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tv   Key Capitol Hill Hearings  CSPAN  April 27, 2016 1:30am-7:01am EDT

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believe me, that is not because of john kasich or ted cruz. that is me. how you say to them, we are going to choose a man that looks like 5 million votes and delegates, take him because donald trump was 14 delegates short. i don't think you can do that. with that being said, i intend to get enough delegates. that is it. ok, one more question? >> [indiscernible] stick withi will my feelings on immigration. if you look at what is going on, the record numbers of people right now that are pouring across the borders of this country, they are pouring -- excuse me, i just read it, in a legitimate journal -- we need protection in our country. you look at the kind of crime, what is going on economically,
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we need borders. and by the way, i want people to come into the country. but i want in the coming legally. they have to come in through process. [applause] me?se >> [indiscernible] well, i think the only car jihad is the woman car. she is nothing else going on. frankly, if hillary clinton were would not get 5% of the vote. the only thing he has going is the woman car. and the thing is, women do not like her. look how well i did with women tonight. ladies and gentlemen, thank you very much. i appreciate it. thank you. ♪
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announcer: washington journal is live every day with news and policy issues that affect you. coming up wednesday morning, spotlighting the polling website real clear politics. our guests include the cofounder and the executive editor of real clear media group. both join us to discuss how real clear politics got started, and talking about the role in the media marketplace, and the role of the media in the campaign. also joining us, the national political reporter, reviewing primary results from pennsylvania, rhode island, delaware, maryland. managersenior elections for real clear politics, will public beinge smarter consumers about the polls. washingtonwatch
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journal, beginning live at 7:00 eastern wednesday morning. join the discussion. >> democratic front runner hillary clinton spoke to supporters after winning primaries in delaware, maryland, and pennsylvania. this was held at the election center in philadelphia. went the distance and now i am back on my feet just a man and his will to survive so many times it happens too fast you trade your passion for glory don't lose your grip you must fight to keep them alive it's the eye of the tiger it's the thrill of the fight rising up to the challenge of our rival and the last known survivor stalks his prey in the night and he's watching us all with the eye of the tiger ♪ [cheers and applause]
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hillary clinton: thank you! thank you so much! wow. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: thank you, pennsylvania! [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: what a great night. i want to thank everyone. i want to thank everyone. >> [crowd chanting "hillary"] hillary clinton: thank you all so much. wow. i just want to thank all of you, everyone who came out to vote in pennsylvania and across maryland and delaware, connecticut, rhode island. i am so grateful to all our
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volunteers, our organizers, our community leaders. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: everyone who worked their hearts out. and i want to thank the leaders here in pennsylvania. thank you, governor waltz, thank you, senator casey. nhank you, congressman ca cartwright. and thank you so much, mayor denny, for your great help. and of course, i want to thank the 42nd president of the united states, my husband. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: now, with your help, we are going to come back to philadelphia for the democratic national convention. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: with the most votes and the most pledged
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delegates. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: and we will unify our party to win this election and build an america where we can all rise together. an america where we lift each other up instead of tearing each other down. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: so, we need you to keep volunteering, keep talking to your friends and neighbors. please join the more than 1.1 million people who have already contributed at hillaryclinton.com. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: look, i know there are still too many barriers holding too many americans back. but despite what other candidates say, we believe in the goodness of our people and the greatness of our nation. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: and if anyone doubts that, just let them
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travel across this country, as i have done in this campaign the past year, hearing people and their stories, learning about the struggles. listen to the quiet determination of the working parents i met last week in jenkintown, pennsylvania. they are doing everything they can to provide opportunities for their children in an economy where there still are not enough good paying jobs. listen to the mothers who lost children to gun violence and encounters with the police. they are turning their sorrow into strategy, and their mourning into a movement -- a movement for justice and dignity. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: listen to the nurse i met this weekend in new haven, connecticut, who worked for years to build a middle-class life and raise a family.
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but then, her luck changed. she was diagnosed with breast cancer, and used up all of her savings and her sick time. soon, she was facing foreclosure and the prospect of losing the home she had loved for more than 20 years. and here is what she said to me. my daughter and i live in fear of the day that we might come home and have a lock on the door. we are in pain. we are hurting. we were and are the backbone of this country, the middle class. we are not asking for a handout. we just want to be treated fairly. and she is -- [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: she is speaking for so many people across our country, who feel beaten down, left out, and left behind. people have worked hard and done their part, but just can't seem to get ahead and find it tough even to get by. now, underneath all of these
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worries, together, we are going to come together. and we are going to solve the problems! [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: and, you know -- >> [crowd chanting "hillary"] hillary clinton: i am aware too many people feel at the mercy of forces too big for anyone to control. and they just worry that those of us in politics put our own interests ahead of the national interest. the faith we can make things better, that we can give our kids a better future than we had, is at the heart of who we are as a nation. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: and it is one
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of many reasons being american has always been such a blessing. and our campaign is about restoring people's confidence in our ability to solve problems together, by delivering results that help people follow their dreams. that is why we are setting bold, progressive goals, backed up by real plans that will improve -- [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: after all, that is how progress gets made. we have to be both dreamers and doers. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: and as a great democratic president once said, there is nothing wrong with america that cannot be cured by what is right with america. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: so, here is what i believe. i believe we can create more
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good jobs with rising incomes, jobs that provide dignity and a middle-class life. we can renew our democracy by overturning citizens united! [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: we can lift up people and places who have been left out, from our inner cities to appalachia. in every manufacturing town hollowed out when the factory closed, every community scarred by substance abuse and addiction, every home where a child goes to bed hungry. that is what we democrats believe in, that is what we know is possible. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: so, we will build on a strong progressive tradition from franklin roosevelt to barack obama. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: and i applaud senator sanders and his millions of supporters for challenging us to get unaccountable money out of our politics and giving
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greater emphasis to closing the gaps of inequality. and i know, together, we will get that done. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: because whether you support senator sanders or you support me, there is much more that unites us than divides us. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: we all agree that wages are too low and inequality is too high. that wall street can never again be allowed to threaten main street. and we should expand social security, not cut or privatize it. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: we democrats agree that college should be affordable to all.
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and student debt should not hold anyone back. we democrats agree that every single american should and must have quality, affordable health care. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: we agree that our next president must keep our country safe, keep our troops out of another costly ground war in the middle east. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: and we democrats agree that climate change is an urgent threat. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: and it requires an aggressive response that can make america the clean energy superpower of the 21st century. and we democrats agree on defending all of our rights, civil rights and voting rights, workers rights and women's rights, lgbt rights, and rights for people with disabilities. [cheers and applause]
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hillary clinton: so, in this election, we will have to stand together and work hard to prevail against candidates on the other side, who would threaten all those rights and pit americans against each other. they would make it harder to vote, not easier. they would deny women the right to make their own reproductive health care decisions. they would round up millions of hard-working immigrants and deport them. they would demonize and discriminate against hard-working, terror-hating muslim americans, who we need in the fight against radicalization. and both of the top candidates in the republican party deny climate change even exists. [crowd booing] hillary clinton: now, the other day, mr. trump accused me of playing the "woman card." >> [crowd booing]
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hillary clinton: well, if fighting for women's health care and a paid family leave and equal pay is playing the woman card, then deal me in! [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: so, my friends -- >> [crowd chanting "hillary"] hillary clinton: so, my friends, if you are a democrat, independent, or a thoughtful republican, you know their approach is not one to build an america where we increase opportunity or decrease inequality. so, instead of letting them take us backwards, we want america to be in the future business. that is why i want you to keep imagining a tomorrow, where instead of building walls, we
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are breaking down barriers. we are making it more likely that americans will be part of a prosperous, inclusive, decent society. we are imagining a tomorrow where every parent can find a good job, and every grandparent can enjoy a secure retirement. we are imagining a tomorrow where no child grows up in the shadow of discrimination or under the specter of deportation. and where every child, every child has a good teacher and a good school. no matter what zip code that child lives in. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: and imagine a tomorrow where any young person can graduate from college debt-free. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: we are going to imagine a tomorrow where hard work is honored, families are supported, streets are safe, and
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communities are strong. and where love trumps hate. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: that is the future i want. i want that future for my granddaughter and for all of our children and grandchildren. now, think of this. our nation was born right here in philadelphia. [cheers and applause] hillary clinton: our declaration of independence and constitution were signed just a few blocks away. and ever since, even through dark and difficult chapters of our history, the idea of america has shown through. at our best, we are, as robert kennedy said, a great country, an unselfish country, and a compassionate country. [cheers and applause]
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hillary clinton: but america's greatness is not a birthright. it must be earned by every generation. so please, join us. join us. go to hillaryclinton.com. join. volunteer, contribute, compete. let's go forward. let's win the nomination. and in july, let's return in a unified party! thank you all so much. [cheers and applause] ♪ this is my fight song this is my life song i don't care if nobody else believes 'cause i've still got a lot of fight left in me this is my fight song take back my life song prove i'm alright song my power's turned on starting right now i'll be strong i'll play my fight song and i don't really care if nobody else believes 'cause i've still got
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a lot of fight left in me a lot of fight left in me this is my fight song take back my life song prove i'm alright song my power's turned on starting right now i'll be strong i'll play my fight song and i don't really care if nobody else believes because i've still got a lot of fight left in me a lot of fight left in me this is my fight song ♪
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this is my fight song take back my life song prove i'm alright song my power's turned on starting right now i'll be strong i'll play my fight song and i don't really care if nobody else believes because i've still got a lot of fight left in me a lot of fight left in me this is my fight song ♪ >> ♪ this one goes out to the sinner and the cynical this ain't about no apology this world was saved by the hopeless and hungry this world was saved by the wind of change ♪ announcer: tuesday night,
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cruz told a crowd in nights town, indiana his campaign is moving back to more favorable territory. donald trump swept tuesday's public in primaries. here is a look. [applause] ♪ >> ♪ well, if you ask me where i come from here is what i tell everyone i was born by god's dear grace in an extraordinary place where the stars and stripes and the eagle fly it's a big, old land with countless dreams ♪
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[cheers and applause] sen. cruz: god bless the great state of indiana. [cheers and applause] sen. cruz: to chad, clay, and mike, i want to thank you for being here. thank you for your strong leadership. thank you for everyone coming together on a terrific evening here in the hoosier state. you know, tonight, donald trump is expected to have a good night. >> [crowd booing] sen. cruz: donald trump is likely to win some states. and the media is going to have heart palpitations this evening. they are going to be excited. oh, so very excited at donald
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trump's victory. and the media is going to say, "the race is over." the media is going to say, "donald trump is the republican nominee." now, if you find yourself wondering why the media is so eager to have donald as the republican nominee, you don't have to look any further than today's "usa today" front page. 40% of g.o.p. doubts they would vote for trump. 40%. now, i want you to think for a second. the network executives, are they democrats or republicans?
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every one of them are ready for hillary. and donald trump is the one man on earth hillary clinton can beat in a general election. and so, the media has told us, the candidates in this race, the republican and democrat are both going to be new york liberals. but i have got good news for you. tonight, this campaign moves back to more favorable terrain. [cheers and applause] sen. cruz: tonight, this campaign moves back to indiana! [cheers and applause] sen. cruz: and nebraska, and north dakota, and montana, and washington, and california.
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sen. cruz: now, the media want to say everything is decided. and the question is, can the state of indiana stop the media's chosen republican candidate? [cheers and applause] sen. cruz: well, as you all know, we are here on the hickory basketball court. and bruce, who travels with me, bruce, i want to ask you something. do you have a tape measure with you? tell me something. how tall is that basketball rim? 10 feet. you know, the amazing thing is that basketball ring in indiana is the same height as it is in new york city and every other place in this country. and there is nothing that
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hoosiers cannot do. [applause] sen. cruz: now, there has been a lot of media speculation lately about vice presidential vetting. and i have an announcement to make. a major announcement. hillary clinton has decided on her vice presidential nominee. hillary has picked donald trump. >> [laughter] sen. cruz: now, it is important to note hillary had a very careful vetting process that went into this. she wanted someone who shared her vision of the federal government. you know, donald trump did recently a town hall. he was asked, "name the top functions of the federal government."
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he said security, and then he said health care, education, and housing. >> [crowd booing] sen. cruz: funny thing is, if you ask hillary, she would say the same thing. if you ask bernie, bernie would be like, wow, that is aggressive. you don't only want socialized medicine. you also want to put the federal government in charge of all education. education. common core. >> [crowd booing] sen. cruz: according to donald, that is the core responsibility of the federal government. and housing? how many people are ready for the federal government taking over the housing market? and, you know, donald and hillary, they are flip sides of the same coin. hillary clinton has made millions of dollars selling power and influence in washington.
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and donald trump has made billions of dollars buying politicians, like hillary clinton. but some in the media will say come on. it's not reasonable to suggest that donald trump and hillary clinton could ever run as a ticket. i'm going to walk you through 13 policy issues where donald and hillary have the very same views. let's start with the area of jobs. my number one priority is jobs, bringing back jobs and economic rowth. [applause] bringing manufacturing jobs back to the state of indiana. [applause] raising wages for the hard men and women working in this country. but donald and hillary both
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agree that our taxes should be increased. last week donald trump went on national television and said, yes, we should increase jobs. well, that's a great idea and increase taxes. that's a great idea if you want to kill jobs. if i'm president, we're going to cut taxes. [applause] second critical area under jobs, donald and hillary both support the o bottoma care individual mandate. -- obamacare individual mandate. both of them think it's a terrific idea. you know that obamacare is the biggest job killer in america. and as president, i will repeal every word of obamacare. [applause] a third area where donald and
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hillary get it wrong on jobs is immigration. both donald and hillary believe that illegal immigrants who are here should be able to become u.s. citizens. now donald thinks we should fly -- out of our our country first. leter me tell you what we will do. end welfare benefits for those ho are here illegally. but let's talk about freedom, the fundamental freedoms of the bill of rights. amen. donald trump and hillary clinton both support taxpayer funding for planned parenthood. audience: boo!
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indeed they both describe planned parenthood as terrific! as president, i will instruct the didn't of justice to open an investigation into planned arenthood. [cheers and applause] donald trump and hillary clinton both supported bill clinton's national ban on many of the most mportant fire arms in america. audience: boo! as president, i will defend the second amendment right to keep and bare arms. [applause] donald trump and hillary clinton both believe we should negotiate with harry reid and chuck
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schumer on supreme court nominations. i give my word to the people of indiana and the people of america that every justice will be a principled constitutionalist -- [applause] and unlike donald and hillary, i will not compromise your religious liberty. and donald trump and hillary clinton both agree that grown men should be allowed to use the little girl's restroom. now, let me say it is just common sense. this isn't a matter of right or left or democrat or republican. this is basic common sense that grown adult men, strangers should not be alone in at-bat room with a little girl.
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[applause] and yet donald and hillary care more about the prment c. police than they do -- p.c. police than they do about speaking the truth than they do about common sense. and let's speak about security. donald trump and hillary clinton both believe the u.s. government believe they should be neutral between israel and the palestinians. as president, i will not be neutral. we will stand with israel. cheers and applause]
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the ninth area they agree is donald trump and hillary clinton have both said they will keep this catastrophic iranian nuclear deal in place. as president, i will rip to shreds this nuclear deal with iran. [applause] the 10th area of agreement, donald trump and hillary clinton both believe that hillary clinton was one of the greatest secretaries of state of all time. that's what donald said. why do you think he kept contributing to her? why you do think donald trump gave money to hillary clinton's presidential campaign? and then let's talk more broadly about washington corruption.
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you know donald trump loves to style himself an outsider. and listen, when it comes to human decency, when it comes to politeness, when it comes to respect, he's right. you know, most people in indiana are raised that you don't scream and curse and insult everyone you see. [applause] but donald trump and hillary clinton's campaigns are both run by washington lobbyists. washington lobbyists their entire campaigns for both of them. donald trump and hillary clinton both supported obama's failed stimulus plan. and donald trump and hillary inton both supported obama's tarp bailout of wall street.
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you know, it was striking just this past week. donald's lobbyist campaign manager was talking to the top officials of the republican party. and he said, donald is just playing a roll. he's just playing a part. he doesn't mean any of. this he doesn't believe any of this. he's going to change and pivot away from everything he's saying. now, when that was first reported, the trump campaign immediately tried to deny it. but the problem was they caught trump's lobbyist campaign manager on tape. so they have him on tape saying donald is just playing a role. and he'll be a completely different person. as donald put it he can be the most politically correct person on earth. we've had enough of having the most politically correct person on earth in the white house. cheers and applause]
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donald is telling us he's lying to us. everyone is fed up with politicians who betray us, who make promises and then don't do it. donald is telling us he's lying to us. he said he can be a different person tomorrow than he is today. well, let me tell you what, i am the same person today that i was yesterday and that i will be tomorrow as president. cheers and applause] the federal government out of control taxes and regulations are killing jobs all across the country. the working men and women in this country are paying the price for washington that isn't listening to us that is captive
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to the washington lobbyists like he trump and clinton campaign. and this is no longer a theoretical threat. this is a threat that has come home in the great movie "hoosiers" there's a wonderful quote from that movie. "look, mister, there's two kinds of dumb. the guy that gets naked who runs in the snow and barks at the moon and the guy that does the same thing in your living room. first one, don't matter. second one, you're kind of forced to deal with. well, let me tell you right now, this out of control federal government, these regulators and bureaucrats that are destroying cold jobs all across indiana that are destroying small businesses all across indiana that are hammering farmers, hammering ranchers they have become the guy naked barking at
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the moon in our living room. and i am here to tell you, we are going to deal with it! [applause] this race is real, real simple. donald trump and hillary clinton are both big government liberals. they both think the federal government is the answer to every problem. i agree with ronald reagan that the scariest words in the english language are i'm from the government and i'm here to help you. [applause] and i want to thank the people of indiana because you are going to have now the opportunity, the eyes of the nation are gazing upon you. the eyes of the nation are looking at this state at the
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cross roads of america. to make a decision for our country. do we want to support a campaign a -- that is based on yelling nd screaming and cursing and insulls? or do we want to unite behind optimistic, forward-looking conservative campaign based on real policy solutions to the problems facing america? this election is about jobs. it's about freedom. it is about security. thank need a president -- you, sir. you know, it's always nice that you have one donald trump supporter who comes in and disrupts and i know that what he
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does is he wants to scream and yell and disrupt. thank you, sir. see, one of the things that mr. trump doesn't understand is the first amendment gives everyone the right to speak. but it doesn't give you the right to disrupt. it doesn't give you the right to try to silence others. it doesn't -- hey, hey, treat him with respect. everyone keep your hands off of him. everyone keep your hands off of him. everyone keep your hands off of him. see, one difference, if this were a trump rally, i would be encouraging people to punch him. instead, i am encouraging people to treat him with respect, with civility. he's an american and i can tell you -- cheers and applause] i can tell you even as he comes
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here and tries to scream and yell and insult very much following the trump pattern, i am running to be his president as much as i am running to be everyone's president. cheers and applause] we're tired of a president who divides us! tiferede a president who rips us apart! we need a bhoth unites us who remembers who we are as americans! together, the people of indiana are going to send a powerful signal to the media, a powerful signal to the washington establish dwhrament the chosen candidates of washington, the chosen candidates of big money and the lobbyists they are not going to decide the republican nominee. it is going to be we the people taking our country back and
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doing it together! thank you! and god bless you! cheers and applause] ♪ sun coming up over new york city school bus driver in a traffic jam taring at the faces in her rear-view mirror a king at the promise of promised land one kid dreams of fame and fortune ne kid helps pay the rent
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one could end up going to prison one just might be president only in america dreaming in red, white, and blue only in america where we can because we want to we all get a chons everybody gets to dance nly in america sun going down on an l.a. freeway newlyweds in the back of a limousine
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a welder's son and a banker's daughter all they want is everything. ♪ [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2016] >> c-span takes you on the "road to the white house" as we follow the candidates on c-span, c-span adio and c-span.org. >> ahead of this year's white house corns dinner, andre cody discusses his planning for the annual event. he talked about staffing, con ten general si plans and his biggest worses about the night of the dinner. >> andre cote is the executive chef here at the washington
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hilton. chef andre, you have 2,600-plus people coming over for dinner. what's it like to prepare for that? >> organized chaos at its finest. it's an honor first and foremost but it's also a lot of fun. it's an opportunity for us to really prepare unusual foods. -- for a large amount of people. >> when you say unusual, what do you mean? andre: we can't go over this year's menu. but once we do a taste test with the white house correspondents dinner, the decision is usually made that evening. and then our work begin first the following year. >> and when do you do the taste test? >> it's usually roughly three months prior to the function itself. it depends on their schedule and our schedule but we always work it out
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>> you have 23,000 square feet of kitchen, one of the largest in d.c., largest kitchen in d.c. does it get crowded on the night of the correspondent's dinner? >> gets very crowd. >> who is in here? >> we have a lot of celebrities that walk through the back of the house. but at the same time, we've got so many cooks and people working that evening whether it be from the management team or all the team members. you're looking at roughly 400 people that are here to assist on that evening. >> does that include servers? >> that includes servers. >> how many people are it on the floor? >> you've got about 200 servers out on the floor. then you have maitre d's that oversee a certain amount of tables. >> another 200 people back here? >> about that. about that. it's actually organized chaos at its finest.
