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tv   Key Capitol Hill Hearings  CSPAN  June 24, 2016 6:45pm-12:01am EDT

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mr. trump: we're going to do a ribbon-cutting, ok? mr. trump: where are the council people? get some of them if you want. that's right. she's tough. say, whoa. [laughter] ♪ ok, we do it on three, ok? we do it on three. one, two, three. [applause] thank you, everybody. thank you.
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>> thank you, mr. trump. that was perfect. thank you. >> do you have a message for -- >> no. >> are you concerned about running into david cameron too uch? tsca you worried about and vermont wanting to break off now? -- texas and vermont wanting to break off now?
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[captioning performed by the national captioning institute, which is responsible for its caption content and accuracy. visit ncicap.org] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2016] >> british voters not only shock the world and financial markets, but also handed hillary clinton a potential economic burden. the reporting of joseph schatz who write for "politico," he's joining us on the phone from ondon. thank you for being with us. guest: thanks for having me. host: i want to talk about the political implications. any parallels to the u.s. but first, give us a sense from your vantage point in london how the day unfolded. guest: basically the polls closed late last night. london time. and for the first few hours as results came in it looked like the expectation was that the remain crowd, the crowd that wanted to stay in the e.u., was probably going to pull it out. but then things shifted overnight as particularly towns in the northeast of england came in very heavily anti-e.u., pro-leave. and by about 5:00 a.m. local
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time here the bbc was calling it. saying that in fact brish britain had voted to leave the e.u. that set off a chain of events. first the british pound started plummeting. in currency markets. you started seeing trouble in the asian markets. and soon after that prime minister david cameron announced that he would be resigning effective in the autumn. basically the party, there's a four-month basically succession election plan or process rather. -- is he suggestion election plan or process, rather. there will be a plan for who comes next. after that you saw the bank of england, governor, come out and pledge to do everything he can to keep financial markets stable and to back up british banks. and for the rest of the day, you kind of saw reaction from europe, obviously top european union leaders have hoped that britain would vote to stay.
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and now that they're not, that's going to start an enormously complicated probably two-year process of kind of disentangling the u.k. from the e.u. that's kind of where we are right now. host: as you're reporting, this is the splintering of the world's largest political union and trading block, an $18 trillion economy. we're seeing the impact here in the u.s. on wall street. but long term, what are the political implications for hillary clinton and donald trump? guest: right, well, basically when it comes to donald trump has obviously -- he's expressed support for the brexit movement. and today he's actually over in scotland. he said, you know, it's a great thing they are taking back their country. whether -- there have been a lot of parallels drawn between some of the anti-immigrant sentiment that's been evident in the brexit campaign here and kind of what's going on in the u.s. presidential campaign as well. parallels being drawn there.
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although it's important to remember that the brexit -- the debate over britain's role in the e.u. does go back decades. but for hillary clinton, the issue may be kind of -- brexit, there's a decent chance that you could see kind of a brexit-fueled economic down turn in europe that could bleed over to the u.s. kind of complicate secretary clinton's -- her message that the economy's improving. and make things harder for her in the fall. host: i'm reminded the election of the conservative party leader maggie thatcher back in 1979, many said that was a precursor to the u.s. election of ronald reagan in 1980. from your standpoint in what we've seen over the last 24 hours in the united kingdom, is that a fair analogy or comparison? guest: i like the fair analogy. i think it's easy to overstate potentially the parallels. because, again, as you point out, just now, the issue of kind of britain's role in
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europe and this feeling that the brits here want to kind of take control, take more control away from brewer contract dems brussels, that's a long standing issue here and it predates donald trump, it predates kind of the rise of the sort of, you know, populism you're seeing in the u.s. right now, particularly in the republican primary. and so i'd be wary of -- there's definitely -- there's definitely similarities. but i'd be wary at this point of drawing too many parallels between what's happening here and what's happening there in terms of what it could mean in the u.s. presidential election. host: in looking at results today, the map of the united kingdom, -- kingdom, it was clearly northern ireland, scotland and the greater london area supported the remain campaign but the rest of the wanted to exit. wanted to leave the e.u. yet some of the polls indicated that the remain campaign was leading, so what happened in the final analysis? guest: it seems that they misrepresented who showed up. you saw a big turnout across the board.
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but particularly in those areas. saw about 70% turnout here, which is more than they usually ave in big national elections. the leave camp, particularly in towns in northeast england, really showed up. what was happening last night is the vote counting was happening, in places like london would you see strong votes to stay in the e.u. but they were countered by the fact that the leave camp was really running up the total. running up their totals in other parts of the country. kind of the folks in scotland and northern ireland and london who wanted to stay weren't matching those totals. they weren't coming out in the same numbers. partially turnout. there was also a weather issue that i'm sure there will be lots of debate in the coming days about what happened. there was flooding in yesterday that prompted some polling stations to be moved. but it was always going to be close. it was always, you know, right down -- even though the polls were trending a little bit, seemed to be trending toward the remain camp, they were
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very, very tight. it was too close to call right up until the end. host: joseph schatz. his work available online at politico.com. thank you for being with us. guest: thank you very much. [captioning performed by the national captioning institute, which is responsible for its caption content and accuracy. visit ncicap.org] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2016] >> hillary clinton is in indianapolis this weekend for a meeting of the u.s. conference of mayors. she is speaking to the gathering at 4:00 p.m. eastern on sunday. and you can see that live here on c-span. and then sunday evening, bernie sanders who sat down for an interview with c-span discusses the 2016 campaign. his life and career. you can see that at 6:30 and :30 p.m. here on c-span. >> the hard-fought 2016 primary season is over with historic conventions to follow this summer. >> colorado, florida, texas, ohio. >> watch c-span as the delegates consider the nomination of the first woman ever to head a major political
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party. and the first nonpolitician in several decades. watch live on c-span. listen on the c-span radio app. or get video on-demand at cspan.org. you have a front row seat to every minute of both conventions on c-span, all eginning on monday, july 18. >> house speaker paul ryan and congressman kevin brady who chairs the ways and means committee today unveiled the house g.o.p. tax proposal. they say their plan would simplify the tax code and decrease taxes. this is 25 minutes .
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mr. brady: good morning, everyone. i'm kevin brady, chairman of the house ways and means committee. america is the greatest country on earth. we don't have to settle for second-rate economy where paychecks are flat and millions of qualified americans can't find full-time work. and why is america growing weaker while our foreign competitors grow stronger? the problem is the costly, complex and unfair tax code that washington imposes on hardworking taxpayers. house republicans, led by our speaker paul ryan, see a better way. and today we propose a new tax code for the american people, a tax code built for growth, for the growth of paychecks, for the growth of local jobs and the economy and the growth of america's economy. and first, we unleash new job creation. with the lowest taxes in modern history on local businesses,
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small or large, corporations or family owned and here's why. washington must take less from these job creators so they can grow the local economy rather than washington's economy. for the first time in history, we'll change the way america taxes its businesses so they can compete and win, whether on ain street or in madrid. and when they win, they will not be charged one dime to bring those profits back home here to america to be invested in good jobs, research and growth. for the first time, we'll end the penalties in the current tax code that too often force american companies to move their jobs, their technologies and headquarters overseas. no longer will we be the only major country that still taxes its own exports. no longer will american products lose out to foreign competitors simply because they're proudly stamped "made
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in america. for the first time, local businesses will be able to immediately write off unlimited investments in building, equipment and technology. this new wave of business investment coarsing through our local economies will be a strong catalyst for more jobs along main street. for the first time since it was established in 1916, we will end the death tax so family-owned farms and businesses will never again fear the i.r.s. swooping in and taking nearly half of the nest egg they worked a lifetime to build. the result of this built for growth tax code is that america will leapfrog from dead last among our foreign competitors to firmly in the lead pact of pro-jobs tax code in the world. americans are sick of this huge complex tax code riddled with special breaks for others and othing but headaches for
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them. for years hardworking taxpayers have asked washington for a tax code so simple and fair and understandable that it could fit on a postcard. we've been listening and that is exactly what we propose. for the first time in modern history, a tax code simple and fair enough to fit on a postcard. this postcard form will simplify the number of tax brackets by more than half. it will take less from taxpayers at every income level because washington takes too much of your hard-earned dollars. nd to make it easier to save for retirement and grow the local economy, we will cut taxes on savings and investment o half the regular rate. the postcard we propose will include help with the basics -- home and children, charity and college. it will be that simple.
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it will be that fair. but make no mistake, america. make no mistake, it is not our tax code, but yours for before this new tax reform proposal is introduced into law, we will be asking the american people do you want simple in fair or more complicated with more loopholes in sending more money to washington? listening. finally, a simpler, fair tax code demand simple, fair. we will bust up the irs as it is today, redesigning it in to three smaller, more focused units to serve as mrs. -- to serve businesses and quickly and affordably resolving tax disputes. an independent and
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unbiased small claims court so families and small businesses aren't forced to spend thousands of dollars to resolve a routine tax. here is a challenge going forward. happens once a generation and it can be too easily hijacked by washington and special interests. at this urgent moment in history as america struggles to obtain it standing in the world and american struggle to retain their standard of living, we cannot afford to continue to struggle under this tax code. house republicans believe it's time for a change. it's time to let your voice be heard. if you want more local jobs, speak up. if you want a simple and fair postcard, speak up and like us, if you want america to be the strongest economy on earth for you and your children, it's time to speak up. loudly.
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>> i want to congratulate kevin brady into the ways and means committee to the hard work they to this point.et this plan represents over 50 members of congress who brought their ideas forward as well and who represent every region of this country. everybody knows this tax code is broken. it's one of the things holding back our economy. i am tired of seeing american companies leave america to be able to remain competitive. senset it make a lot more to fix the problems causing american businesses to leave just to be competitive?
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completely reorganizes the tax code we all know is broken. it creates a more simplified program that makes it easier for families to save for their retirement, makes it easier for small businesses to grow. we completely eliminate the debt , one of the tax biggest threats to small businesses being able to stay in family hands so if you build a business, you can pass it on to your kids. that is one of the things this tax code destroys. that the irseen target people based on their political views. doesn't it make sense to rein in the i.r.s., take power away from the i.r.s. and put that power back in the hands of families all around this country with a more simplified postcard-sized
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tax code? a tax code where you can actually fill out your taxes on a postcard while still being able to have your mortgage interest deductions and your charitable contributions that families love all around this country. so this is a great day to be able to talk about the contrast of between a pro-growth, bold idea like a tax code that's simplified that the republicans are bringing forward versus the old failed way that president obama and liberals in washington want to continue to keep growing where the i.r.s. stays powerful. and has so much influence over destroying our economy. so it's an exciting day. a lot of great work has been done by kevin brady and the ways and means committee to bring us to this point and it's a great contrast we can bring forward now to the american people in these next few months because ultimately the american people will make this decision in november. do they want a more simplified tax code that puts more power in the hands of families by taking it away from the i.r.s. and bureaucrats in washington? to talk more about this is somebody who knows a lot about tax policy. before he was speaker, he had another job.
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chairman of the ways and means committee which he still probably wonders about sometimes but brady is not giving that up. our speaker of the house, paul ryan. [applause] speaker ryan: i used to know something about tax policy. this job takes it away from you. no. just kidding. thank you very much. i just want to say how proud i am of my fellow colleagues. they have done outstanding work over the last six months. they have put together a serious principled agenda for 2017. this tax reform plan is absolutely no exception. the way i'd sum it up. we want a tax code that works for taxpayers, not for tax collectors. we want to make it simpler, flatter, fairer. bring the number of tax brackets down from seven to three. lower rates for every hardworking american, bringing the top rate down to 33%.
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consolidate those deductions and credits. make it so simple that the average american can do their taxes on a postcard and that the i.r.s. -- the average i.r.s. agent can actually understand. more than that, we want america to be the best place in the world to do business. we cut taxes on small businesses. we lower their top tax rate to 25%. we cut our corporate tax rate, which is the highest in the industrialized world, down to 20% from 35%. stop taxing people when they bring their money into our country so they bring more. stop taxing new investments. don't punish people for saving and for investing.
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reward them. all of these things are going to grow our economy and create jobs. all of these things, these reforms will raise our wages right here in america. and finally, the i.r.s. needs to get its act together. it needs to put taxpayers first so we overhaul and streamline the internal revenue service. we install a new commissioner and we clear out the bureaucracy and we update their technology so taxpayers can get help in the privacy that they deserve. all of these things will fix our tax code, and all six parts of this agenda will get our country back on track. i think it's good to remember why we started this project in the first place. we did it because we are living in a very uncertain time in america. 70% of americans think america is headed in the wrong direction. we agree with that, but the way we see it that means that we have an obligation. we have a moral duty and an obligation to offer a better way, to give our fellow citizens who are so worried about the direction of this country a new direction, a better way.
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a better way to lift people out of poverty, a better way to keep america safe, a better way to grow our economy, to protect self-government, a better way to fix our health care and now a better way to fix our tax code. if you want to learn more about all six of our planned parts, go to better.gop. to close, i want to say how i see this moment we are in. we are going into a global economy that is faster than anything we have ever seen before. one part of our country is ok with this. another part of our country is very concerned, very anxious and very skeptical about this. they're wondering, how are we going to be able to preserve our values? how are we going to be able to preserve opportunity for everyone in america?
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how are we going to be able to keep america strong and safe? really, the question is -- are we, america, going to shape the global economy or is it going to shape us? i think with this plan, once again america will take the lead. with this plan, everyone in our country, the anxious and the eager, the old america and the new america can unite and build a confidence america. with this plan, we can take our founding principles, these beautiful animating principles that built this wonderful, exceptional country in the first place -- liberty, freedom, free enterprise, government by consent and we can bring and breathe life of these principles into the 21st century. with this plan we can turn this country around and expand opportunity for all americans. this is what our country needs. this is a better way. thank you very much. [applause]
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we'd like to take questions. i want to bring chairman brady up to answer questions about tax plans and if there is possibly a question on something else i'll take those afterwards. mr. brady. mr. brady: thank you. questions. yes, sir. reporter: for both of you, this plan, what do you view in here as a sacrifice for or departure from your ideals to deal with the revenue constraints? mr. brady: we designed this to be revenue neutral on how our economy will grow under this. in my view, we have delivered a detailed plan on how to grow the economy, especially along main street, a detailed plan to simplify the tax code for most families, a detailed plan to actually return power to americans rather than washington, d.c.
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and the most important part of this whole day is to say, america, we're not imposing a tax code, we're proposing a new simpler, fairer tax code and now it's your turn to have a say. we will be listening as republicans, the american people through this year to get their thoughts and their ideas at every step of the way, we'll make this blueprint better. every step of the way we're going to make it better for the american people and we are doing all this to introduce a tax bill to move it in 2017. so this is a serious discussion with the american people and we're ready to listen. mr. speaker: ditto. reporter: this could be both of you. you talked about the global economy and i wondered if you're concerned about the economic uncertainty that could be caused by the brexit. mr. brady: well -
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mr. speaker: obviously the markets will react when new news and information like this occurs. i believe markets will eventually stabilize. that's point number one. point number two, all the more reason for america to lead. america needs to lead. the world wants america to lead and with this tax reform plan, america will clearly be leading. and in so many ways, by having a code -- in the ways and means committee, they had to make a decision. get a system so it's in the middle of the pact with the rest of the country or world or do we have a plan that leapfrogs the rest of the world? this leapfrogs and leads the rest of the world. for the moments of uncertainty around the globe, having strong, powerful, confident, american economic leadership is in need and this does that. mr. brady: yes. reporter: regarding the postcard. is that an illustration or is
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that one of the goals for the tax plan? mr. brady: one of the goals is to make this code so simple and understandable for people that they can file it on a postcard. when you look at it in the blueprint, you can see, you know, one real serious tax cut for savings investments. that's not only good for families, it grows the economy in a major way. you're seeing the basics -- the mortgage interest deduction and charitable deduction. we want people to give to their local church or local charity. you'll see help with raising kids which is so expensive and college costs which is so expensive as well. it will include people to move to toward and the economic ladder. it's a postcard. it's as simple and fair as that. so the key question for america is, do you want a code that simple and understandable or we can load that postcard up with dozens, if not hundreds of special interest provisions as long as everyone understands.
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that means you have to send far more money to washington and sort of beg to get it back to your pocketbook. and we're thinking the american people want to keep those dollars in their family, their pocketbook and their local economy. but we're going to be listening to the american people about whether they want that simple and fair postcard. yes. reporter: can you go into more detail about the deductions? how would you treat tax deferred savings for retirement? mr. brady: well, two things. go to the blueprint and you'll see the layout where we want to go. as you imagine to lower rates and to simplify things, we have to -- we have to take a lot of the special provisions and set them aside so that the code is lower and fairer and flatter.
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from that standpoint, we know that grows the economy and we know it can go forward. what was the second part? we put a real premium on savings investment and so the ways and means committee, along with house republicans, will continue work to simplify the way we save. today there are just too many provisions. it's really complicated. i think we have teenage boys so we're saving for college. i think the cheat sheet for the savings provisions on college is 90 pages long. that's a simplified summary of it. we think we can do a lot better than that. so the committee and house republicans are also continuing work to simplify the way we save. we think there is a better way. yes, ma'am. reporter: the rate structure you guys are proposing here is a departure from the past budget blueprints that speaker ryan and you guys voted on. can you explain how you got to these rates now and how it evolved from the budget blueprint? mr. brady: think about this, when president reagan started his reform, there were 15 tax brackets and today we're proposing just three. what we do is we consolidate
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down those tax rates. and so we simplify by lowering them at every level effectively eliminating the 10% bracket. and we do that in a way that simplifies and grows the economy. we also do it in a way that this fits within our budget. it's revenue neutral within real-life analysis of the economy. those were key goals. and so if you combined lower and simpler tax code with real pro-growth incentives for business and a completely different i.r.s., we think we position america for much stronger economic future going forward, certainly than what we have today. reporter: 30% tax rate, are you saying it would not have been possible to get down to the 25% in the budget blueprint in a revenue neutral way? mr. brady: we followed the principles we laid out simpler, flatter.
