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tv   U.S. House of Representatives  CSPAN  May 13, 2016 9:00am-3:01pm EDT

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for joining us this morning. making opioid approval and we will now take you to the labeling decisions. develop recommendations house which is gaveling in live. requiring for prescriber education programs that address live coverage from c-span. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2016] extended release and [captioning performed by the long-acting opioids and develop national captioning institute, which is responsible for its caption content and accuracy. visit ncicap.org] generic opioids with abuse deterrent practices. representative pallone led the co-prescribing to reduce overdoses act which would establish a grant program for co-prescribing of opioid reversal drugs for patients who are at a high risk of overdose. representative evan jenkins and bill hers crafted the the speaker: the house will be in order. the prayer will be offered by our chaplain, father conroy. for treatment for babies with neonatal abstinence syndrome and fixes an unintended consequence within the medicaid drug rebate program that discourages drug manufacturers chaplain conroy: let us pray. merciful god we give you thanks from producing opioids that are for giving us another day. harder to abuse. help us this day to draw closer to you so that with your spirit representative lujan help to and aware of your presence provide grants for state among us we may all face the substance abuse agencies to tasks of this day. have delivery models for pregnant mod whols have a bless the members of the substance abuse disorder such
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as opioid addiction. people's house. help them to think clearly. representative kinzinger veteran emergency medical speak confidently. and act courageously in the technician support act will belief that all noble service improve the quality of care within our communities by is based upon patience, truth, providing grants to states with emergency medical technician and love. give them the wisdom and the shortages so as to help streamline state requirements courage to fail not their for our veterans to enter the fellow citizens nor you. e.m.t. work force without there may all that is done this day being unnecessary dupe policecation of their training. be for your greater honor and representatives meehan, kind glory. amen. and veasey led the legislation directing the c.d.c. to study what information and resources the speaker: the chair has examined the journal of the are available to youth athletes last day's proceedings and and their families regarding announces to the house his approval thereof. the dangers of opioid use. pursuant to clause 1 of rule 1, the journal stands approved. lali's law, authored by representative dolled and for what purpose does the gentleman from georgia seek representative kathryn clark, recognition? >> mr. speaker, i demand a vote would create a competitive grant program to increase on agreeing to the speaker's approval of the journal. the speaker: the question is on access of reversal overdose agreeing to the speaker's medications to save lives. approval of the journal. so many as are in favor say aye. those opposed, no. he bill clarifies when the ayes have it. the journal stands approved. scheduled 2 controlled substance, including opioid mr. collins: i demand the yeas pain medications can be partially filled. and nays. the speaker: the yeas and nays representatives foster and are requested.
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those favoring a vote by the pallone spearheaded the yeas and nays will please rise. a sufficient number having examining opioid treatment act arisen, the yeas and nays are ordered. which requires the g.a.o. to pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20 collect the data necessary to , further proceedings on this assess the opioid question are postponed. infrastructure in our country, looking at the numbers of hospital beds and treatment the pledge of allegiance will be led by the gentleman from facilities. and finally, my hoosier texas, mr. olson. mr. olson: mr. members and colleague, representative staff and guests join me in the bucshon, along with representative tonko championed the bill that will have pledge of allegiance. i pledge allegiance to the flag treatment capacity of the united states of america substantially by providering and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty all while ensuring the care and justice for all. that individuals receive is high quality and minimizes the risk of diversion. each approach that i just set out has been a reflection of much effort put into crafting the speaker: the chair will these bipartisan, thoughtful entertain up to five requests for one-minute speeches on each and a comprehensive package to side of the aisle. ive each of our communities, for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my re families and individuals with addiction the need. the speaker: without objection, the gentleman is recognized. thank you and i reserve the mr. olson: mr. speaker, this balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves the week the people's house balance of her time. the chair will receive a message. the messenger: mr. speaker, a message from the senate. celebrates national police week. the secretary: i have been we celebrate heroes like our directed that the senate agreed
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colleague, dave reichert, who to the amendment of the house to s. 1523, cited as the caught the green river killer federal water pollution control after 20 years. act. celebrate heroes, like ann, the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new jersey is from stafford, texas, who was recognized. mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i shot in the face and near her yield two minutes now to the gentleman from new york, heart and sped off at over 100 plengle. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new york is miles an hour to apprehend the recognized for two minutes. mr. engel: i thank the gentleman for yielding to me. thugs who shot her. mr. speaker, my heart goes out and we celebrate heroes like to the thousands of american families affected by the opioid these young teenagers from my epidemic. i am pleased the house has hometown of sugarland, texas, worked in a bipartisan manner to address this crisis. however, we could be doing more who sold lemonade for cops . the prescription opioid death because blue lives matter. rate has more than quat rupeled since the late -- quadrupled lives like deputy sheriff since the late 1990's. prescription opioids played a darren goforth, who last year role in more than 28,000 was gunned down in cold blood, overdose deaths. shot 15 times in the back of we must equip our communities with the resources needed to is head and back side. reverse these trends. yes, authorizing new grant programs, reports and studies
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he was pumping gas in his is an important step, but uniform with his cruiser. without new funding communities won't be able to fully heroes like dave reichert, ann, implement these initiatives. on wednesday, the majority blocked a democratic substitute rren, and young texans opioids package which would have provided $600 million paid selling lemonade have a message for america. blue lives matter. for, i might add, to fund the i yield back. initiatives we have considered this week. the speaker pro tempore: the i understand the need to get gentleman's time has expired, our fiscal house in order, but for what purpose does the i don't understand the impulse gentleman from texas seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, ask unanimous to do so on the backs of consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: millions of americans grappling without objection. mr. smith: mr. speaker, a new with opioid abuse. report by u.s. immigration and these bills are great and i customs enforcement reveals upport them but we need to put that last year the obama administration released 20,000 money where our mouths is. it's touched my hometown in new illegal immigrants convicted of york city to the shores of the crimes into our communities. pacific. so many hearns l americans have together they had committed already felt this impact. 64,000 crimes, including we need to do everything we can to keep it from impacting more kidnapping, homicide, drunken of our families, our friends, driving, and sexual assault. our constituents. instead of putting the safety we're on the right path, but, of americans first, the obama again, without money this administration often gives a becomes irrelevant. free pass to violent criminals we need to make sure that we who are in the united states have adequate funding so what illegally.
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we all want to do on both sides this report should have been national news. of the aisle can become a reality. however, many outlets like the thank you and i yield back. "l.a. times," "washington the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new york yields post," and associated press, as back the balance of his time. well as the major television the gentleman from new jersey reserves. the gentlewoman from indiana is networks, abc, nbc, and cbs, recognized. mrs. brooks: i yield two minutes to the gentleman from failed to cover this horrific michigan. the speaker pro tempore: the report. gentleman from michigan is the american people deserve to recognized for two minutes. mr. walberg: thank you, mr. speaker. know the truth about our immigration policies and the it's past time -- >> it's past time to give our damaging consequences of the health care providers the tools obama administration's actions. they need to confront the when the national media growing epidemic of opioid intentionally failed to report the facts, the american people abuse in our country. are the ones who literally this is an emergency. suffer the consequences. as a doctor who has treated patients in northern michigan for over 0 years, both in the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. private practice and in the for what purpose does the v.a. system, i know how urgent gentlelady from indiana seek the need for immediate action recognition? >> mr. speaker, i ask unanimous is. mr. benishek: the amendment to consent to address the house for one minute. the comprehensive addiction and the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mrs. walorski: thank you. recovery act that we are considering today will be a thank you, mr. speaker. giant step forward in how we i rise today to recognize the provide treatment and care for titan robotics team from those suffering from opioid trinity school in south bend. addiction. the bill will also improve the next week they'll travel to california to compete in the quality of care available tower legoland open invitational nation's veterans. championship. the rate of abuse for --
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i had the opportunity to speak available to our nation's with these students about their veterans. project in which they were the rate of buice is significantly higher in our challenged find new ways to help the environment. they discovered that recycling veteran population than the general population and this labels on plastic wrappers were problem is only continuing to grow. often hidden or unclear making we have an opportunity today to consumers less likely to take a first step in fixing a recycle. after hours of research, they proposed a solution -- a new major national problem and pass label with the recycle symbol meaningful legislation that that would wrap around the will help save the lives of plastic wrappers on the outside thousands and thousands of making it easier to see if the americans. i urge my colleagues to support product is recyclable, and a this legislation and continue different label to inform working together on bipartisan consumers if the product is solutions for our nation's not. mr. speaker, i commend these kids for their hard work and growing epidemic of substance wish them the best of luck in abuse. i yield back. their competition. the speaker pro tempore: the i want to thank the parents, gentleman from michigan yields back the balance of his time. coaches, principals, and the gentlewoman from indiana everyone in the community who reserves. supported them. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. i ask unanimous consent to mr. pallone: thank you, mr. insert the names of the speaker. i yield two minutes now to the students and coaches into the record. the speaker pro tempore: gentleman from new york, mr. without objection. tonko. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new york is recognized for two minutes. mrs. walorski: i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for mr. tonko: thank you, mr. speaker. this week we've seen a number what purpose does the gentleman from nevada seek recognition? of well-intentioned bills come >> to address the house for one to the floor with good ideas on minute. how we can address the nation's revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentleman is recognized for one minute. opioid epidemic that is sweeping our entire country. >> mr. speaker, drug overdose i was proud to lead one of
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those efforts with my good is now the leading cause of friend, representative bucshon, accidental death in america. with a bill that endeavors to the prescription painkillers lift the cap on the number of account for 47% of those 47,000 patients a provider may treat ith a prescription while deaths. no one debates those medication can serve an important role in pain management, but we cannot ignore the ability to entrap giving it to nurses and nurse innocent and unintended practitioners. this is a good bill and would victims. mr. hardy: that is why we are help individuals facing months taking steps to protect the long waiting lists for effective treatment. endangered epidemic -- those like the gentleman i met last endangered in the epidemic. week while touring an addiction with bills passed this week, we clinic. are improving training and he struggled for addiction for providing resources for medical decades. after making the decision to try to get clean was faced with providers and pharmacists making sure that federal seven-month and a agencies work better together in reducing excess amounts of unused meds in the homes of waiting list. patients with short-term needs. unfortunately, when this bill came to the floor, we were told so that excess medicine can be the cap language had to be available for those still in temporarily replaced with need. instead of falling into the hands of children and family placeholder, sense of congress language until we go to members. conference because our bill was there is always more we can do. going to cost too much. now, when we talk about the and will do in the future. cost of this bill, what we are but today is the dade day that really talking about is the
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america has started -- today is fact that more people will have the day that america has started on the road to access to effective treatment recovery. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman and more lives will be saved. from colorado seek recognition? >> permission to address the it is an unfortunate truth that house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. in the distorted budgetary the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one terms of washington, dead minute. mr. polis: mr. speaker, it's people cost less than the with great honor that i rise before this body of congress to living. so we can talk all we want. recognize dr. john warner of we can pass all the bills we brecken ridge, colorado. want, but unless we put our he's served on our town council money where our mouth is, we for 14 years and the last eight will be simply be peddling years as mayor. false hope. being mayor of one of the we will be condemning more of our brothers and sisters to the country's premiere resort communities has its challenges death spiral of addiction when we could have done something to for my constituents, but john help. has guided his community a sense of congress won't end through growth and uncertainty months' long waiting lists for with integrity and passion. effective treatment. his steadfast commitment to a sense of congress won't get making a place that residents call home is an inspiration to life-saving reversal drugs out us all. the hallmark of his tenure was to first responders. if this congress has any sense as we move into conference sustainability and many committee, we will support this important projects result interested his efforts like the epidemic with the robust new recycling facilities, three resources this country deserves solar projects, hybrid vehicles for a real and meaningful in the town's fleet, and response. with that, mr. speaker, i thank you and yield back the balance sustainable certification of my time. program for businesses. despite many complicated the speaker pro tempore: the
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issues, john took each one with gentleman from new york yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from new jersey a calm assurance and balanced reserves. the gentlewoman from indiana is recognized. approach. mr. speaker, it's with great mrs. brooks: mr. speaker, i pride that i rise to pay reserve my time. the speaker pro tempore: the tribute to dr. john g. warner gentlewoman from indiana reserves. on behalf of the residents of the gentleman from new jersey the second congressional is recognized. pallone pallone i yield now two district and myself, his minutes to the gentlewoman from contributions to the town of california, ms. matsui. brecken ridge will remain his the speaker pro tempore: the legacy for many years to come. gentlewoman from california is recognized for two minutes. thank you. ms. matsui: thank you, mr. speaker. the opioid and heroin crisis has hit home for everyone. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields. for what purpose does the gentleman from west virginia impacting our co-workers, seek recognition? neighbors and our friends in >> mr. speaker, i ask unanimous every corner of this country. consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: in sacramento, my district, the without objection, mr. mckin ln: mr. speaker, this week is deadly consequences of fentanyl are devastating our families. indeed national police week. a time to honor and commemorate the faces behind the tragedy the sacrifices of the are people like 28-year-old courageous men and women who jerome butler, a young father serve in law enforcement. they keep our communities whose life was cut short strong and our neighborhoods because of a tainted pill. the human toll of this crisis safe. but today i want to demands our leadership. particularly recognize sergeant john shultz of the wheeling this week we took a step forward by passing a number of police department for his 20 years of service and for always bipartisan bills to address the putting others first. opioid epidemic, many of which sergeant shultz was not only a we worked on in the energy and proud police officer but also commerce committee, but we can
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served abroad in desert storm and we must do more. and desert shield, and for the we need new funding to confront last five years, he has this tragedy. mentored local kids as a p.r.o. my democratic colleagues are -- at wheeling middle school. and i are ready to fund the his selfless service was president's $1.1 billion evident last year when on june request for this crisis. 2 he drove -- domb into a we need a real investment to public pool fully clothed, meet the challenges our communities are facing every boots, shoes, and weapons, to day. as we advance substance abuse successfully rescue a student legislation and continue our who was unconscious at the important work on comprehensive bottom of the pool. for this courageous deed and behavioral health reform, i urge my colleagues to focus on admirable and respected career, he has been recognized by the solutions that both adequately national association of police address the immediate crisis organizations for honorable and long-term community mention for the prestigious top cops award. prevention strategies. let's congratulate him for his the families reeling from the honor and thank all of his law tragedies of this epidemic deserve nothing less than our enforcement colleagues who swift action and full support. dedicate their lives every day thank you, mr. speaker. i yield back. to the well-being of all of our the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from california yields back the balance of her fellow citizens. time. the gentleman from new jersey i yield back the balance of my reserves. time. the speaker pro tempore: the the gentlewoman from indiana is recognized. gentleman yields. mrs. brooks: mr. speaker, i reserve my time. the speaker pro tempore: the for what purpose does the gentlewoman from indiana reserves. gentleman from georgia seek recognition? the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. collins: by direction of the committee on rules, i call
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up house resolution 725 and ask the gentleman from new jersey for its immediate is recognized. consideration. mr. pallone: i rise this more the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the to speak in favor of house resolution. the clerk: house calendar amendment to s. 524. number 113, house resolution over the last two days of floor 725. gate we have heard heartfelt resolved, that upon adoption of speeches from members of this resolution it shall be in congress about how the opioid order to consider in the house epidemic is affecting their the bill, senate 524, to constituents and for some their own families. we have heard from both authorize the attorney general democrats and republicans, to award grants to address the national epidemic of members from urban districts, prescription opioid abuse and suburban districts, and rural heroin use. districts, as well as members from every region of the united all points of order against consideration of the bill are states. what's clear is that no waived. community has been immune to an amendment in the nature of a this crisis, including substitute consisting of the respective texts of the bill communities in my home state of specified in section 2-a of new jersey. about 256,000 new jersey this resolution shall be residents are addicted to considered as adopted. the bill as amended shall be heroin and prescription opioids. that's nearly the same as the considered as read. entire population of newark, all points of order against provisions in the bill as amended are waived. the largest city in new jersey. the previous question shall be so this is a serious crisis considered as ordered on the that demands an urgent bill as amended to final response. a comprehensive solution to the passage without intervening motion except one, one hour of crisis will require real dollars and must take an debate equally divided among approach that targets the full spectrum of addiction, that is and controlled by the chair and ranking minority member of the prevention, crisis response, committee on energy and expanding access to treatment, commerce, and the chair and and providing support for
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ranking minority member of the lifelong recovery. committee on the judiciary. the approach must be guided by science and cannot be deterred and two, one motion to recommit with or without instructions. because of stigma or misperceptions about proven treatment and intervention section 2-a, bills referred to strategies. i'm pleased to support the in the first section of this package of opioid legislation resolution are as follows. that we are considering today 5046, h.r. r. because it takes steps towards that approach. this bill incorporates proven public health approaches to fight against the heroin and 4063, h.r. 4985, h.r. 5048, prescription drug abuse crisis. it improves the tools available to prescribers to prevent h.r. 52, h.r. 4843, opioid abuse and the development of opioid use disorder. expands access to lifesaving in a laxon, an open yoit overdose 49783 of 8 owe, h.r. 1818, h.r. reversal drug to respond to those in an acute crisis. 4969, h.r. 4586, h.r. 4599, it expands access to evidence-based treatments that r. 4976, h.r. 4982, h.r. help individuals with opioid use disorders and recovery. however, i want to make clear 4981, and h.r. 1725 in each that we must go further to ensure the skill of our case is passed by the house. response is proportionate to b, informing the amendments in the burden of the crisis. the nature of a substitute we not overwhelm need to support individuals' entry into referred to the nirs section of recovery, we need to ensure we this resolution, the clerk,
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provide access to the supports one, shall assign appropriate and service that is lead to designations to provide -- to lifelong recovery, and we must provisions within the amendment in the nature of a substitute. lso further expand access to two, shall conform cross-references and provisions for short titles within the medication assistance treatment amendment in the nature of a for opioid use disorders. substitute. currently we do not have and three, is authorized to adequate treatment capacity to make technical corrections respond to the unprecedented within the amendment in the nature of a substitute to demand for treatment and that's include corrections in why we need to expand upon the spelling, punctuation, page and opioid use disorder treatment expansion and modernization act line numbering, section numbering, and insertion of to significantly increase the physician tients a appropriate headings. section 3, upon passage of senate 524, the title of such can treat with this medication. and allowing nurse bill is amended to read as practitioners and physician assistants to treat patients with this medication. follows, to authorize the in the committee democrats voted to raise the cap to 500 attorney general and secretary of health and human services to patients for qualifying award grants to address the physicians with appropriate national epidemics of credentials. prescription opioid abuse and additionally, committee democrats and republicans voted heroin use, and to provide for the establishment of an unanimously to permanently allow nurse practitioners and interagency task force to review, modify, and update best physician assistants to treat patients with it. practices for pain management and prescribing pain medication, and for other purposes. i'm committed to working with my colleagues to ensure we list
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section 4, if senate 524 as amended is passed, then it the arbitrary and harmful shall be in order for the chair treatment cap and ensure nurse practitioners and physician of the committee on energy and commerce or his designee to assistants in every community can permanently use their move that the house insist on skills and experience to serve those in need of opioid use its amendments to senate 524, disorder treatments in their and request a conference with community. the senate thereon. finally, mr. speaker, i want to be clear that we should not be under the illusion that we can the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from georgia is recognized for one hour. adequately respond to this crisis without providing mr. collins: mr. speaker, for purposes of debate only i yield urgently needed resources. and waiting on the the customary 30 minutes to the gentleman from colorado, mr. polis, pending which i yield appropriation process isn't myself such time as i may suitable. consume. our states and communities during consideration of this urgenly -- urgently need money resolution, all time yielded is for the purpose of debate only. now. we should not be forced to cut mr. speaker, i ask unanimous other discretionary funded consent that all members may health programs to provide have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks resources to substance abuse and include extraneous material programs of the the discretionary funding caps have on house resolution currently under consideration. already left many of our vital the speaker pro tempore: public health programs without objection. mr. collins: thank you, mr. underfunded, forcing additional speaker. i am pleased to bring this rule cuts to those programs in order forward on behalf of the rules committee. to provide funding to respond the rule provides consideration to the opioid epidemic. of s. 524, the comprehensive and it will limit our ability to adequately respond to the opioid addiction and recovery act. crisis as well as to meet the the rule provide for one hour remaining public health needs of debate equally divided among of our communities. we don't have to guess how it and controlled by the chair and turns out if we fail to provide ranking minority members of the the urgent robust funding that
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energy and commerce committee is desperately needed. and sadly the evidence is and the judiciary committee. the rule also provides for an already staring us in the face amendment in the nature of a that it will be more lives lost substitute that consists of the to the epidemic. it will be thousands more 18 bills passed by the house americans who will continue to this week to combat the opioid be left behind to battle epidemic. without treatment and recovery under the rule, if s. 524 is support services they need. so we are losing now, we passed, it will be in order for estimate, 78 americans each day the chairman of the energy and commerce committee to request a and we can't afford anything less than a comprehensive well conference with the senate on the house passed packages of funded federal response. i urge my colleagues to vote bills. yes to this legislation because let me emphasize this again for i believe it takes important members so they'll understand steps to turning the tide in the process going on. this crisis that is taking the what we will do, if under the lives of 78 americans every rule if s. 524 is passed, it day. but i also urge my colleagues will then be made in order for the chairman of the energy and to support providing the financial resources and commerce committee to request a conference with the senate on additional tools necessary to the house packaged bills. meet the burden of this crisis. . with that i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the each of these 18 bills passed gentleman from new jersey reserves the balance of his time. the gentlewoman from indiana is the house by strong bipartisan recognized. mrs. brooks: mr. speaker, i'm support. prepared to close. this is a sign of the the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from indiana is prepared to close. recognition that something must be done about the opioid the gentleman from new jersey. mr. pallone: i have no epidemic. you have seen members who additional speakers at this represent urban areas, members time. so i would just urge support who represent suburban areas for this package.
