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tv   U.S. House of Representatives Legislative Business  CSPAN  May 24, 2016 12:00pm-2:01pm EDT

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used for commercial purposes. later, members begin work on the 2017 energy and water spending bill. live coverage of the house here on c-span. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2016] [captioning performed by the national captioning institute, which is responsible for its caption content and accuracy. visit ncicap.org] the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the prayer will be offered by our chaplain, father conroy. chaplain conroy: let us pray. god of mercy, we give you thanks for giving us another day. we ask your blessing upon this assembly and upon all to whom the authority of government is given. help them to attend to the immediate needs and concerns of the moment, all the while enlightened by the majesty of your creation and your eternal spirit. the season of graduation for millions of american youth is upon us.
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may a our appreciation as a nation, the value of education among those who are our future be incentive enough to guarantee its importance in our public policy considerations. may all that is done within the people's house this day be for your greater honor and glory, amen. the speaker pro tempore: the chair has examined the journal of the last day's proceedings and announces to the house his approval thereof. pursuant to clause 1, rule 1, the journal stands approved. the pledge of allegiance will be offered by the gentleman from new york, mr. zeldin. mr. zeldin: i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible with berty and justice for all. the speaker pro tempore: the chair will entertain up to 15
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requests for one-minute speeches on each side of the aisle. for what purpose does the gentleman from south carolina seek recognition? mr. wilson: permission to address the house for one minute and revise and extend my remarks. i'm grateful to hold a competition for students throughout the 2nd congressional district of south carolina. the smiling faces, beautiful placeses a competition received over 125 submissions where the students described their favorite moment in south carolina history. helen miller, a third grade student in columbia, wrote a winninges a on the revolutionary battle of charleston. that took place in 1780. jack hinchey, a third grade student, wrote the winninges a on the pirate blackbeard. i appreciate the schools that submittedes a as can in the competition.
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lake carolina, midway and round top elementary. the nspired to represent 2nd congressional district and humbled to have received submissions. may the president never forget september 11 and the global war on terrorism. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentlelady from wisconsin seek recognition? the gentlelady is recognized for one minute. ms. moore: thank you, mr. speaker. you know, despite the ongoing economic recovery that we've seen, we've seen the longest streak of private sector growth, job growth in history. but since the 2008 crash, the uneven recovery in the housing market has absolutely crushed the poor and working class, leaving homeowners in poor
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areas underwater and squeezing renters with lack of units and high rents. shamefully the g.o.p.-controlled house has been an absentee landlord on this issue, and now we find out that republican nominee for president wanted the crash because it would be a good thing for rich guys like him to make more money. maybe that's why now the failed trump mortgages pushed subprime loans. the american people deserve a congress and a president who will keep them in their houses and in their homes. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? mr. johnson: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for one minute. thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, social security has made no bones about how important it is for americans
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to safeguard their social security numbers. beneficiaries are warned time and again to protect their cards in order to avoid identity theft. measures sense safety should also be taken by social security. unfortunately, the inspector general's recent report found that this agency is failing americans in a very dangerous way. how? the social security administration is including your social security number on the documents it mails. that means any lost or stolen letter from social security endangers the social security of a beneficiary's identity. this bad practice needs to stop now. and as the chairman of social security, i'm working to fix it. in fact, this week i will
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introduce the social security mail act. it's a commonsense solution to a problem that shouldn't exist. let's get it done. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from missouri seek recognition? the gentleman is recognized for ne minute. mr. cleaver: mr. speaker, i'm not sure what it is but something is wrong with us. it makes me sick at the stomach see a presidential campaign that is an embarrassment to most thinking americans. i can't imagine any parent with good sense who would say to his
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or her child, why don't you look at the presidential election, look and learn how to debate. learn how to disagree with someone and remain on a high level. this is disgusting. it is embarrassing, and i just hope the american public is not ok with this. this is not the way the world's leading superpower should conduct its business. the whole world is watching us, and we're watching tv looking at the worst kinds of things that could be said by human beings from the united states of america. and i certainly hope that the american people are not happy with what is going on. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from new york seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. reed: thank you, mr. speaker. why does it seem like no one at an airport security checkpoint
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has been delegated with that awesome yet shockingly absent power of commons? why is the -- of common sense? why is the u.s. military service member in uniform with a military i.d. on military orders having his or her toothpaste confiscated? as management and resource allocation issues arise that are plaguing the bureaucracy at t.s.a., red flags are going up with the peak travel season nearly upon us. some airline passengers reporting wait times as much as two or three hours to get through security. lines will get longer if t.s.a. doesn't pursue a course correction. coordinating with airport authorities and airlines to ensure staffing levels meet peak level times. if you four lines being occupied and you have a long wait, maybe you should occupy some more of the available security lanes. mr. zeldin: allow law enforcement to do their law enforcement duties to free up more screeners to screen. airlines can do their part by
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knocking off the madness with the hidden baggage fees. the trick might help fill seats on planes. that will result more people bringing baggage through security. t.s.a. doesn't have a funding issue. last year congress gave them more than they asked for. no one wants to hear t.s.a.'s excuses. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentlelady from new hampshire seek recognition? ms. kuster: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized for one minute. ms. kuster: thank you, mr. speaker. today i rise to recognize and celebrate gene connelly, the principal of concord high school, my alma mater, in concord, new hampshire, who will be retiring from his position at the end of this school year. over the past 14 years, principal connelly has served at the helm of conquord high school leading the school to -- concord high school leading the school to championships and academic heights. if it wasn't for his diagnosis of a.l.s. in july, 2014, there
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is no doubt that principal connelly would continue to serve the students of concord high. i have the privilege of meeting with principal connelly -- i had the privilege of meeting with principal connelly last week in d.c. when he came to congress to support a.l.s. patients. it's a testament to his unparalleled leadership and courage that even in the face of extreme adversity, principal connelly is spending his time advocating for legislation that will benefit a.l.s. patients in the future. he has changed the lives of generations of concord students, and while we are all sad that principal connelly's tenure will come to a close this summer, there is no doubt that his leadership, his courage and his spirit will continue to inspire future generations of students at concord high and beyond. thank you, mr. speaker. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. for what purpose does the gentlelady from florida seek recognition? ms. ros-lehtinen: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized for one minute. ms. ros-lehtinen: thank you, mr. speaker. it should come to no surprise that president obama has agreed to arm communist vietnam and that he continues to extend diplomatic nicities and concessions to authoritarian regimes that show no intention of changing their brutal tactics. these overtures took the castros in cuba have resulted advocate, ent rights berto soler. the ladies in white and 27 others being arrested this week and facing charges of resistance because only in communist regimes and under ruthless dictatorships is nonviolent opposition to the regime considered a crime. peaceful dissidents resistance is a crime in cuba. for all the engagement, the concession after concession to
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the ruthless dictatorship, it has not moved the castros even one inch toward freedom, toward human rights, toward the rule of law, toward democracy. the people of cuba deserve better. thank you, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from michigan seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i seek unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. kildee: thank you, mr. speaker. well, last week we learned that the republican presumptive nominee, donald trump, actually rooted for the collapse of the housing market just before the great recision wrecked our economy. in 2007 before the crash, donald trump said he was excited about the housing market crash because -- these are his words -- i've always made more money in bad markets than in good markets. well, today we don't know if he made money or not because unlike presidential candidates for decades, donald trump
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refuses to release his income tax returns. in fact, there's one report that suggests that he paid no income taxes in one year. even worse, his own company, trump mortgages, actively pushed people into subprime mortgages. millions of people lost their homes in the housing crisis. 8.4 million americans lost their jobs, but donald trump was the winner. he's doing what he does best -- putting himself above everybody else. he does not want to make america great. donald trump wants to make donald trump richer. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for one minute. the othfus: mr. speaker, first freedom mentioned in our constitution is the free
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exercise of religion. the founders understood the universal right to seek god in accordance with one's conscience and also that many sought refuge on these shores because of religious persecution. pilgrims, puritans, quakers, catholics, these were just some of the groups fleeing persecution in the old country, in the old days. exercising one's faith could result in lost business opportunities and other forms of discrimination. some faced imprisonment and death. the founders saw that history and sought to guarantee the new federal government would not allow such injustice. regrettably, mr. speaker, today we are seeing laws, rules, executive orders and court rulings at different levels of gort force some people to choose between following their conscience and pursuing their livelihood. such a choice is exactly what the penal laws of 18th century ireland presented the catholics in that country, abandon your faith or face severe hardships this is at odds with explicit constitutional liberties and basic human rights.