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we think this guarantees certainly makes more certain tax relief at every income level and does it in a fairer and fairer and simpler way so those -- flatter and simpler way so those principles were -- reporter: can i follow up on the brexit vote. mr. speaker: after the tax question. reporter: what do you make of the political environment behind the anti-establishment vote? do you think there are parallels for our elections in the fall? mr. speaker: well, sure. the question is about the brexit vote. i do believe -- look, as an american, we value the principle of sovereignty, self-determination, government by consent and limited government. these are very important principles and these principles are being expressed here at home and around the world. so we clearly understand the thinking behind these principles. let me just say since you're going off the tax script i'll go off it for this moment, deidre.
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england is our indispensible ally. our friends in the united kingdom is an indispensible relationship, period, end of story. >> last question. mr. brady: yes, ma'am. reporter: you talk a lot about [inaudible] do you have any plans to do some sort of formal solicitation for comment or hit the road and have town halls? mr. brady: all of the above. the invitation to speak out and for us to listen begins this moment. we have our better way website, the blueprint.
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we have at ways and meansandmeanscommittee.gov/bluep meansandmeanscommittee.gov/bluep meansandmeanscommittee.gov/bluep also, ways and means house republicans we will be going throughout our districts throughout the country basically asking people, is this a simple and fair tax reform that you want or do we want to continue with the same complex, burdensome, almost unknowing tax code that we have today? and as we do that listing, we will be preparing for tax legislation in 2017 and moving to fix this broken code. mr. speaker: all right. thank you, everybody. appreciate it. [applause]
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>> sunday on newsmakers, texas congressman jeb hensarling. you'll talk about monetary policy, his ideas for replacing the dodd frank financial legislation law and the democratic sit in on the house floor this week. newsmakers is on c-span sunday 10:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. eastern forsunday, hillary clinton a meeting with the u.s. conference of mayors speaking to the gathering at 4:00 p.m. eastern on sunday. you can see that life here on live here on c-span. senate of the the body has come to this conclusion.
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television in the senate will provide citizens with greater access and exposure to the actions of this body. this access will help all americans to be better informed of the problems and issues which face this nation on a day by day basis. >> during the election, i had the occasion of meeting a woman who had supported me in my campaign and she decided to come to shake my hand and take a photograph. a wonderful woman. she wasn't asking for anything and i was very grateful she took the time to come by. it was an exceptional moment except the fact she was born in margueriter name was lewis, an african-american woman born in louisiana. ,orn in the shadow of slavery born at a time when the lynchings were commonplace, at a
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time when african-americans and women could not vote. country from the time of its founding until the mid-1980's to build up a national debt of $850 billion which was the size of the stimulus package when it came over. we're talking about a real, borrowed money. >> 30 years of coverage of the list tenant on c-span2. -- coverage of the u.s. senate on c-span2. morning, saturday european union ambassador to the u.s. david o'sullivan will britain vote to leave the european union means from a diplomatic standpoint. daniel griswold will take a
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look at britain's eu referendum vote and what it means for u.s. interests. be sure to watch washington journal beginning live at 7:00 eastern saturday morning. join the discussion. >> a fairly big decision day in the supreme court yesterday and we are joined by lawrence hurley. correspondent for thompson reuters. the headline this morning in financial times, the supreme court deals a heavy blow to obama's immigration legacy. tell us about the case and what the court decided. guest: this was president obama's bid to try and revive a program that would protect up to four million immigrants from deportation and allow them to work in the country that had been struck down by lower courts. the supreme court took up this case, they actually didn't reach a decision. they deadlocked, 4-4. so there's no -- for us reporters trying to get the
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news out, there was no written opinion like you normally get in the cases. just like one sentence saying the court was equally divided that means the lower court decision was upheld. kind of on a technicality. host: what was the president's plan that was tested here by the court in the lower courts? guest: this was obama's 2014 executive action that was aimed have -- g people who who have been in the country a long time. who have children who are u.s. citizens or permanent residents. who don't have criminal records. it would allow them to stay in the country and be protected from deportation and also give them work authorization. that would affect up to four million people. it's a large number of the estimated 11 million or so people who are in the country illegally. and it was obama's last effort
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to try and do something big on immigration before he leaves office. host: in that financial times piece they write about that, mr. obama who campaigned as an immigration reformer in 2008 was later stymied by congress, unveiled his unilateral plan in 2014 and was immediately castigated by republicans as an imperial president. they write the case will now be sent back to the lower court in texas for the legality. it will take several months. it will not be over by the time a president takes office. a new president could decide to pursue the case. drop the obama plan enthrire, or modify it to make it more legally palatable. are there any other immigration issues pending before the supreme court? guest: not before the supreme court. the deissue here on the court actually not ruling in a decisive way on this is it does leave the legal question unresolved. even though the lower court
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decision was upheld, that's not really binding nationally. it's not binding on any future president. if the -- either if a future president such as hillary clinton continues to try and fight to revive obama's plan, which is probably a long shot, or if they try something different, there could be some possibility of doing something on immigration. depending on what happens at the supreme court, obviously where it's currently one just as short because of the death of justice scalia. host: lawrence hurley is our guest, with thompson reuters covering the supreme court. we look forward to your calls and comments on the immigration case and a couple of other decisions that came down from the court yesterday. 202-748-8001 the number to call for republicans. 202-748, 8,000 for democrats. and for independents and all others, that's 202-748-8002. c-spanwj.tweet at
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the president reacted to the news yesterday, short briefing at the white house. president obama: although i'm disappointed by the lack of decision today by the supreme court, a deadlock, this does not substantially change the status quo, and it doesn't negate what has always been the case which is, if we're really going to solve this problem effectively, we've got to have congress pass a law. i have pushed to the limits of my executive authority. we now have to have congress act. and hopefully we're going to have a vigorous debate during this election. that's how democracy is supposed to work. and there will be a determination as to which direction we go in. host: the president talked
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about the limits to his executive authority. this is not the only case where that's been tested over the past eight years, is it? guest: no. republicans have constantly been complaining about obama's use of the executive powers. a lot is in terms of interpreting government regulations. particularly in the environmental area. such as the administration's efforts to deal with climate change, which they have had to push through administrative action through the environmental protection agency because congress didn't pass any climate change legislation. host: to our callers, katherine is waiting in new hampshire. for -- on our independents line. go ahead. caller: good morning. i have a suggestion. and it might help in the future. instead of nine supreme court justices, there should be a 10th. there should be 10 supreme
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court justices. nine of the justices would hear and rule on cases. the 10th would not sit on the court and would only be a substitute if, sadly, one of the nine became really ill or died. this way there would always be nine justices and there wouldn't be this 4-4 deadlock. and a lot of things have substitutes. football games, basketball games, schoolteachers in schools, and why not the supreme court? host: on this case in particular it's an 8-8 tie, the united states v. texas, a great little resource at reuters.com in terms of the cases that were just announced, was this case heard by antonin scalia? guest: not this one. the oral argument was in april after he died. there were -- there was a couple of cases that the court did hear before he died ended
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up being 4-4 splits. i think three in total so far. we still have three more rulings to come. certainly his death has affected the court's ability to decide some cases. host: another case that was reported out yesterday, the decision handed down in the affirmative action case, this one fisher v. university of texas at austin, a 4-3 decision, here is the graphic at reuters.com. what was the case about and the decision? guest: this was a case where the court ended up upholding the admissions program at the university of texas, austin, which allows for the limited consideration of race as a form of affirmative action to try to increase the diversity in the student body. a little bit of unexpected decision because it was a 4-3 win for the university, with justice kennedy cited with the court's liberals. justice kennedy is a
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conservative who sometimes is the swing vote on the court. he previously has not been supportive of such programs. in fact, this very case was at the court a few years ago and they sent the case back for further litigation. at that time it wasn't clear whether he was willing to uphold it. it's been a surprise. host: we hear from barbara in ohio. democrats line. caller: yes, good morning. i just wanted to applaud john lewis and chris murphy for their efforts to try and get something -- some legislation to control this gun madness that this country is experiencing. host: we appreciate your call. moved on to another topic, barbara. to joe. we're talking about the supreme court decisions. notably, particularly on immigration yesterday. and on affirmative action. this is pritchard, west virginia.
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joe, good morning. caller: good morning. i like c-span a lot and i truly thank god there's a c-span so people can call in. i'm a democrat. i was a republican. i'm a retired coal miner. our area is rampant with unemployment. our -- we're at the bottom of every list in america. i live in the tristate area that surrounds west virginia, kentucky, and ohio. and we have more people here in the last five years that cannot speak english. they are of mexican or spanish descent. they are taking up all the odd jobs. we have a serious unemployment problem here, major, major, major. but there is no jobs because these people have filled the vacuum that these laid off coal miners and other people could -- jobs that they could have taken. the president and the
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democratic party are wrong on this issue. they need to cut or hold on immigration. donald trump is right on this and hillary clinton and the democratic party are wrong because if we don't stop this, britain is a good example of what happens. britain is being overrun and the middle class is being destroyed in the united kingdom. the middle class is being destroyed in the united states and it's all because of corporate interests. you look at everything that happens, if i default on my loans, i have to do bankruptcy or i have to do a prison term, or i have to pay my bills. if i don't pay my medical bills in the state of west virginia, then the state of west virginia bankruptcy is caused by medical payments higher than any other issue in the state of west virginia. host: joe. thanks for that comment. go back to the oral arguments made on immigration and how do
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the administration defend their actions? guest: the administration said that they were merely doing something that they were already allowed to do under immigration law, which is to defer action on deportation, which under the immigration law they can do if they are on a case buy case basis. simply for one reason being they don't have the resources to actually deport everyone who is here. and they also have priorities for how they determine what to focus on. they have chosen, as the president reinforced yesterday, the emphasis is on deporting people who have criminal records and who are not -- who have not lived here very long. so a lot of the stuff that the administration wants to do in this order was things that they can already do. the challenge was the scope of it. the fact that it covered so many people and that it was a kind of uniform action. which states like texas, which
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challenged it, didn't like. one point worth mentioning is that congress would have to pay for the people to be deported because it costs money to do the process. and congress has not done that. so there are only a limited number of people who the government can deport every year. host: lawrence hurley is our guest, supreme court reporter for thompson reuters. we welcome your calls and comments. tweets as well. reaction on twitter yesterday from the likely nominees, hillary clinton. here's what she tweeted yesterday after the supreme court decision. today's heartbreaking immigration ruling could tear apart five million families facing deportation. we must do better. and from the donald trump campaign, donald trump tweeted, south carolina -- supreme court has kept us safe from executive amnessy for now but hillary has pledged to expand it. taking jobs from hispanic and frican-american workers.
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red oak, texas. illa, hello. caller: how are you? host: fine. you're on the air. caller: i would like to say something about the immigration. i think president obama is working to solve the immigration problem and i would also like to say that anybody that would vote for donnell trump is not -- donald trump is not using their senses. that man is psychotic and i don't understand the christian people that have laid their religion down that would vote for donald trump. now, if they send all the hispanic people back, who's going to pick the peaches? who's going to cut the cucumbers? who's going to work in the hotels? who's going to put that hot tar
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on top of the houses to fix the roofs. the white people aren't going to do it. and the black people aren't going to do it. so who is going to do it? host: this is a case brought up according to "usa today," excuse me, the "washington times." a total of 26 states sued the obama administration over the executive order on immigration. the supreme court affirmed an earlier ruling blocking the order in a split decision. a tweet from swrim who says, i heard the lower court ruling was binding nationwide. who knows what the reality is. guest: the injunction that was issued is binding nationwide. and the -- that was upheld by the appeals court. then the supreme court was deadlocked. so that leaves that decision in place. host: albuquerque, new mexico. next up. eddie on the independence line. caller: thank you for having me on. quick question with regards to ffirmative action.
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i doubt there is any kind of real test for many of these people who are checking off the boxes they are african-american, others, others. of course saying who they are. but we're taking them at their word. what is the sense of using things like ancestry.com, actual fluid tests to test these people some of the benefits that they'll be receiving in terms of admissions, maybe possible scholarships, are we too far away from that? is that something that you think people might start to implement? there's a lot of people trying to get in to these colleges. we can go back to elizabeth warren. people say they are 132nd chairee. there needs to be an -- cherokee.
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there needs to be -- we can go to ancestry.com, essentially figure out who these people are. i don't think anybody would have a problem with that. maybe not have the typical characteristics, but if they have the heritage in temples creating a more diverse background. host: eddie we'll get comments from lawrence hurley. guest: i think one university's looking at this. they care about diversity. that's the thing that they are pushing for. when they talk about diversity, they say that they are considering a whole variety of factors. not just about race. they are not allowed to do that anyway. i think when people apply to college, they are looking for anything that will add to the diversity of the student body, whether it's where you're from or economic background and your rate can be a part of that, but it's not the only thing. host: you wrote in this that the plaintiff in this, fisher, you wrote that she said the university denied her admission in favor of less qualified black and hispanic applicants. she maintains that the program violated the u.s. constitution.
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the constitution's guarantee of equal protection under the law. was this -- did she take this case up a couple of times, in a couple of ways? had she come to court before in this case? guest: abigail fisher was a white student who applied to the university of texas. didn't get in. and the university said at the time, that she wouldn't have got in anyway regardless. she sued with the backing of a conservative group that has fought various cases seeking to end racial preferences as they call them. so this case actually went up to the supreme court in 2013 and the court didn't really decide it on the merits. they sent it back for further litigation. then the case continued. went back to the appeals court, then came back up to the supreme court. finally we have a ruling that -- against abigail fisher so she basically spent eight years
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fighting this. she's since graduated from a different college and working in austin for a fortune 500 company. it's a lot of legal fighting and not much in the way of an outcome. host: was she getting legal help from other organizations? guest: she was helped by this conservative legal group. host: here's abilene, texas. good morning to matty. caller: yes, sir. i'm from texas. and unless you live in a border state, you don't understand how bad it is. i'm glad the supreme court ruled as they did. -- if they should have justice scalia had been alive, he would have voted with the four that voted against president obama's executive order. i think he took very much leave
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when he actually did that. that wasn't his job. and i think that there was a lady that called a few minutes ago that was talking about there won't be anybody to make your bed and pick your peaches. that's not what they do in texas. they have their own businesses. they come across the border, they put a phone number on their pick up truck and taking obs away from people that have -- pay taxes, and pay their state tax, and they do all this for cash. and people are out of work here because of that. so i think there probably does need immigration reform. doing it this way is the wrong way. i appreciate it. host: to larry in denver, colorado. also on our independents line. go ahead.
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caller: i was calling to comment on the guy from west virginia who called in and this lady who just finished, the lady from texas just mentioned about the jobs being taken. this thing's been going on for a good 40, 50 years about illegals coming up from texas -- from across the border. taking jobs. the problem that we've got, this is one of the problems we've got, is that businesses are hiring these illegals and paying them under the table and they are taking jobs. it's been going on for a while. you find ellegals are employed much better than -- in this country than the people who stay here. and unless they get this -- the companies to pay or get some kind of a penalty for hiring illegals, this thing is going to continue on. so it's not just the republicans who got it wrong, the obama administration -- got a little bit of it wrong. they just be a little more understanding. really, there's got to be a tightening of the screws on
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companies who hire illegals because as long as they keep paying them under the table, this unemployment thing for american citizens is going to continue on. host: lawrence hurley with thompson reuters, their supreme court reporter. we're looking at some of the key decision that is have come down from the court. wanted to point out reuters.com, their wider image segment, nice photo display or photo site of some of the pictures of the supreme court. we're linkage showing some of those now. the court coming down with decisions yesterday and one more set of decisions for monday. what are the cases still pending? guest: three cases left that will be decided on monday. one is the big abortion case which like the immigration case and the affirmative action case from texas, this was a law that was passed in texas a couple years ago that places significant restrictions on
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abortion clinics. and abortion providers caused up to half the clinics in the state to close down. and the court has to decide whether this law places an undue burden on a woman's right to have an abortion under the urt's 1973 case roe versus wade. so the -- again, the court closely divided 4-4 at the moment between liberals and conservatives. we don't know exactly what's going to happen in that case. then another big case they are waiting for is a case involving the former governor of virginia, bob mcdonnell, who was convicted of corruption. his appeal of his conviction. based on the oral argument we heard back in april, it seemed like he's probably likely to win that case, but we'll wait and see what happens on monday. host: what did you hear in that oral argument, former governor mcdonnell, that would indicate that he may be -- may win that
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case? guest: there seemed to be some concerns on both sides of the ideological divide on the court that the law under which he -- it's unclear whether the law that he was supposed to have violated, whether he had done anything to -- whether the actions he was accused of doing, which was accepting gifts from a friend on be-- whether and his wife it constitutes a criminal act upped the federal bribery laws. host: keep you abreast here of the news overnight. a different story of the news overnight of the e.u. vote in the u.k. voting in the u.k. to leave the european union. some of the reaction to that on the financial markets. headline "usa today" at this hour, stocks plummet on brexit is their headline. we may hear something from president obama today. he's speaking at the global entrepreneurship summit. that's coming up at 1:45
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eastern here on c-span. back to comments on the court to st. louis. we hear from joy on our republican line. welcome. caller: good morning. good morning, c-span. it's unbelievable that the scorte did not come down -- supreme court did not come down 8-0 against president obama's executive order. what happened to the rule of law? crossing the border without a visa is illegal and you should be a felony. host: here's artheir in cincinnati. another view. democrats line. caller: hello. thanks for having me on. what i'm speaking on, i used to live -- i have been across this country, south, east, west, north. i have looked at -- americans, we all came here from somewhere. and they talk about jobs, about the mexicans taking our jobs. those people are taking the
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lowest wage jobs that americans do not want. and if i had been in high class restaurants across this nation, i -- in most cases, it's the mexicans that are cooking our food back in the kitchen. the waitresser, either they are black or white. and the ones i tip is the ones that cook our food. a lot of people don't understand -- a lot of our food is grown in mexico. these people take the lowest -- how many americans are willing to go out in these fields and pick our fruits and vegetables? host: just to -- reflect on arthur's comments, a tweet here says, black stone water work construction any longer. lady is so long. referring to an earlier caller. maybe if they don't want to do it for $8 an hour, but they'll do t what are the numbers in
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this case of the illegal immigrants that the administration would be affected by this -- wasn't an executive order but by this decision of the administration? guest: they said that they were up to four million people, maybe more, who could have applied for this program, which would give them a piece of paper saying they are not going to be deported and would allow them to work legally. one thing that's maybe worth noting is that the fact that the program won't go into effect doesn't mean those people are going to be deported. these people are already here. they have already been here a long time. so on the ground this isn't going to change much. and even the people who oppose this program admitted that the government has the authority to defer action on deportation. so some of the rhetoric may be -- gets beyond their reality of what's actually happening on the ground.