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and members like me who once again stress that we are not providing enough funding. represent rural billses that as much as i believe that this support these bills. package is very important and i -- bills -- rural areas that certainly would agree with my colleague on the republican side how important it is, but support these bills. we are not providing enough resources. with these passage of these i hope that when we go to conference and before this bill bills we are taking decisive goes to the president, this action. package goes to the president the senate bill, the that we can provide the comprehensive addiction and additional resources. recovery act, received number with that i urge everyone to unanimous support in that chamber. i want to thank senators support the bill. yield back the balance of my time. portman and whitehouse for the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. their leadership on that bill. the gentlewoman from indiana is recognized. mrs. brooks: thank you, mr. there are additional measures. speaker. in closing, i would like to it is my hope that conference provided for by these bills emphasize that as my colleague, will yield the strongest the ranking member from new possible measure because we jersey, indicated, we have made need strong, swift and decisive real strides this week in action to address the growing turning back the epidemic, but crisis of the opioid epidemic. we agree it's not enough. and it's not over. in the united states, more this fight is not going to be people die every year from drug over. there is still more to be done. overdoses than car accidents. but i do hope that this week's i think that's something that productivity will lead to more is really as the debate has weeks where we can continue to taken place on the floor this engage in the healthy and week i think the numbers have just been amazingly stark. robust debate about the issues that matter. and when you realize -- and this week has proven we are
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stronger as a body when we just a statistic like that, focus on the things that unite when the deaths from drug us and bring us together. overdoses eclipse car sadly it shouldn't take a epidemic or national crisis to accidents, then we're dealing with something i think just bring us together. this week has taught us that begins to put it in with enough will and dedication perspective. my home state of georgia has we can get to yes. 159 counties. the conference committee wishes 2012 prescription drug this bill will initiate will overdoses led to deaths in 152 need similar forward to come to f 159 counties, totaling 592 a resolution on the differences we have with the senate. that accomplishment is within our grasp. we have come too far to turn deaths. the opioid bills in the house back now and let this -- rather package before us today help implement measures to prevent than let this issue languish. these tragedies. that's why i urge my colleagues to vote in favor of this bill, addiction is happening far too support the motion to go to often. with devastating consequences. conference, and beyond the 78 further, it's shown that prescription opioid abuse often leads to heroin abuse. americans who are dying every compounding the problem, in day. we have 1.9 million americans fact -- compounding this addicted to or abusing problem. in fact, according to the prescription opioid-based centers for disease control, painkillers across the contry. 45% of those who used heroin and we -- because of their were addicted to opioid lives, their families' lives we painkillers. must pass this bill. it is worth mentioning again thank you. i yield back the balance of my now. i have had many conversations time. the speaker pro tempore: the
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with this was in my area in the the gentlewoman from indiana jackson lee yields back the balance of her time -- the ninth districts which runs on the 85 corridor up in atlanta gentlewoman fromin yields back the balance of her time. in the northeast. i ask them and i keep in contact with them regularly. my background, my father being in the state patrol. i know the law enforcement community very well. one of the first questions i all time for debate for energy ask them -- in the 10 years -- i've been in the state house nd commerce has expired. for six years and i've been here into my second term and i always ask, what is the biggest thing you're seeing? what is the epidemic or what is the issue most you see? early on it was the gentleman from virginia is methamphetamine. recognized. especially my rural area, my mr. goodlatte: mr. chairman, i mountain area, methamphetamine. yield myself such time as i may it is still very prevalent but consume. due to the many restraints that the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. goodlatte: it has been quite a week. was put in georgia, and i this week the house has passed noticed my friend here in 18 bills designed to address georgia as well. various facets of america's we worked in the state legislature to do this to control the methamphetamine opioid epidemic. most recently yesterday the problem. and then the prescription opioid problemes that ouse passed by an overwhelming developed. and now what my this was will tell me and my law enforcement 413-5 vote the judiciary and city police will tell me that heroin is by far their committee's flagship bill, h.r. fastest growing issue that 5046, authored by crime
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they're seeing. and it's hitting not just urban subcommittee chairman jim sensenbrenner. areas. it's hitting suburban areas. creates a comprehensive justice it's hitting very rural areas. department grant program to it's hitting across the income provide states with the gap those who have been resources needed to fight opioid addiction. addicted to the prescription opioids now find that heroin is it authorizes $103 million a year for five years for the cheaper to purchase and is grant program. it allocates precious resources cheaper to access. and the problem is unlike many responsibly by leveraging and streamlining existing programs of the prescription opioid and fully offsetting the painkillers, the heroin issue is one in which they can take legislation in compliance with the first dose and it be their the house's cut-go protocol. in addition to that bill, the last. this is something we cannot house passed four other continue to look away. judiciary committee bills this week to address drug abuse and in georgia, heroin deaths have increased 300%. protect american people. that statistic alone should be h.r. 5052, the open act, a call to action. nationwide the number of people increases the transparency and it affects is staggering. accountability of the c.d.c. statistics on opioid comprehensive opioid abuse abuse show 18,893 overdose grant program in h.r. 5046, by deaths related to prescription requiring grantees to report on the use of grant funds and painkillers. requiring a publicly available 10,574 overdose deaths related to heroin in 2014. analysis of whether the grants have achieved their intended the opioid epidemic affects purposes. everyone. h.r. 4985, the kingpin i believe that most people could tell you of a family member or friend who has designation improvement act, suffered in some way because of
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protects classified information this problem. from disclosure when a drug and these problems aren't only affecting adults. kingpin challenges his designation as such in a they're affecting college aged federal court. students, high schoolers, h.r. 5048, the good samaritan children and even the littliest among us, the babies. assessment act, requires the g.a.o. to study state and local every 25 minutes in our country, babies are born with a good samaritan laws that dependency. this is tragic. protect caregivers, law babies are born to opioids enforcement personnel, and often struggle to survive, have first responders who administer dangerous health complications opioid overdose reversal drugs and suffer from serious or devices from criminal or withdrawals. these innocent children don't civil liability, as well as deserve this. those who contact emergency they deserve a life full of promise. instead, they face life service providers in response to an overdose. threatening challenges from the moment they are born. finally, s. 32, the we can do better and should do better. transnational drug trafficking in fact, not only from the act, improves law enforcement's moment they're born, they're ability to pursue international suffering in the womb as well. drug manufacturers, brokers, this is an epidemic we have got and distributors in source to address. importantly, several of these nations. i am pleased that the house bills will help address this took up the senate version of this bill. problem. as a result, that legislation is on its way to the for example, congressman latta president's desk to be signed introduced h.r. 4893, the into law so federal prosecutors infant care of safe plan can begin using that tool to improvement act. this bill requires the pursue foreign drug traffickers. department of health and human along with the excellent services to distribute to legislation prepared by our
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sister committees spearheaded states best practices, safe by chairman upton, chairman care plans for babies with miller, and chairman kline, substance abuse and withdrawal four of the judiciary committee bills will be included in the house amendment to s. 524, the symptoms. abstinence atal senate's competitive addiction and recovery act. as a package these bills make syndrome which requires a report on the number of babies substantial policy changes at the federal agencies with n.a.s. responsible for fighting and youth athletes may face if they're prescribed opioids for addiction. they take real steps to address sports-related injury. the opioid epidemic and provide h.r. 4969, the john thomas real relief to a real problem decker act, introduced by affecting real americans. congressman pat meehan from members of this body should be proud of these accomplishments. pennsylvania, requires the c.d.c. to study information and in addition to the committee chairman, i mentioned, i also resources available to youth want to thank chairman harold and families regarding the rogers who spoke in support of danger of opioid use and abuse. r. 5046 yesterday and is a still other bills relate to veterans and how we can help them. strong ally in the fight for example, the comprehensive against elicit opioid abuse. opioid abuse and reduction act, introduced from mr. i have no doubt he will make sensenbrenner from wisconsin authorizes investments in every effort during this veterans courts. congress to provide the funding i believe there is another conversation that's going on in authorized by the bulls that congress right now concerning have passed the house this our criminal justice and week.
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criminal justice reform and mr. chairman, i look forward to things we need to do to make sending this legislation back to the senate and moving to sure that not only are we not -- erence exirblely using our jails as mental health facilities but we're getting people the help they need and some of the ways do expeditiously. you that is found in treatment there is bicameral support for courts and many of those are these efforts. i thank my colleague for their found in newer treatment courts, not just substance support and hard work and i urge everyone to support the house amendments to s. 524. abuse but veterans courts as well and we'll continue looking i thank my colleague, the at that. 4063, the , the h.r. ranking member of the committee, mr. conyers, for his hard work on this as well. this truly is a bipartisan the jason simcakoski act, effort. i commend all to support this directs the department of motion to go to conference. defense and department of i reserve the balance of my time. veterans affairs updates the the speaker pro tempore: the v.a., d.o.d. practice guideline gentleman from virginia reserves his time. the gentleman from michigan. for management of opioid mr. conyers: mr. speaker, i therapy for chronic pain. yield myself such time as i may it requires the v.a. to expand consume. the speaker pro tempore: the opioid safety initiatives. gentleman from michigan is recognized. you see, i'm a chaplain still mr. conyers: members of the house, i rise in support of the in the air force reserve. i served in iraq. i saw firsthand the scars the house amendment s. 24, the competitive -- comprehensive battlefield can leave both physical and mental. we need support systems for our addiction and recovery act. veterans like the ones provided before starting out on the for in h.r. 5046 and h.r. 4063. merits of the legislation, i
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we need to address their pain wish to commend the judiciary and we need to suren sure they committee chairman, mr. have the avenue to get the help they need. i believe the bills in this rule will provide to take the goodlatte, for chairing our five committee bill judiciary steps to make that happen. our veterans deserve the very best. to house passage. we cannot discuss this package i also commend the subcommittee without mentioning the resources this provides for law chairman, mr. sensenbrenner of enforcement. as a son of a georgia state wisconsin, for authoring the trooper this is critical to me. legislation that is largely it provides law enforcement responsible for bringing us training. these measures also provide for together today. the expanded use of naloxone by but i also recognize the law enforcement. it can reverse opioid overdoses leadership of the crime subcommittee ranking member, and so it's a valuable tool to sheila jackson lee of texas, have on hand this is through establishment of a who, as an original co-sponsor comprehensive grant program that will provide resources to of the primary judiciary law enforcement communities and states and combined with other committee bill, and who's helped us find common ground in bills we have a real chance to make a difference here today. addressing the issue of drug addiction and treatment. mr. speaker, addiction issues are often related to other this week the house considered concurring disorders, including and passed a wide range of mental health issues. addiction claims victims and bills aiming at combating the addiction is a disease. we must not turn a blind eye to devastating impact of drug abuse and addiction that is
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those in need. we must work to halt the opioid epidemic. we must act to prevent more afflicting communities all deaths and to stop the growth across our nation. and spread of this problem. we must take this action because our nation is in the the motion to impto conference midst of a major public health is a step towards doing that. crisis caused by a epidemic of over the course of this week, we have seen members from every walk of life. prescription and opioid abuse. representing people from every walk of life come to the floor it is a crisis that affects to speak on the opioid americans of all ages, of all epidemic. each and every one of these races, of all income levels. members have made statements to bredth of th and it has devastated communities across the united states. it affects families, the this problem. workplace, and also our we have a chance to ease that nation's economy. problem, to combat it. these bills call for further studies to compt response of and drug overdoses are now the the opioid crisis, provide support for doctors, treatment of abusers and also to help law leading cause of injury related enforcement efforts in death in our nation. combating drug trafficking. in my state of michigan, for neighborhoods and families are being torn apart by heroin example, there were 1,745 drug addiction and opioid abuse. communities like my home in northeast georgia need help to address these problems. overdose deaths in 2014. and through these bills we are
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helping to provide that. and more than half of those importantly, we also -- we are overdose deaths were attributed also providing enough flexibility so states can to opioids and heroin. determine what will work best for their specific populations in fact, 78 americans die from and communities. many communities, many members an opioid overdose every single and staffers have worked hard to bring together these important reforms, and i want day. to thank them for their so without question this is a dedication and hard work. these reforms are a step in the crisis that cries out for right direction. and with that, mr. speaker, i immediate relief. fortunately there may be reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from colorado is effective solutions. for example, several states recognized. mr. polis: i thank the gentleman for yielding me 30 have undertaken various minutes. i yield myself such time as i may consume. innovative measures to better mr. speaker, i rise in respond to the rapid increase opposition to this rule today that provides for consideration of s. 524. of individuals addicted to prescription opioids and as has been discussed on the heroin, and to prevent floor this week, mr. speaker, our nation is in the midst of individuals from dying as a an epidemic. result of drug overdose. while opioid abuse is nothing new, the numbers are getting as i mentioned only yesterday more and more alarming. during debate with respect to addiction claimed over 28,000 5046, sideration of h.r. ves in 2014, and drastically
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which has been incorporated into altered many more for the the house amendment to s. 524, worse. all week we've heard stories from both sides of the aisle speaking to how addiction is this measure would fund new, breaking apart families and innovative ways to address communities. and today we're considering a opioid de epidemic of package of bills that hopefully will take some meaningful steps towards addressing the crisis. drug abuse addiction. prescription drug addiction is a very complex issue. this -- these innovations there's no simple solution. include, for instance, the law it's a subject that deserves enforcement assistance diversion comprehensive debate, pull approach. consideration of ideas that which has been utilized with democratic and republican members have to be able to great success in two cities that address this public health i know about, in seattle and in crisis. santa fe. and while i and many of my programs such as this diversion democratic colleagues are supportive of the underlying approach underscore the fact legislation, there are problems that we cannot arrest our way with the process that have locked out ideas that can save out of opioid abuse addiction. lives that are being prevented treating addicts as criminals from coming to the floor under this rule. only makes matters worse for of the 18 bills included under them and also for the rest of us this rule all but two were
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too. brought to floor under the diversion approach, which suspension. what does this mean? it means no members, democratic or republican, were allowed to reduces, by the way, resid vism amend or improve 16 of these 18 by 60% is just one example of bills. and the scope of the two bills innovation at the state and that were brought forward in a manner that allowed amendments local level that we must was so narrow that it closed encourage through increased out many of the amendments that funding assistance. and it's more evidence that we considered in the rules committee because they weren't germane to these two particular treatment alternatives to bills. i find that very frustrating. incarceration work. it limits discussion on a major the funding authorization under public health crisis, something that is an issue that's not at this measure would establish a competitive grant program to all partisan and many bipartisan amendments that i'll provide funds to state and local talk about in a moment, many governments, to continue and ideas from republicans and improve their efforts to protect democrats were simply not even americans from the dangers of allowed to be considered in this process. amendments that would save opioid and heroin abuse. lives, amendments that families would be grateful for, and it will help ensure that addicts have access to the amendments that would reduce services that are provided. opioid abuse in our country are not even allowed to be considered here on the floor of these funds would support such the house. and these were not amendments with an ideological agenda.
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initiatives as providing sometimes we're down here on a treatment alternatives to bill that's highly ideological. there's amendmentes that are incarceration, fostering better locked out that would change -- collaboration between state amendments that are locked out criminal justice agencies and and that would change it drastically. these are good ideas from the state abuse systems. experiences that many of us have had back in our own districts to how we can address and substance abuse systems. this opioid abuse crisis that providing first responders with we're facing nationally. the ability to purchase in a lox among the amendmentes that in a locko receive -- would have -- should have been allowed this -- among the amendments that would have been allowed -- should have been allowed this week, one of the sewn and to receive -- naloxono amendment that was locked out was a bipartisan amendment by and receive training on how to administer this life-saving annie kuster and frank guinta, drug. my colleagues from new important medication assistance hampshire, which is really one programs by criminal justice of the ground zero areas for agency. in addition, investigating more this crisis, offered a bipartisan amendment to h.r. of the illegal distribution 4641 that would allowed h.h.s. methods of opioids. to award grants to recovery community organizations. treating prescription drug now, their amendment monitoring programs and acknowledges that recovery is a long road, and for any of us, including myself who have known addressing juvenile opioid abuse
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which is unfortunately people that have been in recovery from drug addiction, increasing. and establishing comprehensive they know it's difficult. it's a real test of internal pioid abuse response programs. fortitude for them. and, of course, their family and community need to rally the house amendment to s. 524 around them in support of their also includes a number of sew bright. we need -- sobriety. we need lifetime support for important provisions added the lifetime struggle to pull pursuant to a series of people out of the vicious cycle amendments passed by the house of addiction. and the amendment that was blocked under this rule took only yesterday. in some -- in sum, these the view to address this crisis, we need the long-term additional provisions expand the support of recovery community range of allowed purpose areas organizations. now, we know how pressing this under the new program to more issue is for our new hampshire fully address the range of colleagues, republican and problems and solutions presented democratic, so why not open up by opioid abuse. this process to allow their whether we provide separate new idea to be debated on the merits? grant programs for each of these and if members of congress found it lacking merits, of approaches or whether we consolidate them into one grant course, it would be the prerogative of this body to program, it is critical that we vote it down. at least have this debate. think it would have passed. change our ways of addressing
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addiction. the scourge of drug abuse and kathryn clark and mr. jenkins its overwhelming impact on our had an amendment, again, locked out under this rule. communities requires us to we're not allowed to debate it. we're not allowed to vote on address this problem, not only it. it would authorize grants for the creation of comprehensive immediately but effectively. i thank all of the committees systems to provide support for prescribers with regard to and individuals that have patient pain and substance abuse. according to a study in the participated in this effort and journal of opioid management, o accordingly, i support house less than half of primary care providers felt sufficiently trained in prescribing opioids. amendment to s. 524 and reserve this would address that the balance of my time. training gap of prescribers so the speaker pro tempore: the they would less often use gentleman reserves. opioids and more frequently use the gentleman from virginia is alternative pain reduction recognized. prescriptions. and it is our doctors and nurse mr. goodlatte: we do not have any speakers remaining, we're practitioners and nurses who are on the front lines. prepared to close. they need to be adequately the speaker pro tempore: the prepared to deal with patients gentleman from virginia reserves. in pain and patients in the the gentleman from michigan is ecognized. throes of addiction. . . under this rule that amendment is not allowed to be considered
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mr. conyers: i yield myself such time as i may consume. by this body. i personally offered a we were hoping we would have at least one amendment but we don't bipartisan amendment with mr. rohrabacher of california that have the member here to present would have required the pain management task force created it, and so i will close by in h.r. 4641 to take into consideration the potential for saying, i support house marijuana to serve as an alternative to opioids for pain amendment s. 524 because it will management. several private studies have help address our nation's crisis yielded promising results. in 2014 the journal of pain of opioid and heroin abuse. found that those who suffer from chronic pain reduced use of open point of orders by my support for this legislation significant margin when using is based in part on the fact marijuana for medicinal , at it includes h.r. 5046 purposes. marijuana likely won't work in every instance where somebody has chronic pain, but where it legislation that i have worked does, you have far less on with my colleagues on both sides of the aisle that would harmful, less addictive option with much more limited side provide critical grants to effects than opioid pain states and local governments kalers. we shouldn't be taken an option intended to prevent and treat with limited side effects off opioid abuse addiction. the table when it could help most importantly, i support this three million americans from crippling addiction. legislation because it would that amendment simply an
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amendment to take into help save lives. consideration to study the issue was also blocked under provides dment to 524 this rule. those are some of the many examples. as i mentioned, none of the amendments made it out of rules a comprehensive approach to the committee, and our colleagues opioid substance abuse public wanted the opportunity to weigh on the house floor. a wide variety of amendments health emergency that is currently ravaging our nation, were blocked. this really is irresponsible of this bod body in responding to and accordingly, i urge my a epidemic of this complexity colleagues to support this to not debate and solicit measure and i yield back the ideas, bipartisan ideas, balance of my time. republican ideas he f, and the speaker pro tempore: the democratic ideas from members gentleman -- of this body to find creative mr. conyers: wait a minute. solutions. mr. speaker -- the speaker pro tempore: the that can save lives and would gentleman from michigan is be of great comfort to families recognized. mr. conyers: i would like now to that are affected. yield to the gentlelady from my other concern is that the texas, who has entered the majority is authorized by not funded or appropriated any of chamber and is prepared to the programs under these bills. in february, the president submit her amendment. submitted a proposal that would have provided $1.1 billion in the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from texas is new funding that would address recognized. for how long? this epidemic and enforcement treatment, but despite that, mr. conyers: as much time -- for the balance of the time.
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this dill bill has no funding the speaker pro tempore: the for these efforts. gentlewoman is recognized. combating addiction is truly a ms. jackson lee: i thank mr. bipartisan effort. goodlatte and mr. conyers and when close to 100 americans are dying from drug overdoses every the judiciary committee and mr. sensenbrenner who mentioned day. we have to work together to yesterday that he has been change that. and i think that, working on this for two years. unfortunately, under this rule, and we have joined him as while it might be some baby original co-sponsors in steps forward, we are falling supporting this on the crime short of the mark of really subcommittee which i am ranking, being able to put our very best along with mr. sensenbrenner, thinking and very best solutions forward. and this is a moment that all of us are appreciative of. according to the c.d.c., since 1999 the number of prescription as i thought about this week open yoids sold in the united where we are honoring police and states has quadrupled. we are also acknowledging those despite no discernable change who have fallen in the line of in the pain that americans were reporting. duty, this bill, the so the 15-year period opioids are used four times as much. comprehensive addiction and recovery act, becomes even more that is the precursor to this important. this week the house adopted a opioid addiction problem. number of bills that together are intended to provide a we need to be more to address response to the opioid crisis that over prescription of that is commensurate with the scope of the problem. opioids. yesterday, the house passed by in my home state of colorado, an overwhelming vote the primary the statewide rate of drug overdose deaths increased from contribution of the judiciary committee to this effort, h.r. 9.7% per 100,000 residents to
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5046, the comprehensive opioid 16.3% for 100,000 residents of open yoids were a part, major act. i'm an original co-sponsor of component of that. and nationally there's been this that bill and the other even larger increases. since 1999, deaths from bill introduced by mr. sensenbrenner. prescription open yoids like i commend him for the years work and persistence on this issue oxycontin, methadone, have and i commend chairman goodlatte and ranking member conyers for quadrupled. their leadership for it would so it's no surprise the number of prescription opioids sold in not have been shepherded through committee if we had not all worked together to find common the united states have quadrupled and deaths have ground on this important issue. quadrupled. that's been the trend as we work it's no coincidence those on justice reform, provocative, numbers are similar. in 2014, almost two million innovative bills that will change the lives of many of those incarcerated for many, americans had some level of dependence on prescription pain many years. we're going to turn mass relievers. this trend is especially dire incarceration upside down and on consequences during pregnancy, its ears and cause it to be which one of our bills addresses, in the last decade alone over 130,000 infants were extinct. this new approach to opioids is born with newborn drug part of that. withdrawal symptom. this bill has no mandatory giving the circumstances minimums. as we take the steps today which surrounding opioid abuse in this contry, i'm glad that this will allow us to engage in body is devoting some effort discussions with the senate so
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we may soon end -- send a bill towards casting a critical eye on what we can do. to the president for his and i'm saddened that this body signature, i'm pleased with the didn't have a more open process progress that is made. to include many of the ideas i can only hope that you are owork on sentencing reduction, that i mentioned earlier from prison reform and juvenile bipartisan members of this body justice will have the same kind and others that are simply of impetus and wind up on the locked out under this rule. president's desk. that's the vision, i believe, of the energy and commerce committee reported out 12 many republicans and democrats in and out of this house and as bills. foreign affairs committee considered a bill to allow the well it is the vision of the president but more importantly treasury department to block it is the vision of suffering international drug traffickers families who do not have their from using the u.s. financial loved ones with them. system of the the veterans' the reason we must work together affairs committee passed out a is that a leading killer of bill, and the committee i serve on, the education and work force committee, took up a bill americans today is drug overdose, started first by that i co-authored along with prescription use in many representatives barletta and instances. between 2014 -- in 2014 almost clark and chairman kline, and ranking memberle -- ranking half a million people died of drug overdoses. in 2014 alone, more than 27,000 member scott. people died of drug overdoses. to develop a scaife care plan to closely monitor the infants the largest percentage of overdose deaths in 2014 was that are born with this syndrome. attributed to opioids like the scourge of opioid addiction prescription painkillers, has touched families in my methadone,more phone and heroin. district and across the contry.
