you think isis, as it spreads it ideology to libya and they are becoming more active, have you seen the same sort of illicit activity in the art of the middle east? mr. edsel: it is not a question i am qualified to answer. crimes we do know they have taken control of several major archaeological sites in libya. there has been some anecdotal information. we do not have the satellite information. there is one big difference. if you are getting revenue from oil, you can bomb it. the problem with archaeological eggs as that we do not want to moment. >> you want to talk about the wall going around, the areas of
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concern in libya are the very areas that the first monuments men started work in north africa. we are right back to where we began. >> do you think that the purchasers of these antiquities in america, are they aware -- let me rephrase that, do you know love the illicit artifacts having been purchased by americans? mr. edsel: not necessarily from this area, i don't have any knowledge of that, no. >> anybody else? >> when people purchase this time -- type of three-dimensional artwork, what is the probability of them
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knowing, in fact, it has been obtained through illegal activities. >> clearly, there is a good faith market in date not good faith market like in any other area. they are working to avoid acquiring, selling, taking as gift implicated artworks. today, the world has been churning around issues. there's no question things fall through the cracks despite the good faith effort. so everyone who is acting in good rate, the credible sectors of the market, are doing their best to ferret out problematic assets. >> can you think of another way where we can avoid the heavy hand of the government getting
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involved to help in some way these folks make sure their good faith efforts are supported? >> the analogy i would use, if we look to the pharmaceutical industry, for example. 20 years ago they had enormous problems with adulterated drugs. they still have problems today, but it is far better thing and it was. it was not until the entire supply distribution chain came together and created systemic solutions that enabled ensuring the integrity of the object. here we have the same dynamic and certain ways. ideological motivations trying to eradicate identity will stop at the same time they're saying, as long as we burn it down, instead of destroying it when we go get money to further our territories and that is what takes it into the trade.
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a locked the ideas are multidimensional. boots on the ground. how do we prevent the instruction in and how do we create barriers that ultimately d incentivize everyone from monetizing around the asset. >> thank you. >> the gentleman from ohio is recognized or five minutes. >> thank you. a lot of great questions have already been asked. i would like to follow on to some of those questions and i have a question, you said if we could make declaring antiquities looting and crime a national security priority, we could start to reform things and that's we need to make it an
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intelligence and law enforcement priority. how would we do that? it an executive action? is a law required? how can we make that happen quickly? >> we already have institutions and agencies who are operating and dealing with this issue but we should have greater resources toward those elements. the state department has a huge role in this. the issue of cultural diplomacy is something that -- the institutions for cultural diplomacy we could leverage more. a lot of what we talked about was public perception. the potential for us to emphasize and highlight in our diplomacy this cultural issue. the cultural property issue. if you think about, someone mentioned earlier led diamonds.
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you can also think about wildlife trafficking and the industry. these are industries where you can think about, how something people are familiar with. diamonds. we do not have that in the same sense as antiquities. we need to raise that level. i would say in dhs, within customs, within i.c.e., you already have things in place. we have within our government, i think, a lot the arteries that could do this. at the national security council, there is opportunity to have greater coordination. i know we has been a little bit about legislation but in someone
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who is a former government person who has seen how it operates, there is definitely opportunity to help coordinate these efforts. >> we have talked with other members earlier about the legislation that is pending that would, you know, been importation of certain syrian antiquities. from the perspective of the panel, what other legislative proposals? you talked about pedigree earlier, for lack of a better word. and getting the recent ownership of antiquities and art trading. what other proposal should be pursued if we are going to get at this problem? >> there has already been one reported out of the homeland security.
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it is no new law but it would streamline the way customs operates and streamline the two parts -- customs and border protection. it would coordinate them to work together which they do not do terribly well in this field at least. they have not rewritten a customs director -- customs director since 1990. there are several steps that could be taken beyond 2285. the number of places to which art antiquities can be exported could be restricted so expertise would be developed among customs expert. this is a very narrow, obscure area of law in number of people could be trained as agent or among u.s. attorneys and it should be limited. we should concentrate the expertise and therefore have better outcomes of lawsuits, criminal prosecutions, and the
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like. >> are there any imports today who have more expertise? >> new york is the most of course. because of that, i have been told anecdotally that until you declare something is worth at least $250,000, they do not inspected. there are a couple of other ports in particular in the south . there are a couple that had things coming from central and america. houston, santa fe, the from asia come to san francisco, los angeles. sometimes people move things through ports that to not have a lot of antiquities. a bunch of chinese antiquities were picked up through alaska. geographically it makes sense but they probably do not have the expertise and they are not accustomed to it.
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both in the u.s. attorneys offices, they should have trained experts who would take on these cases. we have a very effect of fbi that could use more resources. we do not have that same level of expertise in customs and we do not have it in the u.s. attorneys offices other than probably the district up new york. i think federal prosecutors and judges should understand where and where there is a conviction there is a possible jail time. there is a cultural restriction that has not been used enough. a lot could be used with education, that would produce more effective law enforcement and better criminal sentencing outcome inappropriate -- in appropriate circumstances.
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>> thank you for everything you have worked for and testified for. i know my time is expired. i yield back. >> i am going to yield myself five minutes and ask to put up the original slide. you went through in your opening statement what we are looking at. i am asking if you could explain in a little more detail what we are looking at. >> this is the second one. >> yes, this is the slide. first i want to ask, the fbi warning back in 2015, those who were involved in the trafficking of islamic state antiquities could be investigated and prosecuted under material support for terrorism provisions. to your knowledge, has the fbi ever applied those types of charges? >> i have not heard of anything publicly.
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>> for antiquities coming out of -- >> i have not heard of any prosecution or charges? >> how about investigations #any and total -- any anecdotal evidence? >> people have been approached. buyers have been approach. i assume investigations should be going on but i have not seen any publicly. >> do you have any ideas what the obstacles to investigation would be? >> somebody just mentioned the two attorneys offices will stop cultural property is not the most well-known topic for investigators. even though the bureau does have a good team, if you think about all of the agents alone over the country and if not the world cultural property is not something that is probably the
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most -- we do not necessarily have the most expertise in our offices. >> in your testimony, you mentioned when these artifacts are intercepted at say, the southern border of the united states, they are identified in some sort of acid leverage or process but no prosecution. i suppose that is because of lack of authority? >> for instance, this syria import restriction is not a criminal provision. it is only a forfeiture. in a lot of cases that is correct. the biggest obstacle to criminal enforcement is, if this is my ancient syrian antiquity, if i am looking at it i cannot tell if it is legal or illegal. that means, if i buy it, first of all it is up to law enforcement to determine whether it is legal or illegal.
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but for prosecution may have to determine whether or not i knew we was legal or illegal. and you can only do that either through undercover investigation or through somebody who flips. you know, my bookkeeper. whatever. reports me. i think one thing that could be done is to encourage undercover investigation. thatority and finance support because it takes time to develop the personas and everything for the undercover investigation. i think that is the biggest problem. i would like to see more criminal options under import restrictions. one way of getting the criminal options is through the sanctions. those would be criminal if you violate them. at the knowledge factor is still a problem. >> did you go into more detail as to what we are looking at.
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mr. edsel: are we doing enough in the united states? --, are we doing enough in the united states? >> the white structure is a palace from the early part of the millennium. to the left of it are excavated areas, the lines that you see. all of the pits around it are looters circles. the red circles were in the two or three months before the image was taken. this spot the lender isil control in the spring of 2016. you can go back to the worst slide and we will see the difference. >> basically, at this site there
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is a very well known local village close by and they traditionally have always been the looters of that site will stop long before the fighting started. i think when things changed and syria, before isis took over, when the regime was willing back , there was no longer any oversight or scrutiny of what was going on as well as many other sites and it became a looters haven. sectors were being sold by the local organized mafia. controlled by this one local village to the highest bidder to come and the site. when a cyst took over they came upon this pre-existing situation.
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now, we the ones who issue the license is. you can't continue looting but everything has to come from us and we will take our cut from every step of the process and this has been read heated on site after site ---- this has been repeated on site after site. >> when will this be repeated. are there any other areas we should look at? >> libya without question. >> i have spoken to a libyan colleague of mine who said she does the same thing i do. she said they are already experiencing a very similar pattern of behavior in libya.