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host: reaction was swift from the white house. we showed you some of president obama's comments. here's some of what speaker ryan, speaker paul ryan had to say yesterday. speaker ryan: i want to say word about the supreme court ruling we just got that halt's the president's executive amnesty. this is a win for the constitution. it's a win for congress. and it's a win in our fight to restore the separation of powers. presidents don't write laws, congress writes laws. this is a case that the house weighed on because it's fundamental to our system of checks and balances. congress, not the president, writes our laws. and today the supreme court validated that very core essential fundamental principle. host: paul ryan from yesterday, that nondecision was a 4-4 split on that case. you write about another 4-4 split. they are split 4-4 in native american tribal court dispute. what's this case about? guest: that's a much smaller case. it's another case where the failure of the court to have a
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majority means this legal issue which will be of concern certainly to some companies and businesses that do work on indian land because it affects whether you can be pulled into indian court or whether you can only be heard in a federal court. or state court. and this is one of now four cases that we have had where the court ended up being deadlocked which shows that the court, on occasion, not all cases, by any means, but some cases they are struggling to get a majority. host: you covered the court on a regular basis. do things feel different, out of sorts at all now that there's this 4-4 split and there's no ninth justice? guest: a couple of differences. one in their oral arguments, which we had towards the end of the term, certainly very different without justice scalia, who was very outspoken and kind of larger than life
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figure. he was always the one who could make jokes, everyone would laugh at. and he would be quite caustic with his remarks sometimes. towards the lawyers or towards even his colleagues sometimes. so the tone of oral argument is different. various people who watch the court notice how it's changed the dynamic of the oral argument. perhaps some justices speaking a bit more. some asking questions they wouldn't have asked before. maybe asking the questions scalia would have asked if he was still there. we n terms of the way cover the court, it certainly led to a little bit of uncertainty from people like me who have to write about it because we're not sure what's what's going to happen. previously when you got nine justices on the court you always know with few exceptions there's going to be a decision at the end of the day. even yesterday when we got the immigration case, there was a
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bit of rucking around the pressroom, people waving pieces of paper. we n.o.w. that was a possibility that would happen, it does -- we new that was a possibility that would happen, it does show we have to be ready for possibility on decision days. host: a few more calls in massachusetts. mark, independent line. caller: good morning, gentlemen. thank you very much. in response to the supreme court immigration ruling and the tie on the 4-4 tie, don't think it's going to make that big a difference. like mr. hurley just said. it's not going to say they are going to get deported immediately. especially in regards to what happened last night in britain with the referendum that has happened in the u.k. and the shock wave that is sent across the world and the markets. just right now i just read that the pound is trading at a
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30-year low as a result of this exit, to exit the e.u. just to finish, to sum it up, in the bigger picture, in my opinion, is that i think the trump supporters should lead the warnings that has happening, or happening right now to britain and their choice to basically exile themselves as a hermit kingdom and heed the warnings, thank you. host: let's go to -- any thoughts? let's go to ted who is in new hampshire. independent line, good morning. caller: how are you? my issue with the immigration is the people that get on social security and draw from it that haven't paid into it. now, they are telling us it's going to be out by 2030. why would you deplete from a
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total account that's been paid in by legal people to give to somebody who hasn't paid in? if you're paying and given housing and medical, and social security, it doesn't make sense. we're kind of cutting the hole in the bag of security and i have -- and our seniors will pay for it. host: any way to tell under the president's program, among these people, are these people paying social security tax? guest: that was one of the issues in the case because the action obama suggested, depending how you interpreted it, could allow people to be eligible for social security. and a lot of immigrants in the country do pay taxes. and i think if anyone is -- does become eligible to pay social security, whether through becoming a lawful permanent resident or citizen, then of course they'll be paying into social security but
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they'll also be eligible to withdraw. host: mary lou on our democrats' line, california. caller: hi, i like mr. hurley what he's saying. he makes sense. i want to know if he knows about the overstay visas and vacation visas, are they doing anything about that? of cubans rillions across laredo and they don't get for thed because the act of 1966 -- get deported because of the act of 1966. when will that get changed? this country is called the united states of america because everybody came from around the world in boats, whatever kind of things they came through, ellis island. and it's called the united states of america. host: did the president's order affect any of those visa overstay people? guest: any big changes on immigration will have to be
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made by congress. doesn't look like it's happening. host: we have been hearing news throughout the morning about the vote yesterday, the u.k. voting to leave the european union and the impact on the markets overseas and this morning on wall street and a statement from the president just released says that in part the people of the united kingdom have spoken. we respect their decision. the special relationship between the united states and the united kingdom is enduring and the united kingdom's membership in nato remains a vital cornerstone of u.s. support and economic policy. some of what president obama had to say. we may hear more later at 1:45 eastern as he's speaking at the global entrepreneurship summit. we'll have that live here on c-span at 1:45. momentarily we'll take you live to the capitol to hear from paul ryan, the house speaker, unveiling tax policy today. we continue with your comments on the decisions of the supreme court. to jasmine in st. petersburg,
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florida. go ahead. democrats line. caller: good morning. i just get so upset. americans get so mad at undocumented workers, but really it's the companies that are hiring them. if the companies didn't hire them, then they wouldn't come. stop being angry at people that just want to make a living. host: let you go there. jasmine, lawrence herly, any final thoughts on the decisions or what you expect on monday's abortion decision? guest: monday will be a big one. the abortion case is very closely looked at. and again the court's closely divided. it could be a complicated decision if they choose to compromise. it could be some kind of compromise decision where they could send it back to the lower court or something. that's what we'll be looking out for. host: lawrence hurley is with thompson reuters, you can follow his report at
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following the decision yesterday of the united kingdom to part ways with the united -- european union fed the eu could set is made up the procedure as both sides tried to negotiate a path forward. the president of the european parliament and other officials have reportedly expressed interest and beginning negotiations before october, which is when the british prime minister david cameron is expected to step down fed one person and support -- step down. one person and support of the farrage.m was nigel he spoke yesterday as votes were coming in. nigel farrage: ladies and
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the don is -- dawn is breaking on a independent united kingdom. [applause] farrage: this, as the predictions, if they are right, this will be a victory for real people. for ordinary people. victory for people. [applause] farrage: we have fought against the multinationals, the big banks, the big politics, we fought against lies in the corruption and deceit. believe inhonestly,
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a nation, is going to win. [applause] farrage: and we will have ,one it without having to fight without a single bullet be in -- being fired. through people like my friend mr. banks. [applause] and by people in the labour party and the conservative party, and ukip and of no party, who have taken part in the campaign. and we have done it, not just for ourselves. we will have done it for the whole of europe. i hope this victory brings down this failed project and believes a europe of sovereign states
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trading together, the and friends -- being friends together, and let's get rid of the emblem and brussels and all that has gone wrong. [applause] let's --rage: june 23 go down as our independence day. [applause] farrage: -- >> once the results were official, david cameron announced that he would step down by the end of october. he gave a statement to the media, explaining his decision and what it would mean for negotiations going forward.
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prime minister cameron: good morning, everyone. the country has just taken part in a giant democratic exercise, perhaps the biggest in our history. over 33 million people from england, scotland, wales, northern ireland and gibraltar have all had their say. we should be proud of the fact in these islands we trust the people with these big decisions. we not only have a parliamentary democracy, but on questions about the arrangements for how we're governed, there are times when it is right to ask the people themselves and that is what we have done. the british people have voted to leave the european union and their will must be respected. i want to thank everyone who took part in the campaign on my side of the argument, including all those who put aside party differences to speak in what they believed was the national interest. and let me congratulate all
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those who took part in the leave campaign, for the spirited and passionate case they made. the win of the british people is an instruction that must be delivered. it was not a decision that was taken lightly, not least because so many things were said by so many different organizations about the significance of this decision. so there can be no doubt about the result. across the world, people have been watching the choice that britain has made. i would reassure those markets and investors that britain's economy is fundamentally strong, and i would also reassure brits living in europe and countries -- european countries and european citizens living here that there will be no immediate changes in your circumstances. there will be no initial change in the way our people can travel, in the way our goods can move or the way our services can be sold. we must now prepare for a
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negotiation with the european union. this will need to involve the full engagement of the scottish, welsh and northern ireland governments to ensure that the interests of all parts of our united kingdom are protected and advanced. but above all, this will require strong, determined and committed leadership. i'm very proud and very honored to have been prime minister of this country for six years. i believe we made great steps with more people in work than ever before in our history, with reforms to welfare and education, increasing people's life chances, building a bigger and stronger society, keeping our promises to the poorest people in the world and enabling those who love each other to get married whatever their sexuality. but above all, restoring britain's economic strength. and i'm grateful to everyone who's helped to make that happen.
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i've also always believed we have to confront big decisions, not duck them. that is why we delivered the first coalition government in 70 years to bring our economy back from the brink. it's why we delivered a fair, legal and decisive referendum in scotland. and it's why i made the pledge to renegotiate britain's position in the european union and to hold the referendum on our membership and have carried those things out. i fought this campaign in the only way i know how, which is to say directly and passionately what i think and feel, head, heart and soul. i held nothing back. i was absolutely clear about my belief that britain is stronger, safer and better off inside the european union, and i made clear the referendum was about this and this alone, not the future of any single politician, including myself.
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but the british people have made a very clear decision to take a different path and as such, i think the country requires fresh leadership to take it in this direction. i will do everything i can as prime minister to steady the ship over the coming weeks and months, but i do not think it will be right for me to try to be the captain that steers our country to its next destination. this is not a decision i've taken lightly, but i do believe it's in the national interest to have a period of stability and then the new leadership required. there is no need for a precise timetable today, but in my view, we should aim to have a new prime minister in place by the start of the conservative party conference in october. delivering stability will be important, and i will continue as prime minister with my cabinet for the next three months. the cabinet will meet on monday. the governor of the bank of england is making a statement
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about the steps that the bank and the treasury are taking to reassure financial markets. we're also continued taking forward the important legislation that we set before parliament in the queen's speech. and i've spoken to her majesty, the queen, this morning to advise her of the steps i'm taking. a negotiation with the european union will need to begin under a new prime minister, and i think it's right that this new prime minister takes the decision about when to trigger article 50 and start the formal and legal process of leaving the e.u. i will attend the european council next week to explain the decision the british people have taken and my own decision. the british people have made a choice. that not only needs to be respected but those on the losing side of the argument, myself included, should help to make it work. britain is a special country. we have so many great advantages.
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a parliamentary democracy where we resolve great issues about our future through peaceful debate, a great trading nation with our science and arts, our engineering and our creativity respected the world over. and while we are not perfect, i believe we can be a model of a multiracial, multifaith democracy where people can come and make a contribution and rise to the very highest that their talent allows. although leaving europe was not the path i recommended, i am the first to praise our incredible strengths. i said before that britain can survive outside the european union and indeed that we could find a way. now the decision has been made to leave, we need to find the best way, and i will do everything i can to help. i love this country and i feel honored to have served it and i will do everything i can in the future to help this great country succeed.
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thank you very much. >> president obama acknowledged the u.k.'s referendum, saying he respects the country's decision. specialin part, "the relationship between the united states and united kingdom are in during, and the united kingdom's membership in nato remains a cornerstone of u.s. foreign-policy. they will remain partners, even as they begin negotiating ongoing relationships. we will hear president obama talk more about the brexit vote coming up later, along with reaction from paul ryan.
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first, we will year from donald -- here from donald trump who was in scotland today for the reopening of a golf resort that he owns. [applause] [laughter] >> i apologize. mr. trump: get him out. >> sorry, mr. trump. mr. trump: ok. thank you. >> sorry, mr. trump. mr. trump: ok.
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thank you. i appreciate it and this is an amazing honor. it's an amazing day, very historic day for a lot of reasons, not only turnberry. this is one of the big votes in the history of europe, scotland, everywhere. it was very exciting coming in and we were landing and we had just heard the results so i wish everybody a lot of luck. i think that it's purely historic and what's happening is historic. so it's an honor to be with you. my mother was born in scotland in stornoway. she loved scotland. she would be here a lot. she would come every year with my sister, marian and my sister, elizabeth and she just loved it. her loyalty to scotland was incredible. she respected and loved the queen and she loved the ceremony and the pomp, pomp and circumstance, and she was something special. and to think we'd be here owning turnberry one day would be incredible.
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she would come to turnberry with her friends and they'd have dinner at turnberry. she didn't play golf but they would have dinner at turnberry, so having taken this hotel and done the job that we've done with it is just an honor i was given the opportunity. we bought it about 4 1/2 years ago. the town council has been incredible. the local politicians and all of the politicians all throughout have been absolutely incredible. they approved virtually everything that we asked for. we asked for the right things, but the approval process, because it's so historic, had to go through many different layers but every single thing we wanted they agreed. they thought it was good and in some cases great. we've taken the light house, which is a very, very important building in florida -- i mean, in scotland, and we've taken that building and made it something really special.
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inside the lighthouse right now is incredible suites and it's called the halfway house because this is the 9th tee and it's called the halfway house. on the bottom you have dining and golfers will stop and they'll go and get something to eat and then they go into the 10th hole, 10th tee right next door. and it was in disrepair and all of the people from landmark scotland and all of the people we had to go through were -- i just thank you because it was a long, difficult process getting that approved, but they really wanted to see it at the highest level. and now it's really at a higher level than it ever was. when you see -- i don't know if you'll get a chance but if you do you should try and get to see the suites because they are two of the most beautiful suites you'll ever see. when the water is rough today, it's very calm. in fact, i've almost never seen it like this but sometimes you have waves that are literally crashing onto this piece of land we're on. it's one of the most beautiful sights you'll ever see.
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the hole didn't exist. they worked with us on design. they wanted to do these changes for probably close to 50 years because they were so obvious and we made certain changes to the course in addition to that, we fully renovated the course. brand new sprinkler system. the highest level. many of the holes have been jiggered and made even longer and new greens and new everything and yet it's the same turnberry. le 9, 10 and 11 and 4 have been changed and moved out into the ocean. this hole is an example from approximately this area. you would hit over there. this was a par 4 and you'd hit over there and it was a much different thing. now you're hitting out over the ocean. and just to the right of the lighthouse you have a green and people think this will be the
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greatest par 3 anywhere in the world and then 10 becomes a par 5 that the golfers know and the members know. i think we have a lot of the members of turnberry in the back, the captain. we appreciate you being here. and we have then number 11, which is a spectacular hole. also a par 3. built right on the cliffs. and that hole was moved about 200 yards to the left. and tom watson saw me and he won the british open many times, peter, right, and he said five. he said what a change. you know he actually thought it , was a very easy hole the way it was, but he probably liked it because he'd birdie it all the time. but what we've done is what everybody's wanted to do for many, many decades. i want to thank martin ebert who has done an incredible job as the architect. [applause]
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and i called up -- i called up the royal and ancient peter dawson who is an amazing man and great guy and talented person and loves the sport and loves scotland and frankly i said, who should i use as the architect and he did me a big favor. he recommended martin and so i want to thank you and i want to thank peter dawson who is with us now. [applause] headed up the royal and ancient for years. he's been just a great friend and i thank you for everything, peter. your recommendations have been incredible. thank you very much. my son, eric, was in charge of the job. i wanted to come over here and ivanka and don came to congratulate eric. he was -- really, we gave him the responsibility for building the hotel. as you know was gutted down to the steel and rebuilt. i think it's going to be one of the great hotels of the world. it already was but it was in somewhat dilapidated shape and we had a choice.
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we could fix it and paint it or we could do it the way we did it and we went back to the original plans. we were able to get the plans from the original architects from many, many years ago. it was 1906 and we went back to those plans, which are magnificent rooms, very big. they were cut in half and all sorts of things happened over the years. and we have something that's very special. considered one of the most beautiful buildings in all of golf. i think we can say that, peter. usually a building, when you have a building on a golf course that's not an asset. , that's called a liability. this is one of the buildings where even though it's in the distance, when you're on the 18th hole and you're looking down the fairway and you're looking at that building, it's considered one of the great, beautiful and historic sites in golf. as you know, jack nicklaus won the open championship and i guess the greatest, i guess one of the greatest tournaments if not the single greatest tournament in the history of
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golf was the duel in the sun, 1977 with tom watson and jack nicklaus which was birdie, birdie, birdie. everybody else was sort of, they were not in the match and these two kept going wild and that's when tom watson chipped in an area that you couldn't get from the green let alone get it in the hole. the only way to get it in is if you chipped it in. jack is an incredible sportsman. the way he walked off the course was one of the great scenes in all of golf. and jack nicklaus is a friend of mine and great champion and great champions, whether it's tom watson or greg norman or nick price, we've had amazing winners at turnberry. and really, not only amazing winners for the open championship but some of the best tournaments they ever had. so we listened to the royal and ancient and we did what they wanted us to do. in addition, they put in tremendous miles of television
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cables and everything's underground so it's all ready to go from that standpoint. and the town is so happy and so thrilled and the town council, who's here, and i want to thank you very much for being here, they have been really terrific. so, again, in honor of my mother, mary macleod, who is a terrific person. she came to the united states at the age of 19. she was a beautiful, beautiful woman and a very, very smart woman and she met my father and that was it. they were married for a long time and they had a great marriage and really a great marriage, but in honor of my mother, mary macleod, and in honor of my children -- don was instrumental in buying it. here, friendsers of mine from dubai. great people. this wasn't their thing because they didn't know too much about golf. and they actually felt, why should we move a hole into the
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ocean when we already have a hole? and i said, well, it's that better. they said, yeah, but it's already there. so you know they didn't , understand the golf thing but it always did well. turnberry, because of its location, because of the fact you are on the ocean, because it's one of the most spectacular properties in the world, they always did well. but now since we opened we're actually opened a number of weeks ago, the course, and we haven't had an empty slot. peter, you'll be happy to hear this. we have not had one empty slot. it's from morning until night it's packed so it's a special location. i don't know, it's just the location. everybody comes here, whether it's from london or wherever they want to be, they all want to come to turnberry. and with that i just want to thank a few people. i have to thank ralph who the one thing the other owners did -- [applause] they said -- where is ralph? ralph, the one thing they said, you have a man named ralph. he was an assistant manager at the time and one of the owners who is a friend of mine said he's the most talented hotel
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person and they said, you should have him be manager. and we did. we appointed him manager and it has been nothing but great stuff. the hotel opened about two weeks ago and it's been amazing. usually when a hotel opens you have drains not connected and pipes not connected and water that is spewing through the roofs and all sorts of things. we haven't had anything. they've did -- done a great job. the contractors have done a fantastic job. the hotel is built to the absolute highest standards of luxury. and the course is built to the absolute highest standards of tournament golf. i think there'll be nothing like it. in one of the reviews, i think it was "golf digest" in the united states, they compared the 14 courses and the 14 all great courses. and it's where they play the open championship. and this writer said, turnberry
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is number one. but because trump owns it, i'm making it number three. i said to myself, that's hatred. that's hatred. but i'm used to that with the press. that's ok. i considered it a compliment. i immediately sent that review. i sent it to the royal and ancient. i sent it to mark. i just want to thank everybody. i want to ask perhaps eric and ivanka and don to come forward and say a few words. and again ivanka and eric said, wow, this must be important because ivanka came, right? because she's something else. my children have done a great job. and one of the very important reasons i'm here not only because we own it and we're going to cherish it, we're going to take care of it, one of the great, great places, great resorts of the world. but also because i want to really support my children. they worked very hard to make this property what it is and what it's now become.
