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tv   U.S. House of Representatives Legislative Business  CSPAN  May 11, 2016 6:00pm-7:01pm EDT

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for what purpose does the gentleman from kentucky seek recognition? mr. guthrie: mr. speaker, i move that the house suspend the ules and pass the bill, h.r. 4586 as amended. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: union calendar number 429, h.r. 4586, a bill to amend the public health service act, to authorize grants to states for developing standing orders and educating health care professionals regarding the dispensing of opioid overdose reversal medication without persons' specific prescriptions and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from kentucky, mr. guthrie, and the gentleman from texas, mr. green, will each ontrol 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from kentucky. mr. guthrie: i ask unanimous consent that all members have five legislative days to i reserve the balance of my time their remarks and -- revise and extend their remarks and insert
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extraneous material on the bill. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. guthrie: i rise today in support of h.r. 4586, laly's law, introduced by my colleagues in the house, mr. dole of illinois, and ms. clark of massachusetts. the rate of overdose for individuals age 24 to 34 has nearly tripled going from 8.1 overdose deaths per 100,000 to 23.1 overdose deaths per 100,000, families across the ountry are losing loved ones to reversible opioid overdose. naloxone can prevent overdose deaths by binding to the opioid recenters in the body and preventing the overdose. h.r. 4586 amends the public health service act to authorize grants to states for developing stand orders in educating health care professionals regarding the dispensing of opioid overdose reversal medication without person-specific prescriptions. this legislation is a first
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step in promoting wider access of naloxone or over opioid overdose reversal drugs that may come to market. standing orders are prescriptions that are not person-specific. if a pharmacy has a standing order, anyone needing the medication may come and fill a prescription for it. naloxone, while incredibly effective at stopping opioid overdoses, does not have severe side effects if used incorrectly, or if used when not needed. many states have standing order laws in place, but need help bridging the gap between law and a functioning program. the grants funded by this legislation will help aid that process. mr. speaker, i urge my colleagues to support this legislation and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. green: mr. speaker, i rise in support of h.r. 4586, lali's law, and i yield myself as much time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. green: between 2001, mr. speaker, and 2014, there was a three-fold increase in
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prescription drug overdoses and a six-fold increase in heroin overdoses in the united states. we must do more to prevent drug misuse and abuse, to avoid these tragedies in the first place. we must also ensure that those suffering from addiction to prescription and nonprescription drugs have access to potentially life-saving treatments. when and where they need it. nal objection own has proven to e a -- in a lax own has -- nal bjection own has proven -- nal oxone has the potential for saving thousands of lives each year. h.r. 4586 would create a competitive grant program to help states increase access to overdose reversal medications. the primary purpose of the grant is to fund state programs that allow pharmacists to distribute overdose reversal drugs without a person's prescription to qualified individuals or entities.
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to be effective, overdose reversal drugs must be given to the patient almost immediately. -- immediately in an emergency situation, the ability for emergency medical technicians, law enforcement, substance abuse treatment providers and qualified individuals have such medications on hand can make the difference between life and death. qualified individuals and entities often need to possess treatment before a specific patient is identified. many states have established use -- and used these programs to allow local law enforcement officers or emergency medical technicians to carry and use the overdose reversal drug naloxone. it would expand these programs by helping states develop standing orders and educate health care professionals without dispensing -- about dispensing these medications, without person-specific prescriptions. i want to thank the bill's sponsors, representative clark and representative d.o.d., for introducing this legislation. and i urge my colleagues to join me in supporting h.r. 458 of 6 and i reserve -- 4586 and
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i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from kentucky is recognized. mr. guthrie: thank you, mr. speaker. i'd like to yield two minutes to my friend from georgia, mr. carter. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. carter: i thank the gentleman for yielding. mr. speaker, i rise today in support of h.r. 4586, because it is critical that we educate health care professionals about opioid overdose reversal medications. this bill allows the c.d.c. to authorize grants to states based on their ability to educate health care professionals in dispensing opioid reversal medication. specifically this opioid reversal medication called naloxone can be used in emergency situations to stop an opioid overdose death. also through this bill, pharmacists will be able to dispense naloxone to patients without a prescription, increasing access to this life-saving ability dote. this access will help save lives in emergency situations when patients do not have the