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>> there may have been a request for a second round. is there an objection? >> thing -- thank you to each of you for being with us today. i would like to get your action point. what you would do if you were in our seat. what policy changes, legislation, what works of the international community? what would you do for the antiquities? >> we need more transparency. i think mr. schendel's comments about establishing standards are correct. there's something wrong, from my perspective as a citizen coming back from a country with requirements to declare any
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currency, $10,000 or less, get a kinship works of art around the world out of the eye of them. i think there is a lot of work that can be done in that area. fbi customs needs more funding. they have a difficult situation. we have to get people who are collecting to understand there is a responsibility on their part to know where the items they get come from and there is a consequence to willful ignorance. >> giving our law enforcement more tools to work with wood bring more authority to go after folks who are the worst offenders and i with a, maybe a bit outside of the box, but bring a face to this issue. there should be more coverage i think culturally in the state department.
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this issue should be raised more so the public has a sense of the lost art. monuments men, the power of a media in culture could play into this. >> a few other things, one on the micro scale is to modernize the schedule and require people to declare precisely what they are bringing it into the country. in terms of market transparency, one thing we have not talked about is that when objects are donated to united states cultural institutions and the donor receives a tax deduction at the moment there is under the irs rules, whatever the museum may do is one thing but when the donation is reviewed by the irs
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are advisory panel it is reviewed only for the market value of the object and not for the provenance information or the title. >> on the supply and, increase support to organizations online. to prevent looting. remember, isis has already collected money when the object leaves. the demand, i would suggest like when you buy a car, there is a vehicle identification number on the car. do the same for objects. it is very simple. the onus is on the buyer and seller to make sure the information matches. you're not absolved of responsibility. >> there is a need for both short-term and long-term
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solutions and many of the great ones are short-term focused as they should be. the long-term issue goes back to what we keep saying. transparency and accurate information. know when the article is real fake, the right object they are referring to and the information associated with the object is accurate question mark the clear way to intervene today is through the financial industry. the intersection of money. technology solutions which can put vehicle identification numbers -- in effect -- on objects. the integrity must be a place for decades if not centuries but technology can do that today. that adds to the transparency that can make these specific
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intervention tactics meaningful. otherwise we're not achieving enough scale to solve the problem holistic way. >> thank you. >> with that, we would like to thank our witnesses for their testimony. we find this to be extremely helpful to our work. with that objection, all members have five legislative days with which to some additional distance to the chair, which will be forwarded to the witnesses. i ask our witnesses to respond as quickly as you are able. without objection, this meeting is adjourned. thank you.
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announcer: the next library of congress has been nominated. she will testify before the
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senate rules committee today at 13 p.m. eastern on c-span3 in c-span radio. >> saturday, april 23, is the anniversary as shakespeare's death. on that day the folder library here in washington, d.c., which has the largest collection of shakespeare memorabilia and documents in the world will be hosting an event to celebrate his influence on our world. book tv will cover that life. afterwards, we will have a live, nationwide: shakes their scholars. -- with shakespeare scholars. mr. folger and his wife spent many years and dollars collect the shakespeare memorabilia and
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documents will stop it is the world costs largest collection of shakespeare-related objects. we will be live beginning at noon from the full chair library. 400 years of shakespeare on book tv. announcer: next, ohio governor john kasich campaigns for president in annapolis maryland. governor kasich spoke about the national debt, the economy, and job training. maryland primary voters go to the polls next tuesday. [applause]
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>> thank you. again, there is a lot of new people. my name is mike and i'm the mayor of annapolis, maryland. i want to thank you all so much for coming out and supporting john kasich to be our next president. [applause] [laughter] >> it is only to cheat if i need it.
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well governor, we are proud of the work you've done as a governor, as a congressman, and of the work you're going to do as president of the united states on day one. [applause] >> i was coming here and somebody asked me, why are you supporting john kasich for president? i told them, because the country needs a strong leader to take us forward. i said, the national debt taxes, we are on an unsustainable path. when you look at someone who has the leadership to do it, we've seen that with governor kasich. let me put this in perspective. the last time the federal government was balanced was when john kasich was the budget chairman. [applause] >> we need someone who can be a commander-in-chief. america used to have a lot of respect and prominence in the
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world and some of that has gone away. i was speaking to the service academies. i was congratulating them on two new majors, cyber operations and nuclear engineering. the challenges we face in america in cyber security are historic and unprecedented. the country has never seen a threat like we face before. people from other countries are able to hack our bank accounts steal our records, and can even take control of a nuclear reactor. who is the one person running that has been on the armed service committee and has more experience than everyone combined? this man right here, john kasich. [applause] >> a lot of people ask, what is someone going to do? all you have to do is look at her record. -- they are record -- the
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record. in ohio, he took away an $8 billion deficit and created a surplus. he cut taxes, he cut regulations, and he put people back to work, which is what he's going to do for america when he's president. [applause] >> thank you. haven't cheated yet. >> you don't need it. [laughter] >> so a man who's ready to be commander-in-chief standing in this room, kind of looks like a boxing match, we need somebody who is ready to take it on. the challenges we face we've never seen before. we've got a man with leadership with vision, with passion, and a proven track record. i want you to make some noise, get excited for the next president of the united states governor john kasich! [applause]
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gov. kasich: wow, i've got to tell you, you guys have a great mayor here, don't you? young, articulate, a good leader. how old are you? >> 32. gov. kasich: and what is your experience that it took you to be mayor? >> i sent out a five-year plan. i had worked on campaigns. i managed political campaigns, worked for a software company, did government relations selling management software, other things, had a five-year plan, i set out what i want to accomplish, and it has been a blessing. gov. kasich: how many people do you represent? >> 38,000. gov. kasich: i think you've got an up and comer. don't you? everybody, have a seat. have a seat, ok?
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well, it's such a nice -- who made these signs? no ok. i thought somebody might have paid you for them. resist the rage. research, think. that is like a think tank or something, isn't it? research? no, we like the signs. they are really, really nice and you are all very nice to come out here and cram in here and we want to make sure that we take your questions. i had a really interesting day. i flew into pittsburgh last night. and this morning, i went to this place called the duquesne club. when i was a very fancy schmancy -- when i was a kid, we used to take a bus to downtown pittsburgh from my little town of mckees rocks.
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and then we would kind of walk to the different stores, my buddies and i, and we would go past this duquesne club, and there was always a red carpet in front of the duquesne club, and there was a general was always stationed there. and we would walk by and we would look like this, like wonder what goes on in there. you know? and then we would all salute the general. i found out 25 years later he was the doorman. ok? [laughter] gov. kasich: on his sleep. -- honestly. so now i've been there a couple times and we had some events and then we went to this place called the oyster house, which has been there for 125 or 130 years. they wanted to take me to some retail place, so i said the oyster house. i got to see some people who i literally hadn't seen in about 30 years. they came and gathered and i looked around, and what a country we have.
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what an amazing country. [applause] gov. kasich: i've had such a good life. my father was a mailman. he carried mail on his back. his father was a coal miner. he died of black lung and as he was getting older, he was losing his eyesight. there was nobody to stick up for my grandfather. my mother's mother could barely speak english. i remember the night she was taken from our home and she didn't survive the attack she had. she could barely speak english. my mother was one of four kids and she was the only one to have graduated from high school and really the only one to have gotten out of the eighth grade.