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the reviews of the course have been phenomenal. not just like good. even people that truly hate me are saying it's the best they have ever seen, which is always, to me, peter, that's my greatest. when they hate you and give it a 10, that means you did a good job, right? but the reviews have been phenomenal and the reviews of the hotel have been great. the hotel is -- i didn't put a mortgage on it. we have no debt, no financing, no anything. i wanted to do that with turnberry, didn't want to have any financing with turnberry because it's so special. i did this out of cash flow and we just have an absolutely zero debt property. i think it's something that's going to be a great tribute to scotland and many other places, and also a great tribute to the world of golf for many, many decades to come. so, i will ask eric in particular because he built it. i'll ask eric and ivanka and don to come forward. thank you very much for being here. [applause]
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>> thank you so much for being here. it means a world to us. it means a world to me, my father, anywhere these days, because of his hectic schedule . we love you to death and thank you so much for coming. we really shepherded this process through over the last 12 months as he's been preoccupied with something else. our father put tremendous trust in us, tremendous love, and it's so nice to see it come to fruition as we open up this hotel today. so thank you, dad, to having the confidence in us. we wish you a lot of luck with everything you're doing. no different, this project will be by your side the entire way. and we're proud of what we have created. thank you-all very much. thank you to all our great members in the back. [applause] >> i would like to perhaps reiterate a little what eric said and thank my father for the incredible opportunities and mentorship he's given us throughout the years. working for him, initially, and
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now with him, and now maybe we're doing a lot of it on our own. i just want to thank him for letting us sprout and grow and give us those opportunities. because he's done such an amazing job in his career and to be able to learn from the best is truly spectacular. so being able to work in a , family business is an interesting thing. you see so many horror stories about that, but to be able to work with him, to be able to work with my brother and sister on a daily basis, i guess we have gotten lucky because we have done it right. it's incredible. i couldn't be happier every day going into work. that's a nice way to live your life. i want to thank him for allowing us to do that. for being so great to us, a good mentor and teacher and always being there. thank you very much. i hope we made turnberry great again. [applause] >> thank you, everyone. it is such a pleasure to be here. we all love scotland as a family starting obviously with my grandmother. we have a very personal sentimental attachment to this place. and she really loved turnberry.
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so when my father first set his sights on it and we first visited here as a family, i knew it could be spectacular under his leadership. i think what was accomplished here is illustrative of his bold vision and commitment to excellence. it's the only way he knows how to operate and i think this is the perfect example of that. so being here today, seeing the bold vision that he set forth, seeing the execution of his very capable team spearheaded by my brother eric is such a pleasure. and i look forward to being here very, very often and enjoying it for the next 24 hours. thank you for being here and thank you to our amazing members who have been so supportive of the process. and all the government officials who along the way have given us tremendously positive and reinforcing feedback. we couldn't have done it without you. thank you. thank you, dad. it is really a pleasure. thank you, everyone. [applause]
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mr. trump: peter, i would love you to stand and get a little accolade because you have contributed. mr. peter dawson, thank you. thank you for being here. [applause] if anybody would have questions, go ahead. john? >> question about the brexit, do you see any parallel what happened in the u.k. in terms of rising up against the status quo and what might be happening in america? how would a trump administration approach the brexit should you be elected president. scotland voted 62-38 to remain. should scotland leave the u.k.? as many people are talking about. mr. trump: i think people really see a big parallel. a lot of people are talking about that. and not only in the united states but other countries. people want to take their country back. they want to have independence in a sense. and you see it with europe, all over europe.
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you are going to have more, in just, my opinion, more than just what happened last night. you're going to have many other cases where they want to take their borders back. they want to take their monetary back. they want to take a lot of things back. they want to be able to have a country again. so i think you're going to have this happen more and more. i believe that. and i think it's happening in the united states. it's happening by the fact that i have done so well in the polls. you look at the recent polling and you look at the swing states and you see how i'm doing. i haven't started my campaign yet, essentially. we have done very well. we're raising a lot of money for the republican party. i'm going to be funding a lot myself. but we're raising a lot of money for the republican party. you'll see those numbers come out over the next 30 days. and in particular 60 days. the numbers that were put out last week were -- a very small period of time just to start. but we have raised a lot of money, especially money coming in in small -- from small donors. you'll be amazed when you see
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the numbers we're talking about because we were amazed and i was , amazed. that will be reported fairly soon. i really do see a parallel between what's happening in the united states and what is happening here. people want to see borders. they don't want people pouring into their country that they don't know who they are, where they come from. they have no idea. and i think not only did it win , but a much bigger margin than people thought. >> how would your administration approach the brexit? and scottish independence? mr. trump: you have to embrace t -- it, it is the will of the people. it's not the question of approaching it. it's the will of the people. ultimately that wins out. >> would you like to see -- should scotland leave, sir? mr. trump: if the pound goes down they do more business. when the pound goes down more people are coming to turnberry, frankly.
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the pound has gone down and see what the impact is. i think places like scotland and england and different places in great britain i think you'll see a lot of activity. the pound got high, and people weren't able to do what they wanted to do. but for traveling and for other things, i think it could very well turn out to be a positive. nobody really knows. you'll know in about five years. you'll be able to analyze it and maybe it will take longer than that. what is known is that they have taken back their independence. and that's a very, very important thing. katie? >> it is momentous right now and you are on the world stage. are you traveling with any of your foreign policy advisors who knew this was going to happen today? there was going to be a decision. are you huddling with them to find out what the best way -- mr. trump: i have been in touch with them but there's nothing to talk about. i have been saying i would prefer what happened. i thought this would be a good thing. i think it will turn out to be a good thing. maybe short-term not but ultimately i think it will be a good thing. i have actually been in touch -- by the way, some like it and
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some do not like it. they are advisors, they are like everybody else. they probably know less. every one of these advisors. somebody said you should use advisors that have been hot for the last five years. i said really? i think i want to use one that have not been involved. look what's happened. go ahead. >> we have had a special relationship the u.s. and u.k., , for quite some time. with this vote they are standing in the world, standing in europe will be diminished, their influence will be diminished. will they still be the first call for the u.s.? mr. trump: first call or second? they will be a very powerful call. it will be a great relationship. great allies. always have been. i think zero will change on that score. there's never been a better ally. i think nothing will change in that score. >> mr. trump, do you believe that the u.s. should move immediately to renegotiate trade deals with the u.k.? or like president obama has said, should the u.k. now move to the back of the line in light of the brexit vote? mr. trump: president obama did say, i guess, they should move to the back of the line. that wouldn't happen with me.
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the u.k. has been such a great ally for so long. they'll always be at the front of the line. they have been amazing allies in good times and bad times. [applause] sometimes they make mistakes together. but as we know they have always been great allies. so, i will tell you i think that i was very surprised when i heard president obama say that. and i think he said that because he thought for sure it was going to stay together, but it didn't stay together. and i felt it wouldn't stay together. and again, i think that's what's happening in the united states. it's not staying together, it's a really positive force taking place. they want to take their country back. the people want their country back. we don't want to lose our jobs. we don't want to lose our borders. they want to have wage increases. for the members and all my members of turnberry, we have had hardworking great people that haven't had a real wage increase in 18 years. so they are working harder now and making less money. go ahead. >> follow-up on that. the treasury secretary, the fed chairwoman have both said they
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expect this, if it was successful, would have a negative impact on the u.s. economy. are you worried about that? mr. trump: they do not know. we will have to see how it plays out. what i like is that i love to see people take their country back. and that's really what's happening in the united states. i think you see that. that's what's happening in many other places of the world. they are tired of it. they want to take their countries back. this isn't such a phenomenal -- some people are saying, when people asked me what i thought would happen, i said i thought it would break away. it just turned out that way. it was surprising because the polls indicated probably that it wouldn't happen, 80%. when i landed this morning, the first thing i asked is that. and i mean it was fairly close, , but it wasn't that close. we'll see what happens. i think it will be a good thing. you're taking your country back. you're going to let people you want into your country. and people that you don't want, or people that you don't think are going to be appropriate for your country, or good for your country, you're not going to
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have to take. and look europe like the united , states, has made tremendous mistakes over the last period of time. you look at germany, some of the things that are happening. there have been tremendous mistakes that have been made. so i think it's going toned up -- it is going to end up being a very good thing but it will take time. >> your campaign has gotten global attention, all over the world people know who donald trump is and your campaign for president, do you think anything you said in the united states influenced voters here in britain when it comes to leaving the e.u.? mr. trump: good question. if i said yes, total influence. they'll all say that's terrible, his ego is terrible. so will i never say that. i'd like to give you that one, but i can't say that. and look, the question was, what do i think? i gave my opinion a few times over the last few months, but i also said i don't want people to listen to it because it's not me. it's about them. it's about them. it's their country. but my opinion is that what happened should have happened. and i think they'll end up being
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stronger for it and control their country and control everything about their country. yes. >> amanda, sky news. david cameron said you were wrong when you proposed banning muslims from entering the u.s. do you think he got the mood of his country wrong and right to resign? mr. trump: i like david cameron. he had a couple of rough statements, but that's ok. i think david cameron's a good man. he was wrong on this. he didn't get the mood of his country right. he was surprised. i think he was very surprised to see what happened. he is a good man. and he felt that way. and probably did the right thing. but we'll see what happens. i like david cameron. yes, sir. >> do you think following your arguments about sovereignty, do you think scotland should have its independence? would you support that? mr. trump: that's up to the people of scotland. we have been through this. and really, again, i leave it up to the people. i love the people of scotland. that's why i built -- i built in
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aberdeen one of the great golf courses of the world. it was just judged to be the greatest course ever built. built new new being defined from , 1960 to present. we're very proud of it. and i have gotten to know the people of scotland so well. through my mother and through everything else. the people of scotland are amazing people. and that question really has to be addressed to the people. it was a very, very close vote. i don't know that people want to go through that again. i was here when they were going through that vote. i didn't take sides. i will tell you it was a nasty period. i can't imagine to go through that again. the people of scotland may speak differently. yes? >> from what you said as well about europe and other countries in europe, would you support the breakup of the european union? because that seems to be what would happen. mr. trump: it looks like it's on its way. we'll see what happens. i can tell you i have a lot of friends living in germany that have always been very proud germans.
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to a level that you wouldn't believe. they would be bragging about their country. they would be talking about their country as though there was no other place. they are members of different places that i have. and now those same people, some of them, are saying they are leaving germany. they are moving. they never even thought of moving. now they are thinking about moving because of the tremendous influx of people. you know what's happening in germany. it's a real problem. and these are people that were very proud germans that were beyond belief. they thought the greatest that there ever was. and now they are talking about leaving germany. and you see the problems in germany. so i could see it happening. i have no opinion, really, but i could certainly see it happening. i saw this happening. i could read what was happening here. i could see things happening in germany. i hope they straighten out the situation because it can really become a nasty -- it can be very nasty what's going on can be very, very nasty.
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building safe zones in syria. great idea. building safe zones, magnificent, big, safe as can be. but when you take them into the united states by the thousands, and we don't know who they are, when you are taking them into germany and other countries, and all you have to do is look around. look around the world, see what's happening. some real problems. >> it is easy for politicians to use immigration to divide electorates. how does a leader unite people? mr. trump: you unite people by having a happy country. and when people pour into the country and it doesn't work whether it's because of crime or , various other things. you're not going to be uniting anybody. i just told you about germany where people want to leave germany. people that would -- i would never in a million years have said these people want to leave. but they are going to be leaving. you can't unite a country by forcing things down the people's throats. that's what happened here. people are not happy.
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yes, sir. >> a seismic impact on the british economy, do you intend to scale back your investments in scotland? how does it feel to be on the site lines of the newspaper? -- it'sp: this anything anything, i have big investments over in europe. i own dunebag in ireland, a phenomenal hotel. one of the most beautiful, one of the most highly decorated in all of europe. it has a golf course on this large almost 500 acre parcel of land on the atlantic ocean. and does great. i own turnberry, i own aberdeen. i'm going to stop at aberdeen for a little while. i'm leaving-- i'll only be here one night because i have to go back and campaign, which i love doing, to be honest. but i wanted -- really i wanted to support my children who have really poured their hearts and souls into this development. i think you understand. go ahead. >> speaking of campaigning, a
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lot of people in the states are saying, did you really have to be here for this? mr. trump: because i support my children. next. >> you mentioned that you paid for turnberry without any debt. now you're a politician. does it bug you to have to pick up the phone and ask people to donate to your campaign? mr. trump: i don't like doing it. again, i'm an honest politician, probably one of the few. tom's asking does it bother me when you're raising money, again, tom, i'm raising this money for the republican party. it's something i have never done. i always contributed money to lots of people. a lot of campaign contributions over the years. once i ran i became an outsider. but i don't like doing that but , i have done it. last week i was in houston. we had tremendous lines. i made a speech, also. the lines were on abc they reported, abc local they followed the lines all the way to the highways. i have never seen anything like that. then dallas where we had a similar thing. but we also had fundraisers.
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i sit with 20 people and we talk. and they all and you checks. you checks. bing, bing, bing. checks to the r.n.c. and republican party. i feel i have an obligation to do that. tom, the numbers are going to be, i think, quite staggering. especially in july. steve is here someplace. steve, are we doing well, steve? he's one of the great financiers of the country, actually. i chose him and he wanted to do this. the numbers are staggering. don't forget, we just sort of started this process a few weeks ago. and the first filing was for a very limited period of time. and it was almost before we started. but the numbers are amazing. actually, the numbers for the small donations, we have taken a lot of money otherwise, but the numbers for the small donations are coming in at -- i mean it's beyond anything that we thought. the $25 and $50 and $100 donations. but we'll be reporting in june, but especially the july report,
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i think, we'll show you some pretty massive numbers. i just did the other day. i matched. i put up $2 million and say let's see who is going to go. and we have raised more than two. i guess i offered a $2 million incentive to people to put up money. i don't know if that was the reason, but we had a tremendous response to that. david? you do not have to say. david? >> back to the brexit thing, you said david cameron maybe misread the mood of his country. given that president obama came over here and tried tone courage -- tried to encourage people to vote to remain, and hillary clinton made it clear, what do you think it says about hillary clinton has misread the world and since she's a former secretary of state -- mr. trump: she's always misread everything. [laughter]
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she misread this. i was surprised she was so bold -- the only reason she did it because obama wanted it. if obama wanted it the other way, said leave, she would have said leave. she does whatever he wants her to do. you know why? that's ok. we don't have to get into that. i was actually very surprised that president obama would have come over here. he would have been so bold to tell the people over here what to do. and i think that a lot of people don't like him. and a lot of people voted -- i think if he had not said it, i think your result might have been different. but when he said it, people were not happy about it and i thought it was totally inappropriate. and when i said what i said, i told people don't do what i'm saying. do whatever you think. but this was just my opinion. he came in and really tried to convince people to stay. i said it was inappropriate and she doubled down and did the same thing. obviously for the 219th time they were wrong. they are always wrong. that's the problem with them.
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yes. >> david cameron resigning today, would you back johnson as the future prime minister? mr. trump: i don't know. i do not know him. i'm sure he'll be good. he got it right. so that gives him an advantage. but i don't know. >> since your campaign shakeup i guess it was earlier in the week, can't remember what day it is now, we have seen a campaign that has become more focused, more disciplined, more aggressive, and rapid response. you more on point i think than we have seen you in the past. is this the new you? mr. trump: i don't think sow. -- think so. first of all corey was fantastic , and we did a great job with a very small group of people. i say this to all the folks here that don't come from the united states, i ran a campaign in the primaries where we got the largest number of votes in the history of the republican party, primary votes. larger than ronald reagan, richard nixon, larger than dwight d.
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eisenhower who helped win the second world war. we ran a very lean campaign. i had fewer people and spent less money and i funded the money myself. i spent $55 million i think. something. whatever it is. >> 45. mr. trump: by the way, i'm forced -- legally i have to pay myself back. in other words, this has nothing to do with the campaign. you won't see this. this is to support my children. but if i use one of my resorts in the united states and we have a press conference or something, by law i have to pay myself back. i would like not to. i would like to say use the ballroom and not bother with it. a couple of people said -- by law you have to pay yourself back. i think that we should have been given credit for, in addition to winning, for winning with less money spent and with a smaller staff. so now we have a staff of 73 people. and hillary has a staff of 900 people. i won and she won. i don't think that -- honestly
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as a businessman i say, wow, he won with spending less money and smaller staff. see i view that as an advantage. , a lot of pundits say she has a much bigger staff. i think we're very nimble. i think we're doing well. you have seen the polls coming out. they are very close and equal. we just had one coming out from west virginia where i have a 25-point lead. north carolina came out yesterday we have a two-point , lead. ohio's even. pennsylvania's even. the national polls are getting very close. and i'm spending much less money. she's spending tremendous amounts of money. we haven't even started yet. so it's going to be very , interesting because she spent, what was it, $28 million? she spent a lot of money and we're even. i think that's a good sign. i think that's a good sign. when i won new hampshire i spent a tiny fraction of what other candidates spent. one in particular. i won new hampshire by landslide. that person came in seventh.