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time or ability to seek or receive professional medical care. the world health organization states that this increased access will save up to 200,000 lives. as a life long pharmacist, i believe it is our duty to always educate americans about the life-saving tools available to them. i encourage my colleagues to support h.r. 4586, so more people can be educated and have access to life-saving medication related to opioid overdose. thank you, mr. speaker, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. green: mr. speaker, i yie three minutes to the co-sponsor of the bill, representative clark. the speaker pro tempore: the entlelady is recognized. ms. clark: thank you to the gentleman for yielding. and i thank representative dold for joining me in this legislation. and to the family of alex lali
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for sharing their story. we offer our deepest sympathies. mr. speaker, across massachusetts and the nation, too many parents are desperately trying to save their child from the opioid crisis's deadly grip. in the past year alone, this public health crisis has claimed nearly 1,400 lifes in the commonwealth of massachusetts -- lives in the commonwealth of massachusetts. and the bill before us today, lali's law, is a critical part of addressing this crisis. naloxone, is a life-saving drug. t stops the affect of heroin minutes after it is administered and it allows breathing to restore. but it is critical that it is widely available. under this bill, states that have authorized a standing order that allows anyone to obtain naloxone from a pharmacist would be eligible
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for a grant that can be used for public education campaigns and training for health care providers and pharmacists. i want to share the story of a from my district that illustrates the difference training and the availability of the drug can make. one night a 911 call came in. a desperate and frantic new mother with a very young baby who was unresponsive. the first responders arrived at the scene but despite their best efforts this baby was not reviving. a responding firefighterer relied on his training and quick thinking to save this child's life by administering nar-- narcan. it worked. even though the mom had not revealed she was adistricted -- addicted to prescription painkillers, the first responder knew the symptoms and made the right guess and saved this child's life.
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if he had not been trained to administer narcan and not have the life saving drug with him that night, that baby would not be alive. but the man was and now the baby and mom have a future. this crisis presents an urgent calling for all of us, democrats and republicans alike, to put aside our differences and do what we can to save lives. and that's what we're talking about here. increasing the availability of narcan will save lives. and i am happy to join with my friend from illinois to offer this important bill. i urge all of my colleagues to support this legislation and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back the balance of her time. the gentleman from texas reserves. the gentleman from kentucky is recognized. gulingtgugget -- mr. guthrie: mr. speaker, i'd like to yield five minutes to mr. dold. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. dold: thank you, mr. speaker. i want to thank my good friend
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for yielding. i want to thank my friend from massachusetts for her work on this legislation, representative clark. obviously sharing that story is extremely powerful. in the suburbs of chicago, mr. speaker, somebody dies from using heroin every three days. nationally that statistic is one every 19 minutes. every single one of them leaves behind a family in grief. today, mr. speaker, i'm joined in the chamber by chellsy, jodi and gary, the family of a young man from buffalo grove named alex. alex graduated from stevenson high school. he played sports. he got good grades and made a lot of friends. a typical teenager that had his whole life ahead of him. but behind his happy exterior alex was sick. he was struggling with escalating drug abuse. during alex's sophomore year in
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college he came down with an unknown illness. he would go to the hospital and he would get better. at least for a while. but then a few months later he would get sick. he would be admitted to the hospital and again would repeat the cycle. his family didn't know it then but alex was dependent on primmings drugs and was suffering -- prescription drugs and was suffering from withdrawal. he continued this path until just a few days before his final exams. at that point in time, alex actually overdosed on prescription drugs and heroin at the age of 20 and he passed away. his family never even had the chance to seek help for his dependency. unfortunately this story is far too common across our country. as a father, i can't even imagine the pain of losing a child to a drug overdose. but sadly, too many families like the lalis have experienced
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this loss. heroin and heroin abuse has become an epidemic in our country. during my work as the co-chair of the suburban anti-heroin task force, i met countless families who have been affected by drug abuse. literally torn apart. this is not an isolated issue. it affects every community, every zip code, regardless of your socioeconomic status. regardless of your educational status. i talked to parents that say, the not in my community, and it is. it is in your community. let me just assure you. my work with live for lali and the lake county opioid initiative inspired me to introduce this law with representative clark. our bipartisan bill is named in alex's memory. lali's law increases access to life-saving antidote called naloxone. which in lake county, illinois,
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is already -- has already saved nearly 100 lives since first responders and the police force requested the opportunity to be able to use this life-saving antidote. the police officers actually would respond, would get there before the paramedics, often five to seven, sometimes nine minutes faster. and refused to sit by identify ideal as they watched these -- idly as they watched these young people die from an overdose. when used properly, naloxone helps restore breathing that has been stopped by an overdose. you've heard the statistics, but the world health organization predicts that increased access to naloxone could save another 20,000 lives each and every year. lali's law is a decisive step to not only save young people like alex from falling victim to drug abuse, but also help those in our communities struggling to get their lives back on track. our bill, and frankly the work