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specifically -- morphine and no state has managed to avoid heroin. it. specifically, 26,000 died i stand in opposition to this because of opioid in 2014. rule because truly we need to this is an emergency and it is a do everything we can to address combination of prescription painkillers and heroin. this emergency, including debating good ideas, creative prescription painkiller abuse is the strongest risk for future ideas, from both sides of the levels of use of heroin. aisle, and letting the members that's athletes or those who decide based on their own have had surgery, everyday americans who find themselves speerningses, creative caught in the trap of addiction. solutions, what we can do to approximately three out of four new heroin users report their help combat this scourge that's use began with abuse of affected our country. prescription drugs. i reserve the balance of my time. heroin use becomes appealing to the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from colorado is those addicted to prescription recognized. drugs because it's cheaper and georgia, soarry. easier to obtain. mr. collins: thank you, mr. due to its po tency, it heroin speaker. it is with great privilege that i also yield now as much time use tends to lead to addiction. as he may consume to the we know that from the 1980's and gentleman from georgia, pharmacist, our only pharmacist 1990's from crack cocaine, crack in congress, i think has a very was a more potent extraction of good insight into this. i look forward to his words on cocaine and we saw many of those individuals not get treatment, this, the gentleman from georgia, mr. carter. they actually, and only got, i yield as much time as he may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the incarceration. heroin addiction is often gentleman is recognized. deadly, just as crack cocaine mr. carter: i thank the gentleman for yielding and i thank him for his long-time was.
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leading to overdose or other support of these type of chronic diseases. the rate at which the occurrence issues, both as a member of the of heroin overdose deaths georgia state legislature and as a member of this august increase is cause for alarm. in the four years between 010 body. and 2014, heroin overdoses more retchive collins -- representative collins has than tripled. consistently and very in 2013, 11 million people admitted to the improper use of diligently worked on these issues. as the son of a law enforcement prescription painkillers and therefore were at heightened risk of becoming addicted. officer he understands all too well the importance of making that's why we worked together this week on legislation to put sure that our communities are safe. and i thank him for his support together something like an omnibus to reduce the risk of of this. addiction and to fund mr. speaker, i rise today in appropriate treatment responses support of this rule and the to shows who -- to those who house amendment to s. 524. abuse these drug. the bill passed yesterday this week the house has worked reflect this is strategy by hard to pass 18 bills that address almost every facet of proposing a grant program to be the opioid abuse epidemic. administered by the department of justice to assist states and local governments. we called for the creation of a it is important to note, these task force to develop best practices for pain management statistic the rate of deaths and prescribing pain fromheroin overdoses count medication. we have authorized grants for local and state agencies to the white population, 267% better fight this epidemic through better resources. increase between 2010 and 2014. we have expanded care for in african-americans, increase new-born infants who were
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affected by illegal substance of 213%, 2010 to 2014. abuse. we have improved comprehensive opioid abuse treatment to hispanic, 137% increase from pregnant and post paragraph tell women. 2010 to 2014. native americans, 236%. and we created safety measures for use of opioids when treating veterans with chronic no aspect of american life has pain. i'm proud of the measures this been uninfluenced by the body has passed to make up the devastation of heroin overdoses house amendment to s. 524. and deaths, many of them impacting families whose young, mr. speaker, our nation is facing an opioid epidemic. bright, talented, athletic and no community is safe. otherwise young people have fallen victim to this. it affects all communities across the nation, whether they be urban, suburban, or rural. so this grant program is extremely helpful, which i'm serving more than 30 years as a very pleased. it deals with monitoring the community pharmacist, i have prescription drug, deals with witnessed and participated in some of the greatest advances matching those who are committed in the history of medicine. to working with police officers i have seen diseases that once and it is truly an important required hospitalization become illnesses treated from home bill. let me close, mr. chairman, or with medication. i have seen an antibiotic mr. speaker -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman's time has expired. regimen that once required four tablets each day for 10 days ms. jackson lee: we must have money to support all of this and replaced with six tablets over i'm hoping this won't be think five days. i have seen a deadly disease last stop we will make. like hype tie tiss c cured by the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady's time has expired.
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medication in 90 days. the gentleman is recognized. the advances that i have witnessed in medicine can truly be called nothing more than miraculous. that's important. we need to recognize that this >> the house of representatives fight against the opioid ssed legislation to combat epidemic is going to have to be a team effort. addiction to opioids. we are going to have to have everyone, all professionals, and today's bill would set up all health care professionals, involved in this. grant programs for addiction, whether it be doctors, nurses, prevention and recovery, treatment for pregnant women, pharmacists, p.a.'s, whoever, expand the availability of they have to be involved. overdose reversal drugs and set families have to be involved. our communities have to be up a task force to recommend guidelines for doctors who involved. our legislature has to be prescribe open oids. involved. this week our congress has taken the lead. i'm very proud of that. with -- opioids. very proud of the work that they have done. >> we are joined on capitol hill it's also going to take tools like the prescription drug mcintyre. ellen monitoring programs. while a member of the georgia state legislature, i had the honor of sponsoring the the house focusing on opioid legislation that led to the creation of the georgia prescription drug monitoring program. legislation and going to
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that program has been a great conference with the senate. tool in our toolbox to fight tell us what the house has done the opioid epidemic. since that time, we have so far as they finish up the tweaked that program, made it even better, and it continues week. >> as you said, the house passed to get better. it continues to help us in our about 18 bills relating to the fight against the opioids. opioid epidemic. i mentioned the advances i a lot of bipartisan support on this initiative. witnessed in medicine. i'm a big fan of the these bills are looking at how pharmaceutical industry. a big fan, perhaps their can you limit prescriptions so biggest fan. what i have witnessed, again, you are not filling a full has been miraculous. i call on the pharmaceutical prescription of opioids and companies because right now forming task forces. there exists a gap. they are looking at how to make a gap in treating pain. an advisory panel to review the right now we have available to us medications such as abu return of opioids. ibuprofie. they are doing a lot of different things touching across the opioid epidemic. we go to opioids and there are >> what they are going to do is very few alternatives in that take the senate legislation and gap, in that void. say you passed that, here's what very few. once you get past a couple, we have to offer and at some point the two bodies will get there is nothing else for us to together and something we have use or prescribe. not seen a whole lot in this i have confidence in the congress and that is a pharmaceutical manufacturers.
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and i call on them to fill in conference committee meeting. that gap, to fill in that void. >> the house and senate will be combining their 18 bills in the we need more alternatives, more legislation and going to choices. conference. the senate passed the whether it's true or untrue, i legislation in march. can tell you that many patients also passed with a lot of bipartisan support, 94-1 vote in don't believe that ibuprofen the senate. you are seeing bipartisan will work as well as something support in both chambers, but as you can buy with a prescription. there are differences between that's something we have to the two chambers and people overcome. but there is definitely a void working on these issues will there that needs to be filled. have to reconcile the next few again, i'm very, very confident weeks. that the drug manufacturers, leaders are hoping to get that the pharmaceutical companies can help us fill this through this before congress recesses in july. void. and i call on them to do just >> funding, democrats, in that. mr. speaker, as a lifelong particular calling for more farmcy, i have seen the struggles first hand that fungeding. there isn't a lot of funding americans face with opioid addiction. attached to these measures, i have witnessed my colleagues correct? >> the measures that the house in the pharmacy profession, some who just could not passed this week authorizes overcome that weakness and who have succumbed to prescription funding. but there is no new funding to drug abuse. i have witnessed that. fight the crisis. i have witnessed it with >> the white house in favor, but
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patients. noting that lack of funding in i have witnessed it with customers who have ruined their it. when this winds up at the careers, have ruined their president's desk, what would the families, and ruined their lives because of opioid abuse. white house like to see in a final measure? this is a epidemic. >> i think they would like to certainly something that has to see funding, this is what nancy be addressed in our country. pelosi said, these bills are i encourage all my colleagues good efforts but not doing much to support this measure so we can improve our efforts to without funding. raise awareness while working democrats are pushing for towards solutions to solve this funding. health crisis. republicans are saying fund in i encourage my colleagues to the appropriations process. support this bill. and i applaud my colleagues. >> you can follow her reporting this has been a very, very proud week for me to be a on twitter. member of the united states congress. to see what my colleagues in [captions copyright national this house have done this week. cable satellite corp. 2016] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] as a pharmacist, as a health >> the senate passed its version of the bill in march and the care professional it's made me very, very proud. house and senate need to we did good this week and i'm negotiate on a compromised bill. very proud to be a member of this house. next week in the house, the thank you, mr. speaker. i yield back. defense program and policy bill. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from colorado is we'll have live coverage here on recognized. mr. polis: i'd like to yield three minutes to the the gentlewoman from oregon, a c-span. member of the education and work force committee, ms. >> on american history tv on
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bonamici. the speaker pro tempore: the c-span 3 -- gentlewoman is recognized. >> there has never been a full ms. bonamici: i rise in support of the critical legislative public accounting of the f.b.i. efforts on the house floor this domestic intelligence week to again fighting the operations. thfer this committee has opioid crisis and addiction undertaken such an investigation. crisis that has swept our >> on "real america," the church country. there is much more work to be committee hearings convened to done to combat this epidemic. investigate the intelligence this is an encouraging start, activities of the c.i.a., but we must do more. f.b.i., i.r.s. and n.s.a. too many communities in oregon and across the nation have seen the commission questions the destruction caused by addiction. and too many have experienced committee staffers detailing the heartbreak of losing a f.b.i. abuses and attempted child, a neighbor, a friend, or other loved one to overdose. intimidation ever martin luther last year, just in portland, king junior. >> you have just 34 days in oregon, there was an average of two opioid deaths per week. which to do it. this exact number has been i think about carrie, a mom in selected for a specific reason. it has definite practical napa in northwest oregon. experience. you are done. she lost her son jordan after a >> then associate f.b.i. director admits to some of the seven year strug struggle. excesses while defending a it began when he had a football number of other f.b.i. injury in high school and his
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doctor prescribed vik continue. practices. then at 8:00. my own family has not been >> the rest of us may see data immune to this devastation. my brilliant and talented or two. sister-in-law, valry, struggled they see hundreds. and first sort of see pattern or with chronic pain and struggled her life with the many, many opioids that were way too shift in how people are going available. out in the world. she relied on to dull that pain so they are the ones who sound until she lost her life a few the alarm. >> university of georgia years ago. countless families and doctors professor on the role and how and nurses and public safety they shed light within a society officers have all pleaded with us here in congress, please and start potential threats. sunday evening at 6:30. act. please save families from this loss and heartbreak. so i'm glad we have come secretary of state john kerry together today to answer this who served in the vietnam war. call, but these are only the first steps. shares his views on vietnam in health care and treatment providers must have the resources they need to austin, texas. >> our veterans did not receive effectively curtail opioid abuse and addiction. the welcome home, benefits nor and that means robust funding the treatment that they not only and better research and better deserved but needed and education. we have all stood on this floor today and called this a fundamental contract between epidemic. let's treat it as such. soldier and government simply let's continue building on this was not honored. >> then at 8:00 on the progress.
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i thank the chairman and the presidency. > watched reagan delivered the ranking member for their leadership. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. speech. it was dwight eisenhower. gentleman from georgia is recognized. he called his former attorney mr. collins: thank you, mr. speaker. some of the things also we have general and said what a fine talked about today is education, prevention, it's speech ronald reagan delivered and called a former special also looking at things that we can be a part of and do. assistant and said what an as i said earlier today, the excellent speech ronald reagan things that have stuck out to had delivered. me are some of the statistics dwight eisenhower wrote back a that have jumped out. i mentioned the one earlier plan for reagan to follow it. that more are dying from reagan would follow his advice prescription overdoses than car to the letter. wrecks, but also there are >> examination of dwight other practical ways that we can be a part. if you're suffering out there, eisenhower's behind the scenes mr. speaker, if there is someone who is going through this with either prescription mentoring and the role that he ayed in reagan's political opioid abuse or through heroin abuse, and addiction, there is career. tool kits available. go to c-span.org for a complete we have posted on our social media a place where people can schedule. >> the campaign 2016 bus go, from a bipartisan task force, to combat the heroin continues its travels to honors epidemic, and there are things winners from this year's student where they can go and find
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cam competition. it stopped in new jersey to parent tool kits where they can help with their young children, recognize six-time winner for also young adults in their house from middle school up to her second prize video when the the 20's. house becomes a home. how we can best address some of these real issues. it was very disturbing to me she was honored before having a chance to visit the bus. recently in a magazine article i read that someone who was the bus traveled to west addicted not only to heroin but scranton ell men strear school going through it made the statement, this is -- this for their video national shows you the concern that is immigration issues. here, made the general they donated 500 of their statement that the heroin that winnings to the local charity. they were -- there was this adrenaline rush getting ready following this event, it drove -- when they were getting ready to clinton township in new to shoot the heroin, this may be the last time i shoot up, jersey and the next big problem. and it was -- that was almost driving them to do that. over 250 classmates, teachers . and family members including congressman leonard lance joined think about a young person actually who is so addicted, in the ceremony. thanks for coordinating these who is so wrapped to a drug that really when they go to put community visits and view all it in their body knowing full the winning documentaries at well it could be the very last time they do anything and yet studentcam.org
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that was part of the reason >> we are live at the pentagon, they were doing it. that's just disturbing as we the defense department today look at this. releases its annual report to also, there's -- but there's congress on china's military. also many other things coming secretary ssistant out as we go through this. we have had constituents who were -- knowing what we were of defense for east asia. doing up here today, have the briefing should be getting looked to the pharmaceutical under way in a few moments. industry and found ideas out live here on c-span. there such as this one from a pharmaceutical company that's looking at abuse resistant opioids that don't have the same problems as we see in some of the others with oxycontin and some of the others out there. i think this is about proper management. i appreciate what mr. carter said from georgia on the dealing with this and finding that balance. i think when we have the study committee, especially on how doctors prescribe how pain medication is used, these are the things that get us to a point which we limit to the good uses that they may have but also preventing the addiction and preventative
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steps that's putting us in the situation we currently have. there are a lot of issues out there and that's why this rule is a good first step. it's something we move forward on. and in doing so i think we make a statement to the american people that we are looking to the problems that they're experiencing. we are addressing those needs and we're going to continue to do so. if there's any indication this was the last step, i think that's a misper accepts that's out -- misperception that's out there. this will continue in the appropriations process. this is a tool that we need and with that, mr. speaker, i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from colorado is recognized. mr. polis: mr. speaker, this package before us cannot be the final word. congress needs to approve funding to develop a comprehensive response to this epidemic and save lives. mr. speaker, if we defeat the previous question i'll offer an amendment to the rule to bring up legislation that in addition including all of the opioid bills passed this week, which i do support, will provide $600
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million in funding to address the opioid epidemic. >> good afternoon. mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to insert the text of i'm the deputy assistant the amendment immediately prior secretary of defense for east to the vote on the previous asia. discussion. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. polis: to discuss our today the department of defense proposal, i yield five minutes to the distinguished gentlewoman from new hampshire, submitted a report to congress ms. kuster. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized. involving the peoples republic of china. ms. kuster: thank you, mr. this report mandated by congress speaker, and i thank the gentleman from colorado for yielding. i also thank the representative is on china's strategy and from georgia, the chairman, for military and it is factual, your words. in new hampshire, actually right now we have a four times descriptive and annual it call. let the facts speak for greater chance of dying from a themselves. how china continues to invest in heroin or opioid overdose than military programs and weapons a car accident, as you've designed to improve power pointed out in national projection and operations in statistics. this morning i rise to say that emerging domains such as cyber i am proud of what the house has been able to accomplish space and the electromagnetic this week in a bipartisan way, spectrum. it is preparing for a potential working to address this critical challenge of substance use disorder that's devastating conflict in the taiwan sthrathe communities in my home state of
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and the east china seas and this new hampshire and all across the country. last year i had the honor to is important to the p.l.o. co-found with my colleague from new hampshire, mr. guinta, the growth even eing bipartisan task force to combat the heroin epidemic, to address as its growth decelerates. the critical problem that in march, it announced its heroin and opioid addiction are military budget will grow at bringing to every corner of my district and most parts of the 7.6% to $144 billion in 2015. country. the membership of the task force now includes 83 members, through 2006-2015, its military about half republicans and democrats who are dedicated to budget grew at an average of fighting this problem. last month we unveiled a 9.8% per year. legislative package of 15 bills to fight this epidemic and china's published military we're pleased that many of budget amid several categories these bills and provisions have expenditure such as r&d and been included in the package this week. to mark the start of opioid week, we held a special order procurement of equipment. on tuesday evening when over 20 in terms of total related members from both sides of the aisle came to the floor to spending for 2015 exceeded $180 share personal stories of friends and family who had been billion. affected by the heroin as a result of these epidemic. as part of this special order, investments, they continue to i told the story of carl, son make strides.
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for instance, china's military of a constituent and friend of parade last year, they vun veiled a missile, a system that mine, sue messager. carl at 24 years old, was is capable of precision strikes. working hard to become a dentist. you their modernization program he was a recent graduate, had good grades and had his eyes entered a new phase in 2015. i would like to highlight three set on applying to dental school but it turned out security developments. the first trend is china's unbeknownst to his family that carl had been using heroin. maritime activities. his was another face of in 2015, they use assorted addiction. when he finally spoke to his parents, they began the long tactics to assert its claims in journey with him to recovery. the south china sea claiming they were able to secure a real estate and instructing place in a detox program and military facilities. they then moved toward his they demonstrated a willingness to high tolerance. recovery. he was passing every drug test. he remained resolutely china's strategy is to secure committed to avoiding drugs and its objectives without alcohol and his family was jeopardizing its military overjoyed to see him get development which has maintain better. but when carl came down with an its grip on power. the second trend the growing upper respiratory infection a fatal error occurred. global presence. the leaders are leveraging the unaware of his recent country's power to expand its
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completion of detox, the doctor he saw for the upper international influence and military footprint. respiratory infection the most prominent example is prescribed a narcotic cough their expanding ambitions with suppressent. triggered by the could he doan the announcement that china is codone ough syrup, -- establishing a military facility in gentleman budey. this is a big step for them in the cough syrup, he could not resist the caving. hich never had an overseas he injected heroin and died that day of pure fentanyl. 50 times more powerful than facility. heroin in his own home. the president unveiled plans to there were no labels on the bottle that indicated that the enhance their ability to conduct cough medicine could trigger joint operations by replacing drug-seeking behavior. no way for carl or his mother with new geographic commands and or his parents to know that the cough medicine could pose a communist party's control by fatal danger. establishing new bodies to since his death, his mother, over's the military. sue, has spoken out about the the united states will seek need to reform labeling cooperation in managed requirements, and i am pleased competition with china in the to be a sponsor of position of strength while representative walberg's seeking the ways to reduce bipartisan bill seeking to ensure that medical professionals have pull misclailings. knowledge of a patient's as the united states builds a previous opioid addiction. relationship with china, we will
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sadly, that bill is not in the continue to monitor their package of bills this week and evolving strategy, doctrine and it's one among many that we force development. will need to address at a later we will continue to encourage china to be more transparent date. so i'm hopeful that i can about its military and continue to work with the chair of this committee and so many modernization program. our approach focusing on others on the other side of the aisle to bring forward bills reducing risk and maintaining such as this that will make a difference in people's lives. our military superiority. earlier this week, i introduced the d.o.d. and the p.l.a. the drug abuse crisis act that reached an understanding when will provide $600 million in critical funding to finally chuck hagel and the minister of defense signed two address this heroin epidemic. i want to close my remarks by talking about hope. confidence-building measures. the rules of behavior for safety so many of the bills that we've of air and maritime encounters passed will finally bring hope for recovery, for treatment, and the notification of major military activities. for long-term recovery to the in 2015, they spended on the families, to the users and to our communities. this legislation will build and m.o.u.'s with annexes. expand upon the work that we've these confidence-building done this week by dramatically measures are enhanced efforts to increasing resources for reduce risk and medication-assisted treatment, misunderstanding. funding competitive programs we have included these documents in this report.