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i think when you can do it on a smaller budget and with fewer people, that's the kind of person they want to be the president. because to me that's a big thing. >> mr. trump, seven in 10 voters told us in a cnn poll they want to see you cut ties with your business while you are running for president. mr. trump: i will do that. >> while you're running? mr. trump: i don't think whether it matters while i'm running. i'm here for the soul reason, i did want to see the job eric did because if he didn't do a good job he wouldn't be standing here right now. [laughter] i would give him a hard time. he did a beyond job. this is phenomenal. just as you view this great course, you have to see the hotel that we built. it's phenomenal. but, no, i will absolutely cut ties. the rules are, nobody knows. it's never happened where somebody has had this big a business and runs for president and wins. if i win -- even though i don't have to do that, i would probably put everything in trust.
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my children will run it along with my executives. it's a big company. my children will run it along with my executives. and just do a good job running it. let me tell you the importance of the opportunity i may be given is so important and so massive, making great trade deals with china. and with you folks, by the way, but with china. the numbers are so staggering, when you look at trade deficits of $400 billion and $500 billion, the numbers are so staggering and so incredible. i wouldn't even be thinking about the business. who cares. i would actually say who cares? i would absolutely -- you don't have to do this but i would most likely put it in a blind trust and they would run it or something. >> i think this is the ninth trump property we visited during your presidential campaign. why do you continue to have events?
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mr. trump: number one i have the best properties. you can say that. i will say a lot of the press has said, whether you like him or not, there's no properties like that. i have the best properties. you don't get to see that. but i have the best properties. the other thing is i why show you somebody else's properties? number one they are not as good. number two, it's one of those things i wish frankly i wasn't forced by law to bay myself back. we're forced to pay. a couple people say he's paying to his campaign. i would love to give everything for nothing. but by law i'm forced whatever the fair market value of the ballroom is or whatever it may be that we use or an airplane as an example. i use an airplane, by law i have to pay it back. that's what i do. that's reflected in the filings. jeremy? >> mr. trump, there's been a long-standing tradition in american politics that politics stops at the water's edge . given your comments about president obama this morning it seems that you don't seem to buy
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into that. mr. trump: he didn't stop it at the water's edge because he made statements about this incredible part of the world and that this particular country and frankly a large group of countries should do. he's constantly dictating to the world what they should do. the world doesn't listen to him, obviously. you can see that by the vote. but he's constantly dictating to other countries. certainly it doesn't stop at the water's edge with him. very importantly got it totally wrong. he's embarrassed. he's embarrassed by the supreme court decision yesterday which was a real rebuke. he's very embarrassed by he got involved. i don't know if he did that because of a friendship with david cameron. i think it's something he shouldn't have done. it's not his country. it's not his part of the world. he should not have done it. and i actually think his recommendation perhaps caused it to fail. one more question. yes? >> how much of the brexit votes are about economic issues that you have been hammering home on
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the campaign, low wages, lack of growth in the economy? mr. trump: a lot of it is. i think a lot is borders, immigration. i think i have spoken. i have so many members here, hundreds and hundreds of members sitting in the back. and i have spoken to them. they are not happy with the people flowing into the country. they don't want that to happen. and i think that has a lot to do with it. i really think the borders it's , not so different, it's amazing the world is not so different. we're on the other side of the ocean but the world is not so different. we're right over there you go, many, many miles, right in that direction, and to be honest with you, i think a lot of it has to do with immigration. but i also think a lot has to do with the fact that they wanted to be independent. they get tired of seeing stupid decisions just like the american , people are tired of seeing stupid decisions, whether it's the iran deal, whether it's the border where people just flow across the border like swiss cheese. they are tired of seeing stupid decisions made.
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they are tired of looking at horrible trade deals. you have bad trade deals here, too. i think that has a lot to do with it. >> -- from your campaign? when you talk about leave, i felt, again, knowing the people here very well, but not wanting to get involved, but i felt that was going to happen. i felt it was going to happen. and there is great similarities between what happened here and my campaign. people want to take their country back. ok, maybe one more question. [indiscernible] almost delayed this. by the way, they said there were going to be 2,000 protestors. it turned out, we counted them. 43. 43. and they are way over there. the police did a great job. but there was nothing much to do, frankly. there were 43 just on the record because we heard there were going to be thousands of protesters. 43. and my members are very happy with donald trump, i can tell
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you. is that a correct statement? [applause] mr. trump: they love donald trump. i love what we have done here. this is a little bit what we're going to do to the united states. the united states has rotted infrastructure. roads crumbling. i have a friend who is a trucker, big trucker, one of the biggest in the world. he says he buys these new magnificent trucks that costs hundreds of thousands of dollars, and he's never had this problem before. they are getting destroyed because the highways are loaded up with potholes. when you have an 18-wheeler or 16-wheeler and have these big massive trucks going down the highway at 65 miles an hour, and they hit a pothole and they are loaded up with tons of stuff, he said those trucks, no matter how good they are, they get wiped out. and that's what's happening to our country. i think this is sort of a mini example, what we have done here. the members loves us. scotland loves us. the councilmember here, do we have our council members here?
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yes. the council has been so incredible. it's been a big lovefest. what we do is the united states needs its infrastructure fixed. the bridges are a disaster. the roads are a disaster. my friend told me, he's never had a problem like this before. he said you go down the highways in a brand new truck that costs hundreds of thousands of dollars , it is virtually destroyed. they have to bring it back and have it rehauled because they are hitting potholes on highways. our infrastructure is crumbling in the united states. we spent probably if you add it up now, $4 trillion, maybe more than that in the middle east, and we have a problem. >> the country is not a golf course. mr. trump: no it is not. but it's similar. it's a place that has to be fixed. there's nobody that knows how to fix things like me and there's nobody that knows how to build like me. and you looked very good on television last night.
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i could see you in the dark with the sign behind you. how about these two, sara, go ahead. >> given what sara just said, the fact that this is the ninth property we have been to , tomorrow will be the 10th. you take a lot of criticism out there for people saying your motivations are about your brand -- mr. trump: i don't care about it. if it was about my brand i wouldn't have done this. because i have given a lot. i have given up the apprentice, i said i'm not going to do it. steve wanted me to do years more. continues to do great. i had to give it up because you're not allowed to do this with equal time laws and provisions. you are not allowed to do it. i have lost certain things. especially early on. early on i lost macy's. i am glad to see that the stock tanked, because they were very disloyal. just over the subject of illegal immigration i lost macy's an a -- as a vendor for ties and shirts. it's not a big deal but it was
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-- this is not for brand. if i wanted to do good for the brand i wouldn't have done this because when you -- one thing about politics, everybody likes me. once you run for politics, you will have 55 for you and 45 against. never had that before. very interesting. my wife said to me, i never heard this before, some of the crowd was a little bit hostile. i have been with you for many years and the crowd always loved you. now half the crowd hostile and half the crowd loves you. that's called politics. in politics if you run for office and you get 55% of the vote, that's considered a landslide. that's a big, big difference. but that means that 45% of the people don't like you. so for my brand this has not been a good thing. although look where we have come. we started out, we were 1-17. we won. we won. i think we're going to go much further than that. >> how tough -- mr. trump: this is a tough course. soon i won't be able to beat eric. let me put it that way.
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he hits the ball a mile. he's a very, very good golfer. i think soon, my days are numbered. one more question. >> you gave a speech -- you gave a speech. >> what did you think of the commentators and media outlets that said that vladimir putin and you are the chief been -- benefactors of brexit? mr. trump: i don't know about that. i think he would be probably because i know how he's been scorned by certain -- to a certain extent. certainly he's not a person that likes our president very much. and our president doesn't like him very much. he said some very nice things about me. i think he probably is somewhat of a beneficiary. we'll just see how it works out. i think that the -- i think it's going to end up being a great thing. and the beautiful beautiful , thing is your people have taken the country back. and there's something very, very nice about that. and they voted and it's been
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peaceful. and it was strong and very contentious. in many respects, i watched last night, it was a little ugly. but it's been an amazing process to watch. it's a big move. when i came here i said, who is going to come out here? it turned out that probably more people came out here. there is a tremendous turnout. >> a lot of local politicians who did not show up today because of your politics. mr. trump: we had the entire town council. >> excuse me. we had the entire town council. i have no idea. anybody else? >> you said it was a love fest. is david: where cameron right now?
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mewas negotiating to meet but right now i don't think david cameron wants to meet anybody. the labour party regards it as toxic. we have something. i took one of the best assets of scotland. it is now at a higher level than it has ever been. we are proud of that. at some points, your extreme rhetoric when it comes to building a wall. are you going to continue on with that? mr. trump: we are going to see.
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i am doing what's right for our country. it resonates because i have a tremendous number of backers. is today's vote an indicator that your rhetoric is something you should continue? mr. trump: i think what happened is i was watching some of the commentators. i think it does show something about the wanting their country back. in the united states, the people want their country back. in the united states, people not don't decisions, decisions. we have gotten dumb decisions for many years. i have a feeling, the same thing has happened over here. i love you all. thank you very much!
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the council has been amazing and thank you all for being here. [applause] mr. trump: we going to do a ribbon-cutting. where are the council people? get some of them. that's right. she's tough.
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♪ ok how we do it on three? 1, 2, 3. [applause] thank you everybody. ♪
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>> they deserve. -- thank you sir.
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host: british voters not only shocked the world and financial market but also handed hillary clinton a potential economic burden. the reporting of joseph schatz, who writes for politico, he's joining us from london. thank you for being with us. guest: thanks for having me. host: i want to talk about political implications, my parallels to the u.s. give us a sense from your vantage point of how the day unfolded in london? guest: the polls closed late last night london time. for the first few hours as results came in, it looked like the expectation was that the
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remain crowd, the crowd that wanted to stay in the e.u. was probably going to pull it out. but then things shifted overnight as particularly towns in the northeast of england came in very heavily pro -- heavily anti-e.u., pro-leave. and by about 5:00 a.m., local time here, the b.b.c. was calling it, saying that in fact britain had voted to leave the e.u. that set off a chain of events first the british pound started plummeting, currency markets started seeing trouble in the asian markets. soon after that, prime minister david cameron announced he would be resigning, effective in the autumn. basically, giving the tory party, there's a four-month succession election plan or process rather. so there'll now be a power struggle within his party for who comes next. and after that, you saw that the
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bank of england, governor come out and pledge to do everything he can to kind of keep financial markets stable and to back up british banks and for the rest of the day, you kind of saw reaction from europe, obviously, you know, top european union leaders had hoped that britain would vote to stay and now that they're not, that's going to start an enormously complicated, probably two-year process of kind of disentangling the u.k. from the e.u. that's where we are right now. host: this is the splintering of the world's largest political union and trading block, an $18 trillion economy. we're seeing the impact here in the u.s. on wall street but long term, what are the political implications for hillary clinton and donald trump? guest: well, basically the -- when it comes to, donald trump obviously, he's expressed support for the brexit movement and today he's actually over in
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scotland and he said, you know, it's a great thing that they are taking back their country. you know, whether that -- there have been a lot of parallels drawn between some of the anti-immigrant sentiment that's been evident in the brexit campaign here and what's going on in the u.s. presidential campaign as well. parallels being drawn there. though it's important to remember that the brexit debate, the debate over britain's role in the e.u. did go back decades. for hillary clinton, the issue may be there's a chance that you could see a brexit-fueled economic downturn in europe that could bleed over to the u.s. and kind of complicate secretary clinton's, her message that the economy is improving and make things harder for her in the fall. host: i'm reminded the election of the conservative party leader margaret thatcher in 1979, many
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said that was a precursor to the election of ronald reagan in 1980. from your standpoint and what we've seen over the past 24 hours in the united kingdom is that a fair analogy or comparison? guest: it might be a fair analogy. i think it's easy to overstate potentially the parallels. because again, as you point out just now, the issue of kind of britain's role in europe and this feeling that britain's, you know, the brits want to take control, take more control away from bureaucrats in brussels, that's a long-standing issue here, predates donald trump, predates the rise of the sort of populism you're seeing in the u.s. right now, particularly in the republican primary and so i'd be wary of, there's definitely -- there are elements, there's definitely similarities but i'd be wary at this point of drawing too many parallels between that's happen -- what's happening here and what's happening there in terms of what it could mean for the u.s. presidential election. host: looking at results today,
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it was clear northern ireland, scotland and the greater london area supported the remain campaign but the rest of the country wanted to exit. wanted to leave the e.u. yet some of the polls indicated that the remain campaign was leading. so what happened in the final analysis? guest: it seems they misrepresented who showed up. you saw a big turnout across the board, we saw about 70% turnout here, more than they usually have in big national elections. and you know, the leave camp particularly in those towns in northeast england really showed up what was happening last night. what's happening is in places like london, strong votes to stay in the e.u. but they were countered by the fact that the leave camp was running up the total, running up their totals in other parts of the country. and kind of the folks in scotland and northern ireland
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and london weren't matching those totals, weren't coming out in the same numbers system of partially turnout. there was also a weather issue that i'm sure there'll be lots of debate in the coming days about what happened. there was flooding in london yesterday that prompted some polling stations to be moved. but you know, it was always going to be close. it was always, you know, right down, even though the polls were trending a little bit, seemed to be trending toward the remain camp, they were very, very tight. it was too close to call right up until the end. host: joseph schatz, joining us from london, his work available online at politico.com. thank you for being with us. guest: thank you very much. >> >> the hard-fought primary season is over. colorado, florida, ohio. watch c-span as the delegates considered the nomination. and the first non-politician and
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several decades. or getive on c-span video on demand. to have a front row seat every minute of both conventions. >> of tv has 48 hours of nonfiction books every weekend. the annual roosevelt reading festival in hyde park, new york. as well as history of the oval office. 21 presidents, 21 rooms.
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the untold story. the remarkable life of new attorney. 1941, fighting the shadow war. fdr and the making of the american century. and then at 10:00 p.m., the historian translate the history of guns. she is interewed by william
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doyle, the author of american hunter. strange that the thatnt of our gun culture has the most to gain from selling and celebrating, their is the most invisible when we think about guns. most of the political talk is about interpreting the second amendment. the gun industry has become invisible. clarkday at 10:30, marcia weighs in on the legal system and discusses her second career as a novelist. she is the author of the book blood defense. got a book tv.org for the complete weekend schedule. president obama says he is unitednt that the
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kingdom will have an orderly transition. whende the statement speaking at a global entrepreneurship summit. facebookncluded with founder and ceo mark zuckerberg. this is an hour. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. thank you so much. this is aobama: good-looking group.
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first of all, let me thank him for the introduction. and the entire stanford family for letting us take over the campus for a few days. as some of you know, john is stepping down after 16 years as president of stanford. fortunately for me, i cannot do that to stick around longer than my term limit. john, i'm sure there are some people who want you to stick around longer, but i'm confident that you are going to do extraordinary things. and we could not be prouder of john and stanford and the great work they have done. please give him a big round of applause. [applause] president obama: summer break, so all of you, stanford is not always this quiet. this school is unique. folks ride on bicycles
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everywhere. and athletes are also computer engineers. this is the place that made nerd cool. [applause] president obama: so we are thrilled to be here. i know i am not the first speaker you have heard from, but many of you have traveled here from a long ways. we got more than 170 countries from every region in the world represented. some of you, this is the first time visiting our country. on behalf of the american people, not only welcome to our global entrepreneurship summit, but welcome to the united states of america. we are glad to have you. [applause] president obama: i'm not going to give a long speech, because what i want to do is have a conversation with some outstanding young people, but i do want to begin by offering
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some opening thoughts about the time in which we gather here today. and i'm going to start with the british people's decision to leave the european union, the vote that took place yesterday. just a few hours ago, i spoke with prime minister david cameron. david has been an outstanding friend and partner on the global stage and based on our conversation, i'm confident that the u.k. is committed to an orderly transition out of the e.u. we agree that our economic and financial teams will remain in close contact as we stay focused on financial stability. i spoke to chancellor merkel of germany and we agree that the united states and european allies will work closely together in the weeks and months ahead. it speaks to the ongoing changes
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and challenges raised by globalization. while the u.k.'s relationship with the e.u. will change, one thing that will not change is the special relationship that exists between our two nations. that will endure. the e.u. will remain one of our indispensible partners. our nato alliance will remain a cornerstone of global security and in a few weeks we will be meeting in wausau for the nato -- meeting in warsaw for the nato summit and an opportunity for all people. that will continue to unite all of us. and that is the work that brings us here today. the world has shrunk. it is interconnected. all of you represent that interconnection. many of you are catalyzing it and accelerating it. it promises to bring extraordinary benefits.
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but it also has challenges. and it also evokes concerns and fears. and so part of why this global entrepreneurship summit has been so close to my heart, something that i've been so committed to, is because i believe all of you represent all the upside of an interconnected world. all the optimism and the hope and the opportunity that interconnected world represents. but it's also important in these discussions to find ways in which we are expanding and broadening the benefits of that interconnection to many, many more people. that's what so many of you are going.
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we're gathered here at stanford in the heart of silicon valley, which is one of the great hubs of innovation and entrepreneurship, not just for america but for the world. this is a place that celebrates our ability as human beings to discover and learn and to build, question, to reimagine, create new ways to connect and work with each other. it's where two guys in a garage bill hewlett and dave packard, launched a global company. where student projects became yahoo and google. those were really good student projects. my student projects weren't as good. [laughter] it's where entrepreneurs like so many of you get an idea and work to make it a reality. you launch products and companies. that's the power of entrepreneurship. and it's never been more important. in today's world where our
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economies have undergone dramatic shifts, where businesses don't stop at borders, where technology and automation have transformed virtually every industry and changed how people organize and work, entrepreneurship remains the engine of growth. that ability to turn that idea into a reality. a new venture a small business. that creates good-paying jobs. it puts rising economies on the path to prosperity and empowers people to come together and tackle our most pressing global problems, from climate change to poverty. when people can start their own businesses, it helps individuals and families succeed. it can make whole communities more prosperous and more secure. it offers a positive path for young people seeking the chance to make something of themselves and can empower people who have previously been locked out of the existing social order.