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my mother and father are gone, but i had some relatives there today, and we all look at one another and we are amazed. and i have to tell you that to have a beautiful crowd like this, to have people come and listen and eight -- and paint signs and whatever, i'm really humbled by it. and i want you to know that i'm just like a normal guy in a big office, ok, and i will be a normal guy in even bigger office if i would become president. [applause] gov. kasich: so i happen to believe that what i have been given in my life is -- i don't want to get anybody too uptight, but the lord has given me grace to do many things in my life. ok? [applause] gov. kasich: so when that
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happens, if you recognize it then you have to always try to honor that grace. and so for me, the thing that i've always been committed to is making sure that people like my grandfather -- there was a guy that lived catty corner from our house. he would go up in the morning and he would always have clean clothes and he would get in -- i don't remember, it was a van or a truck. he had a couple kids and a wife. she worked at the little bakery down the road, trying to make some money. usually later than my father or the other fathers in the neighborhood. he was basically a fix it man. he would come home and he would be dirty. i think about how hard they worked. i think about how they need
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somebody to speak up for them. there's two things that bother people in our country right now. i think two fundamental things. one is, people are worried about their jobs. can they keep their jobs and wages? can their wages go up? the other thing they worry about is their children's future. can our kids get an education and can i have a better life than what we have? many of you have sent your kids to school. they have an education, but they are still at home. they can't seem to find their way. i know that people are worried about that. this is not that hard to fix. if we can remember that we are americans before republicans and democrats. [applause] gov. kasich: the problem that we have is, we have not had the leadership to get people to rise
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to a higher level than how they would normally perform if they have a governmental position. leaders get people to do better. if you think about some of the great leaders, just recent leaders in our history if you , take somebody was not even american, winston churchill, he would make these addresses when the bombs were basically falling on every neighborhood in london. somehow, he would say, we're never going to give up. we are never going to give in. people would come out of their homes. things would be basically destroyed. they would sweep the streets and wait for the next bombing. he had a magic about him where he could get people to rise to a higher level. we think about reagan, saint ron. [laughter] gov. kasich: i actually knew
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saint ron. we have created this caricature or this image of him that isn't true. he was a guy that was practical. he was a conservative but he could figure out a way to get things done and he could get people to lift themselves higher than what we normally do. anytime you think about great leaders, you think about sports figures, you talk about soldiers -- no matter who it is, they are people that can get people to perform at an extraordinary level. what i've noticed in government here for a while is that we don't have the leaders to get people to do that. when you do that, it is like a flock without a shepherd. and if the shepherd doesn't guide the flock, the flock wanders around and things never work out the right way. that is what we fundamentally have been missing but there's another thing that i think we have to think about. i'm going to leave plenty of time for questions tonight.
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and that is us. today in pittsburgh, because pittsburgh is like baltimore they are two sides to the same coin -- it is neighborhoods. it is ethnicity. there's a connection, a closeness to them. when i was a kid, and i've mentioned this before and i mentioned it today in pittsburgh, our hero wasn't some politician. we had a lot of politicians that really didn't do a good job. in fact, a number of them where i grew up, a couple of them went to jail. they did. i went to my high school reunion and i had become a congressman. i was like, you know, you wear your best clothes, maybe you dye your hair. i do not dye my hair but i would have had i needed to. it is just a great thing especially if you have been
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successful. so i go to my reunion and i'm a congressman, pretty proud of myself. so i go in, the guy walks up to me, he says, johnny, i hear you are a congressman. i said, yeah. he said, i voted for you to be one of the most likely to succeed. what went wrong? [laughter] gov. kasich: now in the little neighborhood, our hero, one of them, was roberto clemente. he was a great baseball player. [applause] gov. kasich: in fact, i think clemente was on the team and we might have beat the orioles that time in a world championship. i can't remember. [laughter] gov. kasich: but we love that guy. and i only saw my mother in her lifetime probably a couple times , and one of them was the morning she came in to tell me that clemente had been killed in a plane crash headed to help , people in nicaragua who had
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been victims of an earthquake. you see, we think about what ails us and we have some politicians that want to talk about our worries and our anxieties, and they want to feed them, say that america's losing on everything. are you kidding me? our economy is bigger than the the japanese and the chinese put together. think about our life expectancy. think about our health care. think about nutrition. think about invention. we lead the world. the rest of the world tries to steal all of our stuff. but here's the thing that i want us to think about. the leader has to allow the people and the government to rise higher. when you take somebody like churchill or you take somebody like reagan, unique moment in time when they've been able to inspire the public to do better, to live a life bigger than
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themselves -- i think i was flying here from new york. i can't remember. but i met these guys. they had an airplane. and it was a small airplane. and they got to talking to me. they were from long island. i had just left new york. i had eaten my way all across new york. they started talking to me. i said, what brings you here? they said, we do this young -- we flew this young child who has cancer for treatment. there really was no way to get this done any other way. here, let me show you a picture. i said, why are you doing this? do you get paid? no. when you fly them down here, does somebody cover your expenses? we could but we do not. we just take it out of our pocket. i said, why are you doing this? he said, i probably made 25, 30 flights for different people. it is what i am supposed to do. is this your job?
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he said, it is not my job, but this is what i do. really touched me to listen to this guy talk. because i always talk about us needing to live a life bigger than ourselves. so let me get to the point. the spirit of our country doesn't lie in politicians. the spirit of our country lies in us. and somehow, over the last few years, i do not know if it is because we pay taxes and we like to tell people, go take care of it or we lost confidence in , ourselves, whether we have thought that, if i can't change the whole world, i shouldn't change any of it -- see, i happen to believe that we've all been made special and we all have a special gift. some people find it when they are 90. other people find it when they are young. but it is important we find it. because when we find it, it has
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been given to us specially to do something special. so, folks, if we want better education for our kids, and i'll send all the federal money back here, but that is not what stops us from having great education. great education is in your hands. you have to ask yourself, are we really preparing our young people for the jobs of today and the jobs of tomorrow? people yelp about common core, about the department of education. there's nothing stopping you from actually being able to fix your schools if you want to. it is really hard to do, though. it is very hard to do. because as a school reformer, i can tell you, the first thing you have to do is to stand here and run as hard as you can into that wall. [laughter] gov. kasich: but whether we want to fix our schools is not up to -- it may be up to the mayor a little bit, he is the mayor of
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this town, but it is up to us. if you want to deal with the problem of drugs -- and there isn't anywhere in this country where i don't hear some -- it is more acute than it is in other places, but the drug problem is unbelievable. and it is in every home. not in every home, but every type of home. it is in every kind of neighborhood. it is in every city. you want to get rid of the drug problem? go do it. what are we waiting on? if a community decides to wipe out the drug problem, they will. speaking of pittsburgh, when i was a kid, you would come out in the evening and there would be a fine layer of silt and dirt on every car. did you grow up there? you know what happens? the people of pittsburgh said, we are going to live like this anymore. there wasn't even a federal epa. they just made up their mind they were going to do it.
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and they went and they did it, and they cleaned up the city. when you go there, it is a shining city. it is unbelievable the renaissance that his happen there. they didn't wait for the government. they just went and did it. the same is true about poverty. you have people who are hungry. what we've got to do is get them trained. you've got to bring the business in the welfare office. when a person gets a welfare check, they get trained for a job. this is not hard. you want to fix your kids? you want to get your kids believing in something? mentor them. you don't have to wait to do this. in my city of cincinnati, they claim there is a 63% graduation rate. the businesses in cincinnati, in a high school in that system they send their employees in for an hour a week a year. the graduation rate in that high school is 97%. [applause]
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gov. kasich: so if nothing else gets accomplished tonight, i want you to think about what you're supposed to be doing. maybe it is an entrepreneur that creates a small business that hires our families. maybe it is an entrepreneur that is right up against the wall and has the pressure to let somebody go that doesn't. is that changing the world? i think it is. if you are a schoolteacher, the most underpaid people we know, they do this -- is he a schoolteacher? you are a schoolteacher? do you even have a drivers license? [laughter] gov. kasich: you are a schoolteacher? you look more like one. he looks like he would be your student. do you know what the fact is? he gives up salary and he's doing it because he's changing a life. you are trying. or a nurse.
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how about these nurses? any nurses in here? how many times, ma'am, did you get done with your shift and put in another 20 minutes because there was a family down the hall? how many times did you do that? >> a lot. gov. kasich: a lot. you did it, right. the most important thing that a nurse needs, patience. don't ever forget that. [applause] [laughter] gov. kasich: i'll be here all night. let me tell you one other thing. then we're going to get to the questions. so let's take -- i made this woman up as an example. a woman who's been married for 50 years, lost her husband. i made that woman up, and guess what, she's shown up a couple times now. she has. on the rope line. nobody calls her anymore.
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so you decide you're going to take that lady to dinner on saturday. you and your spouse. what do you think she does on thursday? where does she go? oh no. there it was. >> she goes and gets her hair done. gov. kasich: and then when you see her on saturday, i don't know how they do it, there's not one hair out of place. and then when you pick her up, she wears a dress she hadn't worn in six months. did you change the world? i think you changed the world. so there's two levels, the leadership up here the , leadership in the legislature, the school board and all that. we have to do our job. as president, my job is to raise everyone. i've done it before. we balanced the federal debt -- the federal budget.