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>> where are you that evening? >> running around. we were just talking about how many steps i do and the white house corns dinner is definitely the most. 24,000 steps that day because i'm all over the place whether it be in the pastry shop, butcher shop, and preparation of cold food, on the hot side working on hors d'oeuvres, making sure the secret service is ok, making sure that we're ready for them to inspect our kitchen, working backwards on a time line to feed that many people. how much time do we need for the steaks to go in and actually cook. so there's a lot that goes into it. >> there's a lot of high profile people that come to the hilton on a regular basis. so you're probably used to that part.
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where do you source your food in is -- your food? is that a secret? are the secret service involved in your preparation? andre: as far as the food goes. we have primary pro vayiers that we source most of the food from. as soon as the tasting is over, i actually sit down and that's when the ordering of the food takes place. so it took place three months ago because we wanted to make sure there's the correct aging on the beef for the dinner that night. it comes anywhere from california, meat usually from colorado or idaho, somewhere in that area. vegetables, again, florida, california, the majority of the it. there's a lot that goes into it, though. >> what about the secret service? are they participating? keeping an eye on everything that goes on that night? >> they. do and the thing with secret
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service is they kind of take our lead but at the same time we take their lead. meaning that they -- we know our employees who should be here and who should not be here. so as far as working together, we really work well together. as far as overseing the production of the food, they will walk around, inspect things. check on products, etc. but whint comes time actually serving the dinner, the president's dinner is usually picked out of the 2,700 that reproduce that night. >> he's eating the same food? >> correct. they randomly select from the starter deserts as well as the entree. >> how far are we from the actual ballroom right now in -- right how? >> right now you're about 40 yards from the ballroom.
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>> are the servers taking the food from this area or from this kitchen, bringing it out into the ballroom? >> the kitchen actually backs up to the ballroom. it's only about 10 yards away from the entrance to the ballroom which makes it convenient but also efficient. >> chef, andre, your employees to work at the washington hilltop because of the high profile events that go on here, do they have to be specially background checked? >> i honestly couldn't answer that question. however, do know that everybody that walks in to the kitchen once we turned over to secret service, everybody is checked. once going through the secret service line. > what about special orders?
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a lot of people have food allergies? years or this is my 12th dinner, we've had a lot of special requests. and it's challenging that night because you're trying to take care of so many people. when somebody comes across and says i only eat things that are dark shade, ok? right now, my brain is not working. what's a dark shade? what you do mean by that? i've got somebody else that needs their food pureed. i've got a special vegan diet. i would say there's 100 to 150 special requests that evening. and it present as challenge but we do the best we can. >> but what if you're one of the guest in the 1,00-plus rooms here in the washington hilton. you want to grill cheese in a bowl of onion soup?
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are you going to be able to get it? >> we will. we will. we'll have the restaurant kitchen and room service appropriately staffed. we'll have six cooks up there and three pan tremendous persons up there working in room service. we'll probably have about a staff of 15 that evening. so whether it's room service ala cart or the people that like to watch, terry mcclellan's bar, they'll be able to order bar food. whatever they want. >> and that's all done in a spray kitchen? >> yes, which is -- excuse many, up one floor. it's right off the lobby. there's a t.d.l. restaurant and mcclellan's bar. >> in the 12 years that you've been doing this dinner, has anything ever gone wrong or awry that you can tell us about? >> we've actually had a lot go
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wrong. you know, part of my job and my assistant's job is to -- is kind of look into the future what possibilities are there for something to go wrong? so we actually take the menu and we rethink backwards. ok. what happens if we break 50 plates? what happens if we forget to light a hot box? so we kind of backtrack through the whole menu to make sure we try to minimize those. now, we have had things like -- all of a sudden an oven got tired. >> got tired? >> it's a nice way of putting it. we put a french onion soup in the oven and all of a sudden the oven wasn't working. and that's when you have to use the resources in the kitchens, all the kitchens to be able to
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produce the food. so what we did was we used the pastry ovepblet we took some up to the restaurant kitchen. so we're able to minimize any exposure. >> having attended this dinner, it's very crowded in that ballroom and it is tight spaces. what's the advice that you give to the servers to get through? >> be patient. that's the biggest thing. and you know, from my standpoint, i don't see what goes on once they enter the ballroom. because i'm so busy back here. we'll keep working until 11:00 at night, 12:00 at night whether it be up in the restaurant or room service orders or there are afterpartys that go on. so from the kitchen standpoint we're not closing down. you know, we're going -- bile here by 5:00 in the morning that morning. only because the anxiety is setting in i start going through my check or list and
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double-checking everything that i've done up to that point to make sure that i'm ready. it's a long day but at the same time it's a lot of fun. so gets back to your original question with the service that day we'll see roughly 1,500 employees in our cafeteria also. although, a lot of people will only see the white house correspondents dinner. you've got all the people that have been here all day. housekeepers, working hard to turn the rooms over. the bellmen, the doormen, all the people working in the restaurant because the restaurant will serve 3,000 people that day. so if you take all of that, there's a lot more that goes it into than just the white house correspondent's dinner. it's actually planning if the cafeteria. how can we expedite the service? how can we make sure that we're
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able to feed all those employees that are at the white house correspondents dinner. >> 12 years that means george bush and barack obama have been your two presidents. have you had the chance to meet one of them? >> no, i hope i get to take a picture with one of them. so no, i don't get to meet them. i've seen mrs. obama walk through the kitchen quickly a couple of times. >> on the way to this event or other events? >> to other events but that's it. >> what's your biggest worry? >> failure. >> what kind of failure? >> just anything that i didn't think of something that could go wrong and does go wrong. but again it is a high profile group. but every group here, i would say half of them are high profile. so from the chef's standpoint, your concern from, you know,
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last week two weeks ago, the groups coming in, they get a little less sleep with white dinner.rrespondents they don't stress over it. you didn't know i was 90, so i -- i just walk through the process. every process, every step that we do that day, i go over 20, 30 times in my head prior to the function even happening. and that way i'm ready. >> in the creative process enjoy say, ok, for the taste test, let's try this. does this get to stretch your wings as a chef a little bit since coming up with the menu? >> it's funny you say that because i think the first five years i did it, it was kind of echanical so to speak.
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and as a chef i didn't push myself to be a little more creative. and i think this year i think people will be very pleased or more pleased, maybe than they have been in the past with the creativity that -- that we put forth and i'm learning. i'm also learning as a chef. i mean, i've been doing this for 40 years and every day i walk in here, i learn something new. not a lot of people can say that. but as a chef, you take what you learn every day and you push yourself to try something new every day. and then the next day, ok, we're going to try it for 400. ok. we're going to try something different for 1,200 people and then you get up to the 2700 people over 2,000 people. and you're trying to be unique and different. and that's when, you know, you know as a chef that you're doing your job right. so --
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>> this is president obama's last year in office. his last white house correspondents dinner. anything to mark that occasion? >> from my perspective, it really is an honor. you know, i'm a military brat. and for me, you know, i was raised with respecting the position no matter who it was democrat or republican. and for me, it's really an on more to be here to be part of the white house correspondents dinner. to be known as the chef that, you know, helped produce this meal. it truly is. >> now, chef andre, your client is not the white house. ur client is the white house correspondents association. >> correct. shame on me for referring the -- ident but i gets i get a
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but i guess i get a little excited that he's here. there are nice people that are on the committee. they want to do the best for the society -- for the group, the organization. and my job is to make their job a little bit easier. even when i do the mean yous, what can i do? how can i do it to make the decision-making process a little bit easier? >> this din ser being held on april 23030th, 2016. when will planning for 2017 begin? >> the day after in all sincerity. what we do at the hotel is we get together, we discuss what went well, what didn't go well, what we need to do wlrks it be from, you know, we didn't have somebody stationed in a certain area of the hotel to direct people or did i not staff enough
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people in the restaurant kitchen for the business that we had for room service? so we go over everything the day after. theaped the day after that, we actually start planning for -- and then the day after that we start planning for the next dinner. so it's nonstop. >> andre cote, is the executive chef here at the washington hilltop. >> c-span brings you live coverage from the white house correspondents' dinner starting t 6:00 p.m. eastern. it includes remarks by president obama, and this year's host is larry wilmore. tomorrow morning, members of the house armed services committee will begin a mark-up of the 2017 national defense authorization act which provides funding for
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most of the didn't of defense. expected to run late into the evening, our live coverage begins at 7:00, k eastern on our companion network, c-span 3. the supreme court heard oral argument for birchfield vs. north dakota. it's a case to decide if a state can make it illegal for a driver to take a blood, urine or alcohol test. a driver can be charged with a crime if he refuses to such a test. this is about an hour and 10 minutes. >> mr. rossfeld. >> thank you mr. chief justice and may it please the court.
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the fundamental problem with the statues at issue in these three cases is they make it a criminal offense. a person who is stopped on suspicion of impaired driving is obligated to take a chemical test to determine the alcohol content of their blood. the state's concede that these ests are searches. they appear to recognize exception for the law requirement, nevertheless the committing a criminal offense if he or she does not do so. >> they could revoke the driver's license for refusing to take the test either blood alcohol or breathalyzer? >> that's not at issue. we don't dispute for purposes of this case that the state could do that. >> let's assume that that is a concession or that we hold that
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or that that's a premise. if a state can impose a civil administration, why can't it also impose a criminal sanction and we could have hoop thet cals of a three-year suspension. why should there be a difference? >> i think the fundamental things is that between the state taking away a benefit that it didn't have to give you in the first place which is what the court addresses in the unconstitutional line of cases in. which case here you are subject to a criminal penalty, affirmative criminal penalty for asserting a constitutional right. >> i think the conditions are just different. i don't think that an it willically -- that an it willically that it's a different proposition. >> i have to disagree with that,
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your honor. i think that in the unconstitutional lines of cases, what the court has said the state has given someone the benefit that it did not have to give in the first place. and all the state is doing when it takes that benefit away is saying you're back in the position that you were to begin with. there's no direct penalty that's attached to what the individual was doing. the court in those cases will say you will look at the practical effect of the commission of the benefit. and whether or not they're trying to do directly. and that being the suppression of the constitutional right. the court will look to say, i agree with the connection between the ben fit. you look to see the degree of co organize imposed on the >> sender. what it's trying to do is figure out here's the state trying to do indirectly something that it could not do directly. >> one way of looking at what
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the state is doing is not to criminalize the assertion of a criminal -- constitutional right. the bargain was we give you a license to drive and in a change that you consent to blood-alcohol test under service circumstances. that's what's criminalized. why isn't that beater way of looking at this? er are i think to look at it that way you're in a world of consent. in this case, at least, there's no suggestion that consent of that sort was present. but in this case there is no reason to believe that the defendants had any idea that they were arguing to the bargain you described. >> if you had signed a consent form, i consent to take breathalyzer test in the evpblet the officer has grounds to require it? >> first, as to what's going on
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in this case where there is nothing like that on the floor. what's happening here the way it operates if you drive on the roads in north dakota you are irreceive cabably subject to the state. >> suppose there's regal consent? >> then the analysis would be -- not this case -- >> it's real that everybody has to sign its form that you don't -- >> i might. >> i assume they're going to stop everybody from the border. someone who habit seen anything is still subject to the criminal -- >> let's talk about just the state. that, in fact, is the reality of this. but i think as i say the analysis there would be not the analysis of this case but a consent analysis. and i think they are -- it would be the stites obligation to show
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on the totality of the circumstances to suct yourself to the conditions is truly voluntary that is the product of the defendant's choice that it as not the case. >> you have to drive. fixed inhat consent is that sense. spose that it was voluntary and explained on the driver's side. it's coerced. >> i think as i said if the analysis would be a consent analysis it would be that. you cannot drive especially in a rule state like north dakota. something which is especial lrble daily life. what provision of the constitution is that? >> that be turned fourth amendment. the right people have to drive -- i thought you were just
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postulating something saying that you were saying the states could not take away that right? >> no, i apologize. at i'm saying is his submission is that people told and actually are aware that they're being told that if they drive, they're consenting to be searched. i think whether the state can execute on that depends whether or not there's consent. >> i thought you said there's this cohersion because you can't survive in north carolina without a car. which i'm happy -- but what is the basis for that right? >> i think that's not a right in the constitution. it's more like the relevance of that is that there would be cohersion. you know, voluntary consensus. so for purposes of analyzing
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this case, we have to assume that the state could prohibit people from driving? >> i far as the border goes when it comes to stopping people at the border. but what if smin who uses the state roads concept sents to -- blood alcohol ting if they're pulled over. >> that was not be this case. because in this case there is no suggestion that these defendants had any idea that they were voluntarily sournting. in the hypotheticals. i think it would be a difficult case for the state to make because the state's obligation would have to be -- carry the bird stpwhar the defendants didn't actually voluntarily he rendered that. >> sit true that he was given her a reason. and if the state could not do that. then that makes their case even
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weaker. you would not have the benefit. >> i would support with all the traffic depths, right? >> it's not a realistic contention but that's a lot of the hype thet calls. i'm trying to get to the basis, it seemser nea the flexibility that a state has in this situation depends upon what rights the motorists has. i don't the fourth amendment project. this and it isng pertinent to tell you. >> i think there were two points that are crucial. one is that we are not making an unconstitutional agreement. what we are saying is a direct implication -- assertion of if the directing position of criminal penalties on people who assert their fourth amendment rights. this has nothing to do with the
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condition. are aware that they don't have a position at all. >> we're interested in other possibilities. and so if you assume that a state can condition the right to -- the ability to drive on the state's roads and let's assume this is not somebody. they can condition the ability to drive top state roads on consenting to a blood alcohol test. perhaps under certain circumstances. but this is done in writing at the time when the person applies for the license. it's not just implied. what is different about that situation and from a number of other situations that i can think ofment for example, condition a license to operate and interstate passenger train on submitting to a blood/alcohol
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test in the event of rnl suspicion. the person who is operating the trabe under the influence of alcohol or the same thing with someone who is operating aircraft or suppose there were a law that says if you want to enter certain government buildings such as this building as the condition of entering is consenting to a serming. and you have to sign -- a search. you have to go through the manatomete, are and if the person got through that, there was reasonable suspicion that a person would be subjected to the search. what would with the difference between that situation and this situation? >> i think there would be a number of distinctions. one would be at least some of the hypotheticals that you offer . there's a special needs exception to the law rirement.
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i mean, there is no warrantless -- there's no requirement for a warranty in the first place. >> don't you just lose the benefit? >> >>'s correct. >> again, let bees clear on what the doctrine. is there simply is no fourth amendment right. we're not in this benefits of condition. we're simply saying you have to right to resist the search. otherwise -- >> but if you say that then -- and i recognize that there's something similarity in both positions. there was no constitutional right because we could take the constitutional right away. well, that's exact lip what the government is going to argue. it doesn't steam me to help us. again, i was look at it differently, your honor. half of the constitution cases -- and it's saying that in the services of this search is there
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requirement or a warrant? >> suppose we say this is like skinner? there was a compelling showing that there was a measurable increase in traffic fatalities if this was not -- they would say this is a special condition and therefore you must consent. and that means there's no constitution nal right. >> that we would be creating a ew exception to the fourth amendment. what was happening to skinner is that they would hit the court the same. we're looking at the services, the individual's right to privacy. whether or not there's discretion. all those things goes into special needs situations.