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intolerance of religious freedom will not, cannot stand in our nation. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentlelady from nevada seek recognition? ms. titus: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized for one minute. ms. titus: thank you. . i demand an apology frn donald trump. last week, news reports revealed that donald trump actually bragged about being able to make a lot of money from the housing market that was about to burst. he rooted for that bubble to burst. the crash in the housing market devastated my hometown of las vegas which was one of the hardest hit in the country. thousands lost their homes and 71% of homes were under water some by over 50%. bank foreclosures put people on the street who lost their jobs and savings.
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slowly we are coming back. we reformed lending policies, demanded accountability to ensure people keep a roof over their heads. we say to mr. trump keep your short fingers out of the nevada housing market. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. the chair would remind members to refrain from engaging in personalities towards present supplementtive nominees for the office of president. forp the gentleman from pennsylvania seek recognition? >> permission to address the house and revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. >> mr. speaker, today, i honor william e. troxell on his tirement as mayor of the orough gettysburg, he is a
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descendant, the settler. he is a world war ii veteran and served 12 years in the united states army reserve. he is known as the mayor of gettysburg, a position he has held since 1997. he has left an enduring legacy. on behalf of pennsylvania's 4th congressional district, i'm proud and humbled to congratulate him on his retirement and wish him great health, happiness and prosperity. and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentlelady from california seek recognition? >> ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized. ms. hahn: mr. speaker, the panama canal expansion is set to open next month posing challenges for many of our nation's ports. it is more important that the ports have the funding they need
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to prepare for the future and stay competitive. since coming to congress, i have led an effort to ensure that money collected at our nation's ports in the harbor maintenance tax be spent at our nation's ports. we need to get 100% of the funding by 2025 and each year we have a target to get closer to that goal. this week, we are voting on the energy and water appropriations bill on the floor, and i want to thank the leadership of the appropriations committee, chairman rogers and simpson and ranking members lowey and kaptur of recognizing the importance of port spending targets. $1.2 billion is set to go to our ports making it the third year in the row that we have hit our target. this funding will go to the port of los angeles and long beach, where i come from and the ports across this country to create
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construction jobs and economic opportunities for decades to come. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yield back. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? >> ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. smith: a "new york times" columnist recycled disproven assertions to disprove donald trump's claims on climate change. this rhetoric is what we have come to expect from liberal pundits in the media. but science doesn't back the columnist's claims. extreme weather events and no evidence that hurricanes, tornadoes, droughts and floods have increased in number due to climate change. last year, at the paris climate conference, the president said that quote, fish swim in the streets of miami because of a downpour caused by climate change. he was immediately contradicted
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by his own government agency that said the flooding was due to lunar cycles not climate charge. alarmists should speak the truth and not promote a political agenda. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from colorado seek recognition? >> permission to address the house for one minute and revise and extend. mr. polis: i'm here to talk about the failed business record of likely republican nominee donald trump. his own failed company, trump mortgages, pushed homeowners in subprime mortgages. he lost money himself and donald trump's business went out of business but americans lost their homes. i want to talk about his scam university that he set up, trump university. the state of new york said it is illegal to use the name university because you are not running the university. and then changed the name before it went out of business.
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and being sued by many students ho paid up to $35,000 thinking that trump had hand picked the instructors but according to his own deposition, he never selected the instructors and didn't even know who they were and that's why in 2014, a judge found him personally liable for operating the company. losing money, forcing subprime homes on americans and taking money from americans and going out of business, this is donald trump's record of failure. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the chair would remind members to avoid making comments towards the present supplementtive nominee for the office of president. the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. dold: i rise today to recognize may as american stroke
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month. 800,000 americans suffer a stroke with more than 300,000 stroke survivors living in illinois. research and rehabilitation plays a critical role in helping the survivors return to work and lead fulfilling lives. a strong congressional response to stroke is crucial for the hundreds of thousands of stroke victims, their families and their friends each year. my friend and colleague, senator kirk, overcame adversity and returned to work in representing illinois in the united states senate after suffering a life-threatening stroke. his perseverance has been a personal inspiration and he has become an inspiration to countless stroke survivors in illinois and around the country. his battle buddies group is raising awareness that stroke can be prevented through healthy lifestyle choices and low blood pressure. by recognizing the signs of
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stroke, people can save a life and minimize long-term damage. i ask all my colleagues to join me in raising awareness in this issue and ensuring that stroke survivors have the absolute best quality of care possible. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from ohio seek recognition? >> permission to address the house for one minute and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. back in 2005, 2006, 2007 in ohio, we saw housing crisis unlike anything we have ever seen before. mr. ryan: we saw almost 400,000 people in ohio, families lose their home. we saw over 400,000 job losses. we saw 16% decrease in housing values in ohio. and all the while, hundreds of
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miles away, perched in the gold-plated towers of the trump building in new york city, there was a billionaire saying, i hope this happens. i hope the housing market collapses. i hope people get thrown from their homes. i hope they file bankruptcy because that will be good for me. shame, shame that we have a major leader of a major party rooting against families in ohio and in pennsylvania, in florida, in colorado. shame on you, mr. trump. you are supposed to be rooting for the american people, not rooting against them. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the chair would like to remind members once again to refrain from engaging in personalities towards the present supplementtive nominee to the office of president. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek
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recognition? >> permission to address the house for one minute. the gentleman is recognized. >> mr. speaker, last week, i voted to ensure our brave men and women in uniform received the proper training and necessary equipment to protect themselves and our country. i rise to honor and offer my prayers to the family of those men and women who have unfortunately made the ultimate sacrifice in defending the united states. this coming monday, our nation will observe memorial day. as families across the country gather to celebrate this holiday, we must not forget those men and women who gave their lives protecting the rights and freedoms guaranteed by our constitution. these brave men and women answered the call to serve when our country was in need and deserve our honor and gratitude. i remain forever grateful for their service.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from georgia seek recognition? mr. carter: ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. carter: i rise today to recognize the success of catter pillar construction equipment company in athens, georgia. on april 21, 2016, the athens branch was named by governor deal as the largest manufacturer of the year. this award comes on the heels of the branch being recognized as the county manufacturer of the year. opened on october 31, 2013, the location has 850,000 state of the art facility and 1,700 employees. it specializes in small tractors and hydraulic excavators, providing these products to europe and america.
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this attracts new businesses. since 2011, georgia has attracted 511,000 private sector jobs. i'm extremely proud of these statistics. i rise today to congratulate catter pillar athens and i wish them the best of luck in their continued success. thank you and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentlelady from indiana seek recognition? >> permission to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> mr. speaker, i rise today to honor the courage and leadership of chief keith smith or submitty as they called him. he was a dedicated firefighter and a leader and a devoted husband, father and grandfather. sadly chief smith passed away after a battle with cancer. he spent five decades as a firefighter in the indianapolis area.