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why does that matter? i do not have my federal debt clock appeared tonight but we are $19 trillion in debt. when the debt goes up, the job opportunities go down. when the debt goes up, the job opportunities go down. any small business people here? what do you think? how does that make you feel? and he sits on his wallet. he cannot hire anybody else because he does not know what is going to happen. and you've got to get the taxes cut for small business. and you can't have crazy regulations killing this guy. you get to a point where you just say, i don't want to do this anymore. i'm trying to help people and the government is pounding me into the ground. 186-page federal -- boy, i wish i was your accountant. i could have made a lot of money on that. and i will tell you, my view on small business, i hope the mayor is listening to this, if you are
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a small business open your doors. we will get to the rules later. we will fill the paperwork out later. just open up. that is what i believe. those are the people that can hire us. these things can be done. but it takes somebody to say, we have an obligation to improve people's lives. i've done it in washington and i have done it in ohio. finally, a lot of people have said during the debates, why does he keep talking about what he did? you know what i'm a voter too. , this person came to see me wanted to be elected in my community, and i supported this person. i wish i hadn't. because this person then turned around and raised all of our taxes. i think the best way you can tell what somebody is going to do is on the basis of what they've done. [applause]
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gov. kasich: so, anyway, my guys are going to come in here and tell me i have to go sometime so let's keep this applies -- i'm the only politician that says don't clap for me. anyway, that is about it. these things can be fixed. the country can be great, but it does not just rest in a politician. it also rests in us. we've got to carve out a better future and more hopefulness for our kids and grandkids. that is what we need to do. let me take some questions. let me have some polite applause and then we can take some questions. [applause] gov. kasich: right here, sir. you right there. >> [inaudible] gov. kasich: well, look, here is the thing that i really want you
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to know. let me tell you the greatest job is to be a pundit. let me tell you why. well, i was a little bit different and i'm going to explain to you why if you just let me finish, ok? because you get paid for talking and it doesn't matter whether you know what you're talking about or not. it is the greatest job going. god created pundits to make astrologers look accurate. [laughter] [applause] gov. kasich: now, there are no rules for the convention. none have been created yet. even if they create rules, it does not really matter, because you can be nominated for the floor at a national convention. here's what is happening. nobody is going to get enough delegates. i mean, the trump organization
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is complaining all the time about all this and that, and you know why? because they know they are not going to get enough votes. so we are going to be deadlocked. and then what delegates are going to do is they are going to consider, i think fundamentally two things. this one is crazy. who could win in the fall? [laughter] [applause] gov. kasich: now, i beat hillary consistently in every single national poll. everyone. [applause] gov. kasich: ok. and then they have this electoral thing, where these people, i don't know who they are, but they are apparently pretty respectable, they went and surveyed 40,000 people and charted out the electoral college.
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hillary smashed the two guys i'm running against and i beat hillary decisively. so they are going to take a look at this because if we pick somebody with very high negatives, which they have -- some people are angry, but i tell you ultimately, people don't like politicians who they don't like. they just don't. i've got to tell you, when i was governor, after my first year -- because i had to change everything -- when i was governor, we were 355,000 jobs down, we were $8 billion in the hole, our credit was falling and i shook the state from top to bottom. people were like, what is this guy doing? i was at the end of my first year the most unpopular governor in america, but i didn't care about the polls. i didn't even want to go back into politics but i felt i had to.
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by the way when i told my wife , she says, you were a congressman for 18 years, state senator for four years, you've been out 10 years and things are great. now you want to go back into the government. that is really just great, john. [laughter] gov. kasich: but the point is, it took me a year to fix the negatives. then people began to see good results. we are now up 420,000 private sector jobs. our credit is great. the mentally ill, the drug addicted, all given a chance. i believe with economic growth comes opportunity for everyone. just like if a mom and dad do better, the kids do better. when the economy does better, we can help people who we traditionally don't help. but when you have these skyhigh negatives, nobody is voting for you.
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and it is interesting because my positives are the highest in the field, which is great. so i think the delegates are going to look and say, if we nominate somebody that is going to get crushed, we lose the supreme court, we use the united states senate, we lose majorities in the state houses. it will be a wipeout. i know what it looks like when that wave comes at you. that is the number one thing they're going to think about. number two, this is even crazier than the first thing about can win in the fall. who could be president? they are going to think about that. [applause] gov. kasich: so i believe the delegates will look at that. i think they are going to make a pick my way, that is what i believe. and there's one other thing. i'm the only one here with the positive message, the unifying
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message. i think the party ought to have a choice when it comes to that. [applause] gov. kasich: so let me recommend, if you like cooking watch the cooking channel. if you like golf, watch the golf channel. keep off the news. it will put you in a bad mood. [laughter] gov. kasich: i didn't really mean it. yes, ma'am? right here. >> thank you. what is your plan for low income health care, and what are you going to do to expand, improve or do anything about it as a republican? gov. kasich: that is a good question because if we run around saying we are going to get rid of obamacare and it throws tens of millions of people who don't have any insurance, how do you think that is going to go over? i'll give you a story. i was in maine, looking for a restaurant, and i had gone to see the governor. so i saw this guy and i interrupted and i said, have you
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lived here your whole life? he said, not yet. anyway -- [laughter] gov. kasich: so i went -- he told me where the restaurant was and i saw this little shop. i thought i could buy something for my wife. i go inside and this lady looks at me and says, who are you? i said i'm just here on , business. she says, ok. i said, by the way, what do you think of your governor? she said, i hate him. i said, why is that? she said, i spent my whole life trying to get health care and now that i have it the , republicans want to take it away. i just want you to think about this for a second. could you imagine not having health care? you would lose everything you have if you get sick. but obamacare is not the answer. there's three reasons why it is not. number one, the cost of medicine is still going through the roof.
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number two, the cost of health insurance has gone up by an average of 80%. number three, small business people, they do not even want to expand because they are afraid they are going to get caught in it. i would get rid of it except for one provision. nobody should be denied health insurance because they have a pre-existing condition. [applause] gov. kasich: in addition to that, i think we can take some federal resources, combine it with medicaid, which i want to send back to the state, and you could create an exchange. my own exchange in ohio so people could shop, and you can get the working poor the health care they need. but that is not the end of it. because we have to control these costs. this is very complicated, but here's what we are doing in a nutshell. we want total transparency. we want to know what our hospitals charge and we want to know their quality.
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we don't know any of this. we don't know why. i got a hospital bill the other day because i get treated for high pressure in my eyes. i give it to my wife and said, we have the dead sea scrolls here? it would be easier for me to understand them than this hospital bill. we really do not know how our doctors are doing what they charge, or what their quality is. all we do know is our deductibles are going through the roof. what we are doing, actually doing in our state, the seventh-largest state in the country, is with this information, and the transparency of hospitals and doctors, we're going to force them to compete -- not us, the government -- but the market system themselves, by making sure that we reward people who have lower prices and high quality, below the average.
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so if you have a primary care doctor and the primary care doctor keeps you healthy for a year, we will give him or her a financial payment for having driven down the cost of your health insurance. has to be high quality and lower prices. see right now, all the pressure is to raise health care because we do not know anything about it. if the pressure comes to be high quality at lower prices, then we begin to control these rising costs of health insurance. i didn't just create this out of the blue. we have every major hospital system and every insurance provider in the state that is involved in this, and all i told them is we will have a meeting but you decide. a hospital like the cleveland clinic is involved in these decisions. i want to do this nationally. i want to make sure we put downward pressure on health care so one more time, you go to the hospital, you get quality service at a lower price. because right now, sir, you don't know about your hospital. you don't know about the infection rate. you don't know about the
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readmission rate. and when all that becomes clear we become consumers. we control our health care better and we know what the heck is going on. and that is the direction i believe we need to go in, in this country. [applause] gov. kasich: are those crayons? what grade are you teaching? >> i teach fifth grade and it was a gift from a student. so i was in the teacher's lounge and we were trying to talk politics -- gov. kasich: that is not a good thing to be doing. >> but every time i bring your name up they say, you hate the teachers lounge. my students want to know what is your favorite topping on pizza. gov. kasich: let me handle the hardest one first. pepperoni.