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women and minorities. others who aren't part of the old boys network. give them a chance to contribute and to lead. and it can create a culture where innovation and creativity are valued. where we don't just look at the way things have always been but rather say, how could things be. why not? let's make something new. this spirit speaks to something deep inside of all of us. no matter who we are, what we look like, where we come from, you look out across this auditorium, you're all of different backgrounds and cultures and races and religions. some of you are from teeming cities, others are working in small, rural villages. but we've had that same spark.
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that same creative energy, to come up with innovative solutions to old challenges. and entrepreneurship is what gives people like you a chance to fulfill your own dreams and create something bigger than yourselves. we live in a time when more than half the world is under the age of 30. and that means we've got to make sure that all of our young people around the world have the tools they need to start new ventures and to create the jobs of the 21st century and to help lift up entire populations. and so many of you are already doing this. as i travel around the world, one of the extraordinary things that i had the opportunity to do is to meet young people. in every region.
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and to see the problem solving and the energy and optimism that they're bringing to everything from how to generate electricity and environmentally -- in environmentally sound ways in remote places that are off the grid right now, to how do you employ women in remote areas who all too often have been locked out of opportunity. you just see enormous creativity waiting to be tapped. and part of our job, part of this summit's job, is to make sure we're put manager tools, more resources, into the hands of these folks who are changing the world. and making sure that all of you know each other. so that you can share best practices and ideas. and spread the word. now, i know that the daily reality is not always as romantic as all this. turns out that starting your own business is not easy. you have to have access to
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capital. you have to meet the right people. you have to have mentors who can guide you as you get your idea off the ground. that can be especially difficult for women and young people and minorities and others who have not always had the same access to networks and opportunities. you deserve the same chance to succeed as everybody else. we've got to make sure that everybody has a fair shot to reach their potential. we can't leave more than half the team on the bench. that's why we've invested so much time and effort to make sure that america is helping to empower entrepreneurs like you. so we held our first summit back in 2010. since then, we've brought entrepreneurs like you together in turkey and the emirates and malaysia, morocco, kenya, and all told, we've helped more than 17,000 entrepreneurs and innovators connect with each other, access capital, find partners and start new ventures. 17,000. [applause]
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i think the tanzanian startup that helps farmers minimize losses or the company in nepal helping health care. there are 11 cubans here today, the first cubans to join us in one of these summits. hola. they're ready to help create new opportunities for the cuban people. where are they? there they are. [applause] i want to thank antonio garza, a lead for the private equity and one of our presidential ambassadors for global entrepreneurship, because his support was critical in bringing these young cuban entrepreneurs
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here. that's deserving of a hand. [applause] i'm also pleased to announce we have a new group of business leaders signing on as entrepreneurship ambassadors, something we started as part of the summit and they have put their time, energy, effort, and in some cases their money behind entrepreneurs around the world. so our new ambassadors, senator blakely, c.e.o. of spanx. jane durbin, c.e.o. of dermalogica. the c.e.o. of draper fisher jergensen. and katherine colson the c.e.o. of stripe. now supporting entrepreneurs isn't just something we do around the world. it's also a key part of how we create jobs and fuel innovation
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here in the united states. that's why we're working with communities to streamline the process for launching a company. startup in a day. that's why we're expanding innovation corps, our program to equip more scientists and engineers with intrepnurem -- entrepreneurial skills. and it's why at this summit dozens of top tech companies are committing to make their technology work forces look like america, include big publishing data on diversity each year and developing the tech talent of people from all backgrounds. we're very happy for the commitments they've made. give them a big round of applause for that. we're also building on our progress with new commitments from government and business and philanthropists. at last year's parties climate talks, for example, bill gates and other top global investors, agreed partner with government in cutting edge, clean energy solutions. today we're launching an initiative to connect these global investors with clean energy entrepreneurs from
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developing countries. we're also announcing the young transatlantic innovators, to bring 200 of europe's best innovators each year to the u.s. to develop their skills. and we've got organizations like endeavor which supports entrepreneurs starting a $100 million to invest in companies across latin america, the middle east, africa, an soviet asia. [applause] investment firms like capria ventures which will help fund international startups. these are just a handle of the commitments and i suspect new ventures that will come out of this year's summit. all of you budding entrepreneurs, don't be shy while you're here. talk to the experts. make your pitch. network with potential investors. find that mentor who might help you navigate through a tough patch. connect with your fellow
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innovators. because ultimately the world needs your creativity and your energy and your vision. you are going to be what helps this process of tpwhrobal -- global integration work. in a way that is good for everyone and not just some. i've spoken about this before. i believe we are better off in a world in which we are trading and networking and communicating and sharing ideas. but that also means that cultures are colliding and sometimes it's disruptive and people get worried. you're the bridge, you're the glue. particularly the young people who are here. who can help lead toward a more
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peaceful and more prosperous future that provides opportunity for everybody. and because this is about more than just this one event or for that matter this one president, we're going to make sure that the united states continues to help developing the next generation of entrepreneurs. we are very proud to announce that next year's global entrepreneurship summit will be hosted in india. [applause] got the indian contingent in the house. i'll try to stop by if i'm invited. [laughter] but the point is, i believe in you.
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and america believes in you. and we believe that you have the talent and the skills and the ambition not just to pursue your dreams, but to realize them, that you can lift up not just your own families, but communities and countries and create opportunity and prosperity and hope for decades to come. that's the promise that we see in all of you. and that is the promise that we see in our outstanding panelists you're going to hear from. mia medoc of egypt who started a site that is a one-stop online shop for people who organize events. john basco of rwanda, founder and c.e.o. of habona limited, a company that uses biomass and weight to develop ecofriendly fuels used in africa. mayana, the found over laboratoria, that gives young women the education and tools they need to work in the digital sector. [applause] and if that lineup is not enough, you also have a guy you may have heard of who has done pretty well for himself, the
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founder and c.e.o. of facebook, mark zuckerberg. they're the real experts, let's welcome them on stage and we'll start a conversation with them. thank you. thank you so much. president obama: this is a good looking group. and i could not wear a t-shirt like mark for at least another six months but i will take off my jacket so that i don't look too formal. it's going to happen soon. sit down, everybody. relax.
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so these are some extraordinary entrepreneurs, some are just getting started, some seem to be moving along pretty well. but i thought this was wonderfully representative because it's from different regions of the world, it's companies that are at different stages, and maybe we can just start by having everybody introduce themselves, describe a little bit about what they're doing, and then we can have a discussion about what's been easy, what's been hard, how can government policy, like the u.s. government policy, help in advancing some of these issues. how can other countries' governments, because we have 20 representatives from other governments participating in this summit, how should they think about encouraging entrepreneurship, and then most importantly, how can other businesses and venture capital,
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etc., think about some of these international opportunities? so maya, start with you. i've heard some of the great work you're doing, tell us more about that. >> thank you. it's great to be here. [applause] i'm a software engineer, one day i heard that the weekend is happening in cairo and i was not invited but i went anyway with my friend. i went with my friend, she was invited, and she turned out to be my co-founder. we were there just to learn about startups, meet mentors and other entrepreneurs but it was very hard to network and meet people because there's a gap between the organizers and attendees and then a week after,
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we attended one in cairo and had the same experience. we felt like there should be a better way for organizers to organize events. everyone is there for network, connecting people and sharing experience. so we did our research and we were very passionate about the idea, we felt like we can do something and we quit our jobs and started working on this full time before even having the name eventis. now we have full engagement and networking platform for events, it's a very interact app with 86% engagement in most of our events. so we are helping people get together during events. now we have a great team two offices in cairo and dubai and we're working with events in our region.
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when i look back on the journey, wasn't easy at all. it was very challenging. very exciting as well. but this was full of ups and downs. we started before even the first one in egypt. we had few mentors back then. but now we have a number of amazing startups, a number of mentors and support organizations who are working to build this. i can see sometimes it's grown very well but we still have a lot to do. president obama: that's great. thank you. >> thank you, it's an honor to be here. when i was growing up in rwanda, i used to be in the forest collecting firewood for my parents. that was not just me.
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other children in africa are facing the same challenges, they are involved in a number of activities to help their parents just to prepare their meal instead of going to school. so as i was growing up, i kept thinking about something that i can do to help these families have access to alternative fuels they can use to replace charcoal wood that they have been using for many years. so i came up with an idea whereby we collect wood and turn them into an affordable, environmentally friendly product that people can use, it's a great cooking fuel which can improve health and sanitation in homes. it's been two years and we have employed more than 25 people, giving them jobs and we are trying to expand to other areas of the country so that we can
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continue to improve sanitation as well as providing alteshtive -- alternative fuels which can improve health and mitigate climate change in the country and africa in general. president obama: excellent. [applause] >> it's an honor to be here. i'm so happy. i'm trying to get over the fact that you just introduce me. we are a social enterprise, i started it three years ago, we are now in peru, chile and mexico. what we tried to do is go out and find opportunities where other people hadn't. so we looked for women who haven't been able to have the education they needed and make them great developer and connect them with job opportunities. something i notice when students join our program, most are completely unaware of their potential.
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they come in thinking it's going to be really hard to break this vicious cycle of low-skilled employment, underpaid employment or domestic work. but they soon start learning the code and it's such a powerful skill set. a few week into the program they start building their first website, their first app, their games, and showing them to the world. it's so empowering and six months after joining they're ready to go out and join the work force. so we have people who get job offers from the coolest companies in town they go out, get to decide where they want to go and work, they triple their income so they significantly improve their economic
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circumstances and support their families and i think most importantly they start realizing that anything is possible if they work hard enough for it. and we have student that was gone from working at a corner shop to working at the i.d.b. in washington as developer a few blocks from the white house. they are an example that anything is possible. they're changing not only their lives but their communities, their cities, and i think they are transforming the tech sector in latin america. they are bringing the diversity and the talent that the sector needs to really become a leading force in our economy. and i'm pretty sure as we continue to grow and reach thousands of women in the region, they are going to change our country for the better and make sure that we can actually base our growth on the most important thing that we have, our young talent. president obama: that's great. [applause] president obama: we were talking back stage, i'd been reading about this, and i said 60% of the women who have gone through this program now were employed and i was corrected, it's now 70%.
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i had old data but i think it's important to point out that your success rate has been quite extraordinary already. that's wonderful. >> thank you. president obama: mark, there was a time when you were sort of in their shoes and -- but now, obviously facebook's success has been extraordinary. but i'm sure you still can connect with the stories that are told here and some of the stories out there. how is facebook thinking about its own role in creating this platform for entrepreneurship around the world? i know that's something you've been thinking a lot about. mark: well, it's really inspiring to be here with so many great entrepreneurs and you know, you hear about all the work they're doing, it's an honor so thanks for having me. you know, to me,
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entrepreneurship is about creating change, not just creating companies. and you know, the most effective entrepreneurs who i've met care deeply about some mission, some change that they're trying to create and often they don't even start because they're trying to create a company. that's how i think about my connection to all of us here is, i was getting started, i wanted, i cared deeply about giving everyone a voice, and giving people the tools to share everything they cared about. and bringing a community together and it started small, in one university, and i didn't think it was going to be a company at the time. as a matter of fact i was pretty convinced that at some point someone would build something like this for the world but i thought that that would be some other company that already had thousands of engineers and was used to building stuff for hundreds of millions of people around the world and you know, what ended up happening was, that no one built it. so we just kept on going.
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people said it each step along the way, you know what you're doing, maybe college students like it but no one else is going to like it. there's not going to be any money in doing this. all right, only really do it if you care, if you're passionate about doing it. then it started grow, people said it would be a fad, never be a good business. but you keep going because you care, not because you're trying to create a business. and then there was the shift to mobile, people thought it wouldn't be a sustainable business. and you know, through each of these things, the entrepreneurs i think build things that last for a long time keep going because they care fundamentally about the change they're trying to create in the world and they're not in it just to build a company. and you know, i carry that with me today. so today, we have, we live in a world with more than seven billion people but more than four billion of us are not on
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the internet. and we talk about having an equal opportunity to be able to create change in the world, i think that's a hard thing to do if you don't have access to some of the basic infrastructure and technical tools that are necessary to build this kind of -- these kinds of technical products. i kind of think about what we're doing today. very similarly to how i thought about where we are at the beginning. you know, i get people all the time who come to me and say, all right, you're investing billions of dollars in trying to put internet connectivity in places where, you know, we don't get paid for it. it's not something that we'll make any money from for a very long period of time, if it works out. but it's a deep belief that you're trying to make a change, trying to connect people in the world and i really do believe if you do something good and if you help people out, then eventually some portion of that good will come back to you. you may not know up front what it's going to be but that's just been the guiding principle for me in the work that we've done and i hope that some of the work
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we do can play a role in empowering you and help manager entrepreneurs to build the next great companies. [applause] president obama: so for the three budding entrepreneurs, you've already had some success and positive feedback. but i know it's still hard sometimes and frustrating. let's go back to the earlier question i asked. what do you find to be some of the biggest hurdles for your success? and are there policies that either your governments could be
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pursuing or the united states in conjunction with your governments could be pursuing that would really make this process if not easy, then at least a little smoother? and are there questions or concerns that you have in terms of how more established businesses like facebook, how they might be able to interact with startups like yours? so why don't we -- we'll go in reverse order this time. >> i think there's been many challenges along the way and in our case, we tried to disrupt many preconceptions. people were like, how are you going to train them, how will you get a young woman who went to a public high school who isn't very good, to be competitive in the labor market. i think we've overcome those and we've proved that you can learn in months instead of years. most of the companies that hire our developers actually rehire, you know. so they realize that they're
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great, you know. they're as competitive as anyone else who comes from a different background. that's been very, very encouraging and on our way. and i mean, the little secret that i have, being an entrepreneur, motivation is everything. when we are making the end of the month to pay all our people, when we're facing challenges, i just go into the classroom. ok, let me go into the classroom, i talk to the girls that study with us. they're the main force behind not only myself but all my team my partners and all my team because they are fighting so hard to make it happen. they are sometimes committing four hours a day to come and go back. they have on top of studies, they have significant responsibilities and are move -- proving it can be done. that's a reality check to say, i
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have everything i need to keep going at this. [applause] >> i think one of the most biggest challenges that i have faced was because i started this company very young. at the time i was 19 years old and in my culture, it is believed that those great initiatives are started by old people. and those things that have been difficult for old people cannot be possible for young people. so i tried to disrupt that idea and i created this company, but of course during that period no one was even trusting me to be my employee. i had to be my own marketer. i had to be everything in the company, so i can build that
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kind of first impression so i can impress a few people to come to me and help me run this, and the other challenge we are facing is a lot of financial institutions didn't even know what we were talking about because this is -- these are the kind of renewable energy we wanted to bring in, and you find folks working in banks asking you, what are you trying to do, because they don't understand what we are doing. it was very difficult for them to analyze and calculate the risk that might be involved in the activities that we are tiing -- trying to do. but because i trusted in my solution and this kind of thing i want to do for my community i kept pushing, applying for different competitions and lucky the united states africa foundation grant to start -- to start the initiative and when i
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started, people started to see how you can take advantage in ways that you already have to produce some product which is can then go back in communities and be a solution which can improve lives of many people and then from there, people started coming. but the lesson that i learned from that experience is that no matter what you're trying to do, it's necessary that you are having the kind of motive in your mind that you want society to move forward system of the policies come along the way to help you run the initiative but that will happen once you start. if you don't start, no one will come and join you. president obama: good. [applause]
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president obama: part of what the two of you described is, first of all, each country has its own culture and there's going to be sometimes some cultural barrier, whether it's attitudes about women and what they can do, or attitudes about young people and how seriously they take a young person. mark had to deal with that a little bit. but here obviously in the united states and particularly in silicon valley, i think that's begun to change. but there's also just basic issues like financing. and having access to capital. particularly when it's a new idea and it doesn't fit the existing models that the banks or other financial institutions may have.
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mia, do those challenges resonate in your experience? how did you navigate through those? >> i think all the entrepreneurs like everybody where in the world we share the same challenges. i think i made almost every single mistake you read about in every book. i learned everything the hard way. so yeah, it's a learning process. funding was one of the challenges of course. the other one was the legal system and the legal structure especially in egypt. it's not start-up friendly. you have to be persistent to get around that. building a team as well, like, i'm a woman and i started, i was young -- president obama: you're still young, i think. i think you qualify as young. >> so, yeah, i had almost the same challenges.
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i'd say the only thing that keep us going is believing in our idea, believing that we can do something. we can add value to people's lives. and this is the only thing that keeps me getting up every day in the morning and going to work. president obama: all of you are expressing what mark said which is, it starts with a passion. if you start off just saying i want to make money, but there's no clear mission behind it, then when you start hitting some of these barriers it's hard to push through. with respect to some of the barriers that you're talking about, the u.s., in keck to the entrepreneurship summit, what we've been trying to do is take best practices and learn lessons about what's working and what's not. and so in the grants we're providing or the training that we're providing, you know, while
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these -- what these summits have been useful in doing is hearing directly from entrepreneurs and say this program doesn't work as well as it could. this one works really well. what we're also trying to do, though, is encourage governments to listen and hear from entrepreneurs to build a different kind of culture. so the point you made about how hard is it to get a business started? how much paperwork do you have to fill out? what kind of fees do you have to pay? how much bureaucracy do you have to sort through? that's something that here in the united states we've had to deal with ourselves. what we've tried to do is both simplify processes but also use technology in ways that means you don't have to travel across town in cairo to go to an office and the person you need to see isn't there and then you have to travel back and reschedule the next day and the traffic is terrible and it's driving you crazy. if you can go on the net and do a lot of that work ahead of time, that can make a huge difference in accelerating the
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process that you're doing. so i'm very glad that we have 20 countries represented here because part of what we're doing is getting commitments from those other countries to say, we're going to learn from each other and figure out how we can streamline these efforts so that we're making life a little bit easier for young people like you. >> yeah, actually, when we started, we didn't know where to start from. we couldn't find any information online, for example, on how to get the company registered in egypt. we didn't know any lawyers or anyone who can direct us through it. so we have to go and ask for help from other people and couldn't find any information. so much time, effort, and money. president obama: even here in the united states where it's much easier to do business we still have 16 agencies that have in charge of doing business.