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that's been done here in this body today, i think we've got some 1 different bipartisan bills coming -- 18 different bipartisan bills coming together to try to solve this prescription drug epidemic, this heroin epidemic that is sweeping our country, is proof of what is possible when we set aside partisanship and get to work for the people that we all represent. lali's law has already brought alex's story to the united states congress. and it's amplified the life-saving benefit of live for lali's amazing work. now, by passing this overwhelming bipartisan bill, we can ensure that alex's lasting legacy includes helping countless others get a second chance at recovery. and saving their families from the unbearable heartbreak. mr. speaker, together we truly can save lives. again, i want to thank representative clark, i want to thank the -- alex's family, i
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want to thank the first responders, the stakeholders back in lake county, and all of those here in this body that are working to try and create an environment, create the opportunity for us to be able to take a huge step forward in combating this prescription drug and heroin epidemic. i want to thank the gentleman for yielding the time. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. mr. green: mr. speaker, i reserve -- mr. guthrie: mr. speaker, i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from kentucky reserves. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. green: mr. speaker, we have no other speakers and i would be glad to yield back our time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from kentucky is recognized. mr. guthrie: i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields. the question is will the house success pnd the rules and pass the bill h.r. 4586 as amended. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 being in the affirmative. mr. guthrie: i ask for the yeas and nays. the speaker pro tempore: the
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yeas and nays are requested. all those in favor of taking this vote by the yeas and nays will rise and remain standing until counted. a sufficient number having arisen, the the yeas and nays are ordered. pursuant to clause 8, rule 20, further proceedings on this uestion will be postponed. for what purpose does the gentleman from kentucky seek recognition? mr. guthrie: i move the success house suspend the rules a pass the bill h.r. 4599 as amend the. the clerk: h.r. 4599 a bill toll amend the controlled substances act to prevent certain partial filling of prescriptions. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from kentucky and the gentleman from texas will each control 20 minutes. mr. guthrie: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members have five legislative days in which to resize and extend their remarks and insert
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extraneous materials on the record on the bill. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. guthrie: i recognize myself such time as i may consume. rise in support of h.r. 4599. introduced by mrs. clark of massachusetts and mr. stivers of ohio. the number of prescriptions for opyodse has increased. while it can benefit once the pain is subsided there are some unused pills. some several states can partially fill prescriptions to limit the number of pills in circulation. however, current d.e.a. regulations are not clear about such partial fills are permitted. h.r. 4599 amends the controlled substances act to clarify when scheduled 2 controlled substances including opioids pain medications can be
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partially filled. this is a commonsense and bipartisan bill that can save lives and i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. mr. green: i yield myself such time as i may consume. i rise to voice my support for r. 4599, the reducing unused medications act. this is rising at alarming rates, two million americans are abusing opioidses. it is one of the most prescribed classes of medications and estimates that 70% of adults that misuzbekistan them get them from a friend or relative. this is a permanent partial filling of these prescriptions. current drug enforcement egulations say pharmacists can
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partially fill the prescriptions and long-term care settings when the full prescription cannot be slide. while these are not prohibiting fill these, to d.e.a. realize the regulations lack clarity as to when they are permitted. this bill would provide clarity, reduce unused medication act would allow pharmacist at the request to partially fill prescriptions for schedule 2 drugs such as opioidses meaning that a doctor can receive a 10- day supply in return later to receive the remaining portion. this may reduce the number of unused pills in circulation and reduce the risk of substance
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misuse, diversion and overdose. the bill before is is a compromise to reduce the amount of the unused medications and important step in curbing the epidemic. i thank the representatives for their leadership and urge my colleagues support to reduce the unused medication act and i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from kentucky is recognized. mr. guthrie: i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from texas. mr. green: i yield three minutes to the sponsor of this bill, congresswoman clark from massachusetts. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from massachusetts is recognized. ms. clark: thank you, mr. speaker a and thank you to the gentleman from texas for yielding. in the last decade we have seen a staggering increase of opioids