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now here is what i think, and go back and tell them, and this proves my point. i was in new hampshire and i was at this education summit, and somebody said if you were king or whatever, what would you do? i said, i would eliminate teachers lounges. somebody said why. do you know why? teachers, many times by a union that is hostile, they will pound the teachers down and say we are going to take your pay, take your benefits. am i right? and then we expect them to go out and teach our kids. so what i am thinking is, if we do not have as lounges where people would just make each other feel bad like they were going to lose their job, or
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benefits their pay, and everything else, then it would be better. as i think we need to be able to measure how our teachers are doing, but i think we need to hold our teachers up, and the reason is because they are with our specials. i have two 16-year-old daughters. i was on anderson cooper with them. one of them, anderson asked whether she wanted to go into politics and i was delighted to hear, she said maybe, that i want to make a whole lot of money first. this is all under your control because i'm going to send 100 for federal programs back to the state, but here is what the problem is. i do not believe we are currently having flexible education system where we as common sense, get kids out into the community so they can sample
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occupations, and i'm not convinced we are training them for the jobs of today and tomorrow. i will give you a good example. instead of taking spanish, i would have rather taken the language of the computer because that is going to be a lot more valuable. i'm not expecting to be some sort of a spanish diplomat. i would love to learn how to use the computer. we are not very flexible in schools and to me, we have to shake the system. i am going to give you a story about something. we have a town in ohio called youngstown that has had a very hard time, lost a lot of industry. it is coming back now, doing very well. the youngstown schools in the last nine years has had a college ready rate of 1%.
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1%. so i asked through the legislature this provision, that if a school fails three years in a row that i, the governor can appoint a body that rides over the school board because school boards can be very political. and to straighten this out -- where did i get this from? the mayor of cleveland came to see me along with the teachers union and along with the business community, and they asked me to make this come the superintendent of the school, the ceo of the school, so this guy to change the whole operation because the schools were not performing. i like that idea because i think we should put kids first. nine straight years that the had only 1% college ready. when i passed this legislation they sued me to block this. what were they thinking? guess what, they lost the court
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case. and we are going to move forward and fix those schools and return the power to the school board but we are going to stick up for kids. what happens to those kids that do not get a good education? i am passionate about kids and teachers, but i do not think we should let anybody stand between us and our children when it comes to giving them the skills they need to get a job period. and of story. [applause] gov. kasich: in these meetings, somebody is always lobbying for somebody. you had a lobby, pick him. >> i care a lot about renewable energy and i know that maryland is thinking about increasing our renewable energy standard. i know that in ohio, the state
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legislature has actually put a freeze on the energy standard and i know you have come out against it. i am wondering if you are going to keep us increasing the energy standard, and as president how would you continue to do that? gov. kasich: i do believe that there is climate change and i do believe that we impact climate, but so do a lot of other countries more than we do. what can we do about it? we can promote efficiency, greater efficiency in all of our buildings. the second thing that we can do is to promote renewables which are wind and solar and geothermal, any of these things. i love the tesla, the battery car, and that is going to be the big breakthrough. when we get battery technology that is transformative, it is going to transform our lives. you can mandate anything you
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want at that does not mean you can achieve it. the you play golf? what do you do? >> i played baseball. gov. kasich: do you pitch? i am going to mandate for you to throw the ball 100 miles per hour. can you do it? no, you cannot. [laughter] gov. kasich: and somebody will say, he was putting that kid down. but i did meet the next cal ripken. where is that kid? where is he? come on up here, kiddo. [applause] gov. kasich: i am going to demonstrate something for you. what is your name again? ok jake, i want you to take your stance.
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he is in perfect position, as the hands right, as the weight on the back foot, and let me see your follow-through. that is the next cal ripken. give it to me. so i want to go back. you cannot throw it on hundred miles per hour. politicians set the standard at a level we cannot achieve so that means we have to buy out-of-state power which will drive up the cost of industry and i would not like to lose industry, i would like to get more. by the way, we are up over 60,000 manufacturing jobs since i have come in. the legislature got carried away and one point and our standard was like, 20% or 25% and i wanted to just get rid of it.
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i said, we will reset it to fit the economy of ohio because i believe we can have economic and environmental growth. they are going to have to come with a common sense plan because if they try to kill it we will go back to the unattainable number that they set. that is called leverage, i have leverage, and i think it will work itself out. i do not want to worship the environment that i want to take care of it because we need to leave it for our children and grandchildren. we have this beautiful day. i was thrilled that we were in here and not on the rocks looking out over the water but nevertheless, this is great. this is a beautiful, uniform place, and we do not want to lose it, we want to preserve it. i have been told here that governor ehrlich, my buddy, is here tonight.
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where is bob? [applause] gov. kasich: bob, i just want to point out that half the room did not stand. he is a dear friend of mine. christopher shays is here, congressman shays, he has another great one. come here for one second. come on up here. once in a while even billy graham had a testimony from someone else every once in a while. this is my great pal and we served together on the budget committee when we balanced the budget. this is unbelievable, he moved to new hampshire to help me campaign. he lives close to hear.
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he lives in saint michaels. so he went to new hampshire and spent about a month up there and then had to leave and go overseas. i was really happy about that because his wife took his place. chris, why don't you talk a little bit about our time together? mr. shays: i have attended probably 50 town meetings and this is the most important town meeting for you. everything he said tonight is fresh and alive, and he has done it continually. but what you have done for him is you just make him feel so special and make him feel so appreciated, i just love these town hall meetings and i love being with all of you. the point i make the you is that john can get you to do things you do not think you can do. when i was in the budget
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committee, his first budget, 30 of us supported it and it cap growing and when we were in the majority, he walks in with his arm around a democrat and says, we are going to pass a balanced budget and do it with the help of the democrats. i thought, yeah right. we did it for years in a row. we got to the place where the bond dealers were unhappy because we were buying them back, pain back debt. the point i would make to you is everything you see is for real. i ache thinking that he has to even explain to people why he should be president. when i see who he is running against and i see the opportunity we have. john, you are the best. [applause] gov. kasich: that was exactly
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the way that i wrote it. that was perfect. [laughter] >> hello, governor kasich. thank you for coming to maryland to meet with us. the first thing i want to say is thank you because the last few elections i have not felt like there was a candidate with integrity. it was always we are voting for the last of two evils. -- the less of two evils. gov. kasich: i am just a slob trying to make it through. you do the best you can. the great thing about our lord as we get a mulligan every day to clean up our act. i will do the best i can but do not get carried away. go ahead. >> i have two questions. with health care, everybody
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focuses on low income health care and then there is the upper class that can afford to pay for health care, and somewhere in the middle is the middle class where my husband is self-employed, and we pay $14,000, $15,000 a year in premiums for an hmo that we do not use much. it just seems like we are working to pay for the what if's in health care, so my first question would be, what is your plan to help us? gov. kasich: the plan i talked about will put downward pressure is then your husband is going to be able to shop in a more effective way for better quality at lower prices. that is what really gets down to. we have had experience, and you are right about this, particularly the low income. the lowest income folks get medicaid and the upper income
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folks get what they want, although i have got to tell you i know a lot of people who are very wealthy and have had very bad health outcomes. i think it is connected to the fact that we do not understand what is out there. with more transparency, there is more clarity. with health care, we do not know what anything costs and we do not know if it works, so why don't we just change that? >> my second question is fast forward to seven years from now when you have been in office for a good seven years. what the top two or three things -- gov. kasich: that i would like to see? >> that you would like to see as your legacy that you have helped all americans? gov. kasich: i think first of all, we have got to have economic growth. i was in baltimore last week and
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i was talking about so many of the problems that we had seen. somebody said to me, if we had job opportunities and job growth, most of these problems would go away. so if i and the doctor of job growth and you come to me and say, what do i do to get better job growth? i say, do not over regulate and kill this guy's business. number two, lower his taxes. the small businesses in ohio do not pay any income tax. isn't that amazing? we cut taxes by $5 million in light of having an $8 million hole. this is not that complicated you just have to figure it out and finally, you have got to have a fiscal plan. you cannot put your budget together with bailing wire so if
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you can get the jobs going, and that is what we did when we balanced the budget. that formula works. if you come back to me and say i am not feeling very well i have regulated you out of business raised your taxes, and blew up the budget because nobody is doing right, and i do not know why we do not feel well. number one is to get the economic growth. secondly, you have got to transform your schools. when this guy and i were in school, i'm going to tell you we had kids in our classroom who would put their hands down on the desk -- do you remember that -- and they would graduate and get a job in the steel mill and make decent money. those jobs do not exist anymore so the question is, are we training kids for the new type of jobs?
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by the way, i was somewhere and they were talking about utica, new york. maybe it was watertown, but we are losing our oreo factory. it is moving to mexico. let me ask you -- what would you rather make, oreo cookies or computer chips? we have got to have a workforce that is trained to do it. when i said about the mentoring and all those things are so critical, and the education system. we need to honor the high school guidance counselor because the guidance counselor is supposed to find out what our kids want to do, and help them get to where they want to get to. in our colleges and universities we have to have academic advisors to connect the students. when you say, what do you want to be, and when they give you a sense you start directing them.