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i there is to fourth amendment. >> i thought thraffs the whole point? why can't we say this is special needs? >> let's assume the statistics are compelling. >> we'll talk about innocent lives just just as we learned skin. i think that the analysis there basicmean, do you look to fourth amendment character. the court addressed the argument ' driving ations problem is so severe that we can those. d one of >> i'm not sure that's different in this case. in the railroad case what wore
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saying is that the need for transportation. protect it's compelling enough that it fall in the special needs section. wouldn't e why it apply here. i suspect more people day from car accidents than train accidents. >> but i think that was not the rash downtown. i think the principle is saying there was no report up there. and the court said not just that there was no law requirement but that there was no probably cause requirement. o one is sucting that. in that entire line of cases is the whole accommodation that there was no discretion as i said on the part of law enforcement that there were a
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variety of things that have nothing to do with the ordinary criminal process. the court has said time and again that in an ordinary law enforcement circumstance, that a swarnt required. that's the presumption unless -- it's a presumplingssumpings. there are many ways to analyze this case. let's try to focus on one that doesn't have to do with consent or any of these differences that many of them that you've been discussing. e way to analyze, is it -- circumstances that requires a warrant in these services. , seems to me that if it does you know him. and if he doesn't the state will
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do this. that's not what i'm thinking. the question is and i don't find this in the breach and it urprises me. why sthrnt a big difference between a breathalyzer and the other? >> it has strong in the end and you breathe into it. what you breathe into it is carbon dioxide. you're not going to keep it. and more over, it takes place quickly so the evidence hasn't disappeared. >> a blood test, you have to go somewhere else. there's risk involved. you lose system of the event and it's painful in some instances. i immediately think sthrnt a difference? so encaps late in what i'm saying is. what is wrong a breathalyzer test? when it can save lots of lives
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and is given those people where there is probably cause, i take it or at least reasonable decision to think they're drunk. it will kill the innocent and inculpate the gl. very little interference. that might be a different thing. i appreciate what you're responses is to that line of thought. >> and i think that you're tatement is quite correct. the state has considerable more. on the breath test, breath test is a significant inintrusion on personal integrity as the court said. see, first of all, there's no yes that the breath test is a church. that's concede by my friends on the other side. >> but the court's presurpgs has been that when there is a search
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search a warned going to be required. i think it is and north dakota that there is no folks. so no such exception here. >> why can't we say with respect to a breath theast this is a search incident to arrest? of? -- >> i think it's not a search and arrest because of the reason at we're stated in sentiment hich is it's been clear very early on that service is nose preserve offer first safety or to preserve evidence. >> i think this would be on the nation that it is necessary to preserve. >> the judge suggested that this is about uninvase i as a search could possibly be. giving those things together --
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but it is youthful to preserve evidence. nd he is ex-treekly uninvasive search. >> let me answer both of those points. the evidence as being tested sheer the blood-alcohol level. ar that he brought her identical and asked the court -- >> there's something very different in the level of invasion. and it's appropriate to look at the invasiveness of a search when deciding whether to do a search incident to arrest if that weren't true we would haven't talked about how much you could get off of a cell phone in riley. we would allow people to do body cavity severages. so it seems to me that the court n look at the level of invasion incident whether it's a
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particular service comes within to arrest that. that might be a way of separating this way -- from the ones that we were talking about in mcneilly. > when you say -- first, our sense that a breath test is in fact, a significant intrusion on personal integrity. when one takes one of these breathalyzers tests. it is not -- you're exhaling and - i didn't say ordinary way. i said you would blow hard into strong like things. so losing the word significant or not doesn't help me. i mean, -- it is what it is. the question is why it is so intrusive. the constitution insists on a warrant.
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where? that could undermine any questions the evidence that if you are looking for. at's a question of several factors. that seems to me. but the question is not the answer -- >> well, as for why we think it is significant as a personal matter. when was takes the breathalyzer test. you have to exhale for as many as 20 or 25 seconds. the point of it is to expel what court. >> what does that have to do with it? i mean, after all if the person's eyes turned bloodshot. every time he drank four bottles of whiskey, you could look at his eyes and that wouldn't be intrusive at off. i mean, what you're looking for doesn't have much to do with the intrusion. it's the way you're looking for it that's the problem.
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>> the not that you want to mr.b there. >> you're snorting this tube. it can be tested by the government. >> i know we've -- and add tony. but in my experience police when they do the road test, do it because they want to confirm drunk.u're a before before they me off the road, they're doing this test as fart of the probably evaluation. is there enough test to bring you in? there may be. sometimes it -- the breath tests exonerates people. and they go on their merry way. so why are we thinking that it is only evidentiary.
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i do think the blood test in. >> you decided to take them off the road. and the road is now safe from that person. but -- and that is true. >> we're talking about not about preliminary field. we're talking about people have een eent arrested. there's always -- there's probably cause and there's probably cause. . why we view this. it's part of the necessity of the stock and suspicion of the stock. tests were done out here. the -- the officer has the right to give -- >> what is the test that is given out by the car. and under what percentage of
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breath lireses that is been arrested and move to jail. well, as i said their field sew britity test. . i'm saying what percent is which? i'm asking because i'm curious and i think that might be i think the answer to that question, and people are stopped in the arrested for suspicion of driving while impaired. and i'm not sure there are statistics that anybody has that is available. click there is better technology than the breast test. it would be sufficient to measure blood alcohol. would you say that is the search? >> i think that would be a very different situation. >> if you compare that with what has to be done here, what is the
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big difference between those? that you have to put a straw in your mouth? think most people, and maybe this is just me -- but my suspicion is present when presented with the opportunity putting something in your mouth or expelling something deep in your body, people would find that more intrusive. >> the reason people do want to submit to a blood alcohol test is the don't want their blood alcohol measured. it is not that they object so much to blowing into a straw. do you disagree with that? >> i think maybe i do. obviously, people who are stopped on the road don't want to be tested, in any respect. >> well, that is not true. if you are not drunk, maybe you are happy to be tested. is that true? an intrusion if you pass him but he down and you
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have probable cause. what is the worst intrusion? i would guess down a pat down is a much more intrusive form of search, but we allow it. >> let me offer two points. one is, the states in their treatment of blood and breath tests, almost uniformly through the tests identically. >> that is my question, why? that is why i started with that a really don't know the answer. >> and i think the answer is, the test is designed to obtain the same evidence as the blood test. ahead.se, go >> i think what people are concerned about is the dissipation of this evidence. as the blood and breath tests, they are the same. >> you write it is designed to
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get at the same evidence and the dissipation of the evidence works in the same way, that you are suggesting we should close our eyes to the fact that there is a very big difference in the degree of invasiveness. both of these are searches, what you have to say i think that -- we have held that. blowing is a search, there is no question about that. and there are searches and then again, there are searches. there are searches and then there are less invasive searches. that is an important difference when we think about the questions. >> as to the nature of the breath test, i have been addressing this and i not sure how much more there is to say about it, but i think, the reality is, when a foreign object is put into a person's body, that is an intrusive proposition, something most people regard as a significant
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invasion of the personal integrity. >> what about the standard sobriety test? says, walkce officer a straight line. >> that would not be a search. that could be a seizure. >> it is involuntary. if a person is not wanted. search. not a it may be a seizure. that is not something that has not been analyzed. >> into is a seizure -- and it is a seizure if you say to a person, now you walk in a straight line. all think these are almost voluntary. the officer will ask, will you walk ina straight line? people tend to do it. those are not challenged
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here. they represent a different set of issues. think, in addition to the particular characteristics of the breath tests, which we think our intrusive, it is a fact that the court has always, when confronted with a search in an ordinary law enforcement investigation, not a special ne eds investigation, the court says there must be a warrant, unless the recognized exceptions apply. and those do not apply here. >> well, this is the question ia asked. i agree with you that we should not make up no exceptions willy nilly. the question is, why isn't this a search incident to arrest, given the various aspects i have mentioned? the fact that the evidence does dissipate over time, that
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getting a warrant might interfere with that, and it is relatively a not invasive? , myor dissipation understanding of that doctrine withen one is concerned doing something to get rid of the evidence -- flushing the evidence down the toilet -- that is a situation. alcohol -- it does not dissipate at a level. it will remain anybody to be tested later on. i don't think that justifies a search. it is an entirely different category.
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[indiscernible] think there is nothing you can do to take this evidence and hide it. dissipate in ao controlled way. and if the state can test it quickly, they will be able to determine. if the state has a warrant, they can do that and that is what they should do. you, counsel. -- thank you, counsel. >> mr. mccarthy. >> mr. chief justice, may please the court. north dakota statue strikes a bargain with individuals wish to ing to use the state's public upon, and consent is held
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drunk driving. the use of test refusal is evidence of criminal actings. >> what about people will find that texting while driving is becoming an increasing problem. when you get a license, you give implied consent for the officer to look at the texts on yourself unto makes her that a minute ago you were not texting somebody while driving. would that be acceptable under your rationale? >> i think it is highly doubtful, your honor. i think there are many different interests b between the and what is happening here. >> i don't know what the statistics will say. it would surprise me if there are as least as many accidents accidents caused by
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people texting while driving and drinking well driving. >> given the history here, it is uniquely compelling. >> what you mean the history? >> the state has been battling drug driving. >> there is not that much history for texting because iphones have not been around for that long. search only comes up when the driver has been arrested. so, there is probable cause to believe this person is driving drunk. >> i don't see that that is the difference, with respect to my hypothetical. people don't swear the road because they are texting, just like they do when they are intoxicated. and they are stopped for doing the. and the officers says, let me see your phone. just like, let me see your breath. at me test your br le
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reath, let me check the phone. >> there will be probable cause. >> fortis the probable cause come from? -where does the probable cause come from? that comes from theme fro sobriety tests. >> they have to then do the sobriety tests to find probable cause? >> no, not necessarily. road, forn the or you are texting. >> even aside from that, there is a separate set of -- as the
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court indicated most recently in the cell phone case, that is separate. it is one level over and it is much more intrusive to go into that. there is not as much interest with the dissipation of evidence as there is in the case of drunk driving. >> but what is happening here is, the states are in a terrible bind. the situation here, if the states are left only with administrative penalties for refusal, then what happens is they create a loophole in the system that makes it difficult. >> you can get a warrant. i mean, you are not left with that. you don't want the administrative expense of calling a magistrate or setting up the system to get a more. but it is a very powerful alternative. that's what we said in mcneilly. so, it is not that you don't have an out. the issue for us is, do we dispense with a very important
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requirement in our law that before you search, particularly the inside of a person with a needle or in an intrusive way, tha tyot you get a warrant. i am not sure why you think you are left with nothing. >> your honor, two things. we think mcneilly is helpful for us. what the court was concerned about there was first blood draws don't happen under the system. the second part of mcneilly is, mcneilly pointed to these types of statutes and said, these do require forced blood draws. >> the civil consequences? what about to suspend the license. that is directly related to the condition that the license giv es. but criminal sections are a very different thing. affect, you are putting
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somebody in jail. you are not just taking their license away. >> criminal penalties are different. we don't dispute that. that is the essence of the question here, given that the court has already endorsed these kinds of conditions being opposed. being imposed. >> what about the practical consequences of requiring a ward for every breathalyzer. but would that be like in a state of north dakota. north dakota is not like new york city. you don't have night court going on all the time. so, how many of these tests occur during some period of time? how many magistrates would you have on duty at let's say, 2:00 a.m. to field request for a warrant? >> well, oh. the first part of my answer is,
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if i want was required -- if a warrant was required with every dakota you bring up an interesting point. it is not that there are judges and magistrates on duty all the time. in fact, they are considered to be as "on call." they are not on duty, but are reachable somewhere by phone. but it often takes a while, especially in rural areas. >> in miami, it can take five minutes and in montana, it takes 15 minutes. how long does it take north dakota? >> in north dakota, there is a quicker process where they can use telephonic warrants. it can also go directly to a magistrate. my understanding is it can take between 30 minutes to one hour. but in the smaller jurisdictions where it is more rural, they're the process has to go through
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the prosecuting attorney first. >> why is it easier to get somebody on the phone int h the rural area? >> i think i a lot of people -- i think a lot of people in rural areas, are sitting there waiting for the phone to ring. [laughter] honor, at a large part, it is the lack of resources? >> is that an excuse? we are now going to bend the fourth amendment, which i always thought started on the presumption that we favor warrants. we don't despair rhythm. -- we don't disfavor them. but we give a pass to north dakota. >> it is not that north dakota is asking for a pass here. there are a couple things here. a warrant is not required in
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every case. >> i think what people are asking you is to try and get some sense of the real world here. let me ask you to assume something. assume that you actually could put into practice a system which got you a warrant in 10 or 15 minutes, which many say is of a has been done. what would be your interest in the rule you are asking us for? >> the interest would be on most same really and this is the important part, really. the purpose of the warrant is to authorize the search. but that is my happening here. the state does not want to take to overtake those searches. the medical personnel would be between them. >> is he refused to comply with the foreign, you can punish someone for obstructing justice.
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you can get the same outcome as putting them in jail for being drunk and driving. justifiess it that doing away with something as important as the fourth amendment warrant requirement? again, it is not that the state is trying to get rid of one requirement. is trying to do is get evidence of somebody. this is a pure law enforcement need. this has nothing to do with the safety of the community. because the person has been taken off the road. in the present that you can suspend the license. -- and we assume that you can suspend their license. this is something more. >> this is different. i respectfully disagree though, that the suspension of a license and the arrest of a person takes
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them off the road. it is still very much a public safety interest and it requires some explanation here. but the problem here is the states cannot effectively -- and in north an dakota in particular -- they cannot enforce the drunk driving laws. >> that is what we are asking. if you could get a warrant easily in every case, i am struggling to find out what your interest is in having this law. maybe i am not understanding something. suppose you could set up a system where somebody could be reached within 10 or 15 minutes and they would, in almost all circumstances, give a warrant. and in a couple say, i don't think you satisfied the requirement. and you could do that within 10 or 15 minutes. what would be the problem with just relying on a system like that? >> there are two problems. one is that the warrant is not
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required in every case. >> i am asked about your practical needs. and then, we will figure out what is or what is not in line with the fourth amendment. but your practical needs. >> the other point here is that the warrant -- the point of that is to authorize the search. the state does not want to do that. to step back. >> i do not understand that answer. we're struggling for, in the wake of our recent cases when we nts, we findarra out that modern technology allows to get a warrant within 15 minutes. and the position the states are arguing here is that a warrant is not necessary. it takes too long. suppose it takes 15 minutes. what then? we were asking for an extraordinary exception here.
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you are asking for us to make it a crime, what many people believe is a constitutional right. you can point to no case that allows that. and you are just not answering the question about whether or not, in the wake of the recent decisions over the last three or four years, warrants have connected i did in many cases and if they have been, why that is not an answer to your argument? >> to require a warrant in the situation, i think it would require the court -- it would invalidate the stance the court made in mackey. >> many of us want an answer in terms of law. we want to know a practical fact. the practical fact is, is it possible that you could get a warrant in 30 seconds, if you have it button on a cell phone
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that has a big "w" on it. a voice comes on and says, "what's the problem?" you explain and 15 seconds and they say, "you have your not.nt" or the netwas available, would be one thing. minutes, it is an 15 and some in its. or you could say, it does not make any difference. but i want to know what your answer is on the facts. >> there is some delay in getting the warrant. and that make the difference. >> why does it make enough of a difference. >> there are a couple reasons, but i want to step back because the implication of the fourth amendment right is the start of the analysis, not the end.
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there is a bargain here. the court has always allowed the state to impose bargains in this manner. the court has allowed this type of thing as a mechanism. it is really just the criminal element that makes the difference. >> you are not answering the question. >> do you know how many breathalyzer tests or blood tests are administered within any period of time? >> there are approximately 6000. >> could i ask a different kind of factual question? how many of these are done roadside? how many are taken to the police station? when are people taken to the police station? what is the practice? >> so, the only test done on site is the preliminary test, which is not admissible in
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court. done in atest is medical facility. thebreath test is done with police or at a jail. you.ank >> mr. chief justice, and may it please the court, i would like to follow-up on some of the questions of the practicality of the search warrants in these situations. having grown up 20 miles from the north dakota border and attending college in that area, i am very familiar with what the realities are in the rural area. and yes, it may be possible to get a search warrant in every case. but if that what this court is going to require, in minnesota, we are going to be doing warrants in every case with
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blood draws. and that is not what this court wants. >> but why? >> why would i now as a police officer cause any more delay. because there is going to be a delay in getting that search warrant. and why would i delay by taking somebody to the police department, because that is where most of these tests are being conducted. they are not being done on the side of the road. >> breath? >> yes, breath. blood, you have to go to the hospital. >> if you take them to the police station anyway to do the breath test, and it just requires a phone call to get the warrant, what is the problem? >> but why bother? because now i have transported this person to the police station. i then have to get a warrant. right there is a fuphone
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there. >> let's talk about the rural aspects of north dakota and minnesota. in many of these jurisdictions there is one officer on duty. i grew up in a town 2000 miles from a north dakota border. there was always one officer on duty and has not changed. the other problem is, there is not a hospital located in every jurisdiction in minnesota and north dakota. for example, in the town i grew up in, the nearest hospital would actually be in farther north dakota. testat about the breath then? that is the practical alternative. the breath test, blood test. you can choose, precinct or hospital. if they just to take the breath test. >> now, i am not going to get a warrant to take a breath test.
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>> why? >> i can't force somebody to blow into the straw. >> you can make it a crime not to. that will force them. the thing i am missing in this argument, i think what people are trying to figure out -- at least me -- forget the blood tst. it is a separate matter in my mind. i am thinking solely about the breath test does the constitution require you to get a warrant before you administer the breath test? the constitution leans in that direction and so i ask you, why not? and now you have told me all of the things that ar against you. use that come before we give them the test be taken to the station. that seems to take 15 minutes. and in the meantime, why can't you just call the magistrate, so you have some kind of safeguard
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against total arbitrary behavior? and so, why is that bad for the state? >> i would have to look at our implied consent statutes and what that allows end of not allow. so, currently, minnesota's implied consent statute says once i offer a test and they refuse, we are done. item know how to explain it more clearly. i am not talking law. i am talking practical facts. if you are prepared to come back and say, we have to get ia wa rrant, 50% of the drunk drivers are never going to be caught. if you come back to me and say, warrant is required, it will mean 400 policeman have to spend 10 seconds that they would otherwise not spend on a telephone. do you see? i'm trying to get a fact.
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>> i don't have those type of statistics to answer the question. >> let me ask this in a different way. when we decided mcnally, there were two opinions. even the opinion that was the concurrent, for the dissent. -- i don't remember but the chief justice's opinion, even that -- and this was with respect to a blood test. openhe chief justice's and said, if there is 20 minutes between the time you are stopped and the time we can take you to the hospital for a blood draw -- and you can get a warrant in that 20 minutes then yes, you have to get a warrant. so, at the very least, why would that not be the case? whenl of these things -- i thought about this case, i had in my mind, roadside stops.
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but in all of these cases, you are driving the people to the station house. so, why can't you get at least, what the chief justice said in mcnally, which is, if you can get a warrant within that time, you must? know, speaking on behalf of minnesota, minnesota treats -- and i don't necessarily disagree with you. minnesota is up here as the alternative argument. minnesota specifically treats blood tests differently than breath tests. we specifically do and our court has recognized that. so, for example under the implied consent law in minnesota, in order to get a blood or urine test, you have to offer both. so, we do treated differently. and the case -- and minnesota traded a differently in the bernard case. that is very clear.