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overdose deaths. in 2015, this epidemic claimed 125 lives in my district alone. there are a lot of different causes of this crisis. but the number of prescription opioids in circulation is a critical factor. over the last 15 years, the amount of prescription painkillers has quadrupled and generic vicodin is the most prescribed drug to medicare beneficiaries. we know that often patients don't use all the opioids they get prescribed and according to the national institute on drug abuse, over 70% of adulingts who misuzbekistan prescription drugs get them from friends or relatives. millions of half-filled bottles of unused and unwanted prescription drugs line our family's medicine cabinets and
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too often that is where opioids addiction begins. one promising way to reduce unwanted painkillers that are fueling this public health crisis is by allowing patients and doctors to only partially fill opioid prescriptions. by allowing pharmacists to partially fill a prescription of opiods at the request of a patient or doctor, we could help still pill diversion and misuse. the d.e.a. allows partial filling of prescriptions for many drugs, but regulations are less clear for opioid drugs. that is along with representative stivers have introduced the reducing unused medication act. this legislation will resolve any ambiguity and clearly establish that a prescription
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for schedule 2 substances like opioids painkillers may be partially filled upon the request of a patient or doctor. we have all heard the stories. just last weekend, i ran into a dad whose son had been given a 30-day prescription of opioid painkillers for having a wisdom tooth taken out and he had just received an unwanted prescription also for 30 days after having minor surgery. this bill will empower patients to manage their prescriptions and can be a critical tool in the effort to address the opioid epidemic. this is a commonsense bill that will stop the misuse of prescription drugs and fueled the heroin epidemic. i thank you and i yield back.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas reserves. the gentleman from kentucky is recognized. mr. guthrie: i have no further speakers but i will continue to reserve. mr. green: we have no further speakers and yield back the balance of our time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. mr. guthrie: mr. speaker, i encourage all my colleagues to vote for h.r. 4599. the speaker pro tempore: the question is will the house suspend the rules and pass h.r. 4599 as amended. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed and without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid upon the table. for what purpose does the gentleman from kentucky seek recognition. mr. guthrie: i move the house suspend the rules and pass h.r. 4982 as amended. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill.
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the clerk: h.r. 4982, a bill to direct the comptroller general of the united states to evaluate and report on the inpatient and outpatient treatment capacity and availability and needs of the united states. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from kentucky, mr. guthrie and the gentleman from texas, mr. green, each will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from kentucky. mr. guthrie: i ask unanimous consent that all members have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and insert extraneous materials on the bill under consideration. i yield myself. 4992. in support of h.r. introduced by my colleague, the ranking member of the energy and commerce committee, mr. pallone of new jersey and mr. foster of illinois. it directs the government accountability office to
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evaluate and report on the inpatient and outpatient treatment capacity, availability and needs of the united states. it is important to have the data necessary to address the opioid infrastructure in our country. and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. green: i rise in support of h.r. 4982, the examining opioids treatment infrastructure act. opioids use disorder can be treated but requires ongoing management as the current epidemic has grown, resources are needed to evidence-based treatment. public health requires broad-based treatment services for those including behavioral they are is and insurance
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coverage for such treatment. medication assisted treatment is in combanges with behavioral treatment which is shown to be highly effective. mr patients face significant barriers. patients -- and addiction treatment and current capacity is inadequate to meet the population's needs. there are too few recovering services. in order to address these shortages, it is needed for our infrastructure. the g.a.o.ill direct to conduct a study on the inpatient and outpatient treatment capacity of the united states. it instructs the agency to examine the capacity of residential programs, inpatient,
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clinical stabe lization programs, transitional support services and rehabilitation programs. the g.a.o. is directed to report on geographic differences and the availability of treatment and recovery programs for substance abuse disorders. the availability of programs that offer evidence-based treatment options including the use of f.d.a. medications and in different treatment settings. it would include a assessment for substance abuse disorders across the continuing care. we must face this head on and address the this and examining this will help us do this. i thank the bill's sponsor for introducing this legislation and urge my colleagues to support this and reserve the balance of my time.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from kentucky is recognized. mr. guthrie: i yield two minutes to the gentleman from georgia, mr. carter. mr. carter: i rise in support of h.r. 4982 because treatment of addiction to opioids painkillers is vital in fighting the epidemic. it requires the government accountability office to report on inpatient and outpatient treatment capacities, programs, rehabilitation programs and treatment programs for pregnant women and adolescence. the centers are usually one of the biggest obstacles. unfortunately, for most communities, local inpatient treatment facilities are few and far between and many of them are full. as a lifelong health care professional, i believe the only way we will be able to fight this epidemic is if we work together.