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these are the things that would transform education. and then i think on welfare look, i'm going to give you my philosophy. it is a sin not to help somebody who does not need help but it is also a sin to continue to help somebody who needs to learn how to help himself. [applause] gov. kasich: i mean, our inner cities, it is tough. and what i say about education and lifting people is really critical, and getting people trained for jobs including things like vocational education for those who do not want to go to a four-year school. it is so important to lift those people. and we need to have adult education. education has to be all of our lifetime so we remain current and acquire skills. i have to also tell you, in some of our homes, there are kids
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that wake up in the morning and they are afraid to go outside because they hear gunshots. that is a tough situation to fix , but we are not giving up on those kids. those boys and girls deserve a future as well. the problem of this deep poverty and all that, it is a challenge we have to focus on, but he is the answer, the small business person who can come into the community. there is also an opportunity to push people out of the ditch. if you are driving down the road and it is icy, and you see somebody in a ditch you pull them out. when you turn around and day after day they are in the ditch you lose interest. when i would also like to see, a more engaged and spirited population. i would like to see all of us
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caring more about one another and getting back to having somewhat of an american consensus about our responsibility to ourselves and to our neighbors. i think that is important as well, and you cannot do that writing laws. the other thing i want to tell you is we have to lead the world as if we do not these are berean's, -- these barbarians they are after us. we have to bring the world together so these kinds of people cannot prosper anymore. we need to rebuild the military. [applause] gov. kasich: i'm going to tell you one other thing. i know we have to go, but i have to do more here. so i was in new york and we stopped at this little deli and this lady comes in and says, i saw on facebook that you were here.
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i said, that is great. it was nice. she came over and she said, i just am sick of all this foreign aid. if we could get rid of all of the foreign aid we would be great. so i asked her, when there is an earthquake or flood or anything like that, and a country gets destroyed, do you think we should help them? yes. i said, secondly, when we put our troops in japan or korea -- where, by the way they are spending lots of money to support them -- do you think we are doing that for them? she said, i never thought of it that way. i said, that helps us. if we have troops in europe, and we do not have as many as we used to, and we are giving a message to putin that you are
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not going to, and invade anymore countries, who is that for? is that for them or for us? [applause] gov. kasich: these simplistic solutions to the problems we have, i was in pittsburgh yesterday. trump said, i'm going to bring the steel industry back to pittsburgh. and i said, everybody who lives in pittsburgh is going to be a billionaire. everybody here is going to own their own hotel. great. let me just tell you something what i worry about in this country is the draft. if hillary and bernie were to be elected, we are at $19 trillion in debt, it would be $30 trillion. i tell these young people on the college campus, you want to get a job $30 trillion in national debt, i do not think you will get a good job.
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the other guys have never accomplished anything. so what are we going to do drift? can we fix social security? piece of cake. you are not going to get as much as you thought you were going to get, but the lady who totally depends on it, she is going to get as much as she needs. that is number one. number two, you want to balance the budget. let me show you something. see this? my children, a number of years ago, we were on vacation and they said, daddy, what is that box over there? i said, that is where superman changes his clothes. mom and dad used to put coins in their to make a phone call. they are like, no way.
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so think about this -- everything is changing. let me tell you time is going to come you are not going to go to the doctor most of the time. you are going to be monitored at home. transportation, you can go from one part of manhattan to another for like nothing, and you do not even need a taxi anymore. they say we are going to have flying cars. i completely believe it because i saw chitty chitty bang bang. let me tell you a couple other things. inc. about medicine. we can complain about medicine. my uncle george came to the duquesne club today to see me. he is 90 years old. he walks in -- i said, did you walk today? he said, i walked two miles. when business does not change, it dies.
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when government does not change, we get punished. and we have to think about bringing innovation and excitement and change to the way the world works. that is the way -- that is the 21st century. all of those things together can lift us. let me just tell you we are not going anywhere but up if we get this but if we drift, it is going to be a problem. let me just say to all of you we are competing here in your great state. and i even let the maryland basketball team beat ohio state a couple times this year. and depending on the primary, we will look at the football programs. but i have got to go because i have to head into d.c. or
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somewhere. look at this. >> thank you for fighting for us. gov. kasich: look at these. hold on. remember when he voted against me? come over and give me a high five. [applause]
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>> i told them that you will be the next president. gov. kasich: and no fighting. thank you. thank you. >> thank you for fighting for
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our military. >> absolutely, and our veterans. >> i already voted for you. gov. kasich: thank you. thank you, i hope you enjoyed it. [indistinguishable] >> john, i am from ohio.
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i am part of a grassroots organization. i want to know, 16 million dedicated to heroin. is any of it going to go to the nonprofits? gov. kasich: i will get a call to you. >> i am in maryland with my husband. i almost had a nervous breakdown. i am a mother that will not quit. gov. kasich: i agree with you. >> that is why we are saving lives. i have went through three of these myself. gov. kasich: and you know what? i know so many people like you.
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>> you know, we can pray all we want to, but until we get it under control and get these doctors -- you know a first-year doctor can only have 10 patients drug? after the first year, you can have 50. montgomery county's number two. ohio is number two in the nation. gov. kasich: we are shutting down pill mills. >> in the mcdonald's. gov. kasich: i know. let me tell you something, the
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number of those on opiates has dropped. >> we know that. will you speak at our rally? gov. kasich: you mean here? >> dayton, ohio. gov. kasich: we have to take out isis. that is what we have to do. we take out isis and i really want to come home.
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then we need good intelligence and good communication. you know what, i can tell you this, he is proud of what he is doing. >> i will hold you to your word. i will not give up. gov. kasich: i understand the issue but i have got to go. >> thank you governor.
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>> democratic presidential >> hillary clinton won the new york democratic presidential primary last night and over on the republican side, donald trump one. we will hear the candidates on c-span. american history tv on c-span3 this weekend, saturday evening at 6:00 eastern, edward bonnie
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camper discusses his book the myth of the lost cause. he examines postwar arguments made by former confederates trying to justify their split from the union and their defeat. the civil war, how it started and why it ended. >> to explain why it was that this devastation had occurred and that for example 25% of southern white men between the ages of 20 and 45 were dead, not just casualties, they were dead as a result of the civil war. >> sunday morning at 10:00, the 1988 candidate -- campaign of gary hart. a new hampshire news conference where he faced questions about an alleged extramarital affair with a miami woman and withdrawal from the race.
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smithsonian national gallery portrait curator on the lights of dolores suerta and her rights in the farmers rights movement. >> to negotiate contracts, she was at the forefront of that effort. [indiscernible] >> and at 8:00 on the presidency -- >> he just kind of said, those son of a bitches, did they ever invite me to play golf at their fancy country clubs? did any of them invite me to their clubs? it just goes on and on. >> that is one of the few times in those three and a half plus
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years that i was so close to him , he was a very well contained disciplined man, but he erupted when he was talking to don. he hated them for it. >> former net sin deputy assistant alexander butterfield reflects on the former president's personality and policy from watergate to vietnam. go to c-span.org for the complete schedule. >> democratic presidential candidate hillary clinton held a campaign rally in new york following her primary victory in the state. before the new york results bernie sanders had won eight of , the last nine contests.