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for law enforcement and for those hardest hit by this drug continue to make progress with crisis. the p.l.a. in developing the i'm opposing this rule before us today and the previous capacity to cooperate including question so that we can move to humanitarian assistance, consider my drug abuse crisis act. let's bring hope to our counterpiracy, search and rescue and military medicine. families and communities and in short, this report please oppose the previous question. thank you and i yield back my illustrates the complexities. time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. despite its capacity, this is the gentleman from georgia is recognized. mr. collins: thank you, mr. speaker. as i went through in my opening the military that china ties statement i mentioned a good many of the bills that were building. with that, i would be happy to part of the house package this week. i want to go back through a few take a few questions. more that we went through just reporter: i was wonder if you to let people know sort of the scope of what we've been doing. h.r. 4982, examining the opioid could bring us up to date on the treatment infrastructure act. infrastructure development -- it is a bill that requires the the report mentions that the comptroller general on the reclamation has been completed outpatient and in-patient treatment capacity and that was but in terms of the building of by mr. foster of illinois. air strikes, have they been we have h.r. 4599, reducing completed yet? and just on the defense spending
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unused medications act of 2016 from ms. clark from , as i understand it, figure massachusetts. 4586, lali's r. announced in march this year was actually a slowdown in growth law, doled from illinois. for the first time in some time. new e bill from lujan of do you expect that trend to continue? mexico. h.r. 3680, co-prescribing of the intentions -- overdoses act of 2016, sarbanes of pennsylvania. we have h.r. 1818, the veteran emergency medical technician support act of 2016 by mr. [indiscernible] >> i have to refer you to the kinzinger of illinois. chinese government and their again, as you see what we're doing here and why i believe overall objective. moving forward on this rule is we have seen them conduct important and going through and many times what we said -- look, these issues all address construction and reclamation and we have been watching this issue specific needs. they are all encompassing of very closely. we're aware of these issues and our body as a whole, all 435 of we see them as out of step with us. as i read here, these were mix the rest of the region to of both republican and democrat bills that have been passed on peacefully resolve these this floor this week. dispute.
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as we look ahead, it shows the in terms of where they go from here, what the next steps are i seriousness of what we're doing would have to refer you to here and the scope of what we're doing. chinese government. this is why this package needs reporter: the period of the report to today in terms of to be moved and into conference so we can continue to move where they are building, forward with these ideas and with the things that have been put before us this week. finishing airstrips. we can do that by making a the report mentioned three airstrips and says they are positive step and acknowledging being completed, but are they the good work that has gone on now complete? here and i appreciate all the >> the trends in terms of speakers today on both sides of the aisle that have come forward to talk about this construction have continued issue and talk about the real through the end of -- i don't problems that we see that are have anything specific for you right now. dealing really unfortunately in but the trends that we saw in 2015 in terms of military kitchens and living rooms across our country right now every day. this is something that so many construction have continued for people can relate to. a bit. with that i'll reserve the but in terms of number of balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from colorado is certain assets, i don't have recognized. mr. polis: mr. speaker, i yield anything specific for you. myself two minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. polis: mr. speaker, i rise reporter: china said that it is today to honor a constituent of actually the u.s. freedom of mine, mr. timothy gagan of navigation operation are nspiring it to bolster these breaken ridge, colorado.
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tim is retiring from 40 years of civil service. he served towns and cities islands and in general, do you across colorado, illinois, indiana. and recently received the colorado city and county anticipate that having some management association lifetime actual numbers out there about achievement award. during his tenure in colorado, what china is developing and tim was instrumental in working spending will be shaping future with various entities like the e.p.a., the u.s. army, colorado strategic dialogue? state health board and u.s. first, these operations are attorney general and two superfund sites. tim was influential in the formation and success of our highway 70 coalition, an nothing new. we have been conducting -- organization of governments freedom of navigation operations that work with the colorado department of transportation to around the world since the improve safety and reduce 1970's and have been operating congestion along our important according to the report, a lot highway 70, the main artery to our mountain communities. longer than that. he spearheaded a crucial land these operations are intended to exchange with the u.s. forest acknowledge and demonstrate that service that provided for much-needed work force housing that we were able to get a bill we dealt by excessive maritime passed here and signed into law to get done. claims and demonstrate our tim's steadfast focus on the commitment to uphold most important elements to our community are the people that international law and as the live and work in the area president has said and the resulted in the breaken ridge secretary has said, that we are under operate
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vision. tim's accomplishments are highlighted by two early learning centers, a scholarship international law. program that assists parents in there is nothing new in terms of the county and nearly 1,000 these operations. work force affordable housing why china is developing these units in the town with a population of 4,500. capabilities in the south china mr. speaker, it's with great sea, i think may come from a pride that i rise to pay wide variety of other factors tribute to mr. timothy j. gagan and i would have to refer you to their government but the fact we on behalf of the residents of have been doing these operations for decades suggest to me that the second congressional district. his contributions to the town those specific operations are of breaken ridge will be not the cause. remembered for years to come. i reserve the balance of my these issues -- so this is the time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from georgia is discussions that we have not recognized. mr. collins: i inquire of the specific to the upcoming chair how much time is left. dialogues but discussions we the speaker pro tempore: the have been having across the gentleman from georgia has 7 region for several years often 1/2 minutes. center around issues related to the gentleman from colorado has the south china sea. 10 minutes. and i think again, this is -- mr. collins: do you have another speaker? the reason we are talking about mr. polis: i'm prepared to close. these things is not because of mr. collins: ok. if you're prepared to close united states continuing to we'll be prepared to close as operate the way we always have well. the speaker pro tempore: the question is on -- -- rather bass of new things mr. polis: we haven't closed.
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i yield myself the balance of the time. i would argue things that china the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from colorado is recognized. has done in terms of reclamation and construction and mr. polis: mr. speaker, there have been harrowing tales told militarization and sort of here on the floor of the house behaviors. and there's no doubt that and that's what's driving addiction, opioid addiction is concerns around the region and a segment of that. that's what's new in driving it's a public health crisis in these discussions. this country that's hurting i can't predict what communities, hurting families, conversations may happen in upcoming dial ocean, but i can killing people. in 2012, enough prescriptions say in past dial ocean the south were written for opioids to china sea has been an issue of owl in this ngle discussion. reporter: you referred to china using coercive tactics. can you explain what that is and -- single person in this what are you referring to there? >> we talk about it in the country. there are four times as many report where we see china's prescriptions in the last year. we need to do something. it's a start today. forces using tactics such as it's not enough. it's not enough. unfortunately these rules block reclamation, at times some of out and prevent many creative and effective ideas from both their fishing vessels and coast sides of the aisle from coming
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to the floor and we also have guard acting unprofessional in the vicinity of military forces missed the opportunity to provide funding to address treatment and enforcement. or fishing vessels of other the fact that both parties in countries to establish a control brought bers have been around disputed features. it seems to us that these together to deal with this. every district is being activities are designed to stay affected. every member of this body has below the threshold of conflict, taken note. i and many of us know families but gradually demonstrate and and individuals whose lives assert claims that other have been devastated or ended countries dispute. prema turrill from the opioid >> for years this report has -- prematurely from the opioid crisis. it's crucial we approach the been seen as a benchmark between problem from every possible angle. support for providers, training china and taiwan's military for law enforcement, well-funded treatment centers, strength. china is spending 9% on or so. thoughtful policies for addicted parents, education for has taiwan kept the pace? our youth, innovative over the last decade it has been dispensing technologies, relatively flat where china has alternative pain management therapies. there are so many ideas to increased. what's your take? consider. . is the u.s. going to encourage
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the new regime in taiwan to this rule packages 18 bills that address part of the increase its defense spending? problem together. >> we have been monitoring the unfortunately, 16 of them don't allow amendments, and the two that do, many amendments were military bounds for a long time ruled out for lack of being germane. which is demonstrated by the given the rate of deaths for long history of these reports and we continue to monitor the prescription opioid abuse, we situation and we have encouraged should allow a full debate of amendments and ideas on the and we have encouraged taiwan to floor of the house to address continue to increase its defense this issue. yes, we are taking a first step spending and invest in today. but there's a lot more work to innovative capabilities and do to save lives and help concepts and focus on a similar met try because the the obvious families across our con. -- contry. we need to fund these programs and unavoidable and the sheer so they are not just words on a size and because of that, we wage. this is a very real issue, with believe that taiwan needs to real implications for american increase its spending but also families. and we owe it to american eds to make investments in families across the country for more open and thorough process assem metric capabilities that would account for that disparity to do more to combat the opioid and size. reporter: military financing scourge.
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i urge my colleagues to vote no from the united states or something like that? >> i'm not going to get into the on the previous question so we financing of these things that can bring forward ms. kuster's amendment, no on the underlying on its es spend funds rule, and yes on the underlying bills. i yield back the balance of my time. defense in accordance with the the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields. the gentleman from georgia is recognized. mr. collins: thank you, mr. act make articles necessary for speaker. just the other day i had the its own defense but we believe opportunity and speaking to a they need to spend more in order long-time friend and during the to maintain the ability to course of the conversation one of the conversations came up defend themselves. and there was some discussion >> for the last three, four about this issue, and there was years, the pentagon has a general discussion about what was going on up here and the anticipated that it would begin steps that were being taken. patrols. during this time my friend we anticipate by the end of the began to list and talk about year the nuclear submissions will start and haven't started lks close to him that either yet. can you give insight as to why they haven't started and more had addiction to prescription likely this year that they will pain medications or were j.l.-2 nuclear dealing with the aftereffects of that problem.
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missiles? >> i can't begin to speculate as -- with the after effects of to why this trend continues to that rob. this came out of nowhere and sustain over the years. basically said i had no idea. i can't definitively say they and yet within just a matter of a few weeks he had found out conducted a deterrence patrol when just his own sphere of yet or nor may i comment -- i influence that there were a number of people in his family think it's a good question to refer to them. and in his friendship them have not seen connection that were dealing with this abuse. that tells you that this is conduct with the specific something that a lot of times platform, not seen them conduct is hidden just below the a deterrence patrol. surface. but as to why, i can't unfortunately dealt with in very private, very concerning speculate. submariner and i can't ways, because so many times they are trapped in a cycle of addiction in which the addiction is found and then treated and comes back again. et into the specifics of it. and it expresses itself in many they haven't done it as best as different ways. as a pastor and as a chaplain, we can tell and what is going on i have dealt with these issues before. underneath this issue. there is nothing more
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heartbreaking to see someone who wants to break free from an addiction and the abuse they reporter: how significant will it be for the region in terms of are perpetrating on their own body and see progress made and chinese capability? then get a call or not see them >> i can't get into hypotheticals like that. for a week or two. then find out that they have reporter: i want to talk about the budget and $180 billion fell back into their old pattern, or they have, which is a much higher number. unfortunately, found a new addiction that has taken over. and then this year they but when we come to the floor $135osed a budget of about of the house and we have spoken this week, and 1, and the promise of the senate bill and billion. i'm wondering how do you view conference committee going forward, it is saying that we have heard these sometimes that number in actuality and silent screams. these sometimes silent tears. righters and other outlets has of those who may not know how to deal with it but they are said it is a decline in spending looking for ways. we have heard the anguish of but that doesn't include areas law enforcement officers and that you mentioned before. first responders who come to the scene, and if they have the is that a decline and where do proper medication, they have you see the number this year? the proper treatments, they can >> said decline in growth that reverse some these disastrous effects. has beenme, the budget and now we are making sure that we can get that to them. we can get to better ways of been raised to roughly 9.6 per helping them do their job.
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we are looking at ways at year and this year it was seven looking at the task force so we can look at how we prescribe something percent. in terms of their annual and treat pain and these things in people's lives that are official announcements. chronic and ongoing. and in terms of why -- i how do we treat them better so that we don't have to deal with couldn't speculate. it's a good question for them. this addiction side and we don't have to deal with but what we see this possible after effects of that. we have to also look at our contributing to or resulting in ways on how we deal with folks an increasingly capable who are addictioned -- addicted and how we deal with them in fighting force across all treatment. not only from a veteran domains of combat capability. perspective, son or daughter we have seen them as documented perspective, mom or dad, or in this series of reports making even the grandparent perspective. how do we do that? significant investments in how do we do it effectively? military capabilities and we see how do we make sure that what them now reaping the benefits of we are doing is not only when we get to our spending and those investments with appropriations and make sure these appropriations are going increasingly capable and modern out that they are done so in proper ways. systems. reporter: number for 2016 that is the function of the republican majority and that's include areas that you say -- why we are bringing this forward today as we are is to >> let me what i find -- it's in make a difference in the lives of people, but do so in a way the report, i looked at it that is constructive. before i came up. and ongoing.
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i believe our estimate was that as we have heard today and over-e over the course of the it exceeded $180 billion in week, the opioid epidemic is out of control. but we have an opportunity to 2015. in 2016, we haven't made that start addressing the problem. the rule provide for consideration of legislation that will enact measures to estimate yet and i think -- address this problem through multiple avenues to ensure we are taking a comprehensive every report as far as i recall is about the year previous. approach to stopping this scourge. it takes important steps to so i don't have an update in address serious ongoing threat of opioid abuse. terms of what we think they are it keeps a prom that we won't spending in 2016. reporter: what david had asked sit idly by while people continue to battle addiction before about the building. and die. for that reason i would urge my colleagues to support this to t -- the report seemed rule. the comprehensive addiction and recovery act and the motion to go to conference on the house u.s. has - what you passed amendment in the nature of a subs two. this is something that we can do. this is a very positive. seen over the past year in the in a week which for the most part we have come to the floor growth and changes there and in to hear bipartisan unitity in acreage as well as your saying we will act. do not let this day go by assessment of the increase in either the number or scope of because we may not have got everything that everybody facilities. e report doesn't get into an wanted. it's the time to vote yes on
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the previous yes. it's a time to vet yes on the assessment of the scope. >> in terms of specifics and rule. and it's a time to vote yes to acreage, i have to get back to move forward so we can conference with the senate and you. i don't have the number in front put together a product that can of me. but i can say that we have seen make not only this body proud but make the american people know that we have heard their that china continues to conduct reclamation as well as voice. we agonize with them, many of us who have felt it first hand construction. but i don't have anything more specific than that with me but i and in doing so we are doing can get more information to you. the people's business. with that, mr. speaker, i yield reporter: as far as the scrap back the balance of my time. and move the previous question. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields. meets, can you give any sort of the question is on ordering the estimate of scope of iran take previous question on the in the facilities? resolution. so many as are in favor say aye. >> the report doesn't comment on those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, specific military systems, the ayes have it. although we're aware of reports mr. polis: on that i request the yeas and nays. the speaker pro tempore: the of artillery and other systems. yeas and nays are requested. i encourage you to look at the those favoring a voting by the report. reporter: is there any way you yeas and nays will rise. can verbally say they tripled or a sufficient number having arisen, the yeas and nays are ordered. quadrupled or tens to hundreds, the members will record their otes by electronic device t -- do you have a numerical
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device. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20 assessment? >> i don't have the specific -- pursuant to clause 8 and numbers or specific systems for clause 9 of rule 20, this is a you right now. 15-minute vote on ordering the previous question. reporter: on page 57, your [captioning made possible by the national captioning is an says nuclear force institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the additional driver. u.s. house of representatives.] the speaker pro tempore: it will be followed by five-minute don't you think they are vote on adopting the resolution, if ordered, and agree to the speaker's approval on general. pressured by u.s. rather than this is a 15-minute vote. india? >> i couldn't speculate what weighs greater in the minds of the military planners. if you look at the report it refers to that specific section refers to the united states than russia and then india. but i would refer -- in terms of giving an answer in terms of what drives chinese thinking on these issues, i have to refer you to their government. this is our best understanding best on their statements and writings of military scholars.
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reporter: the chinese submitting activities in the indian ocean have increased and reports about u.s. and india to monitor those activities. to what extent the typical indian ocean and the economic trade and u.s. planning to do to monitor. >> we do in the report detail how china's interests are getting more global as their economy expands, as the economy grows more sophisticated and their interests are growing more global which is a primary driver or instance in the facility of jabudi and it's possible they
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are operating in new areas. that assessment does not include a value statement of the intentions behind these actions or effects of these actions. secretary carter visited india and had a positive and productive visit and we will continue to earn hans our bilateral engagement with india, not in the china context but because india is an important player by themselves. and we are going to engage india. >> and finally the last question, there was news eport in the china report that indiscernible] . o what extent would increase tension with china and india and their dispute that china has
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with other neighboring countries like india? >> the territorial dispute between china and india is long standing and something that continues to fester over the years and as the report details, by ve noticed an increase the chinese military in areas close to the border with india. but it's difficult to say how much of this is driven by internal considerations to maintain internal stability. so i don't have a good way to break those things out for you. big called the jabudi a step forward. and whether or not the united states government expects facilities like that to pop up in the coming years? >> the united states has been
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operating around the world for decades and it's a -- our bases around the world are a critical component of our global capabilities, our posture and enable us to fulfill our global responsibilities. what china has announced is we see is different than a traditional u.s.-style base but a facility that would facilitate logistical support far from the chinese mainland. i couldn't speculate in terms of what may come. i think it's possible considering as i mentioned before, the global interests that china has. and it was an issue as you saw in the report that we're noticing that we'll continue to monitor. reporter: there is a point made that the development of china's
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military could reduce the u.s.' technological superiority. and what would you say is the biggest vulnerability that the u.s. faces on that front? is there a number one area or series of areas where in your assessment the u.s. faces a risk of losing superiority in the long-term? >> i'm not going to focus on u.s. capabilities and vulnerabilities. so what i would say is that we have been watching its military being modernized as documented by these reports. and as we have said before, we are going to continue to make these investments and posture decisions necessary to maintain our military capabilities so we can continue to defend ourselves, defend our allies and our interests.
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reporter: i had a question, took my first question and my other question was -- in the report you mentioned the way and in your opening remarks, you mentioned an aggressive style that is designed to stay below a threshold of conflict. in the report it mentions that and certain activities in the south china sea and the east china sea and you said you are going to monitor for changes in doctrine. what changes in doctrine are you concerned about or particularly watchful of in those areas in rms of how the chinese paramilitary forces with u.s. vessels on patrols or partnered in allied vessels? >> i can't call out a specific area.
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what i mentioned and referred to and in the back of these reports is confidence-building measures that we have signed recently that detail how our naval and interact with one another. military-to-military operation is to reduce risk and as our operations operate, we see it is very important rules of behavior o ensure misunderstandings and miscalculations are minimized and the risk of an unintentional incident is reduced as much as possible. reporter: is that interaction, is that effort yielding more positive results or trending more positively or seeing increased concerns that those kind of -- any sort of rules of behavior are becoming further away?
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>> we have seen a positive trend in terms of professional interactions between our two forces and we do think these are important avenues to pursue. areas that we will continue to pursue with them in the military-to-military relationship. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2016] [captioning performed by the national captioning institute, which is responsible for its caption content and accuracy. visit ncicap.org] >> president obama will host leaders from norway, sweden, as part of a in orderic leaders summit. he's hosting a dinner for
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the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the yeas are 229. nd the --
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the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the yeas are 232. he nays are 172. the previous question is ordered. those in favor say aye. the question is on adoption of the resolution.
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those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it. mr. polis: mr. speaker, on that i request a recorded vote. the speaker pro tempore: a recorded vote is requested. those in favor of a recorded vote will rise. a sufficient number having arisen, a recorded vote is ordered. members will record their votes by electronic device. this is a five-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the speaker pro tempore: on his vote --
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the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the yeas are 240. the nays are 165. the resolution is adopted. without objection the motion to reconsider is laid upon the table.
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le pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, the unfinished business is the question on agreeing to the speaker's approval of the journal on which the yeas and nays were ordered. the question is on agreeing to the speaker's approval of the journal. members will record their votes by electronic device. this is a five-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the speaker pro tempore: the nays are 160. there are two voting present. the journal stands approved. the house will be in order. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from indiana seek recognition? mrs. walorski: pursuant to house resolution -- >> i call up s. 524 and ask for its immediate consideration in the house. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the the title of the bill. the clerk: senate 524, an act to authorize the attorney general to award grants to address the national epidemics of prescription opioid abuse and heroin use.
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the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to house resolution 725 an amendment in the nature of a substitute described in the first section of that resolution is adopted and the bill as amended is considered as read. the bill shall be debatable for one hour equally divided long and controlled by the chair and ranking minority member of the committee on energy and commerce and the chair and ranking minority member of the committee on judiciary. the gentlewoman from indiana, mrs. brooks, the gentleman from new jersey, mr. pallone, the gentleman from virginia, mr. goodlatte, and the gentleman from michigan, mr. conyers, each will control 15 minutes. . the house will be in order. the house will be in order. members will please remove their conversations from the house floor. he house will be in order. he house will be in order.