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we need to adequately understand the treatment services that are available to people with addiction across the country so we can use these tools to the fullest extent. that is why i'm supporting h.r. 4982 by understanding all the tools the community can use we can begin to fight this epidemic. we need to begin to leverage our resources to help our communities fight opioid abuse. and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from kentucky reserves. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. green: i yield three minutes to congressman foster from illinois. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from illinois is recognized. mr. foster: thank you, mr. speaker and thank you, mr. green for yielding me the time. my bill, h.r. 982, the examining opioids treatment infrastructure
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act is bipartisan. if we are going to get a handle, we have to know what we are dealing with. we need data and need to what capacity we have in place and what capacity we need to treat this epidemic so we can make smart and adequate investments, which is why we need this bill. this directs a study of the inpatient and outpatient of the availability throughout the u.s. as well as an assessment of the needed types and numbers of treatment options. it seems simple but there is no better place to start with an understanding of the addiction treatment infrastructure that we have versus the need that we have for that infrastructure. . my office -- my office often
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gets calls from parents wanting to share their stories of the children they've lost to addiction. while opioid addiction may start in many ways, it ends with a scientifically understood, increasingly treatable medical condition in which the biochemical pathways necessary to normal decision making in the brain have been hijacked and the chemistry of the brain permanently altered. the more we learn about the science of addiction, the more convinced we become that the best path forward is treating addiction like the medical biochemical condition that it is. to do this successfully, we need the correct number and types of addiction treatment facilities. that's why i introduced the examining opioid treatment infrastructure act with my friend from new jersey, mr. pallone. we know that opioid use and abuse has become an epidemic and now let's make sure that we know the real numbers we're dealing with so we can allocate the necessary resources.
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i urge support of the examining opioid treatment infrastructure act and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas reserves. the gentleman from kentucky is recognized. mr. guthrie: mr. speaker, i have no further speakers and am prepared to close. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. green: we have no further speakers and i yield back the balance of my time. mr. guthrie: mr. speaker, i encourage my colleagues to vote for 4982 and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass h.r. 4982 as amended. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 of those voting having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed and, without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid upon the table. for what purpose does the gentleman from kentucky seek recognition? mr. guthrie: mr. speaker, i move that the house suspend the rules and pass the bill h.r. 4981 as amended. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill.
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the clerk: h.r. 4981, a bill to mained the controls substances act, to improve access to opioid use disorder treatment. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from kentucky, mr. guthrie, and the gentleman from texas, mr. green, each will have 20 minutes. the gentleman or the chair recognizes the gentleman from kentucky. mr. guthrie: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members have five legislative days in which to revise and extend their remarks and insert extraneous materials in the record on the bill. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. guthrie: mr. speaker, i recognize myself for as much time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. guthrie: mr. speaker, i rise in support of h.r. 4981, the opioid use disorder treatment expansion and modernization act introduced by dr. bucshon from indiana and mr. tonko from new york. more than two million americans are living with a substance abuse disorder. medication assisted treatment can have a significant impact on combating this epidemic.
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h.r. 4981 would amend the controlled substance act to expand access to medication assisted treatment for patients with substance use disorders, while improving quality of care provided in minimizing the potential for drugs diversion. this bill would authorize nurse practitioners and physician assistants to prescribe maintenance treatment in an office-based setting after meeting requirements. this would improve the training that all qualifying practitioners receive and it would maintain the critical role, counseling and other support services in provision of quality medicaided treatment. further, the bill would require h.h.s. to perform a thorough review of all opioid use disorders so we know what is working well and where there is a need for further improvement. h.r. 4981 is the product of extensive bipartisan discussion at the energy and commerce committee and i urge my colleagues to join me in supporting this and i reserve
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the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. green: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself as much time as i may consume. mr. speaker, i rise in support of h.r. 4981, the opioid use disorder treatment expansion and modernization act. despite the fact that we're in the middle of an unprecedented opioid heroin crisis, we know that treatment gaps continue to limit our ability to address the growing crisis. only one in 10 people struggling with addiction receive any form of treatment, despite fact that we have evidence-based medication-assisted treatment for those struggling with prescription drugs or heroin addiction. one available treatment is the view -- the medication is safely pri scribed from an office setting -- prescribed from an office setting, similar to any other medication a patient might take. unfortunately in the midst of our current opioid epidemic, currently physicians are restricted to how many patients they are allowed to treat with this medication and nurse