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he led the indianapolis stfield and carmel departments. he retired in 2012, a highly dedicated and respected leader and championed and advocate for firefighter education and mentorship. in 2000, i was honored to work with chief smith to put on the 2001 world police and fire games. his passion for leading others was truly inspirational. i feel fortunate to have known him and i know his legacy lives on through the lives he saved and the men and women he led and his family whom he loved dearly. i offer my condolences to keith's family and all the firefighters who mourn his loss and cherish his memory. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? >> permission to address the house for one minute and revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for one
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minute. mr. lamalfa: thank you, mr. speaker. one of the most important bills signed into law was a measure to reform the department of veterans affairs. to give our veterans choices. this law was adopted in response to a national scandal over outrageous wait times, secret wait lists and 40 veterans who died. in oakland, the regional office discovered over 13,000 additional benefit claims tucked away in a file cabinet. the disfunction and mismanagement of the v.a. is unacceptable. our veterans deserve better. i was shocked by the recent comments by bob mcdonald who made references to disneyland about how long a veteran must wait to see a doctor. veterans are not there for entertainment and they are on a roller coaster whether they will have an appointment when they
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show up. they are in need of basic health care services that they have risked their lives for. i have had veterans had appointments canceled and accessing a benefit. there are veterans who are not satisfied with the v.a. and only way they can work for veterans is with strong accountability and oversight. the glowing reports are a fantasyland of the nontruth. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. . for what purpose does the gentleman from georgia seek recognition? mr. woodall: by the direction of the committee on rules, i call up house resolution 742 and ask for its immediate consideration. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the resolution. the clerk: house calendar number 117. house resolution 742. resolved, that upon adoption of this resolution it shall be in order to take from the speaker's table the bill h.r. 2576, to modernize the toxic substances control act, and for other purposes, with the senate
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amendment thereto, and to consider in the house, without intervention of any point of order, a motion offered by the chair of the committee on energy and commerce or his designee that the house concur in the senate amendment with an amendment inserting the text of rules committee print 114-54 modified by the amendment printed in the report of the committee on rules accompanying this resolution in lieu of the matter proposed to be inserted by the senate. the senate amendment and the motion shall be considered as read. the motion shall be debatable for one hour equally divided and controlled by the chair and ranking minority member of the committee on energy and commerce. the previous question shall be considered as ordered on the motion to its adoption without intervening motion or demand for division of the question. section 2, upon adoption of this resolution it shall be in order to consider in the house the bill h.r. 897, to amend the federal insecticide, fungicide, and rodenticide act and the federal water pollution control act to clarify congressional
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intent regarding the regulation of the use of pesticides in or near navigable waters, and for other purposes. all points of order against consideration of the bill are waived. an amendment in the nature of a substitute consisting of the text of rules committee print 114-53 shall be considered as adopted. the bill, as amended, shall be considered as read. all points of order against provisions in the bill, as amended, are waived. the previous question shall be considered as ordered on the bill, as amended, and on any further amendment thereto, to final passage without intervening motion except, one, one hour of debate equally divided and controlled by the chair and ranking minority member of the committee on transportation and infrastructure, and two, one motion to recommit with or ithout instructions. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from georgia is recognized for one hour. mr. woodall: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, during consideration of this resolution all time is yielded for the purpose of debate only. i would like to yield the
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customary 30 minutes to my friend from colorado, mr. polis, pending which i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. woodall: mr. speaker, i'd also ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. woodall: mr. speaker, you heard the reading clerk read. sometimes it's tough to follow what we do up there in the rules committee, and i would remind folks that rules.house.gov has the copy of the rule and folks can get into all of the details. i'm real proud of the work that we did up there yesterday. i'm glad to be down here on the floor today representing it. house resolution 742, mr. speaker, is a standard rule for consideration of the house amendment to the senate amended h.r. 2576. that's the toxic substances control act modernization act. and it also provides a closed rule for consideration of 897, the zika vector control act.
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mr. speaker, the year was 1976. that was the last time the congress and the white house dealt in a serious way with the toxic substances control act. in fact, that was when the bill was first passed. for the intervening four decades, science has changed, technology has changed, consumer demands have changed and yet the way that we regulate these chemicals has not. and it's not for lack of trying. for pete's sake, mr. speaker, long before i arrived in this chamber five years ago, members were at work trying to find an agreement on how to deal with the toxic substances control ct, how to update that for late 20th century, early 21st century technology. in fact, the late senator lautenberg, mr. speaker, was probably the largest champion for this reform we had on
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either side of capitol hill. he passed away three years ago next week. three years ago next week. many thought the opportunities we had to succeed here passed away with him. despite the headlines, mr. speaker, that read that gridlock controls washington, d.c., despite the one minutes that you hear down on the floor, mr. speaker, where it's their fault and it's their problem or it's his problem and his problem, there really are a serious group of members on both sides of the capitol who want to get the people's business done. and what we have today is one those efforts, an effort 40 years in the making that culminates here today. it happened with a lot of serious hard work on both sides of the hill, mr. speaker. it happened because folks didn't give up when people said it couldn't be done. it happened because nobody said it was my way or the highway but how can i work with folks who may disagree with me in
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order to reach an end that's going to be better for the folks that i serve back home? we have that product today, mr. speaker. in fact, i've got it right here. it's also available. it's the rules committee print, available at rules.house.gov if folks want to give it a read. i won't confess it's a short read. i won't profess it's an exciting read. what i will suggest is it's a proekt conduct of consideration and consensus building. when we first dealt with this issue on the house side it passed 398-1. 398-1. it passed by unanimous consent on the senate side. now here we are today trying to bridge those two bills. tsca aker, that's the legislation. the zika legislation, mr. speaker, is designed to bring those pest control technologies
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that we have, those pest control opportunities that we ave to bear in the name of public health as soon as safely possible. mr. speaker, for years the e.p.a. has had in its understanding of how to regulate in this country as long as it certified a pest control is being safe, they did not have to go back and run it through the clean water act approval process as well. law of the land strictly speaking says, you have to do that. they thought it was duplicative. they hadn't been doing it. so for pete's sake, the law of the land is the law of the land. you ought to follow the law of the land. it ought to bring solutions to the market as quick and safely as we can possibly can, mr. speaker. we get one bite at this apple. we get one bite at zika control. we got one bite of making this public health risk that does
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not balloon here in the united states of america. this bill gives us an opportunity to put our best foot forward in terms of pest control. 40 years, mr. speaker. 40 years we've been working as house members, as senate members, as republicans, as democrats trying to look for the next effort to make sure that the chemicals we use in everyday household products are as safe as they can be, as viable as they can be. for 40 years, mr. speaker. and that process culminates here today. this is a rule that all members can support, and i would encourage them to do exactly that. with that, mr. speaker, i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from colorado is recognized. mr. polis: i thank the gentleman for yielding me the customary 30 minutes. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. polis: my friend from georgia mentioned a website a couple times. i want to make sure you are aware, mr. speaker, at
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democrats.rules.house.gov. that's the website that tells what's really going on in the rules committee and in the house. democrats.rules.house.gov talks about the fact there are more closed rules in this congress than any congress that precedes it. what does it mean? it means republicans have chosen to allow less amendments. they've had more rules that -- bills with less amendments than any prior congress. that's the facts, mr. speaker, we want to bring your attention rules.house.gov. an excellent website. mr. speaker, i want to rise today. this is the last rule that i will have the opportunity to manage in conjunction with our current democratic staff director miles lackey who after 25 years of public service will be leaving at the end of this week. i deeply, as a member of the rules committee, have enjoyed the opportunity to work with mr. lackey these last several
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years. really there are few who know the institution and its rules as well as miles lackey, and i personal will miss him. mr. lackey is a graduate at the university of north carolina at chapel hill. he joined the house of representatives staff back in 1987. in addition to his work in the house, he's been chief of staff to two united states senators. senior official in the clinton white house. he's contributed to many pieces of landmark legislation over the last three decades. and i join my colleagues in wishing him well as he begins his new adventure on the staff , the historic trinity church episcopal parish in new york city. i want to express my profound gratitude, mr. speaker, for having had the opportunity to work with somebody of mr.
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lackey's cal bar as i wish -- caliber as i wish to wish him well. mr. speaker, i rise in opposition to the rule and the first of the two underlying bills, the zika vector control act, h.r. 895. it has changed its name. it's called the reducing regulatory burdens act of 2015. what it should be called, perhaps, is the pesticide trojan horse act, which would be a more apt name for what this bill actually does which i'll talk about in a minute. the second bill that's covered under this rule is the tsca modernization act which is the product of years of negotiations. it certainly has both bipartisan support as well as bipartisan opposition. it has problems, especially regarding state preemption, which i'll talk about, as well as several important attributes that have solved issues that have been facing our country with regard to chemical regulation for sometime.
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-- for some time. now, first, we have a bill that apparently the republicans thought they could change the name of and then bring to the floor again. they figured that with zika in the title, presumably they thought it would be harder to vote against. in reality this bill has very little to do with the zika epidemic. it's really another attack on the environmental protection agency, the clean water act and it's really just a pesticide industry trojan horse bill, and i'm very disappointed that we are considering a rule on this bill when there is a very real threat of zika on our shores. there are already many americans who have encountered zika abroad and have been infected, have returned to our country and it is only a matter of time, mr. speaker, especially with the change in climate that zika will be
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endemic and will be spread in our own country by mosquitoes. i had the opportunity to visit the center for disease control facility in fort collins, colorado, in my district, in the c.d.c. facility in fort collins, they perform all the vector borne illness. it means diseases that are spread by tics and mosquitos, fleas, everything from lyme disease, rocky mountain spotted disease. they have been tracking zika for sometime, close to a decade they knew that zika existed. however, when it spread in south america and the link was recently made to birth defects it jumped to the top of their agenda. unfortunately, they lack the abilities they need and the resources they need to find an effective way to eradicate zika and provide a vaccination against zika. that's the kind of zika bill that would democrats would like to bring forward.