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the chair recognizes the gentlewoman from indiana, mrs. brooks. mrs. brooks: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and and insert remarks extraneous material on s. 524. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mrs. brooks: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the house will be in order. the gentlewoman from indiana is recognized. mrs. brooks: thank you, mr. speaker. this week in congress we passed 18 bills to address the heroin and opioid crisis that is impacting every community in this country. i'm thankful that my bill, h.r. 4641, which i worked on with representative kennedy of massachusetts, this bill will ensure that health care professionals have access to up-to-date guidelines and best
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practices for treating patients with acute and chronic pain. many of these proposals we considered this week enjoyed nearly unanimous support, and i can't express to you how refreshing it was to work with all of my colleagues on meaningful solutions to this public health crisis. as we learned from the multitude of members this week that shared their stories on the house floor, we're facing a public health crisis that crosses every socioeconomic, every jen graphic, generational and ethnic boundary. it's a rural, urban and suburban problem. it reaches into our schools, our places of work, our hospitals. it's tearing apart and devastating families and people's lives. however, in the midst of this crisis, as with many past crises faced by our nation, we as members of congress have set aside our political differences and have crafted a package of thoughtful reforms that will support our communities ravaged by this scourge. i'm proud of the work done by
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the energy and commerce committee and the strong bipartisan leadership by chairman upton and pitts and ranking members pallone and green. we cannot overlook the hard work and countless hours spent by both the majority and the minority committees staff on this effort, and i want to thank them for their hard work. members of the energy and commerce committee have pursued answers to this epidemic through roundtables, meetings with individuals and families on the front lines of this crisis, health workers, first responders and community leaders seeking to guide their communities through this crisis. we as members have visited neonatal intensive care units in hospitals to see firsthand the devastating effects of infants born addicted to opioids and who must already fight for survival through their withdrawal in their very few days of life. we met with juvenile court judges, social workers whose caseloads have doubled over the past few years as more and more children are being removed from their parent's care but a their
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parents are more concerned about where to find their next high than the welfare of their child and it's no longer safe for them to remain in their homes. it's important to note that it's national police week this week, and it's our first responders who so many of us talked to. those we heard from in indiana who keep naloxone in their police cruisers but a they're seeing this unprecedented increase in drug overdoses and they're saving lives each and every day. in a minute my colleague from the judiciary committee will highlight all of the great work that their committee has also done to fight this scourge, but i'd like to take a moment to highlight the bills rolled into this legislation that my colleagues from the energy and ommerce committee have painstakingly crafted. e bill would require the f.d.a. to work with expert advisory committees before making opioid approval and labeling decisions. develop recommendations
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requiring for prescriber education programs that address extended release and long-acting opioids and develop generic opioids with abuse deterrent practices. representative pallone led the co-prescribing to reduce overdoses act which would establish a grant program for co-prescribing of opioid reversal drugs for patients who are at a high risk of overdose. representative evan jenkins and bill hers crafted the for treatment for babies with neonatal abstinence syndrome and fixes an unintended consequence within the medicaid drug rebate program that discourages drug manufacturers from producing opioids that are harder to abuse. representative lujan help to provide grants for state substance abuse agencies to have delivery models for pregnant mod whols have a substance abuse disorder such as opioid addiction. representative kinzinger veteran emergency medical
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technician support act will improve the quality of care within our communities by providing grants to states with emergency medical technician shortages so as to help streamline state requirements for our veterans to enter the e.m.t. work force without there being unnecessary dupe policecation of their training. representatives meehan, kind and veasey led the legislation directing the c.d.c. to study what information and resources are available to youth athletes and their families regarding the dangers of opioid use. lali's law, authored by representative dolled and representative kathryn clark, would create a competitive grant program to increase access of reversal overdose medications to save lives. he bill clarifies when scheduled 2 controlled substance, including opioid pain medications can be partially filled. representatives foster and pallone spearheaded the examining opioid treatment act which requires the g.a.o. to
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collect the data necessary to assess the opioid infrastructure in our country, looking at the numbers of hospital beds and treatment facilities. and finally, my hoosier colleague, representative bucshon, along with representative tonko championed the bill that will have treatment capacity substantially by providering all while ensuring the care that individuals receive is high quality and minimizes the risk of diversion. each approach that i just set out has been a reflection of much effort put into crafting these bipartisan, thoughtful and a comprehensive package to ive each of our communities, families and individuals with addiction the need. thank you and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves the balance of her time. the chair will receive a message. the messenger: mr. speaker, a message from the senate. the secretary: i have been directed that the senate agreed to the amendment of the house to s. 1523, cited as the
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federal water pollution control act. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i yield two minutes now to the gentleman from new york, plengle. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new york is recognized for two minutes. mr. engel: i thank the gentleman for yielding to me. mr. speaker, my heart goes out to the thousands of american families affected by the opioid epidemic. i am pleased the house has worked in a bipartisan manner to address this crisis. however, we could be doing more . the prescription opioid death rate has more than quat rupeled since the late -- quadrupled since the late 1990's. prescription opioids played a role in more than 28,000 overdose deaths. we must equip our communities with the resources needed to reverse these trends. yes, authorizing new grant programs, reports and studies is an important step, but without new funding communities won't be able to fully implement these initiatives.
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on wednesday, the majority blocked a democratic substitute opioids package which would have provided $600 million paid for, i might add, to fund the initiatives we have considered this week. i understand the need to get our fiscal house in order, but i don't understand the impulse to do so on the backs of millions of americans grappling with opioid abuse. these bills are great and i upport them but we need to put money where our mouths is. it's touched my hometown in new york city to the shores of the pacific. so many hearns l americans have already felt this impact. we need to do everything we can to keep it from impacting more of our families, our friends, our constituents. we're on the right path, but, again, without money this becomes irrelevant. we need to make sure that we have adequate funding so what we all want to do on both sides of the aisle can become a reality. thank you and i yield back.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new york yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from new jersey reserves. the gentlewoman from indiana is recognized. mrs. brooks: i yield two minutes to the gentleman from michigan. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan is recognized for two minutes. mr. walberg: thank you, mr. speaker. it's past time -- >> it's past time to give our health care providers the tools they need to confront the growing epidemic of opioid abuse in our country. this is an emergency. as a doctor who has treated patients in northern michigan for over 0 years, both in private practice and in the v.a. system, i know how urgent the need for immediate action is. mr. benishek: the amendment to the comprehensive addiction and recovery act that we are considering today will be a giant step forward in how we provide treatment and care for those suffering from opioid addiction. the bill will also improve the quality of care available tower nation's veterans. the rate of abuse for -- available to our nation's veterans. the rate of buice is significantly higher in our
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veteran population than the general population and this problem is only continuing to grow. we have an opportunity today to take a first step in fixing a major national problem and pass meaningful legislation that will help save the lives of thousands and thousands of americans. i urge my colleagues to support this legislation and continue working together on bipartisan solutions for our nation's growing epidemic of substance abuse. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan yields back the balance of his time. the gentlewoman from indiana reserves. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. pallone: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield two minutes now to the gentleman from new york, mr. tonko. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new york is recognized for two minutes. mr. tonko: thank you, mr. speaker. this week we've seen a number of well-intentioned bills come to the floor with good ideas on how we can address the nation's opioid epidemic that is sweeping our entire country. i was proud to lead one of those efforts with my good friend, representative bucshon, with a bill that endeavors to
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lift the cap on the number of patients a provider may treat ith a prescription while giving it to nurses and nurse practitioners. this is a good bill and would help individuals facing months long waiting lists for effective treatment. like the gentleman i met last week while touring an addiction clinic. he struggled for addiction for decades. after making the decision to try to get clean was faced with seven-month and a waiting list. unfortunately, when this bill came to the floor, we were told the cap language had to be temporarily replaced with placeholder, sense of congress language until we go to conference because our bill was going to cost too much. now, when we talk about the cost of this bill, what we are really talking about is the fact that more people will have access to effective treatment
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and more lives will be saved. it is an unfortunate truth that in the distorted budgetary terms of washington, dead people cost less than the living. so we can talk all we want. we can pass all the bills we want, but unless we put our money where our mouth is, we will be simply be peddling false hope. we will be condemning more of our brothers and sisters to the death spiral of addiction when we could have done something to help. a sense of congress won't end months' long waiting lists for effective treatment. a sense of congress won't get life-saving reversal drugs out to first responders. if this congress has any sense as we move into conference committee, we will support this epidemic with the robust resources this country deserves for a real and meaningful response. with that, mr. speaker, i thank you and yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new york yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from new jersey reserves. the gentlewoman from indiana is recognized. mrs. brooks: mr. speaker, i reserve my time.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from indiana reserves. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. pallone pallone i yield now two minutes to the gentlewoman from california, ms. matsui. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from california is recognized for two minutes. ms. matsui: thank you, mr. speaker. the opioid and heroin crisis has hit home for everyone. impacting our co-workers, neighbors and our friends in every corner of this country. in sacramento, my district, the deadly consequences of fentanyl are devastating our families. the faces behind the tragedy are people like 28-year-old jerome butler, a young father whose life was cut short because of a tainted pill. the human toll of this crisis demands our leadership. this week we took a step forward by passing a number of bipartisan bills to address the opioid epidemic, many of which we worked on in the energy and commerce committee, but we can and we must do more. we need new funding to confront
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this tragedy. my democratic colleagues are -- and i are ready to fund the president's $1.1 billion request for this crisis. we need a real investment to meet the challenges our communities are facing every day. as we advance substance abuse legislation and continue our important work on comprehensive behavioral health reform, i urge my colleagues to focus on solutions that both adequately address the immediate crisis and long-term community prevention strategies. the families reeling from the tragedies of this epidemic deserve nothing less than our swift action and full support. thank you, mr. speaker. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from california yields back the balance of her time. the gentleman from new jersey reserves. the gentlewoman from indiana is recognized. mrs. brooks: mr. speaker, i reserve my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from indiana reserves. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. pallone: i rise this more to speak in favor of house
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amendment to s. 524. over the last two days of floor gate we have heard heartfelt speeches from members of congress about how the opioid epidemic is affecting their constituents and for some their own families. we have heard from both democrats and republicans, members from urban districts, suburban districts, and rural districts, as well as members from every region of the united states. what's clear is that no community has been immune to this crisis, including communities in my home state of new jersey. about 256,000 new jersey residents are addicted to heroin and prescription opioids. that's nearly the same as the entire population of newark, the largest city in new jersey. so this is a serious crisis that demands an urgent response. a comprehensive solution to the crisis will require real dollars and must take an approach that targets the full spectrum of addiction, that is prevention, crisis response, expanding access to treatment, and providing support for lifelong recovery. the approach must be guided by science and cannot be deterred
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because of stigma or misperceptions about proven treatment and intervention strategies. i'm pleased to support the package of opioid legislation that we are considering today because it takes steps towards that approach. this bill incorporates proven public health approaches to fight against the heroin and prescription drug abuse crisis. it improves the tools available to prescribers to prevent opioid abuse and the development of opioid use disorder. expands access to lifesaving in a laxon, an open yoit overdose reversal drug to respond to those in an acute crisis. it expands access to evidence-based treatments that help individuals with opioid use disorders and recovery. however, i want to make clear that we must go further to ensure the skill of our response is proportionate to the burden of the crisis. we not overwhelm need to support individuals' entry into recovery, we need to ensure we provide access to the supports and service that is lead to lifelong recovery, and we must
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lso further expand access to medication assistance treatment for opioid use disorders. currently we do not have adequate treatment capacity to respond to the unprecedented demand for treatment and that's why we need to expand upon the opioid use disorder treatment expansion and modernization act to significantly increase the physician tients a can treat with this medication. and allowing nurse practitioners and physician assistants to treat patients with this medication. in the committee democrats voted to raise the cap to 500 patients for qualifying physicians with appropriate credentials. additionally, committee democrats and republicans voted unanimously to permanently allow nurse practitioners and physician assistants to treat patients with it. i'm committed to working with my colleagues to ensure we list the arbitrary and harmful treatment cap and ensure nurse
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practitioners and physician assistants in every community can permanently use their skills and experience to serve those in need of opioid use disorder treatments in their community. finally, mr. speaker, i want to be clear that we should not be under the illusion that we can adequately respond to this crisis without providing urgently needed resources. and waiting on the appropriation process isn't suitable. our states and communities urgenly -- urgently need money now. we should not be forced to cut other discretionary funded health programs to provide resources to substance abuse programs of the the discretionary funding caps have already left many of our vital public health programs underfunded, forcing additional cuts to those programs in order to provide funding to respond to the opioid epidemic. and it will limit our ability to adequately respond to the crisis as well as to meet the remaining public health needs of our communities. we don't have to guess how it turns out if we fail to provide the urgent robust funding that is desperately needed. and sadly the evidence is already staring us in the face that it will be more lives lost
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to the epidemic. it will be thousands more americans who will continue to be left behind to battle without treatment and recovery support services they need. so we are losing now, we estimate, 78 americans each day and we can't afford anything less than a comprehensive well funded federal response. i urge my colleagues to vote yes to this legislation because i believe it takes important steps to turning the tide in this crisis that is taking the lives of 78 americans every day. but i also urge my colleagues to support providing the financial resources and additional tools necessary to meet the burden of this crisis. with that i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new jersey reserves the balance of his time. the gentlewoman from indiana is recognized. mrs. brooks: mr. speaker, i'm prepared to close. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from indiana is prepared to close. the gentleman from new jersey. mr. pallone: i have no additional speakers at this time. so i would just urge support for this package. once again stress that we are not providing enough funding. as much as i believe that this package is very important and i
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certainly would agree with my colleague on the republican side how important it is, but we are not providing enough resources. i hope that when we go to conference and before this bill goes to the president, this package goes to the president that we can provide the additional resources. with that i urge everyone to support the bill. yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentlewoman from indiana is recognized. mrs. brooks: thank you, mr. speaker. in closing, i would like to emphasize that as my colleague, the ranking member from new jersey, indicated, we have made real strides this week in turning back the epidemic, but we agree it's not enough. and it's not over. this fight is not going to be over. there is still more to be done. but i do hope that this week's productivity will lead to more weeks where we can continue to engage in the healthy and robust debate about the issues that matter. this week has proven we are stronger as a body when we focus on the things that unite us and bring us together.
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sadly it shouldn't take a epidemic or national crisis to bring us together. this week has taught us that with enough will and dedication we can get to yes. the conference committee wishes this bill will initiate will need similar forward to come to a resolution on the differences we have with the senate. that accomplishment is within our grasp. we have come too far to turn back now and let this -- rather than let this issue languish. that's why i urge my colleagues to vote in favor of this bill, support the motion to go to conference, and beyond the 78 americans who are dying every day. we have 1.9 million americans addicted to or abusing prescription opioid-based painkillers across the contry. and we -- because of their lives, their families' lives we must pass this bill. thank you. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the the gentlewoman from indiana jackson lee yields back the balance of her time -- the
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gentlewoman fromin yields back the balance of her time. all time for debate for energy nd commerce has expired. the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. goodlatte: mr. chairman, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. goodlatte: it has been quite a week. this week the house has passed 18 bills designed to address various facets of america's opioid epidemic. most recently yesterday the ouse passed by an overwhelming 413-5 vote the judiciary committee's flagship bill, h.r. 5046, authored by crime subcommittee chairman jim sensenbrenner. creates a comprehensive justice department grant program to
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provide states with the resources needed to fight opioid addiction. it authorizes $103 million a year for five years for the grant program. it allocates precious resources responsibly by leveraging and streamlining existing programs and fully offsetting the legislation in compliance with the house's cut-go protocol. in addition to that bill, the house passed four other judiciary committee bills this week to address drug abuse and protect american people. h.r. 5052, the open act, increases the transparency and accountability of the comprehensive opioid abuse grant program in h.r. 5046, by requiring grantees to report on the use of grant funds and requiring a publicly available analysis of whether the grants have achieved their intended purposes. h.r. 4985, the kingpin designation improvement act, protects classified information from disclosure when a drug kingpin challenges his
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designation as such in a federal court. h.r. 5048, the good samaritan assessment act, requires the g.a.o. to study state and local good samaritan laws that protect caregivers, law enforcement personnel, and first responders who administer opioid overdose reversal drugs or devices from criminal or civil liability, as well as those who contact emergency service providers in response to an overdose. finally, s. 32, the transnational drug trafficking act, improves law enforcement's ability to pursue international drug manufacturers, brokers, and distributors in source nations. i am pleased that the house took up the senate version of this bill. as a result, that legislation is on its way to the president's desk to be signed into law so federal prosecutors can begin using that tool to pursue foreign drug traffickers. along with the excellent legislation prepared by our sister committees spearheaded by chairman upton, chairman miller, and chairman kline,
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four of the judiciary committee bills will be included in the house amendment to s. 524, the senate's competitive addiction and recovery act. as a package these bills make substantial policy changes at the federal agencies responsible for fighting addiction. they take real steps to address the opioid epidemic and provide real relief to a real problem affecting real americans. members of this body should be proud of these accomplishments. in addition to the committee chairman, i mentioned, i also want to thank chairman harold rogers who spoke in support of r. 5046 yesterday and is a strong ally in the fight against elicit opioid abuse. i have no doubt he will make every effort during this congress to provide the funding authorized by the bulls that have passed the house this week. mr. chairman, i look forward to sending this legislation back to the senate and moving to -- erence exirblely
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expeditiously. there is bicameral support for these efforts. i thank my colleague for their support and hard work and i urge everyone to support the house amendments to s. 524. i thank my colleague, the ranking member of the committee, mr. conyers, for his hard work on this as well. this truly is a bipartisan effort. i commend all to support this motion to go to conference. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from virginia reserves his time. the gentleman from michigan. mr. conyers: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. conyers: members of the house, i rise in support of the house amendment s. 24, the competitive -- comprehensive addiction and recovery act. before starting out on the merits of the legislation, i wish to commend the judiciary committee chairman, mr.
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goodlatte, for chairing our five committee bill judiciary to house passage. i also commend the subcommittee chairman, mr. sensenbrenner of wisconsin, for authoring the legislation that is largely responsible for bringing us together today. but i also recognize the leadership of the crime subcommittee ranking member, sheila jackson lee of texas, who, as an original co-sponsor of the primary judiciary committee bill, and who's helped us find common ground in addressing the issue of drug addiction and treatment. this week the house considered and passed a wide range of bills aiming at combating the devastating impact of drug abuse and addiction that is afflicting communities all across our nation.
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we must take this action because our nation is in the midst of a major public health crisis caused by a epidemic of prescription and opioid abuse. it is a crisis that affects americans of all ages, of all races, of all income levels. it has devastated communities across the united states. it affects families, the workplace, and also our nation's economy. and drug overdoses are now the leading cause of injury related death in our nation. in my state of michigan, for example, there were 1,745 drug overdose deaths in 2014. and more than half of those overdose deaths were attributed
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to opioids and heroin. in fact, 78 americans die from an opioid overdose every single day. so without question this is a crisis that cries out for immediate relief. fortunately there may be effective solutions. for example, several states have undertaken various innovative measures to better respond to the rapid increase of individuals addicted to prescription opioids and heroin, and to prevent individuals from dying as a result of drug overdose. as i mentioned only yesterday during debate with respect to 5046, sideration of h.r. which has been incorporated into the house amendment to s. 524,
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this measure would fund new, innovative ways to address opioid de epidemic of drug abuse addiction. this -- these innovations include, for instance, the law enforcement assistance diversion approach. which has been utilized with great success in two cities that i know about, in seattle and in santa fe. programs such as this diversion approach underscore the fact that we cannot arrest our way out of opioid abuse addiction. treating addicts as criminals only makes matters worse for them and also for the rest of us too. the diversion approach, which reduces, by the way, resid vism
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by 60% is just one example of innovation at the state and local level that we must encourage through increased funding assistance. and it's more evidence that treatment alternatives to incarceration work. the funding authorization under this measure would establish a competitive grant program to provide funds to state and local governments, to continue and improve their efforts to protect americans from the dangers of opioid and heroin abuse. and it will help ensure that addicts have access to the services that are provided. these funds would support such initiatives as providing treatment alternatives to
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incarceration, fostering better collaboration between state criminal justice agencies and state abuse systems. and substance abuse systems. providing first responders with the ability to purchase in a lox in a locko receive -- sewn and to receive -- naloxono and receive training on how to administer this life-saving drug. important medication assistance programs by criminal justice agency. in addition, investigating more of the illegal distribution methods of opioids. treating prescription drug monitoring programs and addressing juvenile opioid abuse which is unfortunately increasing. and establishing comprehensive
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pioid abuse response programs. the house amendment to s. 524 also includes a number of important provisions added pursuant to a series of amendments passed by the house only yesterday. in some -- in sum, these additional provisions expand the range of allowed purpose areas under the new program to more fully address the range of problems and solutions presented by opioid abuse. whether we provide separate new grant programs for each of these approaches or whether we consolidate them into one grant program, it is critical that we change our ways of addressing addiction. the scourge of drug abuse and its overwhelming impact on our
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communities requires us to address this problem, not only immediately but effectively. i thank all of the committees and individuals that have participated in this effort and o accordingly, i support house amendment to s. 524 and reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. goodlatte: we do not have any speakers remaining, we're prepared to close. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from virginia reserves. the gentleman from michigan is ecognized. mr. conyers: i yield myself such time as i may consume. we were hoping we would have at least one amendment but we don't
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have the member here to present it, and so i will close by saying, i support house amendment s. 524 because it will help address our nation's crisis of opioid and heroin abuse. my support for this legislation is based in part on the fact , at it includes h.r. 5046 legislation that i have worked on with my colleagues on both sides of the aisle that would provide critical grants to states and local governments intended to prevent and treat opioid abuse addiction. most importantly, i support this legislation because it would help save lives. provides dment to 524
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a comprehensive approach to the opioid substance abuse public health emergency that is currently ravaging our nation, and accordingly, i urge my colleagues to support this measure and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman -- mr. conyers: wait a minute. mr. speaker -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. conyers: i would like now to yield to the gentlelady from texas, who has entered the chamber and is prepared to submit her amendment. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from texas is recognized. for how long? mr. conyers: as much time -- for the balance of the time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized. ms. jackson lee: i thank mr.