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practitioners and physicians' assistants are not allowed to treat patients with this medication at all. many patients are placed on prolonged waiting lists with addiction specialists as they await access to the treatment. this is not acceptable. we must significantly increase the cap on the number of patients a physician can treat, as well as permanently allow nurse practitioners and physicians' assistants to treat patients with this medication. today's legislation is not perfect but it's a first step toward reaching bicameral, bipartisan treatment on -- agreement on a package that -- meets these goals. i remain committed to working with my colleagues to expand access to this important evidence-based treatment as we move to conference with the senate. i want to thank the bill's sponsors, mr. tonko and mr. bucshon, for introducing this legislation. i urge my colleagues to support the opioid use disorder treatment expansion and modernization act and i reserve the balance of my time.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from kentucky is recognized. mr. guthrie: i yield five minutes to the co-sponsor of this piece of legislation, dr. bucshon from indiana. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from indiana is recognized. mr. buck: thank you, mr. speaker -- mr. buchanan: thank you, mr. speaker. the opioid -- mr. bucshon: thank you, mr. speaker. this opioid act is the as a result of months of engagement, expert input and bipartisan negotiation. the opioid epidemic has left no area of this nation untouched. day in and day out we hear from our constituents and see in the news the direct impact this has on the everyday lives of our fellow citizens. the evidence is clear that this epidemic is growing and it will continue to grow unless immediate action is taken. as a doctor, a father and a public policymaker, i want to do my part to help our communities overcome this challenge. that's why i'm proud to offer h.r. 4981, the opioid use disorder treatment expansion
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and modernization act, today with my colleague from new york, mr. tonko. we've worked together over the past several months to find common ground and move forward with a well-crafted policy solution. our final bill represents months of stakeholder engagement and bipartisan work to improve access and quality of treatment for opioid use disorder, while limiting -- eliminating diversion of treatment medications for abuse themselves. h.r. 4981 targets four main areas. increased access to opioid use disorder treatment, where it's most needed. empower physicians to education training and quality of care measures, encourage multi-- a multipronged approach to opioid use disorder treatment, while deterring bad actors and reducing diversion as previously mentioned. this is a positive step toward increasing access for treatment for opioid use disorder, while
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raising the quality of care and reducing diversion. again, i want to thank mr. tonko and all those who have worked with us throughout this process. i urge my colleagues to support h.r. 4981's passage and i look forward to productive discussions with the senate to get critical opioid legislation to the president's desk. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from kentucky reserves. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. green: mr. speaker, i yield five minutes to a fellow member of the energy and commerce committee, congressman paul tonko from new york. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new york is recognized. mr. tonko: thank you, mr. speaker. i thank the gentleman from texas for yielding. i rise in support of h.r. 4981, opioid use disorder treatment expansion and modernization act, which i have had the honor of working on with my colleague and friend, representative larry bucshon in introducing. at the outset, i would like to thank representative bucshon and his staff as well as the hard work of individuals on the
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committee staff and our committee leaders, chair upton and ranking member pallone, to get this bill to this point. i'd also like to praise my colleague and fellow new yorker, representative brian higgins, for his introduction and leadership on the treat act, without which we would not be making this progress today. it is no hyperbole to announce that we are in a crisis when it comes to the opioid epidemic sweeping our nation. more than 47,000 people have died of drug overdoses in 2014. family members, friends and neighbors within that 47,000 for each and every one of us, a vast majority of which were opioid represented. it is a sign of the times that when you drive down the freeway in my district in upstate new york, instead of billboards advertising for mcdonald's or taco bell, you see billboards advising you to call 911 in case of an opioid overdose. it is disturbing how quickly this has become the new normal. this crisis has affected our
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neighbors, our families and our beloved communities. having worked with the addiction recovery community, i know that one of the most important things we can do as policymakers is to ensure that when an individual struggling with addiction cries out for help, that there is someone there to answer the call. that is what this bill endeavors to do. right now treatment capacity for those seeking help for opioid use disorder in an office-space setting is artificially capped at 100 parents -- patients. what this means in reality is that if you are patient 101 or 102, you get a closed door and have to wait weeks, if not months, for treatment. expectedly, these delays can be deadly. the legislation before us will support the goal of raising the cap for qualified physicians to 250, expanding existing opioid treatment capacity by some 150%, all while ensuring the care that individuals receive