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it's the kind of zika bill that americans would expect from a health perspective. it's the kind of sdeega bill that will save lives -- zika bill that will save lives and prevent a public health catastrophe. i think there is a better way to do business on the floor of the house of representatives. it wasn't too long ago that our new speaker was touting dedication to regular order, but here we are again dealing back ecretive, smokey room deals without amendments. as you can see at democrats.rules.house.gov there have been a record number of closed bills in this congress. and last night in the rules committee we had a partisan vote where the democrats sought to open up this rule for amendments. a majority unanimously, the republicans all sided together, shooting down for any chances of real discussion. unfortunately, the republicans are preventing an open discussion of ideas, and they also know reducing regulatory burdens act, that's the pesticide bill and the zika bill, whatever you call it, it
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won't become law but they're yet bringing another partisan attack on the environmental protection agency somehow saying they keep us safe from harmful pesticides is what is -- has anything to do with zika or public health. in fact, the e.p.a. is acting to protect public health by regulating toxic pesticides that not only can hurt humans but can damage our environment. . . i'm glad to see we are having a busy week on the floor of the house, but one of these bills was defeated on suspension and we have so much work to do. only 24 days of business in the house of representatives before congress gets sent home for summer break. it shows me that we could use our time better and pass immigration reform and address our nation's infrastructure and event that encourage corporations and reform our
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broken tax system. there is a lot we could be doing during these limited 24 days besides passing a trojan horse for the pesticide industry. we have a list of must-do items. congress has to pass an f.a.a. re-authorization and pass comprehensive immigration reform and address the student debt crisis and make college more affordable. i believe the american people would like to see all of these things happen before congress gets another day off, week off or two months off as congress is xpected to get in 24 days. a law that has been 40 years old see as failed, the glad to that a bipartisan compromise was struck will strengthen the reform that will protect our communities and public health.
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there is broad range support in the bill, to labor to the e.p.a., to industry groups. however there are some serious concerns that we should take into account like state preemption. the e.p.a. has had their hands tied which is the least effective environmental law out there and this bill will give it some more teeth. but to get improvements, it didn't need much. the current law requires a cost benefits analysis by the e.p.a. which is too high a bar to meet when it comes to protecting our children's safety. we need to focus on health and that's what this bill does and requires a minimum safety threshold by new chemicals before they are able to enter the marketplace. this focuses on vulnerable populations like children and pregnant women who are at risk of chemical exposure.
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most astonishing about the current law it grandfathered in over 60,000 chemicals in 1976. today they are joined by hundreds of thousands of additional chemicals and household products and industrial uses. this legislation would require safety reviews for all chemicals currently in use that people are exposed to. as an example of how ludicrous the current system is, of 62,000 chemicals on store shelves, the e.p.a. only has studies on a few hundred. that means there are over 61,000 chemicals currently on store shelves that the e.p.a. last not done any studies. even more ridiculous, the attempted ban on asbestos was struck down in 1991 due to the e.p.a. having a high standard for unreasonable risk.
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asbestos has killed 107,000 people and couldn't be banned. this will make the burden lower and the communities safer by reviewing more chemicals. the asbestos issue has been dealt with by liability and litigation, court cases that have lasted decades ffment we could have a regular tower system to keep chemicals from being brought to the market and being sold, it will save millions in legal awards if the chemicals were brought to market and actually harmed people. in addition to preventing the harm, these types of safety regulations can actually save both plaintiffs and defendants, both companies and consumers significant amount of resources. to review these chemicals, the e.p.a. will need funding and this bill will collect fees. the implementation of this new
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framework will be extremely important for it to work. there are several other positive aspects of the bill with you the other significant one is it reduces the use of chemicals. the humane society has endorsed the bill. unfortunately, however, it's not all good news. there are some negative aspects to the bill that i was hoping to address through amendment, but due to this sri closed process, we have not. there are problems with the provisions limiting states' ability to act in an aggressive manner and many states around the country that have or are working to enact strong provisions to protect their residents from exposure to dangerous chemicals. so again, in the absence of a meaningful system, many states have taken it upon themselves to protect their citizens from harmful chemicals. the argument is if the federal government does it, we could
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have a preemption. i would like state governments to go beyond the federal regulations without this issue of this issue of preemption. there have been improvements over the last few weeks, compromises written. as drafted, states will not have as much flexibility to protect their residents from unsafe chemicals as they do today. and that's true and it's unfortunate. this so-called preemption pause period, protecting the public from unsafe chemicals may have to wait up to three years for the e.p.a. to finish its review and there are concerns for the ability to to import product. there was the opportunity to do even more to protect the american people and our environment under this bill. and the bill could actually take us backward by preventing
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healthful and safety standards but empowering the federal government and putting teeth in tsca. and preemption, i know this bill will have bipartisan support and opposition and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from georgia is recognized. mr. woodall: i yield myself such time as i may consume. mr. speaker, i wonder why folks have a negative opinion of congress and sometimes i listen to my colleagues speak and i understand why folks have a negative opinion because the folks who serve in this institution seem to have a negative opinion of congress. and i would say to my friend from colorado, i'm not thrilled about the reform either. when it takes 40 years to get something done. when democrats ran the entire show and failed to get it done and when republicans ran the
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entire show they failed to get it done. those are hard things to get done. it takes serious, serious people, working serious, serious hours working on serious, serious issues to come to a conclusion and if i loved everything in this bill, i wondered why we didn't get it sooner. all that's left for us are the hard things. and candidly we have a good team on the field to do those things. i hope when we get into the debate, you aren't going to hear from the republican chairman of the committee but hear from a democratic ranking member. i hope you aren't going to hear from the republican subcommittee chairman, but you will hear from the democratic ranking member on the subcommittee here because that's how this bill came before us. mr. speaker, there has been a discussion of partisanship. the report hand
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from the nonpartisan research arm. the title of this report is congressional report, the house and senate negotiated bill. i agree with my friend from colorado. if he and i were able to write the bills, not just this one, we'd come up with some really great solutions, oftentimes different sluges from the ones that are presented on the floor. the reason no amendments are allowed is because we have been working on it for 40 years, because we couldn't agree. we already passed a bill in the house. they already passed a bill in the senate and they were different bills and we had to come together and agree on the same language. not all of my friends who would like to offer their great ideas at the 11th hour, there were times that they could have been offered and this is the final
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language. and we don't want amendments to the final language. i believe in an open process and in an amendment process. i'm proud that this is a closed rule on this topic because the amendments and the process have gone on in the past. this is the final product here today. that's tsca. the zika vector control act. colleague talks about smoke-filled back room deals. one deal is another man's 30 years of common practice. this is the bill that codifies what the e.p.a. has been doing for 30 years. this codifies what the e.p.a. under democratic and republican administrations has already been doing. they got sued, mr. speaker. folks sued and said we don't think you are doing it and not
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what the rules allow. the e.p.a. came out with a rulemaking process saying just to make it clear, this is the way we can best protect the public health. they got sued again. and the courts said, no, e.p.a., you can't make those decisions. yes, you have been doing it for 30 years, but you can't make that decision, congress needs to make that decision. what did congress do? that bill is before us today. it's not smoke-filled back-room deals, it's light of day, common sense, common practice, trying to align the laws of the land with the expectations of our constituencies back home. absolutely, mr. speaker. every day of the week, we could show up in this institution and run out about somebody and the way it's not going the way it's supposed to go. but we are succeeding where previous republicans and democrats have failed. together, we are succeeding
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today, where previous congresses found it too hard. together, we are about the business that our constituents sent us here to do. this is not a day to denigrate the institution but to celebrate when we come back together. and with that, i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. polis: the gentleman from georgia's remarks have very little to do with anybody who is denigrating the institution and e understands why congress isn't doing its job. now today, it's great, we are working, debating and probably be here until midnight. after three more days of work, congress on thursday will go on an 11-day vacation. it's working until thursday and then 11-day vacation and then they come back in june and
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congress works for 12 days and then in july, i think congress works eight or nine days after the entire month. august, zero days. what the american people expect is for us to be here hammering away at these issues. five days a week, six days a week, seven days a week. that's the kind of work ethic that i brought to the companies i worked for. when i started companies, i was working hard. and whether it was five or six days a week, we worked as long as we needed to to get the job done. and that's the opposite of the work ethic of this congress because there are enormous tasks this congress is not doing. this congress hasn't worked at all towards balancing the budget. there are deficits to close to half a trillion dollars thanks to the republican tax and spend congress. this congress hasn't done a thing to fix our immigration
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system. hasn't passed an immigration bill. let's stay here and make college more affordable for american families, let's reduce the deficit and fix our broken immigration system and secure our borders. those are the kinds of things that i would be proud, i would be proud to be here five days a week. i would be hard to compromise and work with my colleagues to create a work product that the american people would be confident with and increase the confidence of the american people in this institution both the democrats and the republicans would be honored to serve in it. i would like to yield 2 1/2 minutes to the gentleman from texas, mr. green. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. green: i thank my colorado colleague for allowing me to speak. i rise to oppose this rule, but in support of the amendment to h.r. 25776, the tsca
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modernization act. it will reform our nation's broken chemical safety laup since the first time since 1976 and addresses the act's fundamental flaws. congress has worked on reforming tsca for over a decade and i have been working on fixing the statutes since 2008. though not perfect, the proposal before the house today in the words of the administration, a ear improvement over current tsca and environmental law. the most notable improvements in the bill are replacing the burdensome safety standard with the pure health-based standard. that makes sense. explicitly requiring the protection of vulnerable populations like children, pregnant women and workers at chemical facilities like the district i represent. requiring a safety finding before new chemicals are allowed
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to go onto the market. get giving e.p.a. to award testing and ensure chemicals are safe. this legislation responds to the current terms of industry to provide regulatory certainty for the job creators throughout our economy. this legislation is a win for our congressional district and east side houston and harris county, home to one of the largest collection of chemical facilities in our country. the reforms contained have protections for the workers at our chemical plants, defense line communities next to these plants and benefit chemical manufacturing to have certainty in the nation wide market. i urge my colleagues to join me in supporting this amendment and help pass the first major environmental legislation in a quarter of a century. thank you, mr. speaker. and i yield back. .