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goodlatte and mr. conyers and the judiciary committee and mr. sensenbrenner who mentioned yesterday that he has been working on this for two years. and we have joined him as original co-sponsors in supporting this on the crime subcommittee which i am ranking, along with mr. sensenbrenner, and this is a moment that all of us are appreciative of. as i thought about this week where we are honoring police and we are also acknowledging those who have fallen in the line of duty, this bill, the comprehensive addiction and recovery act, becomes even more important. this week the house adopted a number of bills that together are intended to provide a response to the opioid crisis that is commensurate with the scope of the problem. yesterday, the house passed by an overwhelming vote the primary contribution of the judiciary committee to this effort, h.r. 5046, the comprehensive opioid
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act. i'm an original co-sponsor of this that bill and the other bill introduced by mr. sensenbrenner. i commend him for the years work and persistence on this issue and i commend chairman goodlatte and ranking member conyers for their leadership for it would not have been shepherded through committee if we had not all worked together to find common ground on this important issue. that's been the trend as we work on justice reform, provocative, innovative bills that will change the lives of many of those incarcerated for many, many years. we're going to turn mass incarceration upside down and on its ears and cause it to be extinct. this new approach to opioids is part of that. this bill has no mandatory minimums. as we take the steps today which will allow us to engage in discussions with the senate so we may soon end -- send a bill to the president for his signature, i'm pleased with the
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progress that is made. i can only hope that you are owork on sentencing reduction, prison reform and juvenile justice will have the same kind of impetus and wind up on the president's desk. that's the vision, i believe, of many republicans and democrats in and out of this house and as well it is the vision of the president but more importantly it is the vision of suffering families who do not have their loved ones with them. the reason we must work together is that a leading killer of americans today is drug overdose, started first by prescription use in many instances. between 2014 -- in 2014 almost half a million people died of drug overdoses. in 2014 alone, more than 27,000 people died of drug overdoses. the largest percentage of overdose deaths in 2014 was attributed to opioids like prescription painkillers, methadone,more phone and heroin. specifically -- morphine and heroin. specifically, 26,000 died
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because of opioid in 2014. this is an emergency and it is a combination of prescription painkillers and heroin. prescription painkiller abuse is the strongest risk for future levels of use of heroin. that's athletes or those who have had surgery, everyday americans who find themselves caught in the trap of addiction. approximately three out of four new heroin users report their use began with abuse of prescription drugs. heroin use becomes appealing to those addicted to prescription drugs because it's cheaper and easier to obtain. due to its po tency, it heroin use tends to lead to addiction. we know that from the 1980's and 1990's from crack cocaine, crack was a more potent extraction of cocaine and we saw many of those individuals not get treatment, they actually, and only got, incarceration. heroin addiction is often deadly, just as crack cocaine was. leading to overdose or other chronic diseases. the rate at which the occurrence of heroin overdose deaths
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increase is cause for alarm. in the four years between 010 and 2014, heroin overdoses more than tripled. in 2013, 11 million people admitted to the improper use of prescription painkillers and therefore were at heightened risk of becoming addicted. that's why we worked together this week on legislation to put together something like an omnibus to reduce the risk of addiction and to fund appropriate treatment responses to shows who -- to those who abuse these drug. the bill passed yesterday reflect this is strategy by proposing a grant program to be administered by the department of justice to assist states and local governments. it is important to note, these statistic the rate of deaths fromheroin overdoses count the white population, 267% increase between 2010 and 2014. in african-americans, increase of 213%, 2010 to 2014. hispanic, 137% increase from
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2010 to 2014. native americans, 236%. no aspect of american life has been uninfluenced by the devastation of heroin overdoses and deaths, many of them impacting families whose young, bright, talented, athletic and otherwise young people have fallen victim to this. so this grant program is extremely helpful, which i'm very pleased. it deals with monitoring the prescription drug, deals with matching those who are committed to working with police officers and it is truly an important bill. let me close, mr. chairman, or mr. speaker -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman's time has expired. ms. jackson lee: we must have money to support all of this and i'm hoping this won't be think last stop we will make. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady's time has expired. the gentleman is recognized.
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mr. goodlatte: at this time we have concluded our arguments and yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. all time for debate has expire. pursuant to house resolution 725, the previous question is ordered on the bill as amended. the question is on third reading of the bill. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. the ayes have it. third reading. the clerk: act to authorize the attorney general to authorize grants to address the national epidemic of prescription opioid abuse and heroin use. the speaker pro tempore: the question is on passage of the bill. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair the ayes have it. mr. goodlatte: on that i ask for the yeas and nays. the speaker pro tempore: the yeas and nays are requested. those favoring a vote by the yeas and nays will rise. a sufficient number having risen, the yeas and nays are ordered. members will record their votes by electronic device. this is a 15-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned
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coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the speaker pro tempore: on this vote, the yeas are 400, the nays are 5, the bill is passed. without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table.
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the house will be in order. the house will be in order. members will remove their conversation from the house floor. he house will be in order. he house will be in order.
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though house will be in order, members will please remove their conversation from the house floor. members will please take their seats. he house will be in order. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from indiana seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that the house insist on its amendment to s. 524 and request a conference with the senate thereon. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: senate 524, an act to authorize the attorney general to award grants to address the national epidemic of prescription opioid abuse and heroin use. the speaker pro tempore: is there objection? without objection, so ordered. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from connecticut seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i have a motion to instruct conferees at the
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desk. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the motion. the clerk: ms. esty moves that reeesmbers on -- con ifer on the house on senate 524 an act to ask the attorney general to award grants to address the national epidemic of prescription opioid abuse and heroin use be instructed to address title 3 of the bill. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to clause 7 of rule 22 the gentlewoman from connecticut, ms. esty, and the gentlewoman from indiana, ms. brooks, will each control 30 minutes this chair recognizes the gentlewoman from connecticut. ms. esty: i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman will suspend for one minute -- for one moment. the house will be in order. the house will be in order. the gentlewoman is recognized. ms. esty: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today to offer a motion which would instruct the
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appointed conference committee to prioritize prevention, treatment and he covery programses for folks suffering from prescription opioid or heroin addiction. all of the good legislation we worked on so hard this past week in the house is close to futile would appropriate federal funding. it's all too easy for taos say we support helping folks who suffer from addiction to get the treatment and resources they so desperately need or support community programs that spread awareness about the dangers of prescription drug use or to instruct and support medical professionals about the risks of opioid addiction. but it is time for us to put our money where our mouth. this year, the president requested that we appropriate $1.1 billion to help the american people to prevent and treat addiction. it's time for us to act on that request. it is not enough to adopt
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important policies that we have this week on prevention, on treatment. we need funding. we must provide adequate federal funding to prevent addiction from occurring in the first place by expanding our prescription drug overdose prevention strategies. we must provide adequate federal funding to help save the lives of those who have intentionally or accidently overdosed by improving access to the overdose reversal drug naloxone and support targeted enforcement and we must help our local law enforcement by supporting targeted enforcement activities. families across my district in connecticut and across this great nation are reaching out to our offices, asking for support and help, asking us to come together and to address this public health crisis. recently, i was contacted by a
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family from my hometown about a young woman who was a classmate of one of my three children. they've lost track of this young woman. she has fall intoon the grips of addiction and has disappeared for years from her family. they are trying to seek her out, find her and get her treatment and we were successful in finding her in a court. we were successful in getting her a bed. sadly, she turned down treatment at this time. that is the story of what addiction does to families. we are hopeful that she will heed the voices of her family, that she will come back in and get treatment. but that's also why prevention matters. because it is so hard to treat addiction. we need to do everything we can to prevent folks from getting addicted in the first place. that's why some of the provisions i included in this bill are so important, to make sure the public understands the risk of prescription drug addiction, make sure that our
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medical professionals get continuing medical education to understand their responsibility to look out for their patients, to seek out alternative pain management strategies. and to understand those risks. but the sad truth is, we don't have enough treatment beds. the sad truth is, we don't have dissemination of best practices. the sad truth is, we don't have the funding right now to address this crisis in the way that the american people want and need us to do. so let's work together, let's work together to prevent our children, our families, our friends, from being so poisoned bhi this addiction on our streets, but we can't do it without funding. it is just unfair, not just unwise, it's unfair to claim credit for solving a problem and then addressing it without the funds that need to go there. so let's work together to provide funding, let's, in our
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conference with the senate, seek to put the resources there to back the wonderful policies that we adopted this week in this house. so again, i urge my colleagues to support these instructions to instruct our conferees. i reserve the balance of my time and -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves. the gentlewoman from indiana is recognized. ms. brooks: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield two minutes to the gentleman, my colleague from indiana. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for two minutes. >> i want to thank my colleague and good friend, my colleague from indiana, for her hard work on this legislation and rise in support of s. 524. you know, mr. speaker, an astounding 78 people die every day of opioid overdose in america. 78 people each day. 78 families crushed in the wake of this epidemic.
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mr. messer: and that will continue to leave devastation in its path unless we act. austin, a city in my district, is all too aware of opioid addiction's devastating consequences. austin has become the epicenter of an h.i.v. outbreak connected to opioid addiction. the community of austin is rallying to that crisis, but hoosiers aren't the only ones suffering. that's why this week, we came together as a house to pass 18 bills to tackle this epidemic, including the bill we're debating right now. these bills are an important first step and we must continue to work together to end this devastation and help the families crushed by this crisis. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from indiana yields back. the gentlewoman from indiana reserves. the gentlewoman from connecticut is recognized. ms. esty: thank you, mr.
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speaker. i yield to my good friend and fellow nutting mer, mr. hines. -- nutmegger, mr. hines. mr. hines: i'm delighted to join my colleague in connecticut, representative esty, in supporting this motion to this is an ause issue that deserves a meaningful commitment of resources to address the problem plaguing every town and city in connecticut and in this country. this year we'll see 30,000 fatalities to this opioid risis. this nation suffered just shy of 50,000 fatalities in the entire vietnam war.
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in duoyears, the opioid crisis will claim more americans than died in the vietnam war. yet we this week we decided to roughly $106 million available in this scourge. and to those watching at home we didn't make it available. in congress we authorized, which means you can spend the money, and we appropriate. appropriate is when we take out the checkbook and write the check. now is time to put our money where our maos are. and the reason for that is that number that i gave you earlier. 30,000 americans every single
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year. i spoke earlier this week about a young man from my district named alex. 2010 graduate of trumble high school, young man, he was on his way to becoming a nurse. he moved to florida to pursue that career, when in 2014 he fell prey to a heroin overdose that, like so many, started with the abuse of prescription opioids and moved into a heroin addiction and then of course a tragic end as so many americans ave experienced. 415 in my small state of connecticut. people knew he had a problem but nothing happened along treatment
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and recovery to stop the outcome of this young man dying in florida in 2014. 30,000 is a big and abstract number but i wish you could have heard alex's mom, who has now devoted to working and advocating for taos do their jobs to commit the resources we need to commit to address this opioid crisis in this country. youou could have heard her, would want to address this problem. it's about treatment and recovery, it's about training our first responders. we can use a lot of words but until we write the check to help states and municipalities to actually make a difference on he ground, we're just talking.
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i do salute the majority this week for doing these important bills. but i hope we can do better than talking about $106 million and through this motion to instruct actually put the resources we need on the table to try to stop those 30,000 deaths that are going to occur this year unless we act in a meaningful way. so again, i salute the majority for prioritizing this week and thank my colleague, elizabeth esty, for offering this motion to instruct and i hope we can get behind it and i hope we can do something good for an awful lot of tragic outcomes that will happen otherwise. with that i yield back to the gentlelady from connecticut. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentlelady from indiana is recognized. ms. brooks feather sp the other side does not have further witness i'm prepared to close. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves, the gentlewoman from connecticut is ecognized.
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ms. esty: i request the right to close. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady has the right to close. the gentlelady from indiana is recognized. ms. brooks: this legislation was crafted in collaboration with colleagues from both sides of the aisle and it is in the best interest of the people as a whole and regardless of which side of the chamber we sit on, the number 78 has come up time and time again. that's americans dying of heroin and opioid epidemic every single day. from communities large and small, rural, urban, from coast to coast, it's time to come together as we have done this past week on behalf of the millions of americans and their families who are struggling with this horb -- horrible epidemic and desperately need our help. the senate has acted and now the house has put forward a powerful bipartisan package that reflect ours priorities. this will not be all the work we do together. so the package of bill we was done will not be all that this congress does forever.
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together in conference, we can enhance our collective response to this crisis and i look forward to resolving the issue that was been raised by my colleagues across the aisle with our senate colleagues and i look forward to the conference committee where we will resolve so many issues on behalf of the american families and people who have lost loved ones to this crisis. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from indiana yields back. the gentlewoman from connecticut is recognized to close. ms. esty: thank you, mr. speaker. as previous speakers have noted, 30,000 americans are likely to die this year from drug overdoses. in the small cities in my district, waterbury, 130,000 people, 38 people died last year from drug overdoses. in new britain, connecticut. each one of those deaths was mourned. each one of those deaths was
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.nnecessary this is the most basic and fundamental issue we deal with, literally matters of life and death. i'm pleased that my good friend, my colleague from indiana, susan brooks has work sod hard, that the majority has worked hard with the minority this week on it. but the end of the day, our budgets are also our priorities. and we have got to find a way to provide the resources so that these wonderful programs, the good policies that we adopted this week, are reflected and put into place to actually save lives. we cannot claim credit for good policies when we do not provide the resources to the first responders on the street, to the substance abuse counselors, to
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the coaches who need to understand the risks for their young athletes, to parents to understand those risks, to our dentists who are doing wisdom tooth extractions, all our work is for naught if it is simply a bill passed that appears in law books. our job is not yet done. so i urge my colleagues in the strongest possible way to continue our good work, to put into effect the resources so that these policies adopted in the senate and the house have the impact we all want and the american people need, which is to help save lives. to prevent our fellow citizens from becoming addicted to prescription drug or to heroin and to actually help them remove themselves from that addiction. return to life in fullest form. so again, i urge my colleagues to take these instructions and take this charge to heart in the
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meeting, in the conference committee, and with that, i close and yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back. all time the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the previous question is ordered. the question is on the motion to instruct. those in favor say aye. those opposed say no. in the opinion of the chair, the noes have it. the gentlewoman from connecticut. >> i ask for the yeas and nays. the speaker pro tempore: the yeas and nays requested. all those in favor of taking this vote by the yeas and nays will rise and remain standing until counted. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, further proceedings on this uestion will be postponed. for what purpose does the gentlelady from indiana seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent that when the house adjourns today it adjourn to meet on monday, may 16, 2016, when it shall done convenient -- convene at noon for morning hour debate and 2:00 p.m. for legislative business. the speaker pro tempore: without objection.
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the chair will now entertain requests for one-minute speeches. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from arizona seek recognition? without objection, the gentlewoman -- the gentlewoman from indiana is recognized for one minute. arizona, excuse me. mrs. roby: mr. speaker, i rise today to honor the life of andrew: day, a dedicated public servant of southern arizona who was tragically killed last week in a car crash. anne was the sister of former supreme court justice sandra day o'connor, but that did not keep her from making a mark on arizona that was uniquely hers. she came from a ranching background and brought in cow girl, commonsense approach to problem solving that marked her many years of service. she represented tucson in the arizona state senate for 10 years, followed by 12 years as a pima county supervisor. her efforts led to the establishment of local landmarks like the river pass and brandy fenton park, where a memorial service in her honor will be held on saturday. ms. mcsally: she also will be remembered for her love of
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nature and substantial conservation efforts. thanks to her, generations of people from across our country will continue to be able to come to southern arizona and experience the breath taking land escapes that we call home. she is truly someone who's impact and legacy will live far on beyond her years and someone who will be deeply missed by many in our community. with that i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from arizona yields back the balance of her time. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from california seek recognition? without objection, the gentlewoman is recognized for one minute. ms. lee: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today to challenge this house to live up to our constitutional duty to debate the ongoing war in the middle east. for nearly two years our brave service men and women have been fighting yet another war. as they face snipers and mortar rounds, some claim they are not in combat. how can we claim this is not combat? and worse, how can we ask them to go to war when congress cannot even muster the courage to debate it and authorize it?
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or not? the last four presidents have bombed the middle east with little or no congressional oversight. will we allow a fifth president to continue these wars unchecked? as the national deaf authorization act comes to the floor next week, i submitted an amendment to force a debate on this war and repeal the 2001 blank check for endless war that got us into these perpetual wars. as you can see, the congressional research service has indicated that this 2001 resolution has been used over 37 times. these are some of the areas in which that's been used. that is just wrong. the rules committee should allow this important debate to come to the house floor. mr. speaker, let us debate this war, its cost and its consequences. and talk about a real strategy to end isil's reign of terror. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania seek recognition? mr. thompson: request unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks.
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the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. thompson: thank you, madam speaker. madam speaker, i rise to recognize the month of may as national foster care month. across our nation. in fact, i was proud to sign on this week to the legislation creating this distinction. national foster care month was established more than 25 years ago to bring foster care issues to the forefront. highlighting the importance of permanency for every child and recognize the essential role that foster parents, advocates and social workers play in the lives of children in foster care across the country. with nearly 415,000 children in foster care across america, the -- it's safe to say we all know a child in foster care. furthermore, i want to recognize the families who have selflessly decided to open their homes to these boys and girls, providing good homes at a very challenging time for these young people. madam speaker, the foster care system has and always will hold a special place in my heart. when i was 11 years old my
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family welcomed a folvetter care child, bob, into our -- foster care child, bob, into our home. bob throughout the years has taught me so much and will be my brother for life. thank you, madam speaker, and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? >> madam speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman from california is recognized for one minute. mr. lamalfa: thank you, miami. -- madam speaker. last night my colleague, congressman reichert, had a special order honoring our bliffers -- police officers for police week here. though i wished to take part in that, i weant able to. i certainly feel the need and desire to honor our police officers across this country for what they do. for being on the line for all of us here, and sometimes being unappreciated for that in a we nge media setting that
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have these days. harkin back to 2014 when 136 officers lost their lives, fresh on our mind, northern california's loss of two of our plaster county officers, michael davis and danny olver. in a terrible run and gun situation that was going on. with a released inmate. these two officers, many years in their role for the people of plaster county and northern california, like them, many others around the country have lost their lives in the line of duty to protect us. we need to honor them, we need to be behind them at all times. the thin blue line is between us and a lot of really bad things in this nation. they go to work each day willing to pay the price if it's necessary. we honor them. after everything going on these days in the news and the media, it's important that we always remember their sacrifice and stop and thank them and get to know them as they try to get to know the people in the community. we find out they're just human like us and after the same
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things as americans. i yield back, madam speaker. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from montana seek recognition? oh, nothing. ok. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? mr. green: to address the house for one minute, revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. green: thank you. thank you, madam speaker. i understand that when appropriate places are properly stationed, you become the speakerer. madam speaker, i stand today in thewoman of the house to pay tribute to a great and noble american, a person who gave a lot to his country. he was a loyal democrat. he was a democrat's democrat. but he was more than that. he was a person who was a voice for the voiceless. he was one of those persons who had a publication that was widely circulated in houston,
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texas. and this publication was the means by which those of us who could read the front page but not understand the rest of the story, we could acquire that intelligence by simply reading his words. he made things not only clear but very clear. he was a person that went out of his way to get truth to those who would be confused if not but for what he would do. i'm honored to say that carl witmarsh was a great and noble american. i'm also honored to say he was person who made it very much possible for the democratic party to thrive in houston, texas, lane lewis, who is the current chair, benefited from his presence. he and lane worked closely together. in fact, it's very difficult to think of him and not think of lane lewis. carl, lane, carl, may you rest in peace. i'll now have a moment of silence in your honor. thank you and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the
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balance of his time. are there any further one minutes? the chair lays before the house the following personal requests. the clerk: leave of absence requested for mr. knight of california for today, mr. latta of ohio for tuesday, may 10, through friday, may 13, and mr. payne of new jersey for today. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the requests are granted. under the speaker's announced policy of january 6, 2015, the gentleman from georgia, mr. woodall al, is -- mr. woodall, is recognized for 60 minutes as the designee of the majority eader.
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mr. woodall: thank you, madam speaker. thank you for being down here with me today. i want to begin, however, by yielding such time as he may consume to one of the great freshman here leading our institution and take all the time he needs. >> mr. speaker, i rise today in support of admiral brian lohse, the current commander of special warfare command, our nation's top u.s. seal. he's entrusted with the honor of commanding all seals, all special -- -- special boat units and all support staff across this great country and across many theaters. i've had the privilege of serving with brian lohse. seal team six, red team. i can tell you, brian is an outstanding officer.
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but it's the obligation of every officer to take action when he sees wrong. and brian lohse did just that. he saw a problem and took action. he took decisive action because he knew the actions of others around him were wrong. once again an entrusted, entrenched bureaucracy was , lowed to hide behind threats hide behind whistleblower, hide behind rules that were intended to protect command and not to erode it. mr. zinke: and yet those acquisitions -- accusations discredited a great officer and the head of the united states navy seals. i understand these protections are important. and they are necessary. but we cannot allow such protections to go against
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accountability and against the sanctity of command. in this case, the navy reviewed the investigation on admiral brian lohse. they found him to be innocent and wrongly accused. i've seen the evidence and went through line by line. i fully support the navy's conclusion and believe they were properly reviewed in this case. e d.o.d. had different conclusions. and i believe those d.o.d. conclusions from the i.g. are lawed and are cherry-picked. admiral lohse is highly regarded by his sboord nantz, of all -- subordinates, of all special navy warfare community, and all seals who have served with him and under his command. this includes the navy seal standing before you. i've known this man and his family for 30 years. let me just give you a snapshot of admiral lohse's leadership,
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under his command of navy spal warfare. the seals and those under his ommand have executed 654 total missions, have killed 461 high-value targets. every one of those targets, if given a chance, would do grievous harm to our nation. have captured 60 wounded -- 60, wounded 32, rescued an american hostage, deployed an average of 250 days of a year. in 2015 alone in iraq, navy special warfare and its components are were responsible for killing or capturing over 3,000 enemy combatants. admiral lohse personally deployed to operation resolving, reedom, and the 30 countries -- and deployed to 30 countries. forces under his command are
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deployed to 70 countriescross his great globe. they advance security capability, train over 6,000 of our allies. mr. speaker, america, our men, women, and children, both at home and abroad, are able to sleep at night due to the leadership of admiral lohse and those forces he commands. admiral brianlow see, i thank you for your dead -- admiral brian lohse, i thank you for your dedication to command. i thank you for all you have done for the community, for the united states navy, and for our grateful nation. r. speaker, i yield.