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[alicia keys singing "new york"] >> ♪ now you are in new york the streets will make you feel brand-new the lights will inspire you here in new york where dreams are made there's nothing you can't do count on new york. these streets will make you feel brand-new these lights will inspire you let's hear it for new york what dreams are made of there's nothing you can't do, count on neo--- count on new york these streets will make you feel brand-new these lights will inspire you let's hear it for new york new york, new york ♪ ♪ [cheers and applause]
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♪ hillary clinton: thank you, new york! [crowd chanting] >> hillary hillary! ms. clinton: you know, today you proved once again there is no place like home. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: you know, in this campaign, we have won in every region of the country. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: from the north
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to the south, to the east to the west, but this one is personal. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: new yorkers you always -- you have always had my back. and i have always tried to have yours. today, together, we did it again, and i am deeply grateful. i want to thank everyone who came out and voted, and to all of you across new york who have known me and worked with me for so long. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: it is humbling that you trust me with the awesome responsibilities that await our next president. [cheers and applause]
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hillary clinton: and to all the people who supported senator sanders, i believe there is much more that unites us than divides us. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: you know, we started this race not far from here on roosevelt island. pledging to build on the progressive tradition that has done so much for america, from franklin roosevelt to barack obama. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: and tonight, a little less than a year later, the race for the democratic nomination is in the home stretch and victory is in sight! [cheers and applause]
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[crowd chanting "hillary"] hillary clinton: i want to say to all of my supporters and all of the voters, you have carried us every step of the way with passion and determination that some critics tried to dismiss. because of you, this campaign is the only one, democrat or republican, to win more than 10 million votes. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: but i am going forward because more voices remain to be heard. and tomorrow, it is on to connecticut, delaware, maryland,
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pennsylvania, rhode island, and beyond. we need you to keep volunteering. i hope you will join the 1.1 million people who have already contributed at hillaryclinton.com. and by the way, most with less than $100. because we have more work to do. under the bright lights of new york, we have seen it is not enough to diagnose problems. you have to explain how you would actually solve the problems. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: that is what we have to do together for our kids, for each other, for our country. so i want you with me to imagine a tomorrow where no barriers hold you back and all of our
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people can share in the promise of america. imagine a tomorrow where every parent can find a good job and every grandparent can enjoy a secure retirement. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: where no child grows up in the shadow of discrimination or under the spectre of deportation. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: where hard work is honored, families are supported, and communities are strong. a tomorrow where we trust and respect each other, despite our differences. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: because we are going to make positive differences in people's lives. that is what this is supposed to be about, actually helping people and each other. [cheers and applause]
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hillary clinton: now, we all know -- [crowd chanting "hillary"] hillary clinton: we all know too many people who are still hurting. i see it everywhere i go. the great recession wiped out jobs, homes, and savings. and a lot of americans have not yet recovered. but i still believe with all my heart that, as another great democratic president once said "there is nothing wrong with america that cannot be cured by what is right with america." [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: that is, after all, what we have always done. it is who we are. america is a problem-solving nation. in this campaign, we are setting
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bold, progressive goals backed up by real plans that will improve lives, creating more good jobs that provide dignity and pride and a middle-class life. raising wages and reducing inequalities. making sure all our kids get a good education no matter what zip code they live in! [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: building ladders of opportunity and empowerment, so all of our people can go as far as their hard work and talent will take them. let's revitalize places that have been left out and left behind, from inner cities to coal country to indian country. and let's put americans to work rebuilding our crumbling infrastructure, including our failing water systems like the one in flint, michigan. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: there are many places across our country where
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children and families are at risk from the water they drink and the air they breathe. let's combat climanergy superpower of the 21st century. let's take on the challenge of systemic racism, invest in communities of color. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: and finally pass comprehensive immigration reform. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: and once and for all, let's guarantee equal pay for women! [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: and we are going to keep our families safe and our country strong. and we are going to defend our rights. civil rights, voting rights, workers rights, women's rights
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lgbt rights, and rights for people with disabilities. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: those are after all, new york values. and they are american values. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: and just as we did in this primary campaign, we need to stand up for them through the general election and every day after that. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: you know, it is becoming clearer that this may be one of the most consequential elections of our lifetimes. donald trump and ted cruz -- [crowd booing] hillary clinton: are pushing a vision for america that is
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divisive, and frankly dangerous. returning to trickle down economics, opposing any increase in the minimum wage, restricting a woman's right to make her own health care decisions. promising to round up millions of immigrants, threatening to ban all muslims from entering the country. [crowd booing] hillary: clinton: planning to treat american muslims like criminals. these things go against everything america stands for. and we have a very different vision. it is about lifting each other up, not tearing each other down. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: so instead of building walls, we are going to break down barriers. and in this campaign, i have seen again our remarkable diversity and determination.
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this is a state and a country of bighearted, open-minded, straight talking, hard-working people. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: you know, like john, the firefighter from the south bronx that i met shortly after 9/11 as he searched for survivors at ground zero. and like so many others, john got sick from breathing thec air. when we met again last week, he gave me a replica of his fdny badge and thanked me for helping our first responders get the health care they need. we have to keep fighting for john and all of our firefighters and our police officers our , emergency responders, and the construction workers who did so much for us. [cheers and applause]
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hillary clinton: or maxine, a 27-year-old single mom from staten island, who is here tonight. she shared with me how she worked her way out of poverty, graduated from college, thanks in part to the help she got for her child from the children's health insurance program that we started in the 1990's! [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: or mikey, who spent -- is mikey here? i will tell you, mikey spent six months in rikers for a low-level drug offense. and he found out how hard it is for people who have done their time to find jobs when they make it out.
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mikey managed to start his own ice cream shop. i took a lot of you there yesterday. i highly recommend it. as you might have seen, i could not stop myself from eating it as soon as i got it. by the way, he made a concoction for me called "victory." [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: mikey is one of the many reasons why we have to reform our criminal justice system. [cheers and applause] hillary: clinton: and ban the box so others have a fair chance to succeed. new yorkers and americans speak every language, follow every faith, hail from every continent. our diversity is one of our greatest strengths in the 21st century, not a weakness.
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as robert kennedy, whose senate seat i was honored to hold, once said, "we are a great country, an unselfish country, and a compassionate country." and no matter what anyone tells you or what you might hear from others running for president that is still true today. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: america is great. and we can do great things if we do them together. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: so, please join us. text to join, go to hillaryclinton.com. be part of this campaign. i know how important it is that we get the campaign's resources from people just like you who
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go in and chip in $5, $25. i am grateful to every one of you. and to the volunteers who have worked your hearts out -- [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: to the community leaders, members of the state senate and assembly, county executives, mayors of cities large and small, and to the mayor of new york, and our borough president, and our city council members. and to our governor, our senators, our congressional delegates. and all my friends across this wonderful state of hours, thank you. we are going to go up against some powerful forces that will do, say, and spend whatever it takes to stop us, but remember, it is not whether you get knocked down, it is whether you
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get back up. [cheers and applause] hillary: clinton: and finally let me say this. there is a remarkable young woman here tonight. her name is erica. she lives the truth of what i have been saying every day. erica's mother was the principle of sandy hook elementary school. and she died trying to protect her children, her students. erica was devastated, as any
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family member is. and she could not imagine life without her mom. but then, she got thinking. she got back up. she had never been involved in politics before. she has made it her mission to advocate for commonsense gun safety reform. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: like the mothers of eric gardner -- eric garner and trayvon martin, erica has turned her mourning into a movement, and it is not easy.
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as she said the other day, what if everyone who faced tough odds said it is hard so i'm going to walk away? that is not the type of world that i want to live in. erica, it is not the type of world we want to live in, and we refuse to live in that. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: so my friends that is the spirit that makes this country great. new yorkers pulled together and rebuild our city after the worst terrorist attack in our history, and how americans worked our way back from the worst economic crisis in our lifetime. we are going to break down all the barriers holding us back. the motto of this state is excelsior or, ever upward. let's win this election and all
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rise together. thank you so much. [cheers and applause] [alicia keys singing "new york"] >> ♪ let's hear it for new york where dreams are made of, there's nothing you can't do count on new york these lights will make you feel brand-new, the lights will inspire you let's hear it for new york i remember when dreams are made
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of, there's nothing you can't do count on new york these streets will make you feel brand-new, the lights will inspire you let's hear it for new york remember what dreams are made of , there's nothing you can't do count on new york the streets will make you feel brand-new, the lights will inspire you let's hear it for new york, new york, new york ♪ ♪ ♪ remember what dreams are made
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of there's nothing you can't do count on new york these streets will make you feel brand-new, these lights will inspire you let's hear it for new york remember what dreams are made of there's nothing you can't do count on new york these streets will make you feel brand-new, these lights will inspire you let's hear it for new york remember what dreams are made of there's nothing you can't do count on new york the streets will make you feel brand-new, these lights will inspire you let's hear it for new york
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remember what dreams are made of there's nothing you can't do count on new york the streets will make you feel brand-new, these lights will inspire you let's hear it for new york, new york, new york ♪ ♪ [captioning performed by the national captioning institute, >> ♪ i had a dream so big and loud i'd jumped so high i touched a cloud i stretched my hands up to the sky we danced with monsters through the night
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i'm never going to look back i'm never going to give it up, no please don't wake me now this is going to be the best day of my life my li-i-i-i-ife i howled at the moon with friends and then the sun came crashing in but all the possibilities no limits, just epiphanies i'm never going to look back
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i'm never going to give it up, no just don't wake me now this is going to be the best day of my life my li-i-i-ife this is going to be the best day of my life my li-i-i-ife i hear it calling outside my window i feel it in my soul the stars were shining so bright , the sun was out till midnight i say we lose control
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this is going to be the best day of my life my li-i-i-ife this is going to be the best day of my life my li-i-i-ife ♪ ♪ >> during campaign 2016, c-span takes you on the road to the white house as we follow the candidates on c-span, c-span radio, and c-span.org. >> c-span's washington journal live every day with news and policy issues that impact you. coming up this morning, north
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carolina republican congressman on combating terrorism and unconventional warfare. he will also tell us whether he thinks the 2016 presidential candidates are well-versed on the issue. california democratic congressman talks about president obama's visit to saudi arabia. the national park service director joins us to talk about the upcoming 100 birthday of the national park service transit visitor ship and the latest legend challenges facing the service. washington journal begins live at 7:00 a.m. this morning. join the discussion. >> republican presidential candidate donald trump won his home state of new york and one all of the 95 delegates. he spoke to supporters at the trump tower for about 10 minutes.