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from georgia is recognized. mr. woodall: we do not have any further speakers remaining and i'm prepared to close. mr. polis: i am prepared to close. mr. woodall: i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from colorado is recognized. mr. polis: i yield myself the balance of the time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. polis: mr. speaker, i wouldn't to talk a little bit about the -- i want to talk a little bit about the worst of these two bills we are considering under this rule. a bill that has very little or even perhaps know -- no democratic support. a bill that nearly 150 health, environmental, and fishing groups have made their opposition to, that's the reducing regulatory burdens act. it came up last week and failed. now they had rebranded it last week as the zika investigator control act. now they are removing the pretense that somehow this deals with zika and they are just renaming it the reducing
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regulatory burdens act. this is the insec at thisside trojan horse bill. -- insecticide trojan horse bill. this is a changing game, it's the same bill week after week. it failed last week and bringing it back under a different procedure this week. last week apparently they tried to use the threat of the zika virus has posed to attack a very important law that actually protects our health and health of our environment. now, of course, investigator control, mosquito control, tick control, is very important part of managing any health crisis, but this bill really isn't about that. it's a thinly veiled ploy to undermine the clean water act. certain pesticides are considered by the e.p.a. to be pollutants because they are. they kill fish, they kill birds, they hurt people. this bill would eliminate the regulatory step of requiring a permit to use these dangerous pesticides near water. effectively undercutting our primary means of protecting our
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water system. once again, if you want to use a pesticide that is considered by the e.p.a. to be a pollutant near a water source, a river, or lake, you have to apply for a special permit as part of that procedure, you talk about what precautions are made to make sure it doesn't contaminate the water supply. under this bill were it to become law, you would no longer have to receive a permit. and it endangers the water supply. coming from the great state of colorado, we always like to say that water is for fighting over. we value our precious water resources for agriculture and for our residents. and for our environment. anything that risks contaminating it is absolutely detrimental to our interest as a state and that's why so many sportsmen and fishermen have also come out against this bill. zika is the enemy not the environmental protection administration. we have our priorities mixed up. the center for disease control is not asking for this bill, the entity charged with battling
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zika is not, this is just a backdoor attack on the e.p.a., public health experts are not asking for this bill. this bill removes the e.p.a.'s ability to regulate pesticide application that's intended to protect water supply when they can be one of the worst threats to communities' water, especially for vulnerable mothers and newborns. instead of wasting our time with red herrings like this bill, we should talk about how we can support the world class research and doctors we have and need to tackle the threat that zika poses. so far zika's been found in 30 countries throughout the western hemisphere as we head into the summer months, the number of case also only increase. evidence has indicated zika is linked to microselfly which cause as baby's head to develop smaller than normal which will devastation for potentially a whole generation. and we fear when it reaches our shores. there are already cases in the
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u.s. the cdc is monitoring almost 300 pregnant women. we need to prepare for the eventuality that unless we act, which this bill does not do, there will be more people infected with zika and we need to work quickly and agrees quafe-i -- aggressively. the president has a proposal to da that. he has requested $1st9 billion to address zika. i'm offering an amendment to provide this funding if we defeat the previous question. i'll offer an amendment to the rule to bring up legislation that fully funds the administration's effort to man a robust response to the growing zika crisis instead of paying lip service to this public health epidemic through cleverly named bills and short-term funding commitments. mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to insert the text of the amendment in the report along with extraneous material immediately prior to the vote on the previous question. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. polis: mr. speaker, i hope that we defeat the previous question. that will allow the president's
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proposal to actually defeat zika to come forward for a vote. this month i had opportunity to visit the division of investigator-borne diseases at the certainty for disease control in fort collins. it's an h.h.s. funded laboratory. they are an important part of the fighting against zika. we should be supporting their efforts not wasting precious floor time on a bill that literally endangers our waters, environment, and our health. adequate preparation for and ultimately vaccination for zika will save lives. the house needs to act. we need to defeat this previous question. that's why we should be voting on comprehensive zika legislation. not legislation that is a trojan horse for the insec at thisside industry. that undermines clean water and the health of our children. whether it's the impact of the water ecosystem or the fact that water treatment plants spend
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millions of dollars to clean up surface water from pesticides, congress has an obligation to fight to keep our waters clean so that pregnant women, children, and all americans can be healthy. that's why we need to vote this bill down. that's why we need to defeat the previous question, to actually bring up a real zika bill to address this public health crisis before more families are affected. mr. speaker, i urge my colleagues to vote no and defeat the previous question and vote no on the rule and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields. the gentleman from georgia is recognized. mr. woodall: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. woodall: mr. speaker, before i go through all of the things the gentleman from colorado got wrong, i want to talk about what he got absolutely right and that is that this institution is going to miss miles lackey when he leaves at the end of this week. we'll have more time to talk about his contribution here, but
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folks like mr. lackey, we don't need them here on the easy days, we need them here on the hard days. we don't need them here to get the little things done. we need them here to get the mammoth things done. we've got a lot of mammoth things left on the calendar. it is going to be harder to make those happen in your absence, mr. lackey. it has been a great joy serving with you these 5 1/2 years. i appreciate your commitment to this institution. we are what we are here, mr. speaker. because of the commitment of individual members, individual staffers, individual constituents back home who will not allow us to fail. and the two bills we have before us today are examples of exactly that. it's hard to cut through the rhetoric sometimes, mr. speaker. i suspect if we went up to the gallery right now, mr. speaker, and polled folks about -- polled folks about whether or not this zika investigator control act had failed on the floor of the house, whether we brought this
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to the floor and it failed, i suspect everybody up there would say absolutely it failed. i have been hearing about it all morning. the truth is, mr. speaker, because it's washington, d.c., and sometimes the rules don't work here like elsewhere, the definition of failure in this ouse means that it got 262 votes, yes and 159 votes no. make that clear. the bill that we are voting on today that is apparently the controversial of the two is the one that last week when we voted on it got 262 yes votes, bipartisan yes votes. and 159 solely partisan no votes. why is that true, mr. speaker? why can a bill get 262 votes, a clear majority of this institution, and not pass? well, because it was on the suspension calendar. that calendar used for completely noncontroversial bills to try to move things to
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conclusion faster. why is this a completely noncontroversial bill, mr. speaker? because this has been the practice of the land for three decades. because this has been the e.p.a.'s intention for three decades. because this has been the e.p.a.'s goal through its rule making process. but courts being what courts are, e.p.a. couldn't get the finality on what it wanted to do by itself, so it needs congress' approval. i'm in favor of that, mr. speaker. i celebrate that. thank goodness we finally found an agency downtown in this one very isolated circumstance that doesn't think it can do whatever it wants to do without congress' approval. i'm glad we have come together today to give it that approval. 262 yes votes. bipartisan. 159 no votes, partisan, to codify what has been the practice of the land in the name of safety, in the name of clean water, in the name of trying to
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do the very best we can for our constituents back home. i'm proud this bill is a part of the rule today and i hope the house will move it quickly forward. second bill we are talking about, mr. speaker, is the tsca bill, toxic substances control act. toxic is what folks call it in the industry. not a single amendment is being allowed today, mr. speaker. why? because we have already done the amending. we have already done the negotiating. because we have already done the heavy lifting that was required to do what no congress and no white house has been able to do since 1976. the heavy lifting that was started 10 years ago and folks could not get it across the finish line, we have a group of men and women here today, mr. speaker, much house members and senate members today, republicans and democrats, today who wouldn't take no for an answer. it's outrageous that we would
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regulate chemical safety in 2016 in the exact same way we contemplated it in 1976. it's outrageous, but it's hard. it's hard to bring people together. it's easy to tear people apart, mr. speaker. i can come down here, i can lay down the fire and brim stonalstone. we can tear folks apart -- fire and brimstone. we can tear folks apart. that's easey. it's tearing out the dry wall that's fufpblet putting it back up is hard. today we are in the construction business. we are in the building business. we are in the bringing people together and making possible what folks thought was impossible. my friend from colorado is right, mr. speaker, every day is not the same here u.s. house of representatives. some days are better than others. this is a good day. this is a good day. not because there's something special about this particular day of the week, mr. speaker,
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but because it's the culmination of days, weeks, months, and years of folks fighting hard for what they believed in. folks fighting hard for what their constituents sent them here to do. folks fighting hard for what they thought was right. and finding a way to come together and make a difference for the american people. mr. speaker, i hold here in my hand a statement of administration policy, the president urging congress to move this bicameral, bipartisan compromise to his desk for his signature. this isn't a day about show. this isn't a day about politics. this isn't a day about a november election. this is a day about making a difference for the folks who sent us here and with the passage of this rule and the do age of this bill we will together what others found too hard to accomplish. i'm proud of that, mr. speaker. with that i yield back the
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balance of my time and i move the previous question. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the question is on ordering the previous question on the resolution. so many as are in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it. mr. polis: on that i request the yeas and nays. the speaker pro tempore: the yeas and nays are requested. those favoring a vote on the yeas and nays will rise. a sufficient number having arisen, the yeas and nays are ordered. pursuant to clause 8 and rule 20, further proceedings on this question will be postponed.