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mr. woodall: madam speaker, folks wonder sometimes what kind of men and women serve in this chamber, when i'm asked, what did you learn new, rob, that you didn't expect when you got to congress, i talk about the caliber of the men and women who serve here. if you've not had any time to spend with the gentleman from montana, the former commander at navy seal team 6, spent 20 years serving his country in the seals and said, i have more leadership to provide, i want to run for congress because i want to make a difference in that way. he's making that difference here every day. there's so much time, madam speaker, where we spend tearing each other down, talking about all the problems that exist in washington. certainly, they are multiple. but to confront serious problems, you have to have serious people and we do have serious people in this chamber,
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and congressman sinnkey is one of those and i'm proud to serve with him and appreciate his leadership. i want to talk about another topic, madam speaker, that i think lets people -- again we can talk about all the challenges that exist in this country but figuring out what the problem is and who to plame for it should not be our primary goal. our primary goal should be solving those problems. i want to talk about unleashing america's economic potential, madam speaker and i want to talk about the fair tax. you know about the fair tax. the fair tax is not two words, as you know, it's one word. fairtax is the name of a bill in congress. not many bills in congress command the notoriety that fairtax does, but it's h.r. 25, house resolution 25, anybody can pull it from congress.gov and read it. it's short, about 100 pages. but it says, for pete's sake,
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madam speaker, if we're going to try to make america competitive in the world, if we're going to try to create american job, if we're going to try to make america the country you follow, going to try to make america a leader in the world, what are we going to do it on? if you want to create more jobs in america, you could, madam speaker, depress salaries. we could pay everybody pennies, as some nations do and try to create member job -- more jobs. that's an awful plan, it's not the right way. we could stop caring about clean water and cleeven air and throw our environment out with the job creation. but that's not what we want to do. that's a terrible idea. but as we sit here today, one thing that all the men and women in this chamber control, madam speaker is the united states tax code. and the united states tax code, time and time again is read as the single worst -- rated as the single worst tax code on the planet. the single worst tax code on the planet. once a week, you can open up a
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newspaper and find a story of a company leaving america to pursue incorporation outside of america's borders so that they can face a lower tax rate. folks say, oh, how unpatriotic, what an you feel thing to do. i would tell you, madam speaker, that the law of the land requires them to do that. the law of the land says if you're the board of direct yoffers a publicly traded corporation, off fiduciary duty to maximize return to shareholders. and if you're trying to incorporate in a country that's punishing you and you can go to a country that rewards you, you must make that. it's not optional, it's require. we can either try to pass laws that trap companies here or we can try to pass laws that encourage every nation on the planet to locate here. the fair tax does exactly that. let me tell you a little bit about what the fair tax does, madam speaker. it's a fair chance for every american family to build a better life. we talk so much about the income tax in this chamber, but the
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truth is that 80% of american families pay more in payroll taxes than they do in income taxes. all the time we spend complaining about the i.r.s., complaining about the american tax code, the income tax code, it is the payroll tax that is the largest tax burden that 80% of american families face. if you're a millionaire a billionaire, you're running your own giant mega corporation, you can accept your salary any way you want to. you can do it from capital gains, stock options, have your privately held company pay you dividends, you have your choice about how you receive your income and depending on what the tax code punishes and encourages, you can manipulate your income accordingly. but madam speaker, if you're the rank and file american middle class family, you don't have a choice. you don't have capital gains or dive dense or stock options to
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choose from. you get a paycheck. and out of that paycheck, the government takes the first dollar and it's 15.3% that the government takes in payroll taxes alone. now madam speaker, payroll taxes are valuable tool in this country. they fund the medicare program, the fund the social security program. these are two important programs to america but they're both threatened. the revenue stream for those two programs is insufficient to fund the demands on those programs. we've got to find a better way, the fair tax says don't take the money out of an individual's paycheck, the power to tax is the power to destroy when you tax productivity, you destroy productivity. rather than taxing income, let's tax consumption. we all wonder what our neighbors were paying in income taxesment don't you wonderer? they did a money -- money magazine did a study one time. 15 different accountants worked on a different tax return.
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they came up with 15 different tax returns. it was impossible to tell which one was right. you wonder what your neighbor is paying and you wonder if they're paying their fair share, what the fair tax says is we're going to charge you not based on what you produce, but what you consume, so if you have a brand new mercedes sitting in your driveway, we think you ought to be able to help fund the american way of life. if you have a used ford festiva sitting in your driveway, maybe we ought to cut you some slack. if you've just built yourself a new nine-bedroom, 12-bath housings we think you ought to be able to afford to pay to help grow america. if you have your family of six living in a two-bedroom apartment, we think we ought to cut you some slack. if you're working hard trying to improve your life, don't punish producttivity as today's tax code does, tax folks based on consumption. that's not a crazy idea, mr. speaker. america's one of the only oecd countries, one of the only
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industrialized countries, that doesn't have a consumption tax. but america was founded on a consumption tax. that's exactly the way america began. saying, if you have a enough money to import silver from europe, you ought to be able to pay the tax on that. it was excise taxes at that time. i'm talking about a simple retail sales tax. but people spend at different rates, madam speaker. people spend at different rates. what i have here, you can't see it, the print's going to be too small. but it's the relative tax rates of a two-adult, two-child household. what the fair tax says, is listen, we all have basic expenses in our lives. and if you're struggling and you'ring to make a better life for -- you're trying to make a better life for you and your family, you're going to have to buy food, have an apartment, have some form of transportation, whether it's a car or a riding public transportation, you're going to have to have clothing, these basic necessities of life. we've created a system so that
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no american family pays retail sales taxes on those basic necessities. what we'll call poverty-level spending. when you go above and beyond, that you begin to pay the taxes. what that means, madam speaker, is if you're earning $32,000 a year in that family of four you're not paying a penny in taxes. payroll taxes today, largest tax that american families pay, we're not asking to you pay a penny. but if you're earning $50,000 a year, you start to pay an effective rate of about 7.5%. if you're earning $64,000 it's about 11% and on and on until you get all the way up to a 23% tax. no exceptions. no deductions. no exemptions. everybody pays on everything after that poverty level spending. again, madam speaker, if you can afford to have a boat and a new jet ski sitting in your driveway, i think you can afford to help struging families in america -- struggling families in america succeed. if you are one of those struggling families and you're saving every penny that you have because your child -- you
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want to send your child to college one day, we ought to cut you some slack. madam speaker, the fair tax was created by a group of economists, a group of public citizen activists who said, if we started from scratch today, what tax code would we right write? there's -- would we write? there's not man or woman in congress who believes that if we wrote a tax code today we'd write the one we have. the one we have is atrocious. it's atrocious. and what that does is targets every individual working at the i.r.s. the i.r.s. is the most vilified institution in this town. by moving the burden of taxation from income to consumption, the fair tax would close the i.r.s. forever. madam speaker, the problem with the i.r.s. could be the occasional rogue man or woman that works there, but most people who work there are
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conscientious, hardworking civil servants charged with implementing the atrocious tax code that this congress has passed. milton friedman, nobel prize winning economist, said the best way to escape this trap that we're in is to throw the whole thing out, start over from scratch. he's exactly right. madam speaker, #passthefairtax is the way we're driving this particular debate. american e if working families never, ever, ever had to deal with the i.r.s. again. if you're a sophisticated business, you're going to collect that tax and -- in sales taxes, you're going to have to deal with a state tax collector, you're going to have to deal with an occasional federal audit. but if you are a rank and file american family, you will never be threatened by the i.r.s. again. madam speaker, you know as i do, we handle case work all the time from constituents being pushed around by the i.r.s. getting threatening letters
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from the i.r.s. having their home threatened by the i.r.s. why? because despite their very best efforts, they messed up their tax return. "money" magazine hired 15 professional accounting groups to fill out a tax return. they all got different answers. when an american family makes that same mistake, their pun -- they're pun diminished. i want to close the i.r.s. for -- they're punished. i want to close the i.r.s. for good, madam speaker. i want to get folks out of the business of being threatened by their government. i don't think folks mind paying their fair share, but they would like a thank you for paying their fair share, not a threatening letterer from the i.r.s. at the end of the day. what are are we talking about in terms of productivity, madam speaker? the tax code grows longer and longer and longer every year. as the national taxpayers union this year, by this april 15, said, in this one year alone, , billion, .1 billion -- 6.1 billion, billion hours,
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filling out tax returns, that we spent collectively $330 billion to comply. $330 billion to comply. madam speaker, what would have happened to the economy if we dedicated that $330 billion to economically productive activities? could have dedicated that $330 billion to paying down the debt. it's not just the $330 billion that we lose because weaver spend -- because we're spending it on taxes, our tax code is so convoluted, "new york times" reported last month, $458 billion, almost a half trillion dollars go uncollected every year. sometimes through fraud, sometimes through deceit, oftentimes just through inability to understand the tax code and folks not reporting it properly. collectively we're talking about $1 trillion in lost productivity here in this country. it's 11 million words of laws and regulations in the tax code.
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madam speaker, you know you haven't read it. i haven't read it either. we're paying people to help us with our taxes. they haven't read it either. you call the i.r.s. help line for help, they haven't read it either. 11 million words, nobody's read it, nobody understands it. we make a criminal out of every family in this nation when we ask them to comply with it. madam speaker, sadly, particularly over the last two years, we've been reading about abuses at the i.r.s. whether it's targeting groups based on what their conservative beliefs are, whether it's inappropriately leaking confidential information, selectively leaking that information to support one effort or another, madam speaker, the i.r.s. knows more about each and every one of us than many of us are willing to tell our children. and it's wrong. you cannot give that kind of power to an agency without having agency abuses. we can close the i.r.s., we can get every american family out of the business of dealing with
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the i.r.s. on april 15. simply paying a retail sales tax when they shop at their local stores. madam speaker, we're talking about igniting america's economy. we're talking about doing those things that encourage productivity, doing those things that encourage risk taking, doing those things on which america's economy was founded, but many of which we've lost sight of in the past several years. we can't avoid paying taxes. death and taxes are certain. but what we can do is make it easier, what we can do is make it more effective. what we can do is make it less punishing. we're having a debate right now, madam speaker, about what kind of new tax code to provide for america. i believe we're going to get there. i don't think we're going to get there this year. i think it's going to require
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some presidential leadership. i think all the presidential candidates remaining are talking about what they would do to change the tax code. we all realize we're getting shah lacked by the rest of the -- shalacked by the rest of the globe. all of our major trading partners bringing their corporate rates down and down and down, creating the kind of corporate flight we're talking about. i don't want to talk about changing america's tax code so it fits in kind of the middle of the pack. so that we're kind of average. with all of our peers around the globe. i would tell you, america has no peers around the globe. america is a leader around the globe. america stands alone around the globe. and america should lead the world with a single best tax code around the globe. i don't want to lower wrages, i don't want to impact environmental regulations, i don't want to change those things that deliver value. i want to change those things that don't. and a complicated tax code benefits no one except lobbyists in washington, d.c. madam speaker, we hired some of
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the best economists we have in the land, predicted we could create 13 million more jobs. 13 million more jobs with a tax code that encouraged this investment, that encouraged savings, that got us out of the business of punishing productivity, into the business of rewarding it. the former chairman of the council of economic advisors, madam speaker, he said that the long-term gain to g.d.p. from a consumption-based tax reform would be roughly 10%. 10% change to g.d.p. simply because we take away a punitive tax code and put in one that makes sense. madam speaker, i don't know about families in your district, families in ply district can't wait. families in my district don't think the economy's going to great that the ok if we shave off 10% at the top. we can do better and we must. long-run g.d.p. per capita 9.7% higher under national sales
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tax, says the university of california-berkeley. time and time again, economists from the left, economists from the right come to the same conclusion. the power to tax, the power to destroy, taxing income, punishes and destroys productivity. near-term, 9% to 13% increase in g.d.p. says the former chairman of the economics department at harvard university. there's a reason all these different economists come together around the same figure, madam speaker. again, from the left and from the right. we have an opportunity to do better, if only we'll grea agree -- if only we'll agree. madam speaker, the #passthefairtax. it's h.r. 25. more co-sponsors than any other fundamental tax reform in this institution. on the senate side, more co-sponsors than any other fundamental tax reform bill on the senate side. madam speaker, the fair tax has supporters in every state
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across the nation. it's not coming out of washington, d.c. passing the fair tax would take away so much of the power that this town can exercise over people, who will give you a tax credit for buying an electric car, give you a tax credit for buying a wind mill, give you a tax credit for having more children, we'll give you a tax credit for this, that and the other. with the fair tax, all of those exceptions and exemptions go away. hear that. i started telling you about the amazing men and women who serve in this chamber. folks who come to work every day to try to build a better america in cooperation with their bosses, their constituents back home. and we talk so often about how the washington culture creates all these exceptions and exemmingtses and somebody's benefiting from it and -- combemmingses and somebody's benefiting from it and somebody's getting paid off for it. nonsense. there's one bill in this amber that abolishes every
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single special interest exception, exemption, carve-out and credit in the entire united states tax code. that bill is the fair tax. and that bill has more support in this chamber than any other fundamental tax reform bill in congress. madam speaker, we have an opportunity to do this together. we have an opportunity to build a better economy together. we have an opportunity to take the i.r.s. out of every single one of our constituents' lives forever. but the going to take a lot of courage. it's going to take a lot curbling to abolish all of those exceptions and exemptions, it's going to take a lot of courage to hit the reset clock, it's going to take a lot of courage to get out of the business of trying to be mediocre with the rest of the world, kind of settle right there in the middle, and to move from the very worst tax code on the planet to the very best tax code on the planet. worst to first, madam speaker. that's what the fair tax
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offers. and i ask the support from each and every one of my colleagues that has not yet co-sponsored this bill. with that, madam speaker, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the chair announces the speaker's appointment pursuant to section 201-b of the international religious freedom act of 1998 and the order of the house of january 6, 2015, of the following individuals on the part of the house to the commission on international religious freedom for a term effective may 14, 2016, an and nding may 14, 201. he clerk: mr. daniel the clerk: mr. daniel mark, alexandria virginia, to succeed dr. robert p. george. the speaker pro tempore: under the speaker's announced policy, the gentleman from florida, mr. grayson, is recognized for 60 minutes as the designee of the
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minority leader. mr. grayson: thank you, madam speaker. i rise today to address the great american bathroom controversy. this is a picture on my right of someone who may or may not be recognizable to many americans today.
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i'll say her name, the name may be more recognizable to some, jorgensen. christine christine was born in 1926, she grew up in the bronx like i sid. -- like i did. she went to triffer columbus high school, near the public housing where i grew up in the bronx. in fact, my father taught history at christopher columbus high school. i don't know whether he taught christine or not. but it is possible. in 1945, christine was drafted and served in the u.s. military. now that may be a puzzle to some of you listening to me right now, who say, i didn't realize that women were drafted. in the 1940's. well, at that time, christine ease name was george. george jorgensen. that's the name she was born. with she was in fact on her birth certificate male.
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something she struggled with greatly all through the time she was growing up, being a male. something she struggled with being in the military. and then after leaving the military service. in 1951, she heard about the possibility of changing her gender, so she went to denmark and underwent three or more surgeries, plus a very substantial amount ofest ro general treatments, came back to the united states, and then forever thereafter, after 1953, was known as christine jorgensen. christine jorgensen was out, she was well known in america, as someone who was transgendered. i knew about her story when i was growing up in the 1960's and 1970's. she made no effort to de. she didn't feel any shame about it. she was proud of the fact that
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she'd been able to take advantage of what medicine had to offer and live the life that she felt she would have been able to hi if the beginning if she had the proper gender. she had some degree of fame. republican vice president spiro agnew referred to her once in a speech to mock one of his opponents and she performed both as a singer and as an actress all through the 1950's, through the entire 1960's and well into the 1970's. she was the most famous, if you will, transgendered person in america, probably to this day. now, i have to tell you, i don't know exactly where she went when she had to go. i don't know exactly whether she went into a men's room or ladies room, but here's the interesting
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thing. even though this is something new under the sun, even though america never had to address this issue before, no one ever even bothered to ask. i don't remember anybody saying, christine jorgensen, she ought to go to the men's room, she was born a male. or for that matter, christine jorgensen, she identifies as a female, she should go to the ladies room. isn't it odd that america in the 1950's seems to show -- seems to have shown a lot more maturity than america is showing today with our great bathroom controversy right now. where the cis jendered people of america try to dictate to the transgendered people of america where they can go to the bathroom. or at least, frankly, me more bigotted among us. we had a law pass recently in north carolina. i'm going to go out on a limb
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and say it passed almost exclusively with cis gendered republican vote, in which they tried to dictate which bathroom christine jorgensen would have to go if if she was alive today and had to relieve herself and amazingly enough they decided in their wisdom, christine jorgensen if she were alive today, like all other transgendered brothers and sisters, christine jorgensen would have to go to the bathroom she didn't identify as, but instead the bathroom on her birth certificate. this is particularly ironic, there was one form of discrimination that christine jorgensen did face in her lifetime. she was not allowed to get married. not allowed to get married to a man because her birth certificate says she's a male and she was not issued a marriage license on account of the fact that a male trying to marry a male. my goodness.
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here in america just in the past 12 months or so, we finally managed to solve that problem and christine jorgensen could get married today to her lover. now we have a whole new problem. now, thanks to republicans, bigots, in north carolina, we have a law that would require christine jorgensen to go to the men's room. think about that. think about that. in fact, the natural consequence of that law is what i'm about to show you right here. hat. so you folks in north carolina who are obsessed with where the transgendered go to the bathroom, this is the result you've come up with. people who self-identify as
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women, people who look like women, people who act like women, they somehow are being driven into the men's room. and the same thing is true of transgendered who identify as men. you're going to force people po who look like men, act like men, you're going to force them into a ladies room. my god, what's wrong with you. that doesn't make any sense at all. now, let me tell you something. if i had been, back in the day, growing up in new york, and christine jorgensen happened to walk into the men's room, never happened, but let's say it did. i would have thought, that's odd, but i wouldn't have said a word about it. i wouldn't have gone over to her and said, excuse me, i don't think you're supposed to be here. on the contrary, i would have made an appropriate mental note,
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assume she probably found herself in the wrong men's room and would have let it go. i would not have felt any fear. i would not have felt hatred. i would not have felt anything that would indicate to me that somehow i should discriminate against this person. i would have thought it was odd. what this law does is guarantee that experience or worse. have people who identify and look and dress and act like women, forced to go into a men's room. that people identify and look and act and dress like men forced to go into a ladies room. are you nuts? listen, i have heard that the republican party is the party of small government. i've also heard that on the issue of abortion, the party of small government wants government small enough to fit into a woman's uterus. now it turns out the party of
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small government wants a government small enough to fit underneath the toilet seat. can't we all be adults about this? can't we all be adults about this the way we were in the 1960's and 1970's and 1980's? do we need a new law on this subject, much less a stupid law, a bad law, a ridiculous law? now you know, i understand that it's possible, even with the absence of this law, there might be some conceivable problems about this kind of situation. i'm not sure exactly what they are. i'm pretty sure if everybody acted as an adult we could get beyond them without having to litigate over it. and i'm wondering how do you even enforce a law like this? what are we going to do, have to give saliva samples every time we go to the bathroom to see what gender we were born with? bear in mind, there's a law against loitering.
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law against wide stances in a bathroom. a republican senator learned that a few years ago. there's a law against disorderly conduct. there's a law against voyeurism. there's a law against indecent exposure. in fact, in a really bad situation, there are laws against assault and even rape. so why do we need a law to dictate that people who identify as men have to go to the ladies room and people with identify as ladies have to go to the mens room. we had laws like that once. we used to say that we didn't want white people to have to be uncomfortable going to the bathroom with black people. i represent part of the state of florida. i can remember that when we had laws like that. and then somehow or other we pulled ourselves together, realized how ridiculous that was. how is this any different? thank goodness, the attorney general recognizes that it's not. people who are cis gendered have no right to dictate where people
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who are transgendered urinate any more than people who are white have the right to dick kate where -- dictate where people who are black to it. that's not america. let's show some common sense. now, if we did actually want to deal with real problems, we ould deal with this one. a little boy and a little girl both looking into their diapers. d the caption is, oh, that explains the difference in our wages. now, if we want to talk about gender in america in the early 21st century, we could start with that. why is it that women still make only 79 cents for every dollar that a man makes in countless occupations and professions even today? why is that?
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you want to get to the heart of what's really going on between the sexes in america today, why don't we do something to address that problem? and if we want to be more dramatic about it, let's remember the fact that in america today, 91% of the victims of rape are women. could we take our legislative energy and possibly apply it toward dealing with that problem which actually is a problem that affects countless women across the country. let's not protect them from having to go to the same bathroom as a transgendered person by insisting that people who look and act and identify as men go to the bathroom with them. let's instead try to pass wise laws that would equalize pay between men and women, oh, and if we possibly could, reduce the incidence, the terrible incidence of rape.
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but getting back to this north carolina law, there is a deep legal principle that this law offends. it offends me, it offends a lot of people with a good conscience. and that deep legal principle is this. it goes by four letters. m.y.o.b. that's an even higher law than the law that was passed by the north carolina legislature. m.y.o.b. mind your own business. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. mr. grayson: i move that the house do now adjourn. the speaker pro tempore: the question is on the motion to adjourn. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. the ayes have it. the motion is adopted. accordingly, the house stands adjourned until noon on monday
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next for morning hour debate. debating iped legislation all week. the senate passed its version of the bill in march and now the house and senate need to negotiate on a compromised bill to send to the white house. next week in the house, the defense programs and policy bill. when the house is back in session, watch live coverage here on c-span.
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host: the house this week focusing on opioid legislation and now planning to go to conference or working toward going to conference with the senate. tell us what the house has done so far as they finish up the week. guest: as you said, the house passed about 18 bills this week related to the opioid epidemic. these passed with huge majorities. lauded by the president. these bills are doing a variety of things. they're looking at how can you limit prescription sizes so you're not filling a full prescription of opioids? they're looking at forming task forces to review best practices for prescribing method. they're looking at how to make an advisory panel to the f.d.a. .o review abuse they're doing auto lot of things touching across the opioid epidemic. host: technically what they're
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going to do is take the senate legislation and say, you passed that, here's what we have to offer. and at some point the two bodies will get together and something that we've not seen a whole lot in this congress, that's a conference committee meeting. guest: yes. today the house is going to be combining the 1 bills into their legislation -- 18 bills into their legislation, making a motion to go to conference with the senate. the snass pass -- the senate passed a bill in march, it also passed with a lot of bipartisan support. it was a 94-1 vote in the senate. you're seeing a lot of bipartisan support in both chambers. but there are differences in these bills. the two chambers, people who have been working on these issues and bills will have to reconcile for the next few weeks. i know leaders are hoping to get this settled before congress breaks for their recesses in july. host: one of the themes present in the senate debate and march and this week is funding. democrats calling for more funding from where a we understand, there's not a whole lot of funding atashed to these measures that the house pass
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has passed this week, correct? guest: correct. the measures they passed this week authorizes funding, it shifts funding, but there is no new funding allocated to fight this crisis. host: the white house in favor but noting that lack of funding. when this winds up at the president's desk eventually, what would the conscious ideally, the white house like to see in a final measure? guest: ideally i think they'd like to see funding, this is something similar -- democrats, nancy pelosi said, these bills are good initiatives, they're good efforts but they're not doing much without funding. democrats have been pushing for funding on these issues. republicans have said, let's do funding in the appropriations process. host: mary ellen mcintyre is with the morning consult. you can follow your reporting on twitter. [captioning performed by the national captioning institute, which is responsible for its caption content and accuracy. visit ncicap.org] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2016] >> the house of representative today passed legislation to combat addiction to prescription painkillers and heroin. the drugs are known as opioids. in today's bill would set up
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grant programs for addiction prevention and recovery, treatment for pregnant women and babies born addicted to opioids, expand the availability of overdose reversal drugs, and set up a task force to recommend guidelines for doctors who prescribe opioids. the house has been debating opioid legislation all week. the senate passed its version of the bill in march. and now the house and senate need to negotiate on a compromised bill to pass and send to the white house. next week in the house, the defense programs and policy bill. when the house is back in session, watch live coverage here on c-span. us now is tim ryan: joining from ohio. a member of the budget committee. we'll be discussing the massive defense budget that will reach the house for next week. congressman, thank you for joining us. of this us an overview budget.