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we tried to streamline into one, it requires congressional action. [laughter] so at least what we tried to do is consolidate the websites so it's easier to get the information even though you still have to deal potentially with 16 different agencies for different needs. so there are specific things that the government can do to be more entrepreneur friendly. how can companies like facebook, how can companies like facebook, or google or some of the venture funds that are represented here, how should they think about finding good ideas, what sorts of mentorship or training would you find most helpful?
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obviously having experienced entrepreneurs, people who have seen startups in the past, can maybe help you avoid a few of the lessons and part of the goal of the summit here is to build networks so that that kind of mentorship is available. i know that facebook is already doing some of this. tell us about some of the things you're excited about and then maybe we can hear from them about other networking opportunities that they'd be looking for. >> sure. we have a dwooper program all over the world where, you know, we go around and it's called fb start, and we give entrepreneurs free access to tools and send them -- a lot of tools that people can use are free from facebook and other places, but in order to help get started with businesses, we give to different companies tens of thousands of dollars worth of facebook tools to get started. but it's also important to help
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people learn how to use the tools. so we do entrepreneurship workshops around the world. people are starting to create technical companies, but also for small businesses. which i think are an important part, maybe less the focus of this summit but that's a huge part of what we try to do around the world and help people get on the internet and connect with people that they're trying to sell their products to. we have more than 50 million small business pages that are on facebook and a large number of them use it as they primary presence for communicating with people and attracting help. that's a pretty good basic tool that's out there. the biggest thing that i'm personally focused on is connectivity, though. i think for you guys, we talked about this a little bit back stage, i think you're mostly in places that have reasonable connectivity. you were talking about how
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sometimes when you go home it's not so good. but in general, i think, for a whole other big population wave of folks, this is a blocking factor. if you grew up and you've never used a computer or never had access to the internet, it's often hard to even imagine what you're missing out on. and this is a local problem that i think we, you know, need to do a better job of empowering folks in different countries to be able to spread connectivity. this isn't something that the u.s. or some american company can come in and do in the pace -- and do. in the places it's worked, it's been in partnership with local companies, local entrepreneurs and local governments. that's also something i'd love you guys' advice on, how we can do a better job of spreading connectivity, not just to you guys but to other entrepreneurs who haven't had the opportunity to build things as well.
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president obama: in terms of connectivity and how that connects with creating the supply for all these wonderful young women you're training, obviously things are growing. but speak to mark's point about how you see things unfolding both in peru and latin america. >> first of all, facebook is such an amazing tool for us because we often target women who have had limited access to the digital world as a whole, but no matter where you go, facebook is there. young people today live their digital lives through facebook. so even though they don't have email and they have limited use of the internet, they have a facebook account. president obama: mark is very
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happy to hear this. >> i am. >> it's a great connection. it's a starting point. we usually start on our events where we do our program and encourage young women to apply which says a lot about facebook because you know what's behind it. that's an important thread in our communications. so thank you, it helps a lot. and in terms of connectivity, i think latin america is moving forward but there's still many important challenges. we were discussing before, the service is not often the best because there are very few companies in the market. in brings some challenges. we also have, many, many of the latin american countries are centralized in the capital city or major cities where connectivity isn't a problem. as you get further away and it becomes a challenge, so i think it should be a priority for our government. in the case of peru, i think the government is realizing this is important.
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i have to say we've been really lucky, both in peru and chile, we've had support from the government because they realize that they not only need to expand access to digital services but they also need to start bringing in more people to create digital products, you know. we have a gap. if we want to grow and have more digital services who is going to build them? that's been really lucky on our side. and one point, i think it's crucial for entrepreneurs to work hand in hand with big companies and government. i think we entrepreneurs have the amazing advantage of being abling to take huge, sometimes irresponsible risks, no? we can go out and try new things all the time. this is something that as you become larger, and if you're government, becomes harder. so i think we have a role to play here. in building and creating new things. when it comes to scaling up those things, these partnerships are essential to take what we've
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built and invest it and move to a larger scale. pres. obama: i think that is a great point. the kind of training you're doing. even with our entire education infrastructure here, we have that same gap. we initiated something called tech hire where we're going into communities and cities that -- where people can't imagine they could somehow be part of the tech industry and what we're finding is, is that through months of training, in some cases through community college, in some cases companies who are joining with us, it turns out that you can train people very effectively. and as we prove concept, now we have the opportunity to scale up through the the job training programs that already exist in the u.s. government. so i think you're making a terrific point that in the same way your individual companies
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are taking risks, proving concept, and then trying to scale up in the private sector, part of what governments need to be doing is when they see something that's working, a tool, an app, a mechanism, that saves time, makes something more convenient, makes a product more accessible to people, then we have to be prepared to change how we do business and potentially scale up as well. you're right, it's hard sometimes for governments to take massive risks, but what governments can do is to partner with entrepreneurs, start small, workout the kinks, then be able to back the process of scaling up. any additional thoughts in terms of how not only mark but all
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these v.c.'s out here can help you out? make your pitch, man. [applause] [laughter] >> i think facebook is doing a great job in terms of improving connectivity, and when you look at the situation in my country, we are really trying, but we still have a lot of -- a long way to go because connectivity is only available in the cities. you can find it in villages but it's not really fast. so that you can use it for some activities like watching videos or sending heavy files to other people. we are still having a challenge in terms of connectivity and internet, but what we're trying to do as small businesses is
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looking at the big company -- at the tools big companies like facebook using messenger to exchange messages. we see how we can disseminate messages. in my country a lot of people don't know about these waste management things. you see that in many places, they just throw waste everywhere. we are using this technology that we have to be more careful. this is beneficial in this way, and this is harmful in this way. we are trying to use our tools to disseminate such an image. our challenge is that when you small, you are like 10
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years in front of you so you can attract attention from many people to come and join you but depending on the kind of spotlight, support that you are getting from different people, we are trying to benefit from these kind of initiatives to send the messages and bring attention of many people to what we're doing. >> i don't know where to start exactly. in egypt, facebook started a revolution. [applause] facebook was the only way to communicate during the revolution. after that i believe you have , the numbers but the facebook , organization has grown tremendously since then. and it's a basic tool now, like now everyone in egypt, they have facebook.
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and we were just talking about the facebook basics. there's a lot to do and also back to the connectivity thing, i'm not sure if my team and family are watching this or not because they can't live stream. [laughter] i hope they're not seeing the loading. [laughter] pres. obama: i know. i hear you. [applause] if it makes you feel any better, it happens to me too. [laughter] you would think that i have the best gear, but-- just sitting there, waiting. waiting. [laughter] >> yeah, it affects the business as well. i moved to dubai, i have to manage the team in cairo, it's
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hard to do a skype with the team or something like that. we have to work around this, we have -- i have been trying to get another line in the office for like four months now and we still didn't get another line. pres. obama: that's in dubai? >> that's in egypt. dubai is -- much more better. yes. pres. obama: you raise a couple of important points. first of all, the huge opportunity here is for countries to leapfrog existing infrastructure. obviously we see this in africa, in india, places where mobile banking and payment systems have accelerated even more rapidly than they have here. farmers using information to access prices to markets so that they're selling their goods at a
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decent price. so there's an infrastructure and connectivity function that governments can play. you're raising another question, an issue, though, which is a sensitive topic in some countries, which is openness. it is hard to foster and encourage an entrepreneurial culture if it's closed. and if information flows are blocked. and what we are seeing around the world oftentimes is governments wanting the benefits of entrepreneurship and connectivity but thinking that top down control is also compatible with that, and it's not. people remark on my 2008 campaign and how we were really early adapters of so much technology.
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it wasn't because i knew what i was doing. it's because a bunch of 20-year-olds came to me and said hey, there's this new thing called myspace or, you know. [laughter] [applause] that was just a little dig, t here. [laughter] the point is that they had all this stuff that i had never heard of and if i had tried to maintain control and saiding no, -- and say no, no, no. we're going with, you know, pamphlets. [laughter] because i'm used to pamphlets. and i can control what's in the pamphlet. then i might not be sitting here. the same is true for governments as a whole. there's a cultural shift that is sometimes difficult that says, we are empowering individuals and we are open to ideas.
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we are willing to admit new information that maybe contradicts ours own preconception. we're willing to test those new ideas. if they don't work, we're going to try something else. that's the connection between connectivity and the internet and science. part of what has created all this, part of what stanford is all about, is our capacity to say, we don't know. to say that all the received wisdom might not be right. and we're willing to test it. and that is threatening sometimes. it's threatening the government, threatening the cultures. but that's the essence of discovery and innovation. one of the things we've been trying to do, and just encourage
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through the state department, is to gently and sometimes bluntly talk to governments about their need to maintain an openness and a confidence in their own people. what makes it harder, admittedly, is the fact that the openness and power of connectivity also can empower some bad people. and so us wrestling with how do we counter the sort of violent extremism that can end up poisoning the mind and resulting in what we saw happening in orlando, that's a constant balance that we're trying to weigh. but what i worry about is people using that as an excuse then to try to block things off and control the flow of information. and that's a question that i think young people are attuned
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to and they're going to have to pay attention to and all of us are going to have to fight for in the years to come. this has been an extraordinary conversation. how are we doing on time? we're all done. but i'm having so much fun. [laughter] give our panelists a big round of applause. congratulations for the great work you're doing. [applause] thank you, everybody. [cheers and applause] thank you so much. i'm sure your family was watching. if not, they'll be seeing it on video soon. thank you so much. thank you. thank you. we are proud of what you're doing.
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[applause] ♪ >> c-span "washington journal" live every day with policy issues that impact you. saturday morning, european union ambassador david o'sullivan will tocuss what the vote leave the european union means from a list and point. director of the u.s. terrorist screening center and why he thinks it's necessary. sernio research fellow at the rockets center takes a look at britain's eu vote and what it means for u.s. interests. journal" joined the discussion. >> next, house speaker paul ryan and house ways and means committee chair kevin brady
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unveil a new just proposal under the republican house agenda. we heard a speaker ryan get his thoughts on the u.k. referendum. this is 25 minutes. mr. brady: good morning, everyone. i'm kevin brady, chairman of the house ways and means committee. america is the greatt country on earth. we don't have to settle for second-rate economy where paychecks are flat and millions of qualified americans can't find full-time work. and why is america growing weaker while our foreign competitors grow stronger?
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the problem is the costly, complex and unfair tax code that washington imposes on hardworking taxpayers. house republicans, led by our speaker paul ryan, see a better way. and today we propose a new tax code for the american people, a tax code built for growth, for the growth of paychecks, for the growth of local jobs and the economy and the growth of america's economy. and first, we unleash new job creation. with the lowest taxes in modern history on local businesses, small or large, corporations or family owned and here's why. washington must take less from these job creators so they can grow the local economy rather than washington's economy. for the first time in history, we'll change the way america taxes its businesses so they can compete and win, whether on main street or in madrid. and when they win, they will not be charged one dime to bring
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those profits back home here to america to be invested in good jobs, research and growth. for the first time, we'll end the penalties in the current tax code that too often force american companies to move their jobs, their technologies and headquarters overseas. no longer will we be the only major country that still taxes its own exports. no longer will american products lose out to foreign competitors simply because they're proudly stamped "made in america." for the first time, local businesses will be able to immediately write off unlimited investments in building, equipment and technology. this new wave of business investment coarsing through our local economies will be a strong catalyst for more jobs along main street. for the first time since it was established in 1916, we will end the death tax so family-owned farms and businesses will never
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again fear the i.r.s. swooping in and taking nearly half of the nest egg they worked a lifetime to build. the result of this built for growth tax code is that america will leapfrog from dead last among our foreign competitors to firmly in the lead pact of pro-jobs tax code in the world. americans are sick of this huge complex tax code riddled with special breaks for others and nothing but headaches for them. for years hardworking taxpayers have asked washington for a tax code so simple and fair and understandable that it could fit on a postcard. we've been listening and that is exactly what we propose. for the first time in modern history, a tax code simple and fair enough to fit on a postcard. this postcard form will simplify
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the number of tax brackets by more than half. it will take less from taxpayers at every income level because washington takes too much of your hard-earned dollars. and to make it easier to save for retirement and grow the local economy, we will cut taxes on savings and investment to half the regular rate. the postcard we propose will include help with the basics -- home and children, charity and college. it will be that simple. it will be that fair. but make no mistake, america. this is not our tax code, it's yours. you deserve a real say in how you're taxed. so before this new tax proposal is introduced into law, we will be asking the american people, do you want simple and fair as a postcard or more complicated with more loopholes and sending more money to washington? we will be listening.
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and finally, a simpler, fairer tax code demands a simpler, fairer tax collector. we will bust up the i.r.s. as it is today. redesigning it into three smaller, more focused units to serve businesses, to provide state-of-the-art taxpayer service for families and individuals and quickly and affordably resolving tax disputes. in essence, an independent and unbiased small claims court so families and small businesses aren't forced to spend thousands of dollars to resolve a routine tax difference. so here's the challenge going forward. tax reform only happens once a generation, and it could easily be hijacked by washington and special interests. at this urgent moment in history as america struggles to reclaim its standing in the world and americans struggle to regain their standard of living, we
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can't afford to continue to struggle under this tax code. house republicans believe it's time for a change. it's time, america, to let your voice be heard. if you want more local jobs, speak up. if you want a simple and fair postcard, speak up. if you want to stop fearing the i.r.s., speak up. and like us, if you want america to be the strongest economy on earth for you and your children, it's time to speak up loudly. and now i introduce -- [applause] and now i'd like to introduce our whip, steve scalise. mr. scalise: well, i first want to congratulate kevin brady and the ways and means committee for the hard work that they've put in to get us to this point. you look at this plan and it represents over 50 members of congress who brought their ideas forward as well who represent every region of this country. everybody knows that this tax
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code is broken. it's one of the things that's holding back our economy, it's holding back our ability to compete with other countries. i am tired of seeing american companies leave america to be able to remain competitive. all that president obama does is criticizes the company when they're on their way out the door. doesn't it make a lot more sense to actually go and fix the problems that are causing american businesses to leave just to be competitive? that's what this code does. it makes it easier for small businesses to grow. we completely eliminate the death tax, one of the most immoral taxes that actually is one of the biggest threats to small businesses being able to stay in family hands so that if you build a business you can actually pass it on to your
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kids. it's part of the american dream , and yet that's one of the things that this tax code destroys. we have all seen that the i.r.s. actually targets people based on their political views. doesn't it make sense to rein in the i.r.s., take power away from the i.r.s. and put that power back in the hands of families all around this country with a more simplified postcard-sized tax code? a tax code where you can actually fill out your taxes on a postcard while still being able to have your mortgage interest deductions and your charitable contributions that families love all around this country. president obama and liberals in washington want to continue to keep growing where the i.r.s. stays powerful. and has so much influence over destroying our economy. so it's an exciting day.
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a lot of great work has been done by kevin brady and the ways and means committee to bring us to this point and it's a great contrast we can bring forward now to the american people in these next few months because ultimately the american people will make this decision in november. do they want a more simplified tax code that puts more power in the hands of families by taking it away from the i.r.s. and bureaucrats in washington? to talk more about this is somebody who knows a lot about tax policy. before he was speaker, he had another job. chairman of the ways and means committee, which he still probably wonders about sometimes but brady is not giving that up. , our speaker of the house, paul ryan. [applause] speaker ryan: i used to know something about tax policy. [laughter] this job takes it away from you. no. just kidding. thank you very much. i just want to say how proud i am of my fellow colleagues.
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they have done outstanding work over the last six months. they have put together a serious principled agenda for 2017. this tax reform plan is absolutely no exception. the way i'd sum it up. we want a tax code that works for taxpayers, not for tax collectors. we want to make it simpler, flatter, fairer. bring the number of tax brackets down from seven to three. lower rates for every hardworking american, bringing the top rate down to 33%. consolidate those deductions and credits. make it so simple that the average american can do their taxes on a postcard and that the i.r.s. -- the average i.r.s. agent can actually understand. more than that, we want america to be the best place in the world to do business. we cut taxes on small businesses.