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the clerk: the he clerk received the following message on may 24, 2016. that the senate passed, senate l.3, signed sincerely, karen haas. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from washington seek recognition? mr. newhouse: by direction of the committee on rules, i call up house resolution number 743 and ask for its immediate consideration. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the clerk will report the resolution. the clerk: house calendar number 118, house resolution 743. resolved, that, a, at any time after adoption of this resolution the speaker may, pursuant to clause 2-b of rule 18, declare the house resolved into the committee of the whole house on the state of the union for consideration of the bill, h.r. 5055, making appropriations
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for energy and water development and related agencies for the fiscal year ending september 30, 2017, and for other purposes. the first reading of the bill shall be dispensed with. all points of order against consideration of the bill are waived. general debate shall be confined to the bill and shall not exceed one hour equally divided and controlled by the chair and ranking minority member of the committee on appropriations. after general debate the bill shall be considered for amendment under the five-minute rule. points of order against provisions in the bill for failure to comply with clause 2 of rule 21 are waived. b, during consideration of the bill for amendment, one, each amendment, other than amendments provided for in paragraph, two, shall be debatable for 10 minutes equally divided and controlled by the proponent and an opponent. two, no pro forma amendment shall be in order except that the chair and ranking minority member of the committee on appropriations or their respective designees may offer up to 10 pro forma amendments each at any point for the
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purpose of debate, and three, the chair of the committee of the whole may accord priority in recognition on the basis of whether the member offering an amendment has caused it to be printed in the portion of the congressional record designated for that purpose in clause 8 of rule 18. amendments so printed shall be considered as read. c, when the committee rises and reports the bill back to the house with a recommendation that the bill do pass, the previous question shall be considered as ordered on the bill and amendments thereto to final passage without intervening motion except one motion to recommit with or without instructions. section 2, section 508 of h.r. 5055 shall be considered to be a spending reduction account for purposes of section 3-d of house resolution 5. section 3, during consideration of h.r. 5055 pursuant to this resolution. esolution. ection 3034 shall not apply.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from washington is recognized for one hour. mr. newhouse: during consideration of this resolution, all time yielded is for the purpose of debate only. i yield the customary 30 minutes to the lady from new york, ms. slaughter, a good friend of mine from the rules committee, pending such time as i may consume. mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. newhouse: mr. speaker, on monday, the rules committee met and reported a rule, house resolution number 743, providing for consideration of an important piece of legislation, r 2017 55, the fiscal yea energy and water development appropriations bill. the rule provides for consideration of h.r. 5055 under
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a modified open rule, allowing for consideration of all amendments that are germane to the bill and conform to house rules. mr. speaker, the fiscal year 2017 energy and water development bill properties annual funding for national defense, nuclear weapons activities, army corps of engineers, various programs under d.o.e. and other related agencies. over the past few years, we have seen increasing threats to our national security, historic droughts in many regions of the united states rgs, the importance of water and the need for debater energy security and independence. this legislation addresses all of these issues as well as many others and invests in efforts to promote a more secure, prosperous future for our nation. with ever changing global
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security threats from russia and iran to terrorist groups like isil and al qaeda, national security continues as well as it should be, to be a top concern for many americans. now, it is more vital than ever that the u.s. maintain our nuclear security preparedness and this legislation takes important steps to ensure our nuclear weapons stockpile is modern, secure, stable and available. it provides a total of $12.9 billion for d.o.e.'s nuclear weapons security programs. that is a $327 million increase above the 2016 level. and this fund will uphold the nation's nuclear deterrence posture and maintain the safety and readiness of its stockpile and meet any nuclear threat.
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mr. speaker, h.r. 5055 addresses the need for reliable water resources. as we have seen from the severe droughts that have impacted many western states, accessibility is to safe and adequate water resources is critical to our communities. in my home state of washington, we have seen historic droughts over the past few years with serious water supply shortages that have impacted the agriculture, energy and manufacturing sectors as well as many families and small businesses that rely on an adequate and stable supply of water. additionally, washington and much of the western united states have experienced catastrophic wildfire seasons over the last two years. with washington enduring back-to-back years of record-setting fires which have been fueled by a lack of rainfall in especially arid
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conditions. this legislation contains funding for the department of interior and the bureau of reclamation to help manage, develop and protect the water resources of western states. further, the measure includes several new provisions to help western communities by providing relief from the onerous and excessive federal regulations that have exacerbated the situation. energy independence is paramount to the future of our country. in the fiscal year 2017 water and energy development bill invests in all of the above energy strategy in order to promote a more secure and prosperous future for our nation. under the legislation, funding is provided for energy d.o.e. programs and increases funding for the programs that encourage u.s. economic competitiveness and help advance the goal of
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greater domestic energy production and security. this bill provides funds for research and development to advance coal, natural gas, oil and other fossil energy technologies, which will help the u.s. make better use of our rich natural energy resources and help keep energy costs low. additionally, nuclear energy research, development and demonstration activities are increased. mr. speaker, while this bill includes funding for many activities that are critical to our country's future, it also properties funds to address an important issue from our past, and that is the cleanup of our country's defense nuclear sites that supported our previous nuclear weapons production. these sites played a critical part in our country's ability to win world war ii as well as the
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cold war by producing the basic and complex materials used if in the fabrication of nuclear weapons. it happens that the largest of these sites is the hanford nuclear reservation, which is located in my central washington state district. it produced nuclear weapons both during and after world war ii. there are similar sites across the country where the federal government has a moral and a legal obligation to clean up the remaining contaminated facilities and hazardous nuclear waste. a key component of our defense environmental cleanup efforts is the availability of a viable nuclear repository where this waste can be stored. as you know, mr. speaker, yucca untain is the country's only
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repository, for years there have been efforts to kill the use of this site, efforts that would hinder the defense nuclear yeenup for decades and would waste the federal government's $15 billion investment in this repository. this legislation continues congressional efforts to support yucca mountain by providing funding for the nuclear waste disposal program and funds for the nuclear regulatory commission to continue the ajudication of d.o.e.'s yucca mountain license application. it denies the administration's funding proposals for non-yucca nuclear waste activities. another component of this measure is strong support for our national laboratories such as the pacific northwest national laboratory located in washington's 4th congressional district. they perform critical research
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on cybersecurity and develop high-performance computing systems, which lay the groundwork for a more secure energy future, helping to reduce the nation's dependence on foreign energy and ensuring continued economic growth. inally h.r. 5055 includes many conservative policies that are critical to combatting the administration's efforts to undermine economic growth through excessive and burdensome regulations. the bill effectively prohibits the e.p.a. and the corps from implementing the waters of the united states rule and any changes to federal jurisdiction under the clean water act. it also restriggets the application of the clean water ct in certain agricultural areas. there is language prohibiting the administration from changing the definition of fill material
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and discharge fill material. from the beginning, the rule has been an unprecedented federal power grab that expands federal regulations over ponds, over streams, over irrigation ditches in the middle of crop land giving the e.p.a. unprecedented say over what farmers can or cannot do with their land. this bill takes the important step of prohibiting funding for the implementation of this deeply misguided rule, which would have devastating economic consequences for farmers, for ranchers, for small businesses and for communities across our country. additionally, the legislation protects americans' constitutional second amendment rights by including language that allows law-abiding americans to possess firearms on army corps of engineers' public lands. in places in my district, these
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public lands are used heavily by the community. the bill includes language that i offered along with congressman gosar of arizona, to prevent the removal of any federal dams, protecting the critical flood control and the hydropower benefits provided by these facilities. hydropower is a key resource throughout the west and must prevent misguided attempts to shut down these dams. finally, it continues a restriction from f.y. 2016 to prevent any funds from being used to start or enter into any new nuclear nonproliferation contracts or agreements with russia. mr. speaker, this is a good rule that provides for the consideration of h.r. 5055, the fiscal year 2017 energy and water development appropriations act. this is a responsible measure that supports the u.s. national
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security, safety and economic competitiveness, advances an all of the above energy strategy and makes strategic investments in infrastructure and water resources projects. balancing these critical priorities while still maintaining tight budget caps. these efforts will help promote a more secure and prosperous future for our nation, which is why i urge all of my colleagues to support the rule and support the underlying bill. with that, mr. speaker, i eserve the balance of my time. . ms. slaughter: thank you very much, mr. speaker. i thank my colleague from washington for yielding me the time and i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: so ordered. ms. slaughter: mr. speaker, every year the house comes together to allocate funds for programs across the country. from keeping our waters clean to managing our nuclear arsenal,
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they all need funding. under h.r. 5055 the energy water development bill, some programs see shortfalls and others windfalls and balancing these competing priorities is a herculean effort and i want to commend chairman simpson and ranking member capture because they worked so much in tandem to help bring good bills to the floor. first the bill provides robust funding for the army corps of engineers and includes strong funding for the harbor maintenance fund which keeps our nation's ports and harbors dredged and maintained and operational. as the co-chair of the great lakes task force i know the harbor maintenance trust fund is an essential component to keeping local economies on the shores of the great lakes thriving. we owe a great deal to the great lakes. along with canada, we are the protectors of 20% of the fresh water on the planet.