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the very clearly stated in ruling that they weren't going to address blood or urine. they will be shortly because there are two cases before them where that is an issue. >> let's talk just about the breath test. number one, i am not sure why they are not roadside. but number two, if you take them to the police station, then we have the question about the war. let's talk about the breath test and just about the practicalities. let's assume -- i know my colleagues are -- but as part of this, assume that if a system could be put in place for a wa test.for a breath right now we get dozens of cases where the police tell the
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homeowner, we are applying for a warrant. in the homeowner says, then i have got to do it. so, the number of warrants our much less because of that. because they know they are going to get one. so, if you could put a system in place for a warrant. and you tell the person, if you don't take the warrant -- if you don't do the breath test, you are going to be charged with obstruction, what are you losing out? >> will be are really losing out on is the enhance ability. that is the really big difference. >> what is enhanceability? enhanceability with dwi laws. for example, if i cannot charge the dwi, than i am only allowed
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with obstruction. then, i can no longer use that event to enhance any future dwi's that same person might commit. you know, it is as if you want us to create an exception to the fourth amendment and a very drastic one. to give someone the right to say "yay" or "nay" with a warrant. they don't comply, they are charged with obstruction and there will be consequences. consequencese same that it would be if it was a the dwi or refusal. >> that is because you choose not to penalize obstruction at a higher level. that is your choice. we are now creating an exception to the fourth amendment because of your choice. >> and it is minnesota's
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position that a warrant isn't necessary. >> i appreciate that. >but i am assuming, if you can get a warrant. >> justice sotomayor is assuming you are going to lose. so, she wants to know what your reaction is to that. [laughter] >> i don't like it. don't like it one bit. thank you. >> thank you, counsel. justice, i would like to say three things this morning. first, i would like to address the real world consequences. second, i would like to say what i think this numeral is an in compliance.
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in this real world, it is not the case that warrants are available 20 47. -- 24/7. in the north carolina example, the study compared three jurisdictions against the nine jurisdictions that for various resource reasons, availability of judge reasons, and for other reasons, were unable to do it. the experience of the park police in the wake of mcnealy is while they can get the warrant in maryland, they cannot do so in dc. even in mcnealy itself, where the court listed in a long footnote. >> why in maryland have they been able to, but not in virginia? inas the court recognized mcnealy, some of it is the willingness of the judge's to be available 24/7. you might not get in the southern district of new york --
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you might have 24/7 availability for terrorists attacks, but not unk driving.drug driving >> a person is drunk. he is 10% above the legal limit, whatever that is. how long does it take to dissipate? >> i don't know. above isng until 10% not equal to or less than? statistics, i the do have the exact statistics, your honor. is a delay in getting the lord at times. in the case of maryland, you can get it within 15 minutes, but it can take as long as 90 minutes or two hours. the is at page 37 o fthf study. in the mcnealy footnote, the
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court listed 33 states which have electronic warrants, which is not the same as 24/7 judicial availability. but that leaves 17 states that do not have it. >> there are more and more every year, aren't there? we are now up to over 40. >> that is definitely true, but if the court is making a rule based on the idea that these warrants are always available, there is a serious risk that want to require that, that then the evidence is lost. so, if i could then turn to the which line criminal rule, i understand to be the core petitioner's case. in mcneilly, this court said te required as a condition, that a motorist arrested or detained for drunk driving, agree to a bac testing and the state may impose significant consequences on the
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subsequent refusal. lesser sanctions are insufficient to overcome the natural incentive that many drivers will have not to abide by that condition. as a matter of common sense, i think that doesn't make sense. the idea that you can only withdraw a government benefit has major problems. for example, if the condition would ask th extend beyond the m of the benefit, it does nothing. if i could your honor, i am ban, when a one year i leave the solicitor general's office, from content think with the office on an official matter. that is punishable by up to one year in jail. the is a condition of my employment. that is not the only condition.
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14135, the refusal to give dna. the idea that there is a bright line between administering the sanctions and criminal sanctions that forces the government only withdrawal of the benefit is not the case. back in the stevenson case in 1927, which is discussed in the brief, that was a situation in which texas had conditioned --ving on the texas roads and restricted that by imposing requirements -- in that era, those were viewed as in constitutional interferences. and the other side identifies that as a case that did not past terminal penalties. pass criminal penalties. if you look on page 60, it will say that the texas statute imposed criminal penalties. again, the idea that the only thing the government can do is
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to withdraw a benefit in the context of an unconstitutional condition and can go to the core is to witches hich enforce the -- >> i think one of our concerns is that driving is so important. and it is very different from not being able to work for the solicitor general's office. [laughter] >> excuse me, your honor. the court has said that for 60 years, of course it is different from not being able to work for the solicitor general's office. but it is a dangerous activity and the court said, you can condition driving. it is a reasonable condition the state can impose. >> it is a helpful answer, and your time is running out. i am going to stop you.. is it permissible based on the briefs that have been filed with
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us for the court to make a distinction between taking the breath test death refusing to take a breath -- refusing to take a breath test and refusing to take a blood test? >> for this court said in skinner, is that a breath test -- the court has never held that a warrant is required and they should not do so here. there are no significant privacy interests. sense becaused the intrusion is much smaller. the amount of information revealed is just the alcohol. and a gimme done as part of the regular booking process. on that side of the scale, the tribe is the interests are very smaller. tests administered road side. >> there is a preliminary test
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that can be done on the side of the road. there are these testing m obiles, but many jurisdictions, including the park police, are not using those. thetesting is done at station. i would also like to comment on your honor's question. the warrant requirement is an odd fit with the breath context. it provides the function of having a neutral magistrate look at the evidence, but generally what you want -- the officer can enforce compliance. that is not possible with the breath test. testrant for a breath cannot be accomplished without the consent of a breather. it is like an extended birthday cake candle blowout. you can for somebody to do that. -- you can't force somebody to
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do that. >> there are sanctions for refusing to comply with a valid warrant. it is subject to control sanctions as well. >> your honor, it might well be, but it shows a little bit what the use of a warrant does not quite map on in the usual search context. the other problem you have is because you can't force compliance, you might have another statute later to do it. but because the consequences are not as clear, what it will do is drive the state to the blood testing, which one can force. that is the very situation this court has recognized in neville. dot is a situation states not want to be driven to, to a forced blood draw. >> assuming for argument sake, that you can take the breathalyzer without a warrant,
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what need is there for a blood test without a warrant. why isn't it at a minimum that if you are going to a blood test, you need a warrant. the officer has a suspicion that there is something other than alcohol, the blood test is important. >> it will take time. you have to get to the hospital and it is a more serious intrusion. minuteshat 15 to 20 when you take them to the hospital, you can get a warrant. the biggest thing they can do it, but the question is, whether you need the magistrate's approval. there is not bright line on criminal sanctions. it is critically important outside of the blood context, where you need the drug evidence. >> thank you, counsel.
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three minutes. >> thank you, mr. chief justice. three quick points. two legal and one practical. first, given the discussion. we should not lose sight of what i think is a fundamentally important proposition, which is a future of the code and minnesota topic. people who drive on the roads are irrevocably, automatically, they lose their fourth amendment rights to resist warrant searches. there is no consent here. there is no knowledge. the opportunity being offered by the government is that states can simply attach to any benefit that is provided to individuals that they surrender a constitutional right. bethe future, it can attached to the constitution. that weree example offered a criminal penalties that could be attached for
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example, are a situation in which they would lose their fourth amendment right. there would be no constitutional problem there.s second, there has been the discussion about the nature of warrants and how readily available they are. if you look at the studies from the safety administration, you would find that warrants are almost universally available in quick and efficient terms. this is true when a vast majority of the cases. there are more states that provide these fwarrant mechanisms. it will become a universal mechanism. alito asked about, these work effectively. the offices on the field, the those that, and
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handle these cases, they all praise the warrants. test refusal, that makes confrontations between officers and drivers -- it drives up dui convictions. warrants are an effective way of aggressiveness. a third and final point on blood tests. far as i am aware, has never said that one can cut out certain types of procedures or certain types of evidence being sought. the presumption is that a warrant should be required. the court addressed both blood and breath tests, and noted that there were differences between the two, but treated them identically. i do not think there is any reason for treating the two
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differently for the purposeso of a warrant. >> thank you, counsel. the case is submitted. >> the road to the white house coverage continues this morning. we will hear from donald trump, ted cruz, bernie sanders, and hillary clinton. >> this morning, members of the house armed services committee will begin a markup of the 2017 defense armed services act. the overseas contingency operations budget. and military activities. thected to run let into evening, our live coverage begins at 10:00 a.m. eastern on our companion network, c-span3. won all fivemp republican primaries tuesday. he spoke with supporters and members of the media at an event
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in trump tower. next tuesday, primary voters go to the polls in indiana. this is about 40 minutes. mr. trump: i want to thank everyone. this is a far bigger win than we expected. all five and that is something. that is really something. not only is it all five, it is all five whether it is 60 or just about 60 and even i see one re as 66 and 67. you have to remember and i say this all the time to the pundits, there are three people when you crack 60 and as we did last week with our great city and our great state of new york, when you crack 60 with three people that is hard to do. in fact i think chris can tell you if you crack 60 that is called a massive landslide but
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we have three. and some strange things have happened. last night it was very strange when i watched this group get together. that was a strange moment. i got a call at 11:00 and we talked anything that is a good thing because it shows weakness, a joes effectiveness, and it shows a failing campaign. it is collusion. in business, they put you in jail for collision. in politics, they let you get away with it. i put it was a very weak signal. the republican party need something very different. [cheers] trump: we will be going to indiana. i will be leaving tomorrow afternoon for a long stay. it is a great state and i have many friends there. i have a coach -- the great bobby knight. we will be spending a lot of time with bobby. he is an amazing guy. he is tough, sharp, smart and he wins. bobby has endorsed me.
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we're going to spend tomorrow night and i think the next day with bobby. i think it will be a lot of excitement and fun. that is called the gold standard for indiana. i would say bobby knight has to be the gold standard and we have so many other people that have endorsed us there, so that will be great. we will be spending numerous days in indiana and it will be something really special. so, i want to thank the media. the media has really covered me very fairly for the last two hours. [cheers] trump: no, they have been very fair over the last few weeks. we have had record-setting crowds, bigger than bernie. you probably saw, the democrats have treated bernie very badly and frankly, i think you should run as an independent. i think they have treated him very badly. the system is a bad system and
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whether it is their system or our system, you look at what goes on. the best way to beat the system is to have evenings like this, where you have record-setting votes and record-setting delegates. i used the analogy of the boxer. when the boxer knocks out the other boxer, you have to wait for a decision. that is what happened last night. that is what happened last week in new york. that is what is been happening throughout. we had millions more votes -- millions more than cruz. millions more votes than kasich. kasich now, i guess he was one in 41. 46.i guess now he is one in dr. ben carson did much better. he could've hung around and on very well. if you look, chris christie did much better. if you look, marco rubio did much better. [applause] in fact, marco rubio right now
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has more delegates than kasich. i mean, he has got many more delegates. all they had to do was hang around. they thought it was inappropriate. many people don't like seeing it. it is like a skille spoiled person that says, i am staying for whatever reason. kasich as an as he gets hit with the first negative ad, he is done. today we came up against hillary, but we will beat hillary so easily. [cheers and applause] trump: i was not going to run, according to everybody. but i ran. i was not going to sign, but i signed form a. everybody said, wow. and we put in the financials. they were phenomenal, a little bit like this evening, for better than people even thought. they built a great company with my help of my sons and
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daughters, with the help of my family, frankly. we built a great, great company. and everybody said again, well, he is going to have a good time for a couple weeks. he's enjoying it. very shortly we went to number one. over a three or four week period. and we have been number one ever since. again, millions of more votes, hundreds of more delegates. i think this one might be the biggest of them all. in new york last weekend, 60 62% was incredible. that was far better than what people had thought we would do. 50%,said, if you can break with three people, it is hard to do that. we had almost 62%. [applause] last week we had 95 delegates in new york state. we picked up almost every single one of them. but this one is a diverse
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victory. you go rhode island, and go maryland, and then you go connecticut -- and then pennsylvania. and every single one of them was conclusive. and every state is so different. one of the greats was come when you look at almost 50% in massachusetts and almost 50% in the state of alabama. now, that is pretty different. i think we are going to do really well in washington state. i think we are going to do amazingly well in oregon. i mean, every place we are going to. we are going to be fighting hard. we will be fighting hard in new mexico. i think governor kasich and senator cruz have really hurt themselves with a faulty deal that was defaulted on before they even started. because kasich said, what you mean? aren't they going to vote for me in indiana? it is politicians. they are all talk and no action. they can't get it done, and they
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certainly can't straighten out our country. we are going to bring back jobs, take care of our military, so many things. [applause] trump: to me, especially over the last two weeks, because the trouble to new york state. i went to syracuse, poughkeepsie, rome --and i me an, rome, new york. we went to the island. every place we went down, manufacturing down 40%, 45% and even more. we go to pennsylvania and we see the same thing. you look at what is happening with steel and other industries. i get statisticians to give me numbers. before i leave all the time, give me the numbers. and every single place i go is a disaster. 40%, 45%,ing is down
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sometimes in a relatively short time. our jobs are being sucked away from our country and we aren't going to let it happen anymore. you are going to make it difficult to do that. when companies want to leave this country, our great country, and want to lay off all these people that have helped build the country, there will be consequences for the company to pay. when they think they will make their product and send it in, no taxes through a very weak border, which, by the way, our border will be very, very strong. [cheers and applause] trump: they think they are going to send their product through a very weak border and pay no tax and have no consequence for what they did, it is not going to happen that way. when we do that, all of a sudden, companies are going to say, i am staying in, syracuse and pennsylvania, and in maryland. i want to thank the people of maryland to have been so incredible. we had rallies in maryland and
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pennsylvania that were absolutely unbelievable. yesterday in pennsylvania, we were in an arena that was like madison square garden. they turned away thousands of people. unfortunately the press never reports it. they never want to show my face. does anybody want to show this arena that has tens of thousands of people in it? that's ok because i will explain it to you. we are going to have our country back. we are going to make america great again. i just want to tell you for the five states, i was so honored. this was to me, our biggest night. [cheers and applause] you very muchnk and we will take some questions. [indiscernible]
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mr. trump: yeah, i don't know the final numbers-- for the most part, it has been millions of dollars. i consider myself the presumptive nominee. [applause] [indiscernible] senator cruz and governor kasich should really get out of the race. they have no path to victory. they should get out of the race and we should heal the republican party. i a mthe unifier. -- i am the unifier. i unify people. we have people who are backing this party. we're going to have such unity. some have gone too far over the edge.
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but we will have people back to the party and we are going to win. we're going to beat hillary clinton. [cheers and applause] trump: thank you. mr. trump: we are leading by so much. i think we are going to hit the numbers pretty easily. [indiscernible]
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mr. trump: with pennsylvania, we had a massive victory, above 60%. pennsylvania has been amazing. [applause] mr. trump: we've got 17 delegates outright. you have 54 or so that are up for grabs. the one thing different with pennsylvania -- i have heard about it for years -- the winner of pennsylvania, there is a moral obligation, at least in the first round, to support the person that won. we won big. you have the three people. when you have 3 people, to get 60%, that's almost unheard of. getting 60% with 2 people, that's still a really big victory. we have a great republican leader and you have a moral obligation. all i care about is the first round.
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you hear that cruz growing around biting people dinner, getting them into hotel rooms. he's looking for the second and third and fourth. i'm not too interested in that. we are going to win on the first. i'm not looking to go to the second and fourth. the truth is, even if it went there, can you imagine-- in california, i think we hit 50% today. they are at 18%, 60% -- there is a massive difference. --18%, 16%. of carrierthe home conditioning, which is leaving for mexico. i am saying that won't happen if i'm president. carrier will not be leaving
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indiana if i'm president. i've talked about this for a long time. the unfair thing that pundits never report, when i began the process, very capable people with these people -- 17, a record in history of politics. 17 people. i start winning. i'll win new hampshire, and i get 32%. people will say, why did he get 32%? you can't get 50% when you have 16 people. i go to south carolina. we have a massive victory. that was cruz' stronghold. except i won it in a landslide because of the evangelicals that back to me. they have been unbelievable. i won there.
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we had 12-14, many people. we got a lot. we went to nevada. alabama, with all the people we had, we almost had to percent. massachusetts, we almost got 50%. i was watching tonight, the pundits never talk about the fact that these early states 3 -- is unfair. there is a big difference between fighting one person and fighting two people in terms of percentages. whenh you talk about the 1237 number, the first 70%, we had 16-17 people to 10, to 8, to 6, to 5, to 4, and now we are at 3. it's really unfair. i mean, i have always been good at math. nobody ever discusses that. when i watch television -- whether it's cnn, fox -- they never talk about the fact that we have all these people. if you've got a 32 or 38%, and you have 7 people running, that's like 75%. i'm honored to have hit over 60%
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in virtually every race with only three people left. [applause] mr. trump: i did not want to bore you with that long -- i'm telling you, it's never discussed on television. >> can you come up with a short list of potential running mates? mr. trump: he is wasting his time. list of running mates? i heard he had a news conference tonight, and a news conference was for the purpose that is getting out of the race. that is what i thought. and instead just more talk. no, i don't even want to think about that. i'm not doing that. we're going to set up a committee in the not too distant future. i don't want to think about it right now. i think chris christie is fantastic. [applause] >> [indiscernible]
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mr. trump: no, i am me. it's easy to be presidential. i am not playing a part. look, i started off it 17, and in winning, it is over. as far as it can concern, it's over. why would i change? you have a football team and you are winning and you get to the super bowl, you don't change your quarterback. so i'm not changing. i think we are going to do great in the general. i may act differently but my thought process is the same. if i speak to group of 10 people in a conference room, i'm not going to speak the same way i spoke in pennsylvania yesterday to 25,000 people. but i will be saying similar things. >> [indiscernible]
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mr. trump: i'm doing a foreign policy speech, yes. which i look forward to. >> are you concerned about losing enthusiastic long-term supporters-- mr. trump: it's an interesting question. i' had many people write in, tweet in, call in -- please don't change, state the way you are! look, i'm not changing. i went to the best schools. i am going to represent our person with dignity and very well. but i do want to change my personality. [applause]
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mr. trump: it got me here. somebody said, if you change you would be where you are right now. we beat a lot of people. a lot of people are saying what happened darling, why are we sitting here watching television? when i announced, there were many favorites going to win. one of those people raised over $100 million in a pac, have a lot of money personally. others had big advantages, governors of major states, etc. they were all going to do great. but one after another, and here we stand, with 5 victories over 60%. >> tonight in her speech, hillary clinton had a theme about love trumping hate. mr. trump: i call her crooked hillary. she would be a horrible president, she knows nothing about job creation. her husband signed nafta which destroyed to this country economically. look at new england, pennsylvania, nafta was a disaster. her husband signed it. it was a disaster for the country.