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what should we be looking out for specifically? guest: we are talking about dealing with all the complexities in the world. all our citizens are here to recognize where we are. obviously, we have many problems in the middle east. turkey,n syria, iraq, refugee influx come into those regions, and over into europe. we have china expanded in the south china sea, which is an issue that needs to be dealt with. we have russia once again involved in the middle east in a way that they have not been for a while. we have issues with north korea, iran testing missiles, and really pushing the envelope wherever they can. wes bill is about how do address all these major issues? and, how do we have the strength
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that we need to be able to deal personnelaling with on the ground. how to make investments into our claims and planes and trucks and satellites and all of the technical expertise that we need , whether it is ballistic missile's or ballistic missile defense, and, how do we make sure we take care of our soldiers? all these different areas need to be addressed. also, we're doing the research to make sure we have the technology as we move forward. all of this is in the package. that is why, inevitably, a gets as big as it does. it is a package of 575 million dollars spending bill. a little bit more about that from this piece from the hill, earlier this week is that it would provide more can you talk a little about the
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base operations versus the other part of the object and why that's important? guest: this is a big problem. we have been doing this with continuing resolutions and shutting down the government in the past and they have been detrimental to the entire federal budget but in particular to the military. one of the things the military needs consistency. they need a consistent budget with long-term projections in the budget for training, for example. we have men and women flying missions now in iraq and syria but we also need them to be trained for missions that may be in china or russia or maybe and
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the korean peninsula. we need training happening and we need equipment to happen. you cannot go to boeing or lockheed martin or someone who makes airplanes for you and say we have enough money until april of next year but then we've got to do this all over again. there is no long-term projection because of the gridlock in washington. i think we are doing a real disservice to the men and women fighting on our behalf and we are doing a real disservice to our long-term, short, midterm, and long-term shenanigans. the countryefend and have an awesome responsibility around the world. i just got back from the persian gulf a few weeks ago. see the reliance upon the united states in that region whether it's israel or the united arab emirates or any of
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these other countries in the persian gulf, they rely on us. if we are going to be relied upon, we better have our stuff together budget terribly, strict rily as we move forward. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2016] timre talking with host: ryan about the budget bill and his recent travels overseas. democrats can call in. republicans can call in. and independence -- you mentioned you took a trip overseas visiting several middle east countries. where did you go and what was the purpose? guest: the general purpose was to look at our missile defense issues not in the united states
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but how we help countries in that region. anytime you going to the middle east, it's more complicated than just one issue. we went to israel. we went to united arab emirates, and we wentbahrain to the uss harry truman who are flying sorties and dropping bombs in that region. we went into iraq. barwent into baghdad and an province to me with soldiers and sunni leaders in the northwest portion of that region. these are very complicated issues but people rely on the united states. or making's equipment sure our men and women are properly trained, whether or not our airplanes are in the kind of
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condition they should be in and the most powerful military in the world, do we have enough we are doing with cyber security kim again our message out because iran is getting their message out in that region. it's trying to completely understand all of the intricacies of what's going on in that region. that these thinking kind of moves that the republicans are making now are really a disservice to the men and women on the ground out there. host: you expressed for -- support for increasing operations in the middle east and recently the obama administration increased by 250 the number of special operations forces. that has drawn some concerns among some of your more dovish colleagues including representative barbara lee --
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do you think the authorization from congress is necessary and are you worried about mission creep? guest: i would like to see it but the president has the authority to make these decisions now. the alternative is we continue iraqiow syrian and fighters, isis fighters, to continue to take ground in iraq and then leave that area and come up through turkey and go west and plan attacks in western europe like we have seen or potentially in the united states. that is the alternative. i consider myself a piece loving human being. but when someone is
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trying to kill you, you've got to be aggressive and you have to be assertive.you have to be smart. you cannot just do it willy-nilly but you have to be aggressive and in this instance, it means special operations forces and making sure we are helping the iraqis coordinate and work with the kurds and all the rest but we cannot be passive because if we just remove ourselves from the situation, we will leave an area for training. we will allow them to take more territory and they want to get here and i want to kill us. it's that simple. we've got to be very strategic. it also means development, soft power with development in this region and making sure we can build up their economies and be smart with education especially with women. that needs to be a piece of the strategy and we clearly spend a lot on war but we don't spend
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enough on the soft power that would really lead to long-term development in those regions. host: we are talking to congressman tim ryan, democrat from ohio, a member of the appropriations and budget committees about the defense spending bill. and his recent trip to the middle east. up next we have may calling from ardmore, oklahoma on our independent line. caller: good morning. i am so glad that somebody is addressing this. -- there was a piece on fox news and our planes are older than the guys flying them. instead of getting the 18 hours they were supposed to have, they are getting 4. our military has been decimated. the ships have been decommissioned. we don't have what we had in world war i. there is something that's extremely important. i'm glad you said it.
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you don't want to let people in that kill us. the refugees coming in undercover knotting living -- not including cubans given a bag of cash for eight months which our veterans are not. heading we are furious what is happening with our military and how the special forces are being overused. if you send them out on these missions were they are lowing people up all the time, they are not going to be there when we really need them for things only they can do. host: let's give the congressman a chance to respond. guest: i'm not sure what the question is but i agree. i think we are not doing the job the way it needs to be done right now. sequestration to where there were cuts in the military as well as domestic programs which are vitally important. since we are talking about the military, yes, i think we've got to make sure that we have the kind of equipment and technology and training necessary to be the
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leading world power. i knowrely on us and it's difficult and i know it would be easy to ban people from the country and build walls and pull the covers over your head in the morning and call for your mom. that is the alternative. we are the united states. we have a responsibility. we have to help. look at what is going on the european union with regard to technology and trying to integrate their intelligence apparatus in the european union. they cannot do it. they have 35 organizations collecting data and they call the united states. keeping europe safe is about keeping us safe because people tend to leave europe and get to the united states if they can to commit a terrorist act. regardlessobligation of what happens, regardless of how we got here and how the car got into the ditch, now we got to get the car out of the ditch
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and that means stemming the tide in the middle east, making sure we have special operators and the force levels we need to rotate fresh troops in and out of there and have the technology and the planes in that region to stem the tide of them getting to orkey and then going west getting out of syria and going west into europe and here. that is an awesome responsibility. i think our conversation in the united states right now politically especially on the republican side is not anywhere close to the maturity level of the actual challenges that are presented before our country today. talking about special operations forces, do you have a number in mind that smart? guest: the 250 number from the president is adequate and then let's see what it looks like. we have to constantly evaluate this and this is a military operation. you are reviewing this daily to
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see what is happening there. i am concerned that we need to have fresh troops there. we need to have fresh people there. i'm not saying we need more but the ones we have come i hope we withotate in and out shorter commitments from them. soldierso think of our because we have respect to them that they are robots. they have families and bills and they are getting divorced, there are suicides. these are human beings we are dealing with. we need to make sure we treat them like human beings and not 5 rotations. we have to make sure the resources are there in the end strength level is there to deal with this in the way it needs to be dealt with. host: we are talking to congressman tim ryan about the defense spending bill and his recent trip to the middle east. jacqueline on our republican line from california. caller: hello.
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you are talking in line with everything donald trump has been saying and i agree with both of you. my father is a retired lieutenant colonel in vietnam. i was a nurse for 22 years. my concern is, i watch the committee meeting yesterday. talked about mental health and suicide prevention. i hope there will be enough funding for this for when the veterans come back and help them. no doubt i agree. one of the caucuses that dealt with military mental health and i work with veterans a lot. there are alternative approaches we are not taking advantage of right now. i think we have to quickly
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defaulted on to what prescription drug we can give somebody. i have met more than one veteran over the years where they are on up to 12 prescription drugs and i think there are programs out there that are helping veterans heal themselves. we just did a yoga session on capitol hill the other day with a veteran who came back with posed traumatic stress. he is an amazing guy and came back, double amputee, no legs. he found that practicing yoga helped him heal. here we are in the capital, a veteran who was kicking down doors not so many years ago in the middle east and is now helping other veterans get rid of their posttraumatic stress without medication, without high expenses, with a practice that's been around for a long time. how we cantalk about
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really reach out to these veterans and we have 22 that's per day killing themselves -- vets per day killing themselves. they have other modalities that we need to address and these vets who take on and try these alternative actresses, they go from 12 meds a day down to one or two. factor that cost savings into a long-term budget at the va and we will have more money for mental health, prevention, treatment, addiction, recovery for the vets if we are smart about it. host: the hearing on veterans affairs can be seen on www.c-span.org if you want to see more of that. line,t on the democratic anthony from st. paul, minnesota. caller: good morning, i am glad we started talking about vets. i have been a vet for 37 years.
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it took me that long to get the disability from the va. have more accountability and we need to take care of the vets when they are here. all i keep hearing about is people talking about war. in 37 years, i have never met any vet with more than 10% disability and it's ridiculous that a vet serving the country has to take out of his own pocket to give money to a doctor or an evaluation that can cost thousands of dollars when he was presumably hurt serving the country. if this was the private sector and it was workmen's comp., it would not happen. it is absolutely ridiculous. the other thing i want to say is this thing about the mental illness, when you get 10% disability, it's $1500 per year, you cannot live in anything but a tent so you see a lot of
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people out here. why don't we address that? host: let's give the congressman a chance to respond. guest: i agree, we have a slightly different experience. in my congressional district, more than 10% and sometimes a lot more that you are talking about. a lot of that comes through my office. people call for help and we work closely with the veterans service groups locally. there is some level of success getting that number up for a lot of our vevts. your point is we are not doing enough in your absolutely right. we need to do more especially with regard to mental health and mental illnesses, posttraumatic stress, the kind of things these veterans are dealing with. in the bills we are passing this week with regard to the heroin epidemic, there are programs in their that are geared toward
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helping veterans like the veterans court initiative where we can diverge that to someone who has a drug problem and commits a crime but instead of going to jail, they are diverted into programs. we are starting one in trumbull county and that's a great thing happening. the judges are helping us in the mahoney valley region with diversion programs. they are great alternatives. the vets should not be thrown into jail. they have a problem and i got that problem probably from serving our country. we want to make sure the folks with mental in the get the kind of treatment they need. host: we are talking about the defense spending bill, one portion as we noted earlier will call for women to register for the draft in 2018. it's a step toward the day that young americans of both genders can be subject to a draft.
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do you support that measure? serve,if women want to they have to be eligible like everyone else. i think it's a step toward equality. host: up next on our independent line, chuck from saint augustine, florida. um - we have been there for 16 years now. and we still don't know who the hell our allies are. israel took care of these people and fought the mall in six days and wiped them out. this place is a cesspool over there. you say we need more money for arms. we supply 80% of the arms in the whole middle east. then -- excuse me, i
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lost my train of ought. -- of thought. host: do you want to respond? guest: i understand the sentiment, i really do. it's frustrating. i get it. the cold war was frustrating. the hot war was frustrating. do reality is we have to what we need to do now to fromnt really bad people wanting to come to the united states and kill us. that means trying to stop them where they are now so that they cannot make her wait back over here. if we don't take a strong position on that, as complicated as it may be and try to do it as intelligently as we can, and we are going to open the door for them to come here. there is no other way to do it and we are looking for other options area trying to stop
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there -- them there when they are training and taking over territory, in iraq and syria is where we need to be. with the conjunction other troops that are there from iraq and syria or whatever helping us do it. , we coordinated and provide special operations so it's essential for us to be there. host: let's look at the presidential race. you support secretary hillary clinton. does it concern you that the democratic primary is still in sightwith no end and we see republicans yesterday getting together in an effort to unify and look forward to november. good i.thinkk it's the primaries can be good and secretary clinton is starting to hit her stride. with 3h is in her favor million votes over bernie sanders and she has the delegates and the superdelegates. she will be the nominee, there is no question about it.
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bernie sanders is bringing in people that are interested in what he is saying and doing and i think that will be great because we will need all hands on deck as we move into the fall. we will be able to unite the party and you are already hearing ernie center say things like hillary clinton can beat donald trump and we cannot allow donald trump to be president of the united states. if you look at donald trump in the context of everything we just talked about, the complexities, the details, the knowledge, you look at hillary clinton, she can go into any region of this globe and know who the players are and know the dynamic and i trust her. i trust her judgment and ability to get things done. i trust her to be a good president and help position us to stay in be a strong country. host: you wrote a piece in support of her saying she is best for ohio manufacturing. the polls show heard a dead heat
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in ohio with donald trump. she has had some trouble resonating with some of the working class folks. are you concerned about that? you either run scared or you run unopposed so we will run hard and everyone has their game face on but she one ohio and be bernie sanders there and beat him 55-45 among union households and did well. manufacturing help her do well. it's not like there is a steel mill around 40 years ago but it's about the future. over the years in ohio, we have had politicians go through making big promises about how they will bring this or that job back. hillary clinton won ohio. she talked about manufacturing. she talked about clean energy. she did not talk about clean energy in the context of global warming but that is important.
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she talked about in the context of if you build a windmill, there is eight housing component parts. ande is a mile of rebar concrete and gearshift and hydraulic, there is steel. that will be made right here in the united states of america. the maintenance of the windmill, states,re in the united the grid right here that needs upgrading and the batteries made in the united states. if you look at a place like germany, it has about 370,000 removal jobs right now. they are projected to have about 500,000 in 2020 and they are projected to have 700,000 renewable jobs in 2030. hillary clinton is saying i have a plan, a real plan in my clean energy program, to make sure the united states is ahead of germany, head of china where 2/3
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of the solar panels are made. we will make them in the united states and we will make them in regions that used to have steel, used to have coal. we will drive these new industries, this new manufacturing, into the regions that need it the most. she has real plans to do that and that's why she one ohio. host: up next we have richard calling in from massachusetts on our independent line. ryan, do you know the speaker of the house? the speaker of the house is paul ryan but there is lots of confusion. host: do you have a question? do you ever have a conversation with tim ryan? guest: i am tim ryan and i have lots of conversations caller: i mean paul ryan. guest: yes. caller: my question is, i'm retired. i travel all over the country.
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objectives is that it seems like you want the police to be on the people's officersthere are some that need to watch out what the word control is and how to treat people. host: we are talking about the defense budget. did you have a defense related -- caller: i'm talking about the defense in military and defense in how you treat yourself when you never been to a particular state. it seems a little bit uncomfortable because you don't know what the rules of engagement are. host: ok, i'm not sure i understand the question. do you want to give it one more shot? caller: i want to know how you can trust the people -- say you go to california and you have never been.
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how do you know the people are really with you questio? host: we will go on to sun city, california on our democratic line. do you have a question? kidsr: yes, i have three who are currently serving right now. one will retire in about three years and has been going to school. he is going into debt because of school. all the military spending, what about helping them out with their student debt? it would be beneficial for the family when he gets out. give me a thought on that, thank you. guest: i think it's great. we have the g.i. bill that can help pay. i might recommend giving your have congressman a call or your son give their local congressman a call and see how they can be helpful with getting
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him plugged into the g.i. bill. host: up next we have russ calling in from clarkston, michigan on our independent line. caller: thank you for taking my call. mr. ryan, i see you seem to be a pretty upstanding young man. i have a son that's in the army. about -- young sound like what donald trump has been going on. wondering how far mrs. clinton will tear down our military like the president right now has. her husband closed tons of bases in the 1990's. why do you think 250 special ops forces -- they cannot handle this job on their own. to helpother forces these people getting their heads cut off. we had sequestration that
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because ofhe pike his big demand to try to balance the budget in the short term, getting out of the financial crisis. in my estimation, it was not the proper way to do it. those were agreed upon between democrats and republicans. the deep cuts in the budget over all were being pushed in many ways by the republican party. there is a lot of blame to go around there. here we are now and i think hillary clinton will be very interested in making sure that the technology equipment and training is being able to be funded and executed because we need that for the war on terrorism and these other challenges we have like china and russia and these other areas.
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that is really important. the 250 special ops forces are not doing hand-to-hand contact. -- combat. they are cordoning airstrikes and working and training the iraqis and syrians and others who are interested in fighting on our team against isis. they are there to help coordinate and lead as opposed to straight ground forces. we have had two people comment on this, the bombast from donald trump is not a solution to the challenges we face right now. it's got to be an intricate and thoughtful and detailed, understanding the complexities of this issue to put a game plan together to move us forward. host:
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[captioning performed by the national captioning institute, which is responsible for its caption content and accuracy. visit ncicap.org] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2016] >> the reason i say inequality is isn't a problem is because what we're concerned with is not how much money do you have but how did you get it? did you get it through something that was fair or through a process that was unfair? when you try to equalize people who earn their money honestly, that's something that we're challenging and saying, that's not fair way to treat people. >> in the book, mr. watkins says the american dream is threatened not by income inequality, but by limiting success. he's interviewed by manhattan institute's diana. on sunday afternoon at 4:30, iraq and afghanistan war veteran and former c.e.o. of veterans for freedom, he talks about theodore ross velt's citizen in -- roosevelt's citizenship. >> this book is not about me, the not about roosevelt or litigating where he is on the political spectrum. it is a call to action.
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it to me is meant to inspire, motivate and remind americans of every generation what makes america special. and that it is worth fighting for. and some of us carried a rifle and many in this generation still do. to carry a t have rifle to be in the arena. our job to instill in every generation the principles that perpetuate what, is as you all here know, an experiment. an experiment in human freedom. >> at 10:00 p.m. eastern, erin and her book "political suicide." >> what should be a series of thoughtful activity on which the future of the country rests is instead filled with budgetary tight rope routines, sparkly parties and costumes, ethical disappearing acts and most certainly clowns. instead it becomes three rings of horror. we're so fatigued by the time the mud is slug, the skeletons come out of the closet and election day is over, that we're often exhausted by our new legislatures before they've even had a -- legislators before they've even had a chance to start their jocks.
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>> go to booktv.org for the complete weekend schedule. >> this sunday night on q&a, historian adam and his book "spain in our hearts" on american involvement in the spanish civil war. in the late 1930's. >> this coup attempt happened in spain when all over the country right wing army officers tried to seize power and in parts of the country succeeded in seizing power in 1936. it sent a shock wave of alarm throughout the world. because here was a major country in europe, the right wing military quickly backed by hitler and muse linney, who sent arms, airplane, pilots, tanks, tank drivers and muse linney eventually sent 80,000 ground troops. here was the spanish right making a grab for power and people all over the world felt it ought to be resisted. if not here, where? otherwise we're next.
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>> sunday night at 8:00 eastern and pacific on c-span's q anderson a. -- q&a. >> the house of representatives today passed legislation to combat addiction to prescription painkillers and heroin. the drugs are known as opioids. in today's bill will set up grant programs for addiction prevention and recovery, treatment for pregnant women and babies born addicted to opioids, expand the availability of overdose reversal drugs, and set up a task force to recommend guidelines for doctors who prescribe opioids. the house has been debating opioid legislation all week. the senate passed its version of the bill in march. and now the house and senate need to negotiate on a compromised bill to pass and send to the white house. next week in the house, the defense programs and policy bill. with the house back if session, watch live coverage here on c-span. the gentlewoman from indiana is recognized. mrs. brooks: thank you, mr. speaker. this week in congress we passed
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18 bills to address the heroin and opioid crisis that is impacting every community in this country. i'm thankful that my bill, h.r. 4641, which i worked on with representative kennedy of massachusetts, this bill will ensure that health care professionals have access to up-to-date guidelines and best practices for treating patients with acute and chronic pain. many of these proposals we considered this week enjoyed nearly unanimous support, and i can't express to you how refreshing it was to work with all of my colleagues on meaningful solutions to this public health crisis. as we learned from the multitude of members this week that shared their stories on the house floor, we're facing a public health crisis that crosses every socioeconomic, every jen graphic, generational and ethnic boundary. it's a rural, urban and suburban problem. it reaches into our schools, our places of work, our
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hospitals. it's tearing apart and devastating families and people's lives. however, in the midst of this crisis, as with many past crises faced by our nation, we as members of congress have set aside our political differences and have crafted a package of thoughtful reforms that will support our communities ravaged by this scourge. i'm proud of the work done by the energy and commerce committee and the strong bipartisan leadership by chairman upton and pitts and ranking members pallone and green. we cannot overlook the hard work and countless hours spent by both the majority and the minority committees staff on this effort, and i want to thank them for their hard work. members of the energy and commerce committee have pursued answers to this epidemic through roundtables, meetings with individuals and families on the front lines of this crisis, health workers, first responders and community leaders seeking to guide their communities through this crisis. we as members have visited
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neonatal intensive care units in hospitals to see firsthand the devastating effects of infants born addicted to opioids and who must already fight for survival through their withdrawal in their very few days of life. we met with juvenile court judges, social workers whose caseloads have doubled over the past few years as more and more children are being removed from their parent's care but a their parents are more concerned about where to find their next high than the welfare of their child and it's no longer safe for them to remain in their homes. it's important to note that it's national police week this week, and it's our first responders who so many of us talked to. those we heard from in indiana who keep naloxone in their police cruisers but a they're seeing this unprecedented increase in drug overdoses and they're saving lives each and every day. in a minute my colleague from the judiciary committee will highlight all of the great work that their committee has also done to fight this scourge, but i'd like to take a moment to highlight the bills rolled into
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this legislation that my colleagues from the energy and ommerce committee have painstakingly crafted. e bill would require the f.d.a. to work with expert advisory committees before
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