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providing drinking water for both canadians and united states citizens and we owe it to that great thing we inherited called the great lakes. also included in the bill is increased funding for much needed nuclear cleanup. the bill provides funding to clear contamination from past nuclear weapons research and the production activities creating usable land and adding to the safety and well-being of our communities. however, i do remain concerned about the funding levels for the nation's scientific research. we shoulding meeting the president's request and even adding to them for research funding. the agencies that are covered by this bill are not adequate to really meet the needs of our nation's scientific research and help us make up for lost ground, to reclaim our global leadership, not pulling on the reins. one of those programs funded is my-n my hometown of rochester,
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new york. one of the best hubs in the world and we have recently been named an innovative manufacturing facility in the -- in rochester, and let me tell you what kind of absolute research we are doing up there and what great things we are already capable of doing. about 12 engineers who had previously worked at eastman kodak, 35-year-old repurposed kodak equipment made the components of a night vision goggles that took down osama bin laden. that same small company with 250 employees also made the laser beams that the navy seals used to take down the somali pirates holding captain phillips. that was on 35-year-old equipment. imagine what they could do if we could be able to help them get new machines. rochester is famous because the bomb site was made there which
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was a great contributor to winning of the second world war. it's awfully important that we recognize what's happened there now and make sure that we can keep it going, but in many cases it's falling apart. we need much more help for it. but i am grateful for the money for the laser because it not only is moving research along but is responsible for checking on the supplies that we have, and nuclear weapons to make sure they are in good condition. without having to do live testing. there are bright spots in the bill, but there are some harmful policy riders that stand in the way of strong investments. the policy riders include, one, that would prevent the army corps of engineers from clarifying which waters are protected by the clean water act. by locking in a widely acknowledged state of confusion about the scope of the lost pollution control programs. and while it sounds nice to let everybody do all the runoff they want into the great lakes, the
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algae pollution problem caused pesticide control and other things that are in the water have cost us a great deal of pain up there. and that is not a very good idea, even stewardship, or for our future. but the runoff of pesticides and other things they do certainly needs more attention than we are getting. i think we are going in this bill in the wrong direction on that. another rider would prevent the corps from using funds to regulate industry waste. locking in loopholes for polluters and leaving many of the waterways vulnerable to harmful pollution and we know better than that. we know it's not smart. remember, that many of those are the water that we drink. and also i know that my colleague mentioned that, one he liked, the controversial rider about guns be carried on all
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corps of engineer land. given the number of americans killing each other on a daily basis with guns, in one week about two weeks ago, four toddlers who got hold of guns that were unsecured, killing themselves, more guns and more land is not my idea of the way we should be looking at it. i'm very much concerned we don't want to live in a country that i think we are becoming where people can leave home to go to work or to the theater or to school or anything, and not have any assurance as we all grew up with you are going to be safely coming back home. -- the idea of having everybody have a gun, there are 330 million americans and 320 million guns. that seems to me to be a pretty one side equation. with that i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady reserves.
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the gentleman from washington is recognized. mr. newhouse: thank you, mr. chairman. mr. speaker, i just want to agree with the gentlelady from new york. i certainly, too, appreciate the bipartisan effort that was put into this bill on the part of both chairman simpson as well as ranking member capture. they did an excellent job which is -- kaptur, they did an excellent job, which is illustrated both in the committee and subcommittee, this legislation passed on a voice vote. so that's a demonstration of great bipartisan support and certainly speaks well to this committee doing excellent work together. at this time i would like to yield two minutes to the young gentleman from georgia, mr. buddy clark. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. clark: thank you, mr. speaker. i'd like to thank congressman new house and the rules committee, as well as chairman simpson and the energy and water appropriations subcommittee for their leadership and frag made on this year's energy and water appropriations bill.
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h.r. 5055, the energy and water development related agencies appropriations act, is a step forward in updating our nation's water borne infrastructure and energy needs. the first district of georgia is home to a unique set of resources with two large ports, various wetlands and islands, and the state's entire coastline. whether it's the savannah harbor expansion project, the growth of the port of brunswick, or the unique characteristics involved with wetlands permitting, the energy and water appropriations bill has a significant impact on the citizens of the first congressional district of georgia. the port of savannah is the second busiest east coast port and is rapidly expanding, growing at a substantial rate year after year. the port of brunswick is the third busiest roll on, roll off cargo port in the country. these ports are the economic engines of georgia and for the southeast. reaching as far as the midwest in cargo imported and exported out of their facilities.
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h.r. 5055 is vital to ensuring that projects like the savannah harbor expansion project continue on time so our nation's economy continues to grow. i'd like to thank the gentleman, the rules committee, and the energy and water subcommittee for their continued devotion to this cause and i urge my colleagues to support the bill. mr. speaker, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentlelady from new york is recognized. ms. slaughter: i'm pleased to yield two minutes to the gentlewoman from nevada, mi titus. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized. ms. titus: thank you. i'm here to discuss provisions in the underlying bill that relate to the state of nevada. provision that is are identical to language in last year's bill to try and restart the failed ym nuclear waste dump outside my congressional district. first, with all due respect let me correct my friend across the aisle. ym is not a defense -- yucca mountain is not a defense repository, it's a commercial nuclear power plant repository. let's be clear about that.