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hillary will be horrible, absolutely horrible on economic development. she will be terrible on jobs. she does nothing about jobs except jobs for herself. [applause] mr. trump: when it came to answering the phone at 3:00 in the morning, she was sleeping. she wasn't with benghazi. look at syria, so many other things. she will not be a good president. she doesn't have the strength, the stamina. i know about dealing with china. i've made billions of dollars dealing with china. china can be dealt with and you can get along with them. hillary does not have the strength or the stamina to deal with china or other things. put bottom line, one of the big problems our country has his problems with trade. china, japan, mexico -- so many countries ripping us left and right. the politicians cannot handle
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the problem. they don't have the competence to do it. most of them are paid off through campaign contributions so that they don't touch certain things. when people are making less money in real wages than they were 18 years ago, and some people say wow, he had a big crowd. that's one of the big reasons. you have people making less money today, because you see every stat -- less money today than they made 18 years ago. and in some cases, they are working 2 jobs. so they are getting older and working harder. it shouldn't be that way. >> you are not worried about being labeled-- mr. trump: no, not worried about it. i am not a hateful person. i am a person that loves people. again.e america great that's just a theme. she is going with that. i will do far more for women
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than hillary clinton clinton will ever do. she will not be good with the military. she will not be good at protecting our country. she has had her shot. she raised her hand when it came to iraq, and she shouldn't have voted. take a look at the things bernie sanders was saying about hillary clinton. he said she is not qualified to be president. but he said something else. you have to run and see what happens. but he said some things about her that were so incredible. and so incredibly bad. is a great level of hatred. he has been telling the truth. i think bernie sanders should run as an independent. i think he will do great. >> is there a level of frustration-- mr. trump: i think the party is seeing me that way. i'm getting calls that you would not believe.
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i can't even know how they can do it, because they have said such horrible things about me. now they want to join the team. chris can tell you that. ben carson can tell you that. other people can tell you that. paul can tell you. i actually say, how can you do this? how can you do this? how can you do it? and they have no problem. names that you wouldn't believe. names that you interview and say oh, trump trump trump. and how they want to join the team. a lot of them will be coming out soon. >> [indiscernible] mr. trump: tomorrow is going to be interesting. some of my views on foreign policy and defense, and lots of other things. and part of it is the economics. i was asked the question recently by wolf blitzer on cnn, and he talked about nato.
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at first, people didn't like it. they said, trump is right. i said it was obsolete and too many people are getting a free ride. we are funding 72-73% of nato. many of these countries are just taking advantage of the united states. you have to pay up. we don't have a country with $19 trillion in debt. part of what i'm saying -- we love our country and our allies, but our allies can no longer be taking advantage of this country. this isn't 40 years or 20 years ago, this is now. we have to rebuild our infrastructure, our country, we have to get rid of isis and fast. our military is totally depleted. it's going to be the cheapest thing we can do. a lot of great things are going to happen. we are going to make america great again. >> [indiscernible]
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mr. trump: no no, you are really going to hear different things. i'll never change one thing. you know what i will never change? "make america great again." [applause] mr. trump: no, is not going to be the trump doctrine. in life, you have to have its ability. you may say one thing and, the following year you want to change it, because circumstances are different. i have followed people for years. i have friends, many of them endorsing me, many great business people. many of the great endorsingeople are me. you have to have flexibility. you can't say, this is my
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doctrine and i won't move. the world changes, leaders change. lots of things happen. you can't say that. >> [indiscernible] mr. trump: we don't have a ceiling. do you know what our ceiling is? i think it's 100%. [applause] mr. trump: again, the ceiling was always so unfair. i want to do it because it's so important. the ceiling, they kept saying, he doesn't hit 50%. how do you hit 50% when you have 16 people in a race? you can't do it. no no, you don't understand, i have many people running. i think i'm going to win new york. know of the republican can say it. conservative voters? did you see the polls coming out tonight? the most conservative people in the republican party, tonight, back donald trump. [applause] [indiscernible]
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mr. trump: that is the single biggest question i am getting -- student debt. we are going to work on that. students have the problem with that. -- with debt. they go to a could college, they are choking on debt. they get good marks, they working hard, and they can't get a job. i am going to drink jobs back -- brings jobs back to this country like you have never seen. [applause] [indiscernible] trump: that is the biggest
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problem. we have a lot of contrast in terms of jobs, in terms of how i would handle wall street. hillary clinton is funded by wall street, folks. she won't get the nomination unless she gets indicted with these e-mails. you look at what happens to so many other people. they went through hell, their lives have been destroyed for doing less than what hillary clinton did. what you did is an outrage. it is absolute criminal outrage. for her to be able to run as a democrat, maybe that is why bernie sanders isn't finished. the only way you can say that is if something happens to her. she is being protected by the democrats. i see it, and whether i read about it in the papers or watch it with legal experts or tv, virtually every one of them says what she did is a criminal act and a very dangerous thing for our country. yet here she is running for president. i think hillary is a flawed candidate. i think she's going to be easy to beat. i think she's going to be much easier to beat than most of the 16 people that i competed with just recently. [applause]
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>> [indiscernible] mr. trump: to me, always the number one security threat to the united states is nuclear. that is our biggest threat. our biggest risk. the power of weaponry. we have to be unbelievably careful. president obama said the biggest threat is global warming. give me a break. the biggest threat to our country is nuclear. we cannot let iran get a nuclear weapon. [applause] mr. trump: we are going to do something where we will have a real partnership with china. china has rebuild itself by making a fortune over us. china has tremendous power over north korea. we have to be very vigilant on north korea. we cannot let this guy go much further.
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china should handle the problem. they can handle it very easily. they say that they can't, but they are toying with us. we have a lot of power. we are going to have a great relationship with china, with putin and russia. china has a lot of power over north korea. they just refuse to use it, and they refuse to talk about it. they don't respect us or our president and they are getting away with murder. what's going to happen, very important to me -- nuclear weaponry, that is your single biggest threat in the world today. go ahead, tom.
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>> are you worried about the lawsuit with your failed university? trump: no, that is a civil case. i am going to win that easily. >> [indiscernible] mr. trump: my unfavorables have come down a lot over the last few weeks. remember this -- i saw it on all of the cable stations, and a lot of the networks. i've had 55,000 negative ads against me. when i ran in florida, i had 14,000 negative ads. millions of dollars, and i won in a landslide. i've had negative ads all throughout, and i won in a landslide. you all reported it. even carl would agree to that. i think we are going to hurt the industry. but i've had --
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largely the ads were false. i had 55,000. jeb spent millions of dollars on negative ads. and i won new hampshire in a landslide. most of these people that have been fighting the oregon. when i am one-on-one with hillary, she will be much easier to beat than many of those i have already beaten. i think they're hurting the party because they have zero cap to victory. here is what i say. let's assume it did go beyond us assume he let is a good man. and let us say, oh well, trump was 12 short or 15 delegates
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short or 25 short. and500 more they in crews more than that ahead of john kasich. , trump by thatne time will be 5 million votes because of the size of california and other places. trump by that time will be 5 million votes ahead of ted cruz. will be much more than 5 million votes ahead of john kasich. i mean kasich -- i changed it. 46.in i would have one in ohio had i not been given a dirty poll saying that florida was tougher than i thought. i stayed in florida for two more days. if i would've stayed in ohio to my days, i would have wanted. how do you pick up man on the third or fourth ballot that has five or $6 million less than trump. i'm the when the run all these people into the party.
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is why the republican party is up almost 40% over two years ago. peoplenimum, there is are going to be very upset. they are not going to vote. they are not going to vote. they are going to say, ok trump one by five million votes. delegates, 600 more than ted cruz and much more than that above kasich. he brought all of these people into the party. worldwide there are talking but how hot the republican party is. the democrats are 35% down from four years ago. the republicans are almost 70% up from four years ago. that is an amazing tribute. and believe me, that is not because of kasich or ted cruz. that is because of me. how are you say to them, we are going to take a man who lost by 5 million votes because trump
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was five delegates short? i don't think they can do that. i intend to get enough delegates. yes ma'am, one more question. go ahead. "indiscernible" -- >> [indiscernible] whatrump: if you look at is going on with immigration, look at the record number of people right now who are pouring across the borders of this country. airborne. excuse me, excuse me. i just read it. ad i read it and actually legitimate journal. you look at the kind of crime, you look at it economically. we need borders. i want people to come into our country but i want them to come and legally. they have to come in through a process. [applause]
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>> [indiscernible] mr. trump: i think the only card she has is the women's card. and frankly, if hillary clinton were a man i do not think she would get why percent of the votes. the only thing she has going for her is the women's carding and the beautiful thing is, women do not like her. ladies and gentlemen, thank you very much. i've for shaded. thank you. ♪ if you start me up if you start me up i never stop start me up i never stop i've been running hot
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up start me stop never stop never stop we will make a grown man cry. you make a grown man cry you make a grown man cry you can start me up
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grown man cry man cryke a grown you can start me up ♪de it up announcer: c-span brings you coverage from the white house correspondents dinner. andrks from president obama this year's featured comedian.
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announcer: it tuesday night, crowd ined cruz told a wrightstown, indiana, that his campaign is moving back to more favorable territory. here is a look. [cheers and applause] ♪ while of u.s. me were i come from here is what i tell everyone i was born by god's dear grace in an extraordinary place.
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where the stars and stripes and the eagle flies it is a big old land ♪ [cheers and applause] mr. sen. cruz: god bless the great state of indiana. to chad and calais and mike, i want to thank you for being here. thank you for your strong leadership. thank you for everyone coming together on a terrific evening here in the hoosier state. you know, tonight donald trump is expected to have a good night will stop -- a good night. donald trump is likely to win
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some states and the media is going to have heart palpitations this evening. they are going to be excited. at donald excited trump's victory. into the media is going to say, the race is over. [boos] cruz: the media is going to say, donald trump is the republican nominee. now, if you find yourself is soing why it the media eager to have donald as the republican nominee, you do not have to look any further than "usa today" front page. 40% of gop doubts they would vote for trump. 40%.
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now, i want you to think for a second. the network executives, are they democrats or are they republicans? every one of them are ready for hillary clinton. and, donald trump is the one man on earth hillary trump can't the media has told us, the candidates in this race, they are both going to be new york liberals. but i have good news for you. tonight, this campaign moves back to more favorable terrain. [cheers and applause] sen. cruz: tonight, this campaign moves back to indiana!
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[cheers and applause] sen. cruz: and nebraska, and north dakota, and montana, and washington, and california. now, the media want to say everything is decided. and the question is, can the state of indiana stop the media's chosen republican candidate? [cheers and applause] sen. cruz: well, as you all know, we are here on the hickory basketball court. and bruce, who travels with me, i want to ask you something. do you have a tape measure with you? tell me something. how tall is that basketball rim? 10 feet. you know, the amazing thing is
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that basketball ring in indiana is the same height as it is in new york city and every other place in this country. and there is nothing that hoosiers cannot do. [applause] sen. cruz: now, there has been a lot of media speculation lately about vice presidential vetting. and i have an announcement to make. a major announcement. hillary clinton has decided on her vice presidential nominee. hillary has picked donald trump. >> [laughter] sen. cruz: now, it is important to note hillary had a very careful vetting process that went into this.
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she wanted someone who shared her vision of the federal government. you know, donald trump did recently a town hall. he was asked, "name the top functions of the federal government." he said security, and then he said health care, education, and housing. [crowd booing] sen. cruz: funny thing is, if you ask hillary, she would say the same thing. if you ask bernie, bernie would be like, that is aggressive. you don't only want socialized medicine. you also want to put the federal government in charge of all education. education. common core. [crowd booing] sen. cruz: according to donald, that is the core responsibility of the federal government. and housing? how many people are ready for the federal government taking over the housing market? and, you know, donald and hillary, they are flip sides of
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the same coin. hillary clinton has made millions of dollars selling power and influence in washington. and donald trump has made billions of dollars buying politicians like hillary clinton. but some in the media might say, "oh, come on, that is not fair. it is not reasonable to suggest donald trump and hillary clinton could ever run as a ticket." i'm going to walk you through 13 policy issues where donald and hillary have the very same views. let's start with jobs. my number one priority is jobs, bringing back jobs and economic growth. bringing manufacturing jobs back to the state of indiana. raising wages for the
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hard-working men and women in this country. but it is interesting. donald trump on jobs, donald and hillary both agree our taxes should be increased. last week, donald trump went on national television and said, yes, we should increase jobs. that is a great idea. increase taxes, that is a great idea if you want to kill jobs. if i am president, we are going to cut taxes. [applause] sen. cruz: the second article area under jobs, donald and hillary both support the obamacare individual mandate. both of them think it is a terrific idea. if you care about jobs, you know obamacare is the biggest job-killer in america. and as president, i will repeal
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every word of obamacare. a third area where donald and hillary get it wrong on jobs is immigration. both donald and hillary believed illegal immigrants who are here should be able to become u.s. citizens. now, donald thinks we should fly them back to their home country first. but let them right back in and make them u.s. citizens. let me tell you what i'm going to do as president. we are going to stop amnesty, secure the borders, and end of welfare benefits for those here illegally. [applause] sen. cruz: but let's talk about freedom, the fundamental freedoms of the bill of rights. amen. [applause] sen. cruz: donald trump and hillary clinton both support
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taxpayer funding for planned parenthood. [crowd booing] sen. cruz: indeed, donald trump and hillary clinton both describe planned parenthood as terrific! as president, i will instruct the department of justice to open an investigation into planned parenthood. [cheers and applause] sen. cruz: donald trump and hillary clinton both supported bill clinton's national ban on many of the most important firearms in america. [crowd booing] sen. cruz: as president, i will defend the second amendment right to keep and bear arms. [cheers and applause] sen. cruz: donald trump and
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hillary clinton both believe we should negotiate with harry reid and chuck schumer and the democrats on supreme court nominations. i give my word to the people of indiana and the people of america that every justice i appoint to the court will be principled constitutionalists. [applause] sen. cruz: and unlike donald and hillary, i will not compromise away your religious liberty. [cheers and applause] sen. cruz: and donald trump and hillary clinton both agree grown men should be allowed to use the little girls' restroom. [crowd booing] sen. cruz: now let me say it is just common sense. this is not a matter of right or left or democrat or republican.
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this is basic common sense that grown, adult men, strangers, should not be alone in a bathroom with a little girl. [cheers and applause] sen. cruz: and yet, donald and hillary care more about the p.c. police than they do about speaking the truth on basic common sense. let's talk about security. the eighth policy issue where donald and hillary's views are identical. donald trump and hillary clinton both believe the u.s. government should be neutral between israel and the palestinians. as president, i will not be neutral. we will stand with israel! [cheers and applause]
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sen. cruz: the ninth area they agree is donald trump and hillary clinton have both said they would keep the catastrophic iranian nuclear deal in place. as president, i will rip to shreds this nuclear deal with iran. [applause] sen. cruz: the 10th area of agreement. donald trump and hillary clinton both believe hillary clinton was one of the greatest secretaries of state of all time. [crowd booing] sen. cruz: that is what donald said. why do you think he kept contributing to her? why do you think donald trump gave money to hillary clinton's presidential campaign?
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and then, let's talk more broadly about washington corruption. you know, donald trump loves to style himself an outsider. and listen, when it comes to human decency, politeness, respect -- he's right. you know, most people in indiana are raised that you don't yell and scream and curse and insult everyone you see. [applause] sen. cruz: but donald trump and hillary clinton's campaigns are both run by washington lobbyists. washington lobbyists run their entire campaigns for both of them. donald trump and hillary clinton both supported obama's failed stimulus plan.
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and donald trump and hillary clinton both supported obama's tarp bailout of wall street. you know, it was striking. just this past week, donald's lobbyist campaign manager was talking to the top officials of the republican party. and he said donald is just playing a role. he's just playing a part. he does not mean any of this. he does not believe any of this. he is going to change and pivot away from everything he is saying. now, when that was first reported, the trump campaign immediately tried to deny it. but the problem was they caught trump's lobbyist campaign manager on tape. they have him on tape saying donald is just playing a role and he will be a completely different person. as donald put it, he can be the most politically correct person on earth.
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we have had enough of having the most politically correct person on earth in the white house. [applause] sen. cruz: donald is telling us he is lying to us. every one of us is fed up with politicians who betray us, who make promises and don't do it. donald is telling us he is lying to us. he says he can be a different person tomorrow then he is today. well, let me tell you what. i am the same person i was yesterday and that i will be tomorrow as president! [cheers and applause] sen. cruz: the federal government, out-of-control taxes and regulations are killing jobs across this country.
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the working men and women in this country, the men and women with calluses on your hands, are paying the price for washington that is not listening to us. that is captive to the washington lobbyists like the trump and clinton campaigns. [applause] sen. cruz: and this is no longer a theoretical and distant threat. this is a real threat that has come home. in the great movie, "hoosiers," there is a wonderful quote from that movie. "look, mister, there is two kind of dumb. a guy that gets naked and runs out in the snow and barks at the moon. and the guy that is the same thing in your living room. first one don't matter. second one, you're kind of forced to deal with." well, let me tell you right now this out-of-control federal government, these bureaucrats destroying coal jobs across
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indiana, destroying small businesses across indiana, hammering farmers, hammering ranchers, they have become the guy, naked, barking at the moon in our living room. and i am here to tell you, we are going to deal with it! [cheers and applause] sen. cruz: this race is real, real simple. donald trump and hillary clinton are both big government liberals. they both think the federal government is the answer to every problem. i agree with ronald reagan that the scariest words in the english language are, "i am from the government and here to help you." [cheers and applause] sen. cruz: and i want to thank the people of indiana.