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>> ladies and gentlemen, please welcome the next president of the united states, mr. donald j. trump. [frank sinatra singing "new york"] ♪ >> these vagabond shoes are longing to stray right through the very heart of it new york, new york i want to wake up in a city that doesn't sleep and find i'm king of the hill
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top of the heap these little town blues are melting away i'll make a brand-new start of it in old new york if i can make it there i'll make it anywhere it's up to you, new york, new york new york, new york
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i want to wake up in a city that never sleep and find i'm a number one, top of the hill ♪ ♪ mr. trump: i have to say to the people that know me the best the , people of new york, when they give us this kind of vote, it is just incredible. i guess we are close to 70%, and we are going to end a high level and get a lot more delegates , than anybody projected, even in their wildest imaginations. so i just want to thank everybody here. i want to thank my family. [cheers and applause] >> [chanting "usa"] mr. trump: i really want to thank my team. my team has been amazing. you know, it is actually a team of unity. it is evolving, but people don't understand it.
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the press does understand it. they just don't want to talk about it. that is ok. just keep talking. it is very important. keep talking. this has been incredible evening, an incredible day and week. we went all over new york state. new york state has problems like virtually every other state in the union. our jobs are being sucked out of our state. they are being taken out of our country. we are not going to let it happen anymore. we are going to stop it. very importantly, and behind me i have to say, we have some of our great businessmen of the world. carl icahn is here someplace. where is carl? ben lebeau, the great steve ross. steve is building a big building on central park south. it is a tremendous success. they said steve, congratulations on the building. he said, donald, it is nothing compared to what is happening with you. anyway, we are proud of him. we have our great leaders.
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it has been really something. it has really been something amazing. believe me, we are going to use our great business people to negotiate unbelievable trade deals so we bring our jobs back and we don't let our companies go to mexico and all of these other countries anymore. we are going to keep the jobs here. you are going to be very proud of this country very soon. we are going to build our military bigger, better, stronger than ever before. [cheers and applause] mr. trump: nobody is going to mess with us. that i can tell you. we are going to take care of our vets. vets are great people. we have forgotten our vets. illegal immigrants are taking -- are taken care of in many cases better than our vets. that is not going to happen anymore. that is not going to happen.
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we are getting rid of obamacare. it is going to be repealed and replaced. it is a total disaster with premiums going up 35%, 45%, 55%. it is going to probably end of its own volition. we are getting rid of it. we are bringing common core, knocking it out, we're cutting it. it is going to be over, and we are bringing education locally. local communities will take care of their educational needs. people have been waiting for that for a long time. with all of the things that have happened today, tonight, and over the week, i tell you what this has been an amazing week. all over new york state, we want to syracuse, we went to albany. 20,000 people. on average, we would have 15,000 to 20,000 people. we went to rochester. we went all over. and you know what? the people of this country and the people of this state truly are great and amazing people. we are going to be so strong again.
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really. legitimately so great again. and i just can't wait. so, we don't have much of a race anymore based on what i am seeing on television. senator cruz is just about mathematically eliminated. [cheers and applause] mr. trump: and we have won another state. as you know, we have won millions of more votes than senator cruz. millions and millions more votes than governor kasich. especially after tonight, we have close to 300 delegates more than senator cruz. we are really, really rocking. we expect we are going to have an amazing number of weeks because these are places in big trouble. when you look at pennsylvania, when you look at indiana, when
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you look at maryland and rhode island and so many places, we have problems everywhere you look. we are going to solve those problems. [applause] mr. trump: one of the big problems is the economy and jobs. and that is my wheelhouse. again, i want to thank everybody. it is really nice to win the delegates with the votes. you know? it is really nice. [applause] [crowd chanting "trump"] mr. trump: nobody should be given delegates, which is a ticket to victory. and it is not a fair ticket. even though we are leading by a lot and cannot be caught, it is impossible to catch us, nobody should take delegates and claim victory unless they get those delegates with voters and voting. that is what is going to happen.
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you watch, because the people are not going to stand for it. it is a crooked system. it is a system that is rigged. we are going to go back to the old way. it is called you vote and you win. we will be going into the convention no matter what happens, and i think we are going to go in so strong. over the next number of weeks, we just saw a poll out of california which is an unbelievable poll. we are going to go into the convention i think as the winner. but nobody can take an election away with the way they are doing it in the republican party. and by the way, i am no fan of bernie. but i have seen bernie win, win, win. and then i watch, and they say he has no chance of winning. so they have their superdelegates. the republican system is worse. i want to just thank everybody. i have great admiration and praise for the city of new york and the state of new york.
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i can think of nowhere that i would rather have this victory. so we love you all. have a great evening. we celebrate. and tomorrow morning, we go back to work. i am flying tomorrow morning to indiana. i'm going to pennsylvania. i will be all over. so we are going to celebrate for about two hours. then early in the morning, i get up and we begin working again. thank you, everybody. and thank you, new york. we love new york. we love new york. thank you very much, everybody. thank you. [cheers and applause] ♪ [frank sinatra sings "new york new york"] >> ♪ start spreading the news
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i'm leaving today i want to be a part of it new york, new york these vagabond shoes are longing to stray right through the very heart of it new york, new york i want to wake up in a city that doesn't sleep and find i'm king of the hill top of the heap these little town blues are melting away i'll make a brand-new start of it
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in old new york if i can make it there i'll make it anywhere it's up to you new york, new york ♪ ♪ ♪ new york, new york i want to wake up in a city that never sleeps and find i'm a number one top of the list king of the hill a number one
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these little town blues >> madam secretary, we proudly gives 72 of our delegate votes to the next president of the united states. >> american history tv on
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c-span3, this weekend, saturday evening at 6:00 eastern discussing the book the myth of the lost cause, why the south fought the civil war and why the north one. among the disputes myths that the civil war and how it started, and the way it ended. >> southerners felt compelled to explain why it was that this devastation had occurred and for example, 25% of southern men between the ages of 20 and 45 were dead, not just casualties they were dead as a result of the civil war. >> sunday morning at 10:00 on road to the white house, rewind, in 1988 campaign of gary hart. we begin with the -- with him beginning his campaign, and
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finally his announcement to withdraw from the race. smithsonian national portrait gallery curator on the life of civil rights activist dolores hu erta and her developments on the farm union. >> bagged them to send anyone but her to negotiate contracts but she was at the forefront of that for a reason. among many of the participants of the farm movement, when you hear about them -- >> and at 8:00 on the presidency >> those partners of mine, did any of them invite me to play golf in their fancy country clubs? it just goes on and on. >> his lip was quivering.
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that is one of the few times in all of those years that i was so close to him, he was a very well contained, disciplined man. he knew how to keep this in, but he erected when he was talking to don and he was just saying, and he hated them for it. >> former nexen deputy -- nixon deputy reflect on the former president's personality. go to c-span.org. >> this month we showcase our student cam wehner. -- winner. for middle and high school students. this years theme is road to the white house and students were asked, what issues do you want presidential candidates to address?
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one of our second prize high school winners is from seattle washington. leo pfeiffer, a sophomore at allard high school, once presidential candidates to discuss the criminal justice system and mass incarceration. his video title -- and incarcerated nation. president obama: the united states is home to 5% of the world's population but 25% of the world prisoners. we keep more people behind bars in the top 35 european countries combined. every year

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