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is high quality and minimizes the risk of diversion. in addition, this legislation will, for the first time, expand prescribing authority to nurse practitioners and physician assistants who meet certain training requirements and comply with applicable state laws. by breaking these practitioners into the fold, we can expand treatment capacity, especially in rural areas. where physicians oftentimes might be few and far between. importantly, this bill expands access to high-quality addiction treatment, promoting the full range of psycho social services that makes recovery possible, and providing h.h.s. with new tools to remove bad actors from the system. any member interested in decreasing the unlawful diversion of the drug should support this legislation. this legislation is not perfect. and i would still like to see a higher patent limit for the top class of physicians. in the midst of this crisis,
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ensuring access for all needs to be our utmost top priority. no matter where we ultimately land on this arbitrary number, we will still be closing the door on someone who needs our help. we would not accept this in any other field of medicine. so we all need to think long and hard about why we allow this situation to persist in the field of addiction. in addition, i would like to draw attention to two changes made to this bill before floor consideration. first, instead of statter toly lifting the data -- statutorily lifting the data 2000 caps this legislation includes a sense of congress, if you will, that the caps should be lifted. secondly, this legislation would time limit the expansion of prescribing authority to nurse practitioners and physician assistants to some three years. both of these temporary changes were made to bring the bill into compliance with pay-go procedures for floor consideration. and must be fixed as we move
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this bill into conference. i would just ask, mr. speaker, are we firm in our commitment to combat the addiction to heroin? are we firm in our efforts to assist those who struggle with the illness of addiction? do we stand for providing true hope to individuals who count on us to provide the resources along with the legislation to make life available to them? i would suggest that this house and the senate look hard and fast at providing resources that are real and provide for an effective outcome. . if we fail to find a path forward for a meaningful expansion of the physician caps and the -- certainly the nurse practitioners and physician assistants' prescribing authority, then we're rationing care, pure and similar. the starting point for any conference discussion should be the bill as reported out of the house energy and commerce committee. in any final legislation, we must include a statter to
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lifting of the data -- statutory lifting of the data 2000 caps as well as full authority for our n.p.'s and p.a.'s and i would ask for our commitment to work toward these goals. notwithstanding these issues, i believe it is critically important to keep up the momentum and to pass this bill, even in its imperfect form, this bill will make a huge difference in the lives of those who struggle with this disease. if we cannot find a way to get a bill to the president's desk, that will provide needed relief in the midst of this epidemic, shame on us. . hile this is not a cure-all, this will go far to aleve our capacity issues and put more people on the path to recovery. i ask my colleagues in this house and down the hall in the senate to support a bill, this bill, so we can bring hope,
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truly, bring hope into the lives of those individuals, those families and those communities who grapple with this crisis on a daily basis. i thank you and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from kentucky is recognized. mr. guthrie: you said earlier people come here from all walks of life and we are lucky to have a pharmacist and i would like to have o him and great to his expertise, my friend from georgia, mr. carter. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from georgia is recognized. mr. carter: i thank the gentleman for yielding along with dr. bucshon and others across the aisle. congressman green and all of those who have been involved in this, this is a very important subject. mr. speaker, i rise in support of h.r. 4981 because making sure
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that modern treatments are available for opioid adick shun should be our top priorities. h.r. 4981 makes reforms to the controlled substance act that would modernize the way doctors and how patients obtain treatment. this is one more step we can take to improve treatment services for patients. with these reforms, more patients will receive higher quality care. increasing the success of overall treatment. i have witnessed patients firsthand who have struggled for receiving care for their addiction. we must stop the cycle because the system is not adequately structured to provide it. the only way we are able to provide the appropriate care is if we continue to support the evolution of treatment and care for this epidemic.
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that is why i'm supporting h.r. 4981, by reforming the way treatment is provided, we can begin to help all patients with this addiction and i urge my colleagues to support this bill. thank you, mr. speaker. and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from kentucky reserves. he gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. guthrie: i encourage and urge my colleagues to support this very important bill and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the question is will the house suspend the rules and pass h.r. 49 as amended. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 being in the affirmative, the rules are suspended and the bill is passed and without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid upon the table.