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because you are going to have now the opportunity. the eyes of the nation are gazing upon you. the eyes of the nation are looking at this state at the crossroads of america to make a decision for our country. do we want to support a campaign that is based on yelling and screaming and cursing and insults? or do we want to unite behind a positive, optimistic, forward-looking, conservative campaign based on real policy solutions to the problems facing america? [cheers and applause] sen. cruz: this election is about jobs. it is about security. and we need a president -- thank you, sir. you know, it is always nice that
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you have one donald trump supporter who comes in and disrupts. i note that what he does is he wants to scream and yell and disrupt. thank you, sir. one thing that mr. trump does not understand is the first amendment gives everyone the right to speak, but it does not give you the right to disrupt. it does not give you the right to try to silence others. it does not -- hey, treat him with respect. everyone, keep your hands off of him. keep your hands off of him. see, one difference. if this were a trump rally, i would be encouraging people to punch him. instead, i am encouraging people to treat him with respect, with civility. he is an american. and i can tell you -- [cheers and applause]
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sen. cruz: i can tell you even as he comes here and tries to scream and yell and insult, very much following the trump pattern, i'm running to be his president as much as i am running to be everyone's president. [cheers and applause] sen. cruz: we are tired of a president who divides us, tired of a president who rips us apart. we need a president who unites us, and remembers who we are as americans! together, the people of indiana are going to send a powerful signal to the media. a powerful signal to the washington establishment that the chosen candidate of washington, the chosen candidate of big money and the lobbyists,
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they are not going to decide the republican nominee. it is going to be we, the people, taking our country back and doing it together! thank you, and god bless you! [cheers and applause] ♪ >> ♪ sun coming up over new york city school bus driver in a traffic jam staring at the faces in her rearview mirror looking at the promise of the promised land
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one kid dreams of fame and fortune one kid helps pay the rent one could end up going to prison one just might be president ♪ this morning, the house armed services committee will begin a defense programs and policies markup. expected to run late into the evening, our live coverage begins at 10:00 a.m. eastern on c-span 3. >> democratic presidential candidate bernie sanders won the state of rhode island tuesday.
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he spoke to supporters in huntington, west virginia. that state holds its primary on may 10. this is about an hour. [cheers and applause] sen. sanders: west virginia, thank you! what an extraordinary turnout tonight. thanks so much for being here. [cheers and applause] sen. sanders: let me thank helen, chris, and jeff for the introductory remarks. but mostly, i want to thank all
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of you for being here. i want to thank all of you. i want to thank all of you for being prepared to stand up, fight back, and make this country the nation we know it can become. [cheers and applause] sen. sanders: this campaign is not just about electing a president. it is about transforming our nation. it is about having the courage to demand a political revolution. [cheers and applause] sen. sanders: and you are the revolutionaries. [cheers and applause] sen. sanders: because you understand that, unlike football or basketball, politics is not a
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spectator sport. [cheers and applause] sen. sanders: so, let me tell you a secret that many others will not. you are all, each and every one of you, powerful people if you choose to exercise that power. [cheers and applause] sen. sanders: the fight we are waging is not an easy fight. but i know you are prepared to wage that fight against the 1%, against the billionaire class. [cheers and applause] sen. sanders: and against a
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small number of people with incredible wealth and incredible power who control our economic life, our political life, and our media life. [cheers and applause] sen. sanders: when we began this campaign just about a year ago, we started with no political organization. we started with no money. and we had no name recognition outside of vermont. [cheers and applause] sen. sanders: and i want all of you to get up to vermont and visit our beautiful state. [cheers and applause] sen. sanders: and when we began this campaign, the media said bernie is a nice guy, he combs his hair really well.
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[laughter] sen. sanders: top-notch dresser. [applause] sen. sanders: but nonetheless, he really is a fringe candidate. the campaign is a fringe campaign, not to be taken seriously. [crowd booing] sen. sanders: and in the middle of all of that, we were taking on the most powerful political organization in america. an organization that elected a president, president clinton, on two occasions and ran a very strong campaign for secretary clinton for president in 2008. and when we began this campaign, we were about 3% in the national polls. we were about 60 points behind secretary clinton.
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well, a lot has happened in the last year. [cheers and applause] [crowd chanting "bernie"] sen. sanders: as of today, we have now won 16 primaries and caucuses all over the country. [cheers and applause] sen. sanders: and with your help, we are going to win here in west virginia. [cheers and applause] sen. sanders: we have won over 1200 delegates to the democratic
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national convention. [cheers and applause] sen. sanders: and in the last several weeks, the national polls don't show us 60 points down. a few of us actually have us ahead or a few points behind. [cheers and applause] sen. sanders: and what is also extremely important, if the democratic party is to look at which candidate is the candidate to defeat donald trump or any other republican -- [crowd booing] sanders: what we are seeing on national polls which have is 15, 20 points ahead of donald trump, far more than secretary
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clinton. [cheers and applause] sen. sanders: almost every national poll and every state poll has us defeating trump and that margin for us is significantly larger than that of secretary clinton. and the reason that we are doing so much better against republican candidates is that not only are we winning the overwhelming majority of democratic votes, but we are winning independent votes, and some republican votes as well. [cheers and applause] sen. sanders: and that is a point that i hope the delegates to the democratic convention fully understand.
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in a general election, everyone, democrat, independent, republican, has the right to vote for president. the elections are not closed primaries. we were in new york state last week. three million people in new york state could not vote. because they were independent. those folks and independents all over the country will be voting in november for the next president. [cheers and applause]
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sen. sanders: and in most cases, we win the independent vote by a two to one margin. this campaign is doing as well as it is with the extraordinary energy and enthusiasm that we are generating all across this country. look at this room here tonight. we have almost 6000 people. [cheers and applause] sen. sanders: and the reason that we are generating this enthusiasm is because we are doing something very unusual in contemporary american politics. we are telling the truth. [cheers and applause]
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sen. sanders: now, the truth is as every person here knows whether it is in our own personal lives or in our broad national political life, truth is not always pleasant. it is not always something you are happy to hear. but if we go forward as human beings, if we go forward as a nation, we cannot sweep the hard realities of our lives underneath the rug. we got to bring it out, we have to deal with it. and unfortunately, unfortunately, media in this country for a variety of reasons, largely because they are owned a major corporations do not deal in most cases.
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there are great exceptions but they do not deal with the reality -- realities of our lives in a way that we need to be discussing. [applause] sen. sanders: let me just give you a few examples of what i mean and making it really relevant to life here in west virginia. i have been all over this country and the things that i have seen are incredibly heartbreaking. i went to flint, michigan where children are being poisoned by lead in the water that they are drinking. [booing] sen. sanders: i have been to detroit, michigan where their public school system is on the verge of a fiscal collapse. [booing] sen. sanders: i have been to baltimore, maryland where tens of thousands
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of people are addicted to heroin. [audience boos] sen. sanders: i know that addiction is a problem here and we will get to that in a second. the point is -- never forget it -- we are the wealthiest country in the history of the world. but, most people in our country do not know that because almost all of the new income and wealth is going to the top 1%. [audience booing] sen. sanders: we are the wealthiest country in the history of the world and that means that public school systems should not be collapsing. youth unemployment in this country should not be 30%, 40%
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or 50%. our infrastructure should not be disintegrating. [cheers and applause] sen. sanders: we as a people have got to ask some very hard questions and then have the guts to take on some very powerful people. you know, a great nation is not judged by the number of billionaires it has or the number of nuclear weapons it has. it is judged by how it treats the weakest and most vulnerable amongst us. [cheers and applause] sen. sanders: it is not
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acceptable to me that in america we have the highest rate of childhood poverty of almost any major country on earth. that is not the way we should be treating the young people of this country. [cheers and applause] sen. sanders: right here in west virginia, your beautiful state, 100,000 children in this great state live in poverty. over 24% of the total number of kids right here in west virginia. [audience boos] sen. sanders: when we talk about employment, "officially" unemployment in america is supposed to be 5%, but you know that is not the case. real unemployment is much higher than that.
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[applause] sen. sanders: in fact, right here in west virginia, this state has the lowest labor force participation rate in the country. in fact, only 54% of the working age population in this state has a job. when we talk about the grotesque level -- i talk about this a lot -- when i talk about the grotesque levels of income and wealth inequality, west virginia is almost at the top of that list. again, again, this is a national problem. believe me, it exists in my state of vermont.
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this is an issue we have to deal with in every state of this country. listen to this -- from 1979 to 2012, the top 1% of the people in west virginia saw their income go up by more than 60% on average, while the bottom 90% saw their income go down. [audience boos] sen. sanders: go down by 4/10 of 1%. that is what we are seeing all over america. we have an economy today that is doing really, really great if you are in the top 1%. if you are in the bottom 90%, the likelihood is you are working longer hours for lower wages, if you are lucky enough to have a job. [applause]
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sen. sanders: i want everybody here to know this is not just -- i'm using west virginia statistics tonight because i'm here -- this is a national issue and that is why together we are going to create an economy that works for all of our people, not just the people on top. [cheers and applause]
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sen. sanders: a couple of years ago, i was chairman of the subcommittee in the senate. we did a hearing on poverty as a death sentence. you know what i mean by that? this is what i mean by that. when you hear about people being poor, people say that is too bad. they don't have a good car, their housing is not good. then don't have enough money to go out and eat. being poor is much more than that. what being poor is about in america is you die at a significantly lower age than people who have money. [audience boos]
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sen. sanders: mcdowell county in west virginia is one of the poorest counties in the united states of america. the united states of america being the richest country in the history of the world. in mcdowell county, 77% of the children under 18 are living in poverty in the united states of america. [audience boos] sen. sanders: in mcdowell county, men can only expect to live until the age of 63. now, i want you to think about this. again, being poor means not just that you have the big flat screen tv or the fancy car, it means you are dying at a significantly lower age. if you drive six miles north from this county, you are going to fairfax county, virginia. in fairfax county, men live on average until the age of 82 years of age. 18 years more than men live in mcdowell county. [audience boos] sen. sanders: the average life expectancy for
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a woman in fairfax county is 85. in mcdowell county, it is 73 years of age. it's not just mcdowell county. we have counties like them. all over the country. these are issues of inequality that as a nation we have got to address. [cheers and applause] sen. sanders: you know, one of the issues that i talk about a whole lot and is directly related to poverty, to unemployment is the fact that we have a broken criminal justice system. [applause]
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sen. sanders: again, what this campaign is asking all of you is to think outside of the box. think outside of the status quo. think beyond the options that corporate television allow you to envisage. [applause] sen. sanders: think about why people in mcdowell county die at a significantly lower age than people in wealthier communities. think about why it is in city after city in america, we have youth unemployment levels of 40%, 50%, 60% and that relates to an international embarrassment that we have more people in jail than any other country on earth. [audience boos]
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sen. sanders: this is the united states of america. we should have the best educated people in the world. [cheers and applause] sen. sanders: our people should have decent paying jobs, not rotting in jail. [cheers and applause] sen. sanders: this campaign is going to win because we are doing something unusual. we are talking to the american people and not just a wealthy campaign contributors. [cheers and applause] sen. sanders: when i talk about unpleasant
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truths that all of us have to address, truth number one is that we have a corrupt campaign finance system which is undermining american democracy. [cheers and applause] sen. sanders: think outside of the box. what does democracy mean? it is not a complicated concept. it means you have a vote, you have a vote, you have a vote. majority wins. democracy does that mean the koch brothers and a few other billionaires can spend hundreds of millions of dollars to buy elections. [cheers and applause] sen. sanders: that is not democracy, my friends. that is called oligarchy.
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if we do not turn things around, we will increasingly see an economy and a government run by a handful of billionaires and together we will not allow that to happen. [cheers and applause] sen. sanders: but, it is not just a corrupt campaign finance system that we are going to have to address, it is a rigged economy. this is what a rigged economy means. it means today -- listen to this -- the top 1/10 of 1%, not 1%, now owns almost as much wealth as the bottom 90%. [audience boos]
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sen. sanders: in america today, the wealthiest 20 people own more wealth than the bottom half of america. 150 million people. in america today, one family, the walton family of walmart, one family owns more wealth than the bottom 40% of the american people. [audience boos] sen. sanders: you know what i say? i say enough is enough. [applause] sen. sanders: but, it is not only an unfair distribution of wealth. it is income as well. i want to say this to the young people who may not believe me. i want you to google it after you get out of here, not now. here is the facts.
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40 years ago before the explosion of technology, before the cell phones and the space age technology, before the global economy, it was possible in america for one breadwinner to earn enough money to take care of the entire family. one breadwinner could earn enough money to take care of the entire family. then, you got the whole global economy, all of the technology and you know what happens? today, mom and dad are working, the kids are working and they have less disposable income than one breadwinner family had 40 years ago. something is wrong with our economy. [applause] sen. sanders: in america today, in
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west virginia, you have people working not one job, they are working two jobs, three jobs. you have people working longer hours for lower wages. we are going to create an economy that protects the needs of our workers, our children, our seniors, our veterans. all of the people of this country and not just the 1%. [cheers and applause] sen. sanders: what does that mean? is that a hard thing to do? it is not. let me give you an example of what we have to do. in america, if you work 40 hours a week, you should not be living in poverty. we will raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour. [cheers and applause] sen. sanders: $15 an hour will
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mean millions of people will be able to support their families with the kind of dignity and security that they do not have today. [cheers and applause] sen. sanders: second, when we talk about equitable wages, we will end the absurdity of women making $.79 on the dollar compared to men. [cheers and applause] sen. sanders: i know every man here will join with the women in the fight for pay equity. [cheers and applause]
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sen. sanders: when unemployment rates throughout this country are extremely high, especially in urban and rural areas, and when people are not making enough income to support their families, it is a no-brainer to suggest we need a program to put our people back to work. [cheers and applause] sen. sanders: in vermont and west virginia and all over this country, our infrastructure, our roads, bridges, water systems, wastewater plants, rail systems, levies and dams are in massive disrepair. we can create 13 million jobs with a $1 trillion investment. [cheers and applause]
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sen. sanders: well, people say, yeah, that is a nice idea. our infrastructure is crumbling, but how will you pay for it? i will tell you. right now, we have a corrupt federal tax system that allows major corporations, major corporations who make millions of dollars a year in profits to stash their profits in the cayman islands, bermuda and other tax havens. we are going to end that tax loophole. $100 billion a year we invest into the infrastructure. we create the jobs that we need. [cheers and applause] sen. sanders: when we talk about the economy, we have got to talk about something that media almost never talks about. it is not a sexy issue, but an enormously important issue and that is our disastrous trade policy.
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again, let me tell the young people something they may not know. that is there was actually once a time, not so many years ago, when you can go to a department store and buy products manufactured in the united states of america. [cheers and applause] sen. sanders: as a result of trade policies like nafta and trade relations with china, policies written by corporate america, what happened is companies shut down plants in vermont, west virginia, all over the country. they said why what i want to pay somebody $15, $20 an hour when i can go to china or mexico and pay people pennies? that is what they did. [audience boos] sen. sanders: as a result of these terrible trade agreements,
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we have lost millions of decent paying jobs. millions. one of the big differences between secretary clinton and myself -- she supported virtually every one of these disastrous trade agreements. i have opposed them all. our message to corporate america is you want us to buy the products you make? make these damn products here in west virginia and america. [cheers and applause] sen. sanders: this campaign is going to win because we are listening to people whose voices are not often heard. one of the groups of people that i have been very proud to listen to all over this country is young people.
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[cheers and applause] sen. sanders: it is a funny thing. when we began this campaign, the general attitude of the punditry was that young people are not interested in government, politics. they are too busy with their video games or whatever else they do. well, it turns out that the young people of this country are a lot smarter than many of the pundits thought. [cheers and applause] sen. sanders: it turns out that the young people understand they are the future of this country and they want to help shape that future. [cheers and applause]
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sen. sanders: young people understand that there is something profoundly wrong when in this country today, the young generation may be the first generation in the modern history of america to have a lower standard of living than their parents. [audience boos] sen. sanders: that is right. my father came to this country at the age of 17 with no money. he worked hard and my mom worked hard. their dream was their kids would be financially better off than they were. that is called the american dream that millions of american families have experienced. parents work hard so their kids can do better than they. [cheers and applause]
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sen. sanders: and together, together, that american dream, that american dream we will not allow to die. [cheers and applause] there is another issue that young people all over the country talk to me about. they say we did what our parents told us to do, what our teachers told us to do and that is go out and get the best education that we can. because we all understand that learning and education is inherent in who we are as human beings and that also for our country to do well in the future, we need the best educated workforce in the world.
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[cheers and applause] sen. sanders: millions of young people did the right thing. they went to college, but then what happened is they left school $30,000, $50,000, $70,000 in debt. and i have talked to people who are paying off that debt for decades. they can't afford to buy a car, a a house, get married, have kids because they are paying off that debt. what crime did they commit for getting an education? that is nuts. [cheers and applause]
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sen. sanders: all of you know that 40 or 50 years ago, if you had a high school degree, the likelihood was you were able to go out and get a halfway decent job and make it into the middle class, with a high school degree. the world has changed, the economy has changed, technology has changed. people today need more education than they did 50 years ago. [applause] sen. sanders: thinking outside of the box, outside of the status quo leads you to a very simple conclusion. 50 years ago, it was great we had free public education from first grade to 12th grade, but the world has changed. when we talk about public
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education today, it must mean making public colleges and universities tuition-free. [cheers and applause] sen. sanders: think for a moment, there are people who have attacked me on this. it is a radical idea. this is not a radical idea. it exists in countries like germany already and scandinavia. they understand that investing in their young people is investing in the future of their country. [cheers and applause] sen. sanders: by the way, you may not know this, but 50 years ago in the united states of america, our major, great public colleges and
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universities were virtually tuition-free. if we could have virtually free tuition 50 years ago, we damn well can do it today. [cheers and applause] mr. sanders: once again, this proposal, which also includes dealing with a crisis of student debt today. we have millions of people dealing with student debt. our proposal will allow people with student debt to refinance their loans at the lowest interest rates they can find. [cheers and applause]
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just out of curiosity, how many people here are carrying student debt right now? ok. we are going to lower that student debt. [cheers and applause] now, my critics say hey bernie, you are a nice guy, giving up free tuition. where are you going to get the money? ok. i want you to think again outside the box. dynamic that the media provides. eight or nine years ago as a result of the greed, recklessness, and illegal thevior on wall street, congress bailed out the big banks. [boos]
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apparently, there was plenty of money available to bail out large banks who were too big to fail. i believe that right now, when wall street is doing quite well, thank you, that we should impose a tax on wall street speculation . and that tax alone that one tax alone will bring you more than enough money to lower student debt and make public colleges and universities tuition free in this country. wall street may not like it but i could care less what wall street likes.
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these kids never in a million years can imagine they will go to college. clear to can make it the parents and the teachers and the children that any kid in this country who studies hard, who do is -- who does his or her schools work well will be able to get a higher education. [cheers and applause] that is revolutionary. issue thatouch on an i know is controversial here in west virginia.