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second, a recent supplemental environmental impact statement by the n.r.c. confirmed what we in nevada have known for decades. ym is not a secure -- yucca mountain is not a secure depository that would secure dangerous waste safely for a million years. it's a proposal based on bad science and faulty assumptions. specifically, the n.r.c. confirmed that the site is not secure. that it will leak. and that radiation will travel for miles through underground water sources to farming communities on its way to death valley national park. but before the radioactive material can leak out of the ground, it first has to be shipped using untested procedures by truck and by rail through nearly every state and every congressional district in the lower 48. these shipments will occur for decades passing homes and schools, parks and hospitals, churches and farms. they will pass-through the heart of my congressional district along the famed las vegas strip
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where 42 million people come every year to work and play. so we need to stop the yucca mountain boondoggle once and for all and turn instead to recommendations from the blue ribbon commission on nuclear waste, including my legislation, the nuclear waste informed consent act. congress must either accept this reality and work towards actual solutions or we can continue this charade through every appropriation season whereby language to fund yucca shows up in bills so politician can continue to collect checks from the nuclear industry -- nuclear energy strifment thank you. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady reserves. the gentleman from washington is recognized. mr. newhouse: thank you, mr. speaker. i do want to thank the gentlelady from new york for her comments as it relates to the moral and legal obligation of the federal government to continue the nuclear cleanup -- nuclear waste cleanup that we have all over this country. and the lady from nevada
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certainly has voiced some concerns that we have heard before that are important to people in the state of nevada. let me just remind everyone that we are under a modified open rule. if there are changes to this bill, every member in this body has an opportunity to provide amendments to this bill. under a modified open rule everything is on the table. if that is something that she can get the support of the majority of people on this floor, then that certainly is something she could take out of this bill. but i have another opinion, another viewpoint, i have been to yucca mountain. i don't know that there's a perfect place in the universe to store nuclear waste, but yucca mountain to me seemed to be about as close to perfect as you can find. in that mountain you have 1,000 feet of rock. above where the waste would be stored. and you have 1,000 feet of rock
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below. where that storage situation would be. and i should remind the body that yucca mountain is the country's only legal and permanent nuclear repository. it's for both commercial as well as defense waste. and it's a critical component of our efforts to clean up the defense nuclear waste created during and after world war ii. while i appreciate the lady's differing opinion, she does have the opportunity to offer amendments. i would encourage her to do that. with that, mr. speaker, i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentlelady from new york is recognized. ms. slaughter: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, if we defeat the previous question i will offer an amendment to the rule to bring up comprehensive legislation that provides the resources needed to help the families in the city of flint, michigan, recover from the water crisis. the families of flint act
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authored by mr. kildee will provide for long-term investments in infrastructure and care for children affected by the crisis. mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to insert the text of the amendment in the record along with extraneous material immediately prior to the vote on the previous question. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. ms. slaughter: to discuss our proposal, i yield five minutes to the distinguished man from michigan, mr. kildee. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. kildee: thank you, mr. speaker. i thank my friend for offering this previous question and for yielding to me. i urge my colleagues to vote no on the previous question so we can immediately bring up h.r. 4479, which is described is the families of flint act. we all know this story. many members have heard me talk about it here on the floor of the house before. in short, the city of flint had been a struggling community already because of the loss of jobs. and then the state of michigan, just a few years ago, cut one of
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the three essential elements to keep that city running. state revenue sharing. which threw the city into financial crisis. the state's response, appoint a financial manager and emergency manager to take over the city government, suspend democracy, and essentially act in dictatorial form. one of the decision that is that emergency manager made was to move the city from using great lakes water as its primary drinking water source to use the flint river. a highly could rose i have river just to save money. and they did save money. leadater untreated, caused to go into the homes of 100,000 people. there are consequences to that decision. the lives of children, the lives
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of people in flint are permanently affected. 9,000 children under the age of six could bear scars of this poisoning for the rest of their lives. lead is a neurotoxin, it affects brain development. its impact is permanent. but with help, people can overcome the effect of this kind of lead exposure. the failure by the michigan department of environmental quality, the terrible mistakes made by the emergency manager cannot be undone. the effects can't be changed. but what we can do is make it right for the people of flint. we can prevent another exposure and in the kildee-upton bill would do that, but just preventing the next flint isn't enough. we have to make it right for the people of flint. the families of flint act would do that and provide clean
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drinking water and provide support to get rid of those lead-surface lines so this does not happen again. but importantly, the families of flint act would also provide the ongoing support for those families in flint to give them the kind of health care that they need to overcome the effect of lead exposure, monitoring of their health, but especially would provide for kids who should get every opportunity to overcome the effects of lead exposure by providing to those 9,000 children the same thing that any of us would do for our own children if they had a developmental hurdle to overcome, the kind of behavioral support, the kind of enrichment opportunities that many of these kids because they are born in poverty in flint, don't have access to, this would provide
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that for them to make sure they have a chance to overcome this terrible crisis. justice for the people of flint will come in many forms. some people have been fired some have been criminally charged, but none of that does any good for the people of my hometown unless we restore to them the opportunity that the kids in flint and that the families in flint and like any other american expects to have for their kid. justice comes in lots of forms. our job in congress is to make sure we seek justice for the people in our country. and when one community, one group of folks are struggling, facing a disaster, facing the biggest challenge that the community has ever faced, it's our duty, it's our job, it's our responsibility to come together to help them. the families of flint act would do that by providing federal
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help that would be required to have state support equal to what the federal government provides. basically rather than legitimating who is at fault, we fix the problem and realize that the people who live in flint have a right to have their federal government step up for them. even if it was prime aerially the -- primely the them. and when they face the greatest crisis they ever have and expect that congress would provide for them the relief to get through this disaster. and we have done it in other cases and there are times when we come together as americans. this is one of those times. congress must act. congress should do its job and by defeating the previous question, we could bring up the families of flint act and with that, i thank you.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from washington is recognized. mr. newhouse: thank you, mr. speaker, i would just inquire if the gentlelady has any further speakers. ms. slaughter: i have no further speakers and i'm prepared to close. mr. newhouse: as am i. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized. ms. slaughter: mr. speaker, we have today an opportunity to fund groundbreaking cutting edge research all across the country to protect our precious environment and support the army corps of engineers. but the addition of policy riders will inhibit those goals and have no place in the appropriations process. mr. speaker, i urge my colleagues to vote no and defeat the previous question and to vote no on the rule. and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields. the gentleman from washington is recognized. mr. newhouse: thank you, mr. speaker. i thank the good lady from new york.
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the rule we consider provides for consideration of a very important piece of legislation that will protect our country from security threats, ensure we have a modern, safe, reliable u.s. nuclear weapons program, will promote an all of the above strategy and investments in water resources and infrastructure projects of the the funds appropriated for national security means improvements in our nation's infrastructure, domestic energy development and growing our economy that will benefit all americans. this bill is a responsible measure that supports u.s. national security, energy research, water resource development and economic competitiveness, balancing these critical priorities while maintaining tight budget caps. in the current fiscal climate where our national debt is approaching a staggering $20 trillion, many difficult decisions had to be made by the committee in drafting this
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measure and i believe that we have a bill that preserves fiscal responsibility, advances sound conservative and pro growth economic poll cyst and priorityes funding for our country's most pressing needs. the past few years have seen increased security threats highlighting the need to keep our country at the opinion call of nuclear security preparedness and investing in domestic energy production that takes much needed steps towards energy independence. in the western united states, americans have endured severe droughts and catastrophic wildfires which have restricted the availability of water and devastated ground infrastructure. this legislation addresses these issues as well as many others and invests in efforts to promote a more secure and prosperous future for our
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nation. mr. speaker, the 2017 energy and water development bill also includes much needed conservation reforms and policies, conservative reforms and policies to counter the administration'sishance of one crippling policy after another and undermining overall economic growth. h.r. 5055 prohibits the e.p.a. and the army corps from implementing the excessive rule which would expand federal jurisdiction over our water resources, prevents any changes to federal authority under the clean water act and impedes efforts to apply the clean water act in certain agricultural areas such as farm ponds and irrigation ditches. the legislation blocks efforts to remove federal dams and protects americans' second amendment rights by allowing for
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the possession of firearms on army corps' lands. it continues a policy that restricts funds being used to enter into nonnuclear pro livers contracts with russia. this bill funds infrastructure, water and defense programs that are critical to our national security, to our safety and to our economic competitiveness. all while making tough choices to ensure that taxpayers' funds are spent wisely. i urge my colleagues to support the rule's adoption and invest in a secure and prosperous future for our country bypassing the 2017 energy and water development bill. i yield back and i move the previous question on the resolution. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields. the question is on ordering the
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previous question on the resolution. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it. ms. slaughter: mr. speaker, i request the yeas and nays and urge a no vote. the speaker pro tempore: the yeas and nays are requested. those in favor of a vote by the yeas and nays will rise. a sufficient number having arisen, the yeas and nays are ordered the members will record their votes by electronic device. pursuant to clause 8 and clause 9 of rule 20, this is a 15-minute vote ordering the previous question. will be followed by a five-minute vote on the adoption of house resolution 743 if ordered, ordering the previous question on house resolution 742, adoption of house resolution 734, if ordered and the motion to suspend the rules
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nd pass h.r. 5077. this is a 15-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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