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the speaker pro tempore: the chair will entertain requests for one-minute speeches. the gentleman from california seek recognition? >> permission to address the house for one minute. without objection -- the speaker pro tempore: without objection. >> april 18, 2013, kim delaney, 3 years old. maria nash. michigan, february 20, 2016, dorothy brown, 74 years old. arbara hawthorne, 68, mary lounye and tyler smith, 17 years old. lakeland, florida, january 6, 2016, unitea branch, david south carolina,
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arch 5, 2014, victor, 48 years old. honda, 4 , hank, 32. nsas city, kansas, randy nordman. mike capps, 41. austin carter, 29, clint carter, 27 years old. jackson, tennessee, april 28, brian baines,old, 31. la shonda davis, 22 years old. wilmington, delaware, february 1, 2016, steven ryan heart and officer michael manly, 42, christina bellford, 39. the speaker pro tempore: the entleman's time has expired.
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the gentleman from california have a motion? >> i move to adjourn. the speaker pro tempore: those in favor say eye. opposed. accordingly, the house stands adjourned until 10:00 a.m. tomorrow for morning hour debate.
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>> the rules committee saying they will allow 15 amendments to the bill but one of them not allowed was democrat courtney's amendment calling for emergency funding, why didn't the rules committee allow that? >> this has been the question for months ever since the senate took it up for months. the democrats have been pushing for emergency funding which would be in joe courtney's amendment. this is something that republicans say should not be done in the emergency funding side. the republican leadership say they are working on securing that funding in the regular appropriations process. the chairman of the house appropriations committee has been dedicated to this and working on getting that funding
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and that did come up yesterday. you heard members saying this was going to be a priority for hall rogers and money would come through and not needed at the emergency level that democrats have been pushing for. >> the house in a week-long focus on opioid abuse and heroin addiction. house takes first steps on opoids bill and on thursday, they will take up measures with grants from the justice department. >> it would authorize hundreds of millions of dollars of grant money from the federal justice department into treatment and other abuse-related services and this is a key step that had related efforts on the law enforcement side and this is a key step that the obama administration has said they are moving funding from the law
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enforcement side into prevention and treatment of addiction. >> the obama administration supporting some of the bills on the hill but here in their statement they said while the administration welcomes congressional efforts do elevate the efforts, the administration is concerned that without the resources necessary to prevent opioids addiction, these related bills, they say, may be considered at the same time would do to help the thousands of americans struggling with addiction. what would the white house like to see in terms of funding? >> it supports the democrats' efforts to increase the funding by $600 million and come in emergency funding and would be separate from the appropriations process. republicans don't like that. and there is a lot of controversy. but the bill -- there are several bills that are headed to
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passage and don't add any new funding and this has been a battle that has been a long time funding and won't see that amendment on the floor to add that funding and not an issue that is going to be settled. >> democrats weren't successful back in march. but the house will get a shot of taking up that legislation. how does the senate legislation differ from anything that the house has proposed so far? >> there are many similar elements. the senate sponsor, rob portman believes his bill is far more comprehensive and takes a look at the justice department programs and moving away -- moving the law enforcement side more on to working on issues towards addiction. nd calling for a bill from kevin mccarthy yesterday calls for an investigation of how a federal study of how these
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programs are working. o it's a bit more measured and cautious approach in the house. they will bring it to conference later this month to try to bridge the gap between these two bills. >> it sounds like speaker ryan, that's one of his goals to bring it to conference but get a bill on the president's desk. >> there is a vote to passing the 18 opioid-related bill, all of them are bipartisan and the first vote on the first opioids bill it passed. so they know they have broad bipartisan support for. it's going to be a win for paul ryan and the democrats as well, even though they can't get the funding, they will say they are taking steps in what is the most comprehensive step on opyoids in decade and this problem has escalated.
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this is the first time that congress takes this sort of action on this level. >> health care policy reporter for "the hill." read her reporting and follow her on twitter. thanks for joining us. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2016] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> the house approved legislation to set up a task force to set up best practices. the vote was 412-4. more work or opioid-related legislation is on the schedule for tomorrow. >> c-span.org is a video rich complement to your c-span viewing. most of our programs like the house, senate and congressional hearings stream live on this site ffment you are away from your television, you can watch your desk top, laptop, or tablet and all of the programs online in the c-span video
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library, if you miss any program, find it online and watch it at your convenience. the library contains more than 200,000 hours of c-span programs and its powerful search engine helps you find and watch programs going back many years. to watch on your television, we publish the schedule for all three networks. click on the schedule link, c-span.org is a public if you're a c-span watcher, check it out. it's on the web at cspan.org. >> the st. louis post-dispatch reports that congress appears to be getting closer to a $1.1 billion special appropriation to confront the zika virus. a mosquito-carried disease that is especially dangerous to pregnant women. senator blunt overseas a --

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