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but it's an issue that ideal was all over the country, and i'm not going to tell you anything different than i say in vermont or california. is that as a member of the u.s. senate committee on the environment, i applaud the the countryll over and the world, what the scientists tell us almost unanimously is that climate change israel -- is real. [cheers and applause] change is caused by human activity. [cheers and applause] and climate change is already causing devastating problems in our country and around the world. [cheers and applause]
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what the scientists also tell us. this is scary stuff. what they say is that if we do not get our act together, and awayform our energy system from fossil fuel, then what we will be seeing in years two, is flooding, or more extreme weather disturbances, more acidification of the ocean, more rising sea levels, and more international conflict as people fight over limited natural resources. [cheers and applause] that toeems to me address this issue, we have got to do two things. , we have a moral obligation
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to our kids and future generations to make certain that we leave this planet in a way that is healthy and in habitable. -- in aand applause] way that is healthy and in habitable. moral of all, we have a obligation to protect those the fossil fuel industry. [cheers and applause] we cannot leave those people in and the oil industry and the gas industry high and dry. we cannot do that. that is why we have a moral obligation to make certain that those people who may lose their jobs get new jobs. [cheers and applause]
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and get the education and all of the benefits that they deserve. [cheers and applause] when we think outside of the box, we have to ask ourselves some simple questions. how does it happen that every major country on earth guarantees health care to all of their people except united states? [boos] i'm a member of the committee that helped to write the affordable care act, and it has done a lot of good things. but, today, 29 million people have no health insurance still. many of you are under insurance website copayments and high deductibles. companies rip us all off a charging us a higher
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prices. by charging us higher prices. believe we need to move towards a medicare for all single-payer program. [cheers and applause] think about and america -- big about america where everybody has a right help -- right to health care. what that means is you will not have to stay on your job, just because you have health care on that job. [cheers and applause] think about going to the doctor when you are sick, not having to worry about a copayment or deductible. [cheers and applause] think about a medicare for all
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theram savings -- saving average family thousands of dollars the year on their health insurance. [cheers and applause] care,e talk about health let me deal very briefly with an issue that is on the minds of all of you in west virginia and in my state of vermont. there is no debate, but that we have a tragic crisis in america today with opiate and hair when addiction. [cheers and applause] -- and heroin objection -- and heroin addiction. trust me, it is a serious crisis in my state as well. the issue of how we deal with it seems to me to reach the conclusion that we have got to deal with substance abuse and addiction as a health issue. [cheers and applause]
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what does that mean? what it means and again think outside of the box. what it means is that we have got to revolutionize mental .ealth treatment in america [cheers and applause] we have got to provide treatment it, note when they need six months later. [cheers and applause] on another issue, relating to drugs, one of the problems with our criminal justice system is that over the last 30 years, millions of people have received criminal records because of possession of marijuana.
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[boos] if you have a criminal record and you are kid, it is hard to go out and get a job. we have got to rethink the so-called war on drugs. [cheers and applause] now, under the federal controlled subject -- substance act, marijuana is listed as a scheduled one drug, next to heroin. [boos] the pluses ande minuses of marijuana, but marijuana is not heroin, which is a killer drug. [cheers and applause] why i have legislation
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in that will take marijuana out of the federal controlled substance act. [cheers and applause] legalizing marijuana is a state issue. it should not be a federal crime. [cheers and applause] knows a profound lesson of american history. and that is that real change never takes place from the top on down. it always takes place from the bottom up. [cheers and applause] 100 years ago, when workers in west virginia and all over this country were forced to work seven days a week, 12 hours a day, when kids were working in
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the mines and factories, working people came together to form trade unions so they could have some dignity on the job. [cheers and applause] happens when people come together. a hundred years ago, in this country, and the kids don't know this, women did not have the right to vote, did not have the right to get the education or the jobs they wanted less than 100 years ago. [boos] but what happened? women stood up. [cheers and applause] back and with their male allies they said in america women will not be second-class citizens. [cheers and applause]
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hundreds of years ago the abomination of slavery, african americans and their allies had a different vision for america. some of them went to jail, some of them died, some were beaten. they said that in america, we will end racism, segregation. [cheers and applause] if we were here in this room 10 time ato, which is no
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all from a historical perspective and someone jobs up and says you know, bernie, i think by the year 2015, gay marriage will be legal in 50 states in this country. [cheers and applause] the person next to him would have said, you are crazy. not going to happen. but because the gay community and their straight allies were prepared to take on bigotry and hatred, we succeeded in making gay marriage legal. [cheers and applause] if we were here five years ago, somebody jumps up and says, $7.25 federalow, minimum wage is a starvation wage.
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we have to rage -- raise that to 15 bucks an hour. the person next to her would have said, 15 talks an hour. you want to more than double the minimum wage? you're nuts. you are thinking too big. it can't happen. 9, 15 isht dollars, too high. you know what happened? workers in the fast food industry, went out on strike. [cheers and applause] they stood up and they fought back, two years ago come in seattle, los angeles, san francisco, $15 an hour minimum wage. [cheers and applause] in oregon, california, new york state, $15 an hour minimum wage. [cheers and applause]
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what is my point? todaynt is, that ideas that seem so radical, raising the minimum wage, making public colleges and use -- universities tuition free. providing health care for all people as a right, paid family , and the a corrupt ,ampaign finance system addressing the crisis of climate change, making sure that women are paid equal pay for equal work. [cheers and applause] sure our kids have jobs, not jail cells. [cheers and applause]
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today, they ideas seem radical, but they are not radical. they are ideas that in fact are supported by the vast majority of the american people. [cheers and applause] supported bynot the billionaire class by wall street, and corporate america. [boos] so what this campaign is about, is asking millions of people workingut this country, people, middle-class people, young people, old people, gay people straight people, black, it asiantinos, .mericans
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making certain that the donald trumps of the world do not divide us up. [cheers and applause] understanding that when we stand ,ogether, there is nothing nothing that we cannot accomplish. [cheers and applause] now, on may 10th there will be a very important primary here in west virginia. [cheers and applause] what we have learned in this campaign is when there are large voter turnouts, we win, win low
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voter turnouts, we lose. all right. that's what i want to hear. [cheers and applause] i hope that on may 10th west virginia will have the largest voter turnout in the history of the state. [cheers and applause] and i hope very much in west will join the political revolution. thank you all. [cheers and applause] ♪ [cheers and applause]
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♪ [cheers and applause] ♪
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>> c-span's washington journal, live every day with news and policy issues, coming up this washington journal will spotlight real clear politics. our guests in kurt -- include the founder of real media group. both will join us to discuss how real clear politics got started and its mission. we will talk about the westside's role in the media market and the role of the media and campaign 2016. rebecca bird national political
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reporter for real clear politics but she will review primary results, and what's ahead for campaign 2016. will be on toy talk about the latest poll and how the public can be smarter consumers about polls. be sure to watch c-span's washington journal getting at 7 a.m. live this morning. join the discussion. democratic front runner hillary clinton spoke to supporters after winning presidential primaries yesterday. event was held at the convention center in philadelphia. ♪
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[cheers and applause] ♪ [cheers and applause] thank you. thank you so much. wow. thank you, pennsylvania.
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what a great night. everyone, i want to thank everyone. hillary, hillary] i want to thank everyone who , in out to vote pennsylvania and maryland and delaware, connecticut, rolled island -- rhode island. i am grateful. to all our volunteers, organizers, community leaders. everyone who worked their hearts out. i want to thank the leaders here in pennsylvania. thank you governor wolf.
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mayor kenny,much for your great help. thank course, i want to the 42nd president of the united states, my husband. [cheers and applause] with your help, we are going to come back to philadelphia for the democratic national convention. [cheers and applause] mostthe most votes and the pledged delegates. [cheers and applause] party to win our this election and build an america where we can all rise together. an america where we lift each other up instead of tearing each other down. [cheers and applause]
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we need you to keep volunteering, keep talking to your friends and neighbors. please join the more than 1.1 million people who have already contributed at hillary clinton.com. i know there are still too many barriers holding too many americans back. despite what other candidates say, we believe in the goodness of our people, and the greatness of our nation. [cheers and applause] that, just lets them travel across this country as i have done in this campaign the past year. hearing people's stories, learning about their struggles. listen to the quiet determination of the working inents i met last week pennsylvania. [cheers and applause]
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theyare doing everything can to provide opportunities for their children in an economy where there still aren't enough good paying jobs. listen to the mother's who lost children to gun violence in encounters with the police. they are turning their sour -- sorrow into strategy and their mourning into a movement, for justice and dignity. [cheers and applause] the nurse i met this weekend in new haven, connecticut, who worked for years to build a middle-class. then her life changed. she was diagnosed with breast cancer and use up all her savings and or sick time. soon, she was facing foreclosure and the prospect of losing the home she loves for more than 20 years. here's what she said to me. my daughter and i live in fear
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of the day that we might come home and have a lock on the door . we are in pain, we are hurting, we were and are the backbone of this country, the middle class. we are not asking for a handout. we just want to be treated fairly. she is speaking for so many people across our country, who feel beaten down, left out, and left behind. people that work hard and done their part but just can't seem to get ahead, and find it tough to get by. underneath all these worries together, we will come together and we are going to solve the problems. [cheers and applause] i am aware that
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too many people feel at the mercy of forces too big for anyone to control. they worry that those of us in politics put our own interests ahead of the national interest. can make that we things better, give our kids a better future that we had is at the heart of who we are as a nation. it is one of many reasons that being american has always been such a blessing. our campaign is about restoring people's confidence in our ability to solve problems together by delivering results that help people follow their own dreams. that's why we are setting bold,
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progressive goals backed up by --l plans that will improve after all, that is how progress gets made. we have to be both dreamers and doers. [cheers and applause] as a great democratic president once said, there is nothing wrong with america that can't be cured by what is right with america. [cheers and applause] i believe we can create more rising incomes, jobs that provide the guinea and pride in the middle class life. we can when you are democracy by overturning citizens united. [cheers and applause] people in places who have been left out from our inner cities to appalachia, in
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.very manufacturing town every community scarred by substance abuse and addiction. tory road where a child goes bed hungry. that's what we democrats believe in. that's what we know is possible. [cheers and applause] on a strong, fromessive two edition franklin roosevelt to barack obama. [cheers and applause] i applaud senator sanders and his millions of supporters for challenging us to get unaccountable money out of our six -- politics. close the gap of any quality, and i know together we would get that done. [cheers and applause]
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because whether you support senator sanders or you support me, there is much more that unites us than divides us. [cheers and applause] agreed that wages are too ,ow and inequality is too high that wall street can never again be able to threaten main street. we should expand social security, not privatize it. we democrats agree that college should be affordable to all, and student debt shouldn't hold anyone back. [cheers and applause] we democrats agree that every single american should and must have quality, affordable health care. [cheers and applause] agree that our next president must keep our country safe, keep our troops out of another costly
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ground war in the middle east. [cheers and applause] we democrats agree that climate change is an urgent threat. [cheers and applause] and it requires an aggressive response, that can make america the clean energy superpower of the 21st century. we democrats agree on defending all of our rights, civil rights, voting rights, workers rights and women's rights, lgbt rights and rights for people with disabilities. [cheers and applause] in this election, we will stand together and work hard to prevail against candidates on the other side, who would threaten all those rights and pit americans against each other. they would make it harder to
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vote, not easier. they would deny women the right to make our own reproductive health care decisions. they would round up millions of hard-working immigrants and import them. they would demonize and discriminate against hard-working, terror hating muslim americans, whom we need in the fight against radicalization. and the candidates in the republican party denied climate change even exists. [boos] now the other day, mr. trump accused me of playing the woman card. , if fighting for women's health care and paid family leave and equal pay is playing the woman card, then deal me in. [cheers and applause]
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if you are a, democrat, an independent, you know their approach is not going to build an america where we increase opportunity or decrease inequality. instead of letting them take us backwards, we want america to be in the future business. [cheers and applause] that's why want you to keep imagining and tomorrow where instead of building walls, we are breaking down barriers. are making it more likely that americans will be part of a prosperous, decent society. we are imagining a tomorrow where every parent can find a good job, and every grandparent can enjoy a retirement.
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we are imagining that tomorrow where no child grows up in the shadow of discrimination or under the specter of deportation, and where every and ahas a good teacher areaschool, no matter what that child lives in. [cheers and applause] imagine a tomorrow where any young person can graduate from college debt-free. [cheers and applause] we are going to imine a tomorrow where hard work is honored, families are supported, streets are safe and communities trustrong and where love, . [cheers and applause] that is the future i want. i want that future for my
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granddaughters and for all of our children and grandchildren. think of this. our nation was born right here in philadelphia. [cheers and applause] our declaration of independence and constitution were assigned just a few blocks away. , even through dark and difficult chapters of our history, the idea of america has shown through. -- as best, we are a robert kennedy said, great country, and unselfish country and a compassionate country. [cheers and applause] greatness must be earned by every generation. , go to hillary clinton.com check join,
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volunteer, contribute, let's go forward, let's win the returnion and in july we . thank you so much. [cheers and applause] ♪ [cheers and applause] ♪
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[cheers and applause] ♪
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[cheers and applause] ♪ >> sees brand review from the white house correspondent's dinner april 30 starting at 6:00 eastern time. it includes a guest list featuring celebrities, remarks by president obama, and dishes featured comedian, larry wilmore. donald trump won all five
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republican primaries tuesday. he talked to supporters and members of the media at an event in trump tower. next tuesday primary voters go to polls in indiana or this is about 40 minutes. i just want to thank everybody this is a far bigger win then we even expected, all five. [cheers and applause] only is it all five, it is all five, whether it is 60 or just about 60, or 67. i say this to the pundits. there are three people, when you crack 60 as we did last week with their great city and state of new york, when you crack 60 with three people that's very hard to do. i think chris can tell you if you crack 60 with two people,
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that is called a massive landslide. but we had three. some strange things have happened. last night it was strange when i watched this group get together. it was a strange moment. i got a call at 11:00, and we talked and i said i think that's a good thing, it shows weakness, it shows ineffectiveness. it's collusion. they put you in jail for collusion. in politics you get away with it. i thought it was a very weak signal. needspublican party something much different than that. thank you. [cheers and applause] indiana, igoing to will be there tomorrow afternoon for a long stay. it is a long's -- a great state. i've coach, the great bobby knight, we will be spending a lot of time with bobby.
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he is an amazing guy, he is tough, he is sharp and he knows how to win people --. we will spend tomorrow night and i think the next day with bobby. there will be a lot of excitement and fun. that is the gold standard for indiana. we have so many other people that have endorses there, so that will be great. we will be spending numerous days in indiana. it will be something really special. i want to thank the media. the media has covered me very fairly for the last two hours. [laughter] lasthave been very fair of few weeks. it has been amazing what has been happening. big crowds, bigger than bernie. i suggested today, you probably saw that the democrats have treated bernie very badly. frankly, i think you should run
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as an independent. himink they treated him very badly. the system is a bad system, you look at what goes on -- the best way to beat the system is have things like this, where you get record-setting delegates. [cheers and applause] of the boxer,ogy when the boxer knocked out the other boxer, you don't have to wait around for a decision. that's what happened tonight, that's what happened last week in new york. that is what is happening now. we have millions more votes than ted cruz. with million more votes than john kasich. kasich is one in 41. now it is one i and 46. i can tell you that if you look, dr. ben carson did much better. if you look, chris christie did much better.
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if you look, marco rubio did much better. marco rubio right now has more delegates than kasich. all they had to do was hang around. as soon as kasich gets hit with the first negative ad, he's had none, that's the end of that. today we came up even against hillary, but we will beat hillary so easily. [cheers and applause] not goinghis, i was to run according to everybody, and iran. -- youot going to sign sign your life away, and i signed. then everybody said while. we put in financials, the financials were phenomenal, far
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better than even people thought. i've built a great company with the help of my sons and my daughters, with the help of my family. company.a great then everybody said again, well he is going to have a good time for a couple of weeks come he is enjoying it. very shortly, we went to number one over a three or four we. and we have been there ever since. again, millions more fuzz, hundreds more delegates. i think this one is maybe the biggest of them all. it was incredible. far better than what people thought. they said if you can break 50 almostree people, we got 62%. we picked up some many delegates. [cheers and applause] last week, we had 95 delegates in order state -- new york city.
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we picked up almost every single one of them. it was an amazing victory. gode island, the new maryland, then you go connecticut. you go pennsylvania -- the whole thing. delaware. everyone of them was conclusive, and every state is so different. one of the greats was when you look at 50% in massachusetts, and almost 50% in alabama. that is pretty different. we have all across the board. i think we will do really well in washington state. i think we would do amazingly .ell in oregon we will be fighting hard, new mexico, fighting really hard. i think that governor kasich and senator cruz have really hurt onmselves that was defaulted the fourth even started. kasich said what do you mean, are they going to vote for me in indiana? i thought they just make that
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deal. politician, all talk and no action. they simply cannot straighten out our country. we will bring back jobs, ringback the military -- fix the military. [cheers and applause] , because i traveled new york state, went to syracuse and poughkeepsie and rome, rome new york. york and weome, new went to the island, and every place we went, manufacturing and more.nd 45% then we go to pennsylvania, and we see the same thing. you look at what is happening with steel and so many other industries. statisticians give me numbers, before a leave, give me the numbers. every place i go is a disaster 60% manufacturing down 40,
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sometimes in a relatively short. of time. our jobs are being sucked away from our country. we are not going to let it happen anymore, folks. we will make it difficult to do that. when companies want to leave great country,ur and layoff of these people, there will become sequences for the company. when they think they went to make their product and send it in no taxes to a very weak we will build a wall, just remember i said it -- when they think they will send their product right through this week border and pay no tax and have no consequence for what they did, it is not going to happen that way. sudden do that all of a companies will say, i am staying in syracuse, i am staying in pennsylvania.
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her to thank the people of barrel and, they of been so incredible. we had some rallies in maryland and pennsylvania that were unbelievable. yesterday pennsylvania, we were in an arena that would like madison square garden. they turned away thousands and thousands of people. unfortunately, the press never reports us. -- does buddy ever anybody ever want to show the arena which had tens of thousands of people in it? but that's ok. we are going to make america great again. i just want to tell you with the states, i am so honored. this to me, this was our biggest night. [cheers and applause] much, and we will take questions. yes? [indiscernible]
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>> [indiscernible] i consider myself the presumptive nominee. [cheers and applause] ted cruz and governor kasich should get out of the race. there is no path. we should heal the republican party and bring the republican party together. we will have people -- that you
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folks will not believe. [indiscernible] two -- some people got too close to the edge. .e are going to win we will beat hillary clinton. [cheers and applause] >>[reporter] [indiscernible] >> i think we will hit the numbers pretty easily.