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we lower their top tax rate to 25%. we cut our corporate tax rate, the highest in the industrialized world, down to 25% from 35%. they bringle when business to our country. for saving.ople reward them. all of these things will grow jobs. of these reforms will raise our wages in america. needs to geti.r.s. its act together. taxpayers first. so we streamline the internal revenue service. we install a new commissioner out the bureaucracy and update their technology so get help and the privacy they deserve. ourof these things will fix tax code and all six parts of
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this agenda will get our country back on track. good to remember why we started this project in the first place. livingit because we're in a very uncertain time in america. 70% of americans think america headed in the wrong direction. we agree with that but the way see it, that means that we have an obligation. we have a moral duty and betterion to offer a way, to give our fellow citizens who are so worried about the country a newhis direction, a better way, a better way to lift people out of poverty, a better way to keep america safe, a better way to to protectonomy, self government, a better way to fix our healthcare and now a way to fix our tax code. if you want to learn more about of our plan parts, go to
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better.gop. i close, i want to say how see this moment we are in. we are going in a global economy than anything we've seen before. one part of our country is ok with this. country ist of our very concerned, very anxious and skeptical about this. wey're wondering how are going to be able to preserve our values, how are we going to be preserve opportunity for everyone in america, how are we going to be able to keep america and safe. really, the question is, are we, to shape theg global economy or is it going to shape us? this plan, once again, america will take the lead. with this plan, everyone in our thetry -- the anxious and eager, the old america and the can unite and build a confident america. take our plan, we can
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founding principles, these principlesanimating that built this wonderful, exceptional country first in freedom, freety, enterprise, government by consent -- and we can breathe these principles in the 21st century. with this plan, we can turn this and expandund opportunity for all americans. this is what our country needs. is a better way. thank you very much. [applause] questions.o take first i'd like to bring chairman brady up here to answer about the tax reform plan and if there's possibly a question on something else, i'll those afterwards. >> departure from your ideal in
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order to meet revenue and distribution? this to bened in real-lifeal analysis of how the economy will grow. in my view, we have delivered a on how to grow the economy, especially along main toeet, a detailed plan simplify the tax code for most families, a detailed plan to power toreturn americans rather than washington, d.c. part ofmost important this whole day is to say, aerica, we're not imposing tax code, we're proposing a new, and now fair tax code it's your turn to have a say. republicans,ing as the american people, through this year, to get their thoughts and every step of the way we're going to make this blueprint better. the way we're
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going to make it better for the american people and we are doing a tax bill introduce to move it in 2017 so this say with theiscussion american people and we're ready listen. ditto. >> you talked about the global economy. wondered if you're concerned about the economic uncertainty .aused by brexit >> no, obviously markets react new information occurs. i believe markets will stabilize. point number two, all the more reason for america to lead. america need to lead. world wants america to lead and with this tax reform plan, leadingwill clearly be and in so many ways by having a code, in the ways and means had to to make a
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decision, should they stick with the current system and get where it's in the middle of the pack world or dot of the we want a plan that leander paes the rest of the world. so for all of these moments of uncertainty happening around the globe, having strong, economic american leadership is a need and this does that. >> regarding the postcard, is or one oflustration the goals of the tax plan? >> the goal is to make it so and understandable for people that they can file it on a postcard. aen you look at it on blueprint, you can see real serious tax cuts for savings and investment. it's not only good for families, majorws the economy in a way. you're seeing the basics, income deduction and
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charitable deduction. you'll see help with raising is so expensive, and college costs, which is expensive, as well. include an incentive for people to move up towards the ladder but that's the postcard, it is as simple and fair as that. the key question for america is you want a code that simple and understandable. or we can load that postcard up dozens, if not hundreds of special interest provisions as long as everyone understands that means you have to send far more money to washington and beg to get it back to your pocketbook. we're thinking the american people want to keep those family, theirir pocketbook and their local economy but we're going to be peopleng to the american about whether they want that postcard. fair >> could you go into more detail you woulductions
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eliminate and how would you tax deferred savings for retirement? >> two things. go to the blueprint and you'll layout of where we want to go. as you'd imagine, to lower rates things, we have to -- we have to take a lot of the special provisions and set aside. so that the code is lower and fairer and flatter. from that standpoint, we know that grows the economy and it can go forward. was the second part? savings real premium on and investment so the ways and means committee along with house will continue work to simplify the way we save. today there are just too many provisions. it's really complicated. we have teenage boys so we're saving for college. think the cheat sheet for the college isvisions on 90 pages long. that's the simplified summary of it. we think we can do a lot better
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than that. the committee and house also continuing work to simplify the way we save. way.ink there is a better yes, ma'am? >> the rate structure you are is a departure from the past budget blueprints that you haver ryan and voted on. can you explain how you got to these rates now? how it evolved from the budget blueprint? reagan startednt his reform, there were 15 tax brackets. just we're proposing three. down those tax rates, simplifying them by level,g them at every effectively eliminating the 10% bracket in a way that simplifies and grows the economy. we duls -- also do it in a way that this fits within our budget, it's revenue neutral, within real-life analysis of the economy. those were key goals.
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so if you combine lower and code with real forgrowth incentives business and a completely different i.r.s., we think we america for much stronger economic future going than what weinly have today. >> are you saying it would not have been possible to get down 25% in the budget bluiett way?revenue neutral >> no, we followed the principles we laid out in simpler, fairer and flatter. we think this guarantees, certainly makes more certain tax every income level and does it in a fair and flatter so thoseer way principles were exactly adhered to. yes, ma'am? i follow up on the brexit vote. speaker ryan, what do you make of the political environment the brexit vote, the
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anti-establishment vote? and do you think there are our elections in the fall? speaker ryan: sure. about theon was brexit vote. as an american, we value the sovereignty, self determination, government by government. limited these are important principles and these principles are being at home and around the world so we clearly understand behind these principles. since you're going off the tax it with you go off for a moment. indispensable ally and that relationship will what, period,tter end of story. do you have any plans to do
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formal comment or hit the road? above.the the invitation to speak out and begins thissten moment. we have at our better way blueprint, we have ways and means committee, slash tax reform, this bunt. blueprint. are invite comment from local businesses. be goingublicans will out throughout our districts askingout the country people is this a simple and fair want or doehat you want to continue with the same complex, burden burdensome, almost unknowing tax code that is thawe have today and as we do listing, we'll prepare for tax legislation in 2017 and broken code. this
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>> thank you, everybody, appreciate it. [applause]
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>> we'll hear more about the congressional agenda this weekend with texas congressman hensarling.
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sunday,e interview 10:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. eastern on spanoulis. cspan. is not onlyze this something i would love to do but would be different from the that have been written by mccarthy in the past and ways to re-evaluate who this was, what his significance was, what his him onewere that made adulatedsta, dord and figures in american mechanics what were his flaws that made him unpleasant and people. millions of >> sunday night, hudson fellow arthuror look at douglas
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book.hur in his >> he saw the future more saw theoften than he present, whether it was america's role in asia, the rise china, the split between the soviet union and also the fate of american domestic politics. next, a look at global challenges facing the u.s. with senior national security adviser to democratic presidential candidate hillary clinton. part of a conference co-hosted by the truman national the trumanoject and center for national policy. it's 45 minutes.
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>> good afternoon, truman. let's settle down. we've got a great speaker tonight. thank you, team. would you settle down. i know it's been a spectacular day. of theed about a lot critical issues. we're about to have the agenda set by our next speaker. truman community, we are in the battle that we have been for years.or i'm a truman democrat. i've worked in campaign. i've worked in the private sector. i spent six years in the army reserve as an officer.
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i had an office in two world trade and lost friend. as truman democrats, we understand the stakes of the political battle we are in. we believe that a safe, great in our is grounded andes, leans into military diplomatic strength and uses the best of hard and soft power. a hostile world, it is even more important for us to fight for our values and for a vision america and global strength that is optimistic and strong. year, theon this question right now, is are we going to build on american on truman values? or are we going to abandon and from what's made us great? we have a republican candidate infuriatingly and accidentally reminds us of what we stand for because of what and what we are against because of what he stands for. nuclear arms race
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and abandoning our allies. rightsres the bill of and denies climate change. theupports torture and random killing of families of those who oppose us. was for the iraq war before he was against it. he has a quirky crush on dictators in russia and china who wish us harm. he presents us with a choice of a leader who is unfit, unstable opposed tofied as hillary clinton, who has the experience, intelligence and lead.ter to this year, it is critically -- all ofthat awful you engage. many of ourtoo american citizens feel left behind. anger, drawn to hostility and fear. weis our responsibility and have the tools to paint an optimistic vision of american strength,based on
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grounded on values and sustained by our based hopes as opposed to our base fears and no one is to paint that picture than our own brother, sullivan, thejake first author of a truman signed peace, the architect of the iran deal.r the iran nuclear deal, a classic application of hard and soft power, of fact over fiction and hope over fear. jake, my only advice to you is that you take harry truman's advice and remember, as harry truman said, carry the don't let them bring it to you. put them on the defensive and fort ever apologize anything. jake sullivan! [applause]
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you for that incredibly kind introduction. to the truman community, it's remarkable to stand here in 2016 the truman conference and see how the organization has grown. i remember when rachel klein feld and matt spence were just first thinking of it back in the to see how it's evolved over time, spread across the entire country, covering every sector of our national security community, making a the national conversation and individually so waysof you contributing in big and small to national security, it really is just an be able tohonor to be here tonight to speak to you. i have been part of the truman the truman community, basically since the start. whenped in little ways rachel and matt and others were
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getting it off the ground and really, i keep using the term, "truman family" or "truman because it is a community of people who, while every not see ii on issue, we share a few fundamental things, a passion the uniteda that states of america has to lead in the world with strength and purpose, a view that we need strong and smart national security policy to be able to keep our country safe and advance our interests and values around the world, and perhaps importantly, a shared intellectual commitment to best, most durable ideas to the very hard national questions we confront every day and they are hard. if you look around the world difficult there are problem and there are wicked problems. and the thing that i've always compelling about this
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organization and about the people who make it up is that their face away from it. nobody tries to take the easy way out. people are willing to actually grapple with and struggle with the difficulties of operating in the challenging international we find andthat face in 2016. and especially to the people of the acela corridor. lived in a time i far-away place called minnesota spent the last several years basically up and down the of youast but to all carrying the message and ideas and vision of this community country, that is one of the most ingenuous parts of this organization. to say thank you and bless you for expanding the perspectives and of the organization. one more just sort of broad reflection before i make some comments about the challenges that truman --
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the truman organization started the bush administration as a vehicle for setting out a smart progressive foreign policy alternative and that basically mission is an vision, an evergreen where but at this point we stand today in the national political debate about foreign incompletes an mission because donald trump is challenging some of the most basically preaccepts of american allies, onicy, on nuclear weapons, on american oures, on what makes country great in the first place. so, whereas in 2002, it was a sort of accepted a certain level of parameters for lookthe conversation would like, today, i would just urge all of us to think about going basics. we have to be able to effectively articulate and aggressive defend first
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principles. the very idea of american leadership, the simple proposition that to be strong at home we also have to be strong and vice versa. that is now our charge. believe deeply that americans -- the american people are not isolationists but we to acknowledge, all of us, that they are looking around the asking, whatow and should we make of all of this? we need to take their questions concerns seriously and we need credible answers. now, i'll come on to donald trump in a minute but i want to take a little while to reflect upon the moment we are in in our national security. everyone who works in foreign policy or national security at whotime in government or writes about it likes to pick the moment they're in to say the most complicated, the most challenging, the most difficult national security but inwe've ever seen
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our case it's really actually true. periods in our history, of course, where we've geopolitical competition. there are periods in our history where we've had the strategic threat of terrorism. today we're facing both of these, geopolitical competition from china and the threat of networks andor creatingith technology new threats, cyber and pan demics, loose nukes. areglobal turbulence we facing now along with domestic these arehome, contributing to the pervasive sense that the american people there saying can someone explain to me what is happening in the world? think about what they
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have seen over the past 10 or 15 years, you can understand a puzzlement.l of two costly, protracted wars with outcomes, a painful financial crisis, the rise of ambitious new powers like china and the return of old powers russia, the persistence, the malignance of threats flowing out of an islamic world struggling with structures ande doseed hopes and a healthy of domestic political dysfunction in washington so we theseo be fair and say have dented, for some people, a sense of confidence in our shape the world but they shouldn't dent our confidence. we should be confident. we should be believe we are capable of stepping up and doing our part to make our people and to lead the world to a future of greater prosperity because for
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all of our flaws, for all of our wounds, theed united states is still the only country that can step up and get done.b secretary clinton gave a speech in san diego a couple of weeks ago that i'm sure many of you saw. it was a satisfying opportunity really lay out the choice in this election and in that speech consciously used the term "american exceptionalism" because she believes we are exceptional and we have exceptional capacities to go about building that better future for our people and for all people. the question then is, ok, those some nice big words but what's the agenda? actually going to do? how do we actually advance america's foreign policy and security around the world? this is what i want to spend a little bit of time talking about today and pardon me if at get as points in this i
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little bit wonky. i need a break from the campaign and i see a few fellow travelers here so i'm going to talk seriously about what i ofnk the basically project american foreign policy has to look like. at its core i believe that the project of american foreign the globalo update order to reflect current realities in the world while at fundamentally continuing to protect our interests and values. we have to do both at once. we have to acknowledge the realities in the world, the new voices, the new forces, the new trends. on to theues to hold preseps and proposition that have existed after the second world war. that is no easy task, to at once the order according
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to new realities and at the same time making sure that the order the end of that effort continues to reflect, corect and respect our interests and core values but i think that is in a nutshell what stands before us as the challenge and the opportunity of american foreign policy. believe that the next decade offers a crucial opportunity for getting this right. for putting that basic organizing principle into do note because if we act decisively in the period let things drift, then events will shape us rather around. other way so let's get them right and all comes downit to three basic steps -- rebalance, reshape. reinors -- reinforce the foundations of american power and prestige. that means reinforcing our
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economic foundation and secretary clinton has talked a lot about the investments we need to make in infrastructure and innovation in order to effectively do that. politicalour foundation. i'll come back to this at the todaytate of our politics requires quite a bit of -- reinforcement might be a nice word. total fixing up is another way to put it. reinforce the foundation of our values. many of you know better than i the reservoirs of american credibility and the people inwhich young the rest of the world look to the united states and see a depletedcon have been over time. that's partly because an entire people around world have grown up seeing as emblems of american foreign things like guantanamo and abu ghraib and have not about all of the things that the united states did for the cold wares in
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to stand up for freedom and opportunity. so we have work to do around the to recommit ourselves and to spread the message of how the for a states does stand set of core, universal values and principles, does want to fight for women's rights and internet freedom and religious liberty and democracy and all of the things that have laid at the a progressive foreign policy agenda and so many of you work on every day and then of reinforce the to foundation of our alliances. you --refer where everywhere you look on the our oldestl compass, and most important allies in europe are hard pressed. brexit from the west. we have a massive migration crisis from the south. a resurgent russia from the east. and hillary clinton believes passionately and powerful as do i that reinforcing the transatlantic partnership,
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reinforcing the special thetionship we have with united kingdom are crucial to america's national security in the days ahead. this is a fundamental difference of opinion between her and donald trump who thinks we should basically walk away from and give up on the fundamental asset on our national balance sheet. itlary clinton couldn't see any more differently. transatlantic allowances -- alliances and alliances across the pacific is so crucial to the united states being able to project the kind leadership we need to keep our people safe and prosperous here at home. we -- rebalance. termhave heard the rebalance as applied to the asia pacific but i actually believe three basically kinds of rebalances. a rebalance of the asia pacific elevating our engagement in the area of greatest growth and opportunity and where the single most
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consequential geopolitical event of our time, the rise of china, unfolding before our eyes. i remember going with secretary clinton to china in 2011 or 2012 the stateg with counselor who had become familiar with the term rebalance the terms of of the obama administration and he said, i do like this term, rebalance, i think maybe you should contemplate rebalancing out rather than rebalancing in. have acourse we different concept with what we accomplish. the united states has to be a resident power in asia, we have to be present. have to be forward deployed and engaged and i know many of issues. on this set of second is a rebalance of a different kind in the middle east and i want to explain what i mean. as we contend with the threat of safe haven across the iraq-syria border, as we enforce the iran nuclear
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deal, something i care deeply at the- we have to look bigger context. in addition to a vicious and that isd ideology fueling a lot of the extremist networks and movements in the region, in addition to the fraying and collapse of state and institutions, we concede that the proxy conflict the sunnian and states of the region is helping to fuel instability in the perspective,om my a rebalance is needed in order for a moretable effective american strategy in the middle east and it goes like this. to be raising the costs on iran for its destabilizing and we need to be raising the confidence of our sunni partners that the united there andgoing to be so -- and in so doing, in raising their confidence, begin down some ofaw their more dangerous hedging behavior. costs on iran,
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raise the confidence of our sunni partners and set the table effective enforcement of both the iran nuclear deal and our capacity to fight isis. is something that has to be played out with something more terms like that. it's something i would love to engage with many of you as we go because if there's one thing we all know, it's that challenges from nigeria in west africa all the asia, across south a broad arc of instability, is something that is such a complicated and difficult set of questions that we need to we certainlyand haven't gotten all the answers right today and it's going to wee as many good minds as can possibly muster working with our partners in the region and world to try to do better as we go forward. and then finally, a third kind of rebalance. the third kind of rebalance from perspective is thinking about
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rebalancing our own tools and capabilities. you see, for those of you who've ourt time in government, adversaries are getting faster, more adaptable and using increasingly asymmetric means to advance their objectives, many are in direct conflict with ours. propaganda. ae use of corruption as national security tool to neighborsy influence and destabilize them. tools and cyber avoiding attribution. we saw the democratic national ofmittee hacked a couple weeks ago and we could ask ourselves who the progenitor of asymmetric act was. our adversaries, whether they are state or non-state actors, get more effective, more nimble, more justable and frankly, faster, we have to confess that
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we haven't been able to fully the speed and the flexibility that is required to these asymmetric threats and so i believe we need capabilitiesf upre we are really lifting our ability to compete and win in the cyber domain, our ability win againstnd corruption, our ability to push back against and break down the vertically integrated propaganda integratedtally propaganda from state and non-state actors around the world. this is another big piece of business that goes beyond managing geopolitical or dealing with a terror group. this goes to understanding what the evolving threats are in the to taked being able after them in a smart, sound, way.ltimately sustainable finally, reshape. i won't spend a lot of time on can go downhink you
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the list of the major sets of rules governing behavior in our world today -- whether cyber or fluorproliferation or trade and investment or climate, and see bargainingld's tables, the world's decision making forums are messy, they're coment plicated, they're difficult but there is no constitute for the united states and saying we are going to refurbish, we are going shaped rulestively of the road that govern each of these major areas of conduct. just tell a quick story that i've told some of you. of 2009, i was with copenhagenlinton in for the global climate change conference, one of the led to thethat is paris deal in 2015. were 40 heads of state gathered in a small windowless room on the second floor of a shopping center in copenhagen.
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had prime minister singh of of southesident zuma of chinaresident wen and president sarkozy and secretary clinton was representing president obama. they were going back and forth and making very little progress at about 3 -- 3:00 a.m. it broke up and everybody came atrium.rs into a big mr. was a blizzard outside and bring out oney motorcade at one time. snaking40 world leaders through this atrium and like 29 deep towards the back of the pack is nicolas sarkozy and after about 15 minutes of one motorcade after another going the ceilings up in
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and shouts out in english, "i want to die!" and everyone starts applauding. [laughter] and the question is why am i telling this story? this is it. this is what we are dealing with. gone are the days where small group of powers goes into a you, people shake hands, write a full agreement, top to bottom, you send it out, signs on. we have ushered in an era where the rowdiness of negotiating tables, the difficulties of credible results, is so immense, even the paris deal represents some strange binding and andbinding, formal non-formal because that's what governancef future
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will look like. on the campaign trail, global sounds highfalutin, where should