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one of the things with pennsylvania, we had a massive victory, 60%, about 60%. pennsylvania has been amazing. [cheers and applause] we have 17 delegates, then 54 or so delegates that are up for grabs. the one thing different with pennsylvania, i have heard about it for years, is that the winner of pennsylvania has a moral obligation at least in the first round to support the person that one. we not only won, we won big. , when youhree people have three people to get 60%, that's almost unheard of. when you have two people and you got 60%, that's a really big victory. we have a chance where a great republican leader, and you have
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a moral obligation in pennsylvania that those people -- when you people write about ted cruz is going run bind people everything, riding them around all over the place, giving them hotel rooms, because he is looking for the second or third, we are going to win on the first. even -- if you can you imagine if we are up to 50% and they are at 18 percent and 16%. there is a massive difference. we will do great in indiana. carrieris the home of that is leaving for mexico. i have been talking about them for the last four months. i am saying that won't happen if i'm president. carrier will not be leaving indiana if i am president. when you think of it and the really unfair thing that the
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pundits never report, when i began the process, which 17 people, like chris, governors, senators, dr. ben carson, very tough, highly accomplished people. 17 in the history of politics -- 70 people. i start winning. and i won new hampshire. whyt 32% and people said didn't you get 50%. you can't get 50% when you have 16 people. then i go to south carolina and we have a massive victory. that was ted cruz stronghold and i won it in a landslide. i wanted because of the evangelicals who backed me. they have been unbelievable. so i won there. we had many, many people. and i got a lot. then we went to the bottom, we went to alabama. with all the people we had we
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got 50%. in massachusetts,, we got almost 50%. . was watching tonight the pundits never talk about the fact that the early states, even now we have three. hillary has one. i've three. there's a big difference between fighting one person and fighting to people in terms of percentages. what i am saying is when you , theabout the1237 number first things we have from 16 and 26, 17 people, 210, 28, five and now we are at three. i haveeally unfair -- always been very good at math -- nobody ever discusses that. fox, they is cnn or never talk about the fact that we have all these people and if you got a 32 or 35 or 38, and
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you have seven people running, that's like 75. we are really honored by this night and i'm really honored to have hit over 60 in virtually every race with three people in the race. ok. [cheers and applause] i didn't want to bore you with that long -- long. never discussed on television. go ahead. he is wasting his time. had a newseard he conference tonight, and i heard the news conference was for the purpose that he is getting out of the race. instead he just had a news conference. more talk. i am not doing that. we will set up a committee at the point in the not-too-distant future. >> [indiscernible]
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i think chris christie is fantastic. [cheers and applause] [reporter] [indiscernible] interesting, it's very easy to be presidential. i have not playing a part. with 17, i am down and i am winning. as far as land concerned it is over. if you have a football team in your winning, then you get to the super bowl, you don't change or quarterback, right? i am not changing. i think we will do great in new jersey. i may act differently, but my thought process is the same. when i speak to a group of people on a conference room, i am not speaking the same i i
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spoke in pennsylvania yesterday to 25,000 people. it is a different thing. >> i'm doing a foreign policy. i look forward to that. that if youerns live -- you may lose more enthusiastic supporters. >> i've had many people right .n, tweet in, call in please don't change, please don't change. stay the way you are. i'm not changing. i went to the best schools. i'm a very smart person. i will represent our country would dignity and very well. i don't want to change my personality. it got me here. said, if you changed and you are that way, you would the -- you would not be where you are right now. people.a lot of
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a lot of people are sitting back saying what happened darling? don't forget, when i announced, there were many favorites that were going to win. one of those people raised over $100 million and a lot of money personally. others had other big advantages. governors of major states etc.. they were all going to do great. one after another after another, here we stand with five victories over 60%. >> tonight in her speech, said she willn have love tromping hate. hillary, i call her crooked hillary. she's crooked. she will be a horrible president. she's knows nothing about job creation. her husband signed nafta which destroy this country economically. it look at new york state and all over new england, pennsylvania, nafta was a disaster. her husband signed it.
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it was a disaster for this country. hillary will be horrible, absolutely horrible on economic development. she will be terrible and jobs. she knows nothing about jobs except jobs for herself. [applause] >> when it came to answering the phone at three clock in the morning, she was sleeping. the otherazi and all problems. you look at what she did with syria, with what she's done in so many different ways. not be a good president. she does not have the strength, the stamina, i know about dealing with china. i've made billions of dollars dealing with china. china can be dealt with and you can get along with them. hillary does not have the strength or the stamina to deal with china. or other things. bottom line is, one of the big problems our country has is problems with trade. you have china and japan, mexico, so many countries ripping is left and right.
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the politicians cannot handle that problem. number one, they don't have the confidence to do it. number two, most of them are paid off your campaign contributions so that they don't touch certain things. when people are making less money in real wages than they were 18 years ago and then some people say, he headed big crowd. that's one of the big reasons. when your people making less money today as you know, you see every stat. less money today than they made 18 years ago and in some cases they're working two jobs. so they are getting older and working harder, it shouldn't be that way. >> you're not worried about being labeled. >> i don't worry about it. i'm not a hateful person. i'm a person who loves people. [applause] >> that's just the theme. she's going with that because you think it's great. i will do far more for women than hillary clinton will ever do.
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including protecting our country. you will -- she will not begin with the military, she not be good with protecting our country and she has had her shot and she also raised her hand when it came to iraq and she shouldn't have voted. atyou remember, take a look the things bernie sanders was saying about hillary clinton. she said she's not qualified. he said she is not qualified to be president. -- aid something else that he said some things about her that were so incredible. and so incredibly bad. there is a great level of hatred right there. he has been telling the truth. i think bernie sanders should run as an independent. i think you would do great. you discovers of the present of nominee. is there a level of frustration that the party is in treating you that way? >> i think the party is seeing me that way. i'm getting the calls that you
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wouldn't believe. i'm getting calls from people i really can't even know how they can do it because they said such are all things about me and now they want to join the team. chris can tell you that, ben carson can tell you that. other people can tie you that. i'm getting calls, corey can tell you, paul can tell you. we are getting calls from people where i actually say, how can you do this? how can you do it? they have no problem. is, names you wouldn't believe. names that you interview and say oh, trump, trump. now they are calling wanting to join the team. a lot of them will be coming out soon. >> in terms of foreign policy -- >> tomorrow is going to be interesting. it will be some of my views on foreign policy and defense and lots of other things. we will be discussing. part of that is economics.
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i was asked a question recently by wolf blitzer and he talked about nato. i gave a great answer. experts said trump was right. i said it's obsolete and too many people are getting a free ride. we are funding 72, 70 3% of nato. , many of these countries are taking advantage of the united states. and you have to pay up. we don't have a country with $19 trillion in debt they can afford this anymore. you have to pay up. , we of what i'm saying is love our countries and allies, but our allies can no longer be taken advantage of this country. this is an 40 years ago. this is now. to rebuild our infrastructure, rebuild our country. we've given devices fast. our military is totally depleted. we have to build it up. it will be the cheapest thing we can do. we will make america great again.
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even a really are different things. i'll never change one thing. you know i'll never change question mark make america great again. [applause] >> is not going to be the trump doctrine. in life, you have to be flexible. iago flexibility. you have to change. you may say one thing enemy following year you want to change it because certain answer different. i've followed people for years and i are friends of the most successful people in the world, many of them are endorsing me. many of the great business people. you have to have flexibility. you can't say this is my doctrine and i will not move. the world's changes, leaders change. when you talk about winning
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the last few races any feeling it had. -- ceiling you have. >> we don't have a ceiling. i think our ceiling is a hundred percent. and again, the ceiling was always so unfair because i'm just i don't again, i want to do it. , they kept saying he doesn't hit the 50%. will they don't say that anymore. have you hit 50% when you're 16 people in a race? you don't understand. i have many people running. i think going to win new york, no other republican can say that. -- did young to win see the polls where they're coming out tonight question mark in most conservative people in the republican party tonight back to donald trump. [applause]
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>> debt is the single it is question i'm getting. student debt. we will work on that and make it much different. the biggest problem the students have, they the problem with that. they go to a good college, they borrow right up to the limit and they are choking on debt and they graduate, they work hard and get good bars and he can't get a job. on the do bring jobs back to the country that you will never see. [applause] contrasts the biggest best >> we have a lot of contrasts. in terms of jobs. we've a lot of contrasts in terms of how i would have a wall street. hillary clinton is funded by wall street. she will get the nomination unless she gets her self
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indicted with respect to what happened with the e-mails. what i don't understand, you look at what's happened with so many other people and they went through hell, their lives of the destroyed for doing less than what hillary clinton did. what she did is now trade. it's an absolute criminal outrage. and for her to be able to run as the democrat, that's why maybe bernie sanders isn't finished. the only way you can say that is if something happens to her. theis being protected by democrats. because what she did, i see it and whether i read about in the ,apers or watch it with experts virtually every single one of them said what she did is a criminal act. what she did is a very very dangerous thing for our country. and yet here she is, running for president. , think that hillary clinton she is a flawed candidate and i think she will be easy to beat. i think she's going to be much easier to beat than most of the
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16 people that i competed with just recently. [applause] >> if you become president, what's the number one security threat. >> to me, the number one security threat is nuclear. it is our biggest threat and biggest risk. the power of weaponry. we have to be unbelievably careful. not global-- it is warming. president obama said the biggest threat is global warming, that's -- give me a break. the threat to our country is nuclear. we cannot let iran getting nuclear weapon. [applause] >> we are going to do something real we will have a partnership with china. we have a lot of power over china. china has revealed itself by
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making a fortune over us. china has tremendous power over north korea. we have to be very vigilant in north korea. we cannot let this guy go much further. china should handle the problem. china can handle that very easily. they say they can't, but they are toying with us. we have a lot of power. we will have a great relationship with china. we will have a great relationship with putin and russia. let me tell you, china has a lot of power over north korea. a tremendous amount of power, they refuse to use it and refused to talk about it and they are toying with us. right now, they don't respect us. we don't respect our president and because of that, they are getting away with murder. this guy is getting away with murder. was going to happen, and something very important to me and a lot of other people, was very important to me is nuclear weaponry. that is your single biggest threat in the world.
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>> the trump university case is a civil case. i will win that very easily. >> my unfavorables are component -- down a lot. lot on on the cable stations in the network. and i read it in a lot of papers. i have had 55,000 negative ads against me. had i ran in florida, i 14,000 negative ads. millions and millions of dollars and i won in a landslide. i have had negative ads all throughout and of one race is in a landslide. you know it, you report it. i'm not -- even carl would agree to that. and yet i have this tremendous , you'll must say to ads mean anything? i think we will hurt the ad industry.
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largely the ads were false. a little bit of truth to some of them perhaps. i had 55,000, 100 million and even more in negative ads. jeb spent millions and millions of dollars on negative ads and i won new hampshire in a landslide. happening is's most of these people that up and fighting the argonne and when i'm one-on-one with hillary, she will be easier to take down, much easier to beat than the people, many of the people at a party beaten. i think kasich incurs are hurting the party. they have no path, zero path victory. we will win on the first ballot. we don't look for the delegates a number 2, 3, 4, 5 ballot. let's assume it did go beyond the first ballot and let's rnc,e the head of the
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let's say oh well, trump was 12 short or 15 delegates short or 25 delegates short. and farmore than cruise more than that had of kasich. so you go to a second ballot. trump by that time will be 5 million votes because of california, the size of california. be 5 by that time will million votes ahead of ted cruz. we'll be much more than 5 million votes ahead of john kasich. it, to one and 46. how do you stay in the race? i would have won ohio had i not been given a dirty poll saying that florida was tougher than i thought. i stayed in florida for two more days of going to ohio. if i spend more days in ohio, i would've one. how do beginning of the second or fourth ballot who has millions of votes less than
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trump and i'm the one that probably is people into the party. that's why the republican party is up almost 70% from four years ago. [applause] >> you know it's been a happen? those people are going to be very upset and very angry. at a minimum, they will just not vote. so have you do this? won byyou say, ok, trump 5 million votes, trump is 5 million, -- 5, 600 delegates more than ted cruz or kasich. and he brought millions of people into the party and everybody is talking about the party worldwide how hot the republican party is. down fromats are 35% four years ago. the republicans are up almost 70% from four years ago. it's an amazing statistic. that's not because of john kasich or ted cruz, it because of me. how do you say to them, we are going to choose a man that lost
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by 5 million votes and 500 delegates, we will take him because trump was 14 delegates short of winning on the first ballot. intendat being said, i to get enough delegates. one more question. >> allstate with my feelings on immigration. if you look at what's going on and look at the record numbers of people right now that are pouring across the borders of this country. they are pouring -- excuse me, excuse me i just read it and i read it in a legitimate journal. we need protection in our country. you look at the kind of crime, you look at what's going on economically. we need borders. --ant people to come in our into our country, i want them to come in legally. [applause]
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>> x-unit was mark -- excuse me? i think the only card hillary has is the woman's card. she is nothing else going. if hillary clinton were a man, i don't think she'd get 5% of the vote. the only thing she's got going is the woman's card and a beautiful thing is, women don't like her. and look at how well i did with women tonight. ladies government, thank you very much. i appreciated. -- ladies and gentlemen, thank you very much. i appreciate it. ♪
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>> during campaign 2016, c-span takes you on the road to the white house.
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as we follow the candidates on c-span, c-span radio, and c-span.org. >> this month, we showcase our student cam. annual video documentary competition for middle and high school students. this year's theme is road to the white house. issue do youd what want presidential candidates to discuss? our first prize high school winners are from troy, michigan. fraser,ola's, michael zen one he. ni.zehn wa they want them to discuss the scarcity of freshwater. their video is titled the 1%. >> today, americans are drowning in overly debated issues such as
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immigration, medicare, terrorism , leaked e-mails. although these are important topics, the issues that will affect the most americans is the issue of the 1%. >> 1%. >> 1%. >> no, not that 1%. this 1%. the shining blue jewel of the united states, the great lakes. >> one of you -- unique resources the world. nothing like it. everyone has a responsibility to do what we can to protect those waters. >> in the u.s. we are lucky. we have the best drinking water in the world. i think that's a lot is to become a bit complacent about our drinking water. we take it for granted. >> about 70% of our freshwater is right here. here is a graphic of a hundred water bottles. the presenting a hundred percent of the earth's entire surface. worth these -- the entire
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-- earth is covered in water. of all that water, only 3% is fresh. twohat 3% of freshwater, thirds of it is trapped in ice in glaciers. that means 1% of all the water on earth is fresh and accessible. >> freshwater will be the great battleground of the future. it's not going to be a war over oil or fuel or energy. >> it's incredibly important we do protect the great lakes. it is the most precious were natural resource we have, not only in michigan, but in the country and arguably worldwide. >> beside the great lake deck -- great lakes being a great resource, it still faces competitions. construction of a nuclear waste dump is underway on the coast of lake huron. located less than a mile from the water. 2000 cubic meters of nuclear .aste is being buried
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that is right next to the most important freshwater ecosystem in the world. >> the notion that we are going to store nuclear waste anywhere near the great lakes doesn't make sense. >> water moves and water moves downhill. so ideally, anything buried underground, you will keep away from water. >> we have been successful in store nuclear waste in the country. -- we have not been successful in storing nuclear waste. white but this depository right freshwater,of our that is cause for concern about i would like to see a lot more dialogue. >> the great lakes are a huge portion of the world freshwater supply. anything that could potentially contaminate those waters is we need to be paying attention to and really thinking about. not nearly enough politicians from the state of michigan that put their money where their mouth is when it comes to protecting the environment.
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they will pull it out on the stump and say the need to protect the great lakes. if you check their voting record , more than half of our statehouse and state senate right now have 0% voting records when it comes to the environment. very tragic example of what happens when you don't have a government that is very active in protecting his people. >> protection. the people of flint, michigan needed protection. instead, they were poisoned and the children were affected. the common public began to catch on to the atrocities carrying on in flint. the most an entire year after the incident occurred. since the filming of the documentary began, we've been following the water contamination situation in michigan. word has put it onto the national scene. it's received covered for multiple news sources and even emergency actions from president obama. >> we still don't have printable water in the city of flint. state ofse the michigan decided it was less expensive to use untreated flint river water rather than water
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from the great lakes. >> pleased to make jokes about things you would find their, flint dead body in the river. that's the repetition it has. to hook flint back up to the water -- solved the immediate problem of reconnecting to detroit water. because of the chemicals they ,se to purify the flint water it really caused a ton of problems with the old lead piping. >> the water was terrific at the treatment plant. the minute you put it in the pipes, the chemicals drove -- drew the lead out of the pipes. to disconnect from the worlds best water source to go to the flint river, which even general motors has stopped using because it was corroding their auto parts.
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they cause the damage that only paid for half of the reconnection. >> the scary part is the level of irreversible damage because is not just, oh well. beent's, began much as done, what we do? water in the united states -- drink double water in the united states is something everyone should act -- impact. >> people don't really pay attention to the issues themselves. the people of flint were relying on the government and it let them down. >> after trying to make people no less when people should know everything. >> the scarcity of freshwater in the world is a vital situation that needs to be addressed.
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it is an enormous situation that is seldom mentioned amongst politicians. the united states cannot afford to have the great lakes poisoned as the water was in flint, michigan. over 60% of the human body is composed of water. that puts the responsibility on each and every one of us to protect our freshwater resource. >> it's easier to ignore things. people being loud about it gets things done. now there's national news in protest. it's not a superhero movie. it's up to people to do something. >> as all humans consume water, the issue of freshwater demands the immediate attention of our presidential candidates. water is essential for the durance of america and the world. ♪ >> to watch all of the prize-winning documentaries in this year's studentcam competition. visit studentcam.org. this morning, members of the
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house armed services committee will begin a markup of the 2017 national defense authorization act which provides funding for most of the department of defense to oversee contingency operation budgets and most military activity. into theto run late evening, our live coverage begins at 10:00 a.m. eastern on our companion network, c-span3. >> on c-span, "washington journal" followed by mourning our at the house, bills, including one that updates e-mail privacy protection. in 45 minutes come a spotlight on the political news and real care politics with cofounder tom bevan and executive editor carl cannon. they will talk about how they got their start in the role in the media marketplace. any national political reporter for real clear politics will review primary results with
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pennsylvania, maryland, connecticut, delaware, and rhode island. andy senior elections analyst for real clear politics joins us to talk about how the public can be smarter consumers. trump: this was our biggest night. ms. clinton: let's win the nomination and in july to return -- and in july let's return. thank you very much. ♪ .ost: good morning it is wednesday, april 20 2, 2016. there talking about presidential primary results from last night in connecticut, delaware, maryland, pennsylvania, and rhode island. donald trump swept five states while hillary clinton won four out of five, losing only rhode island to bernie sanders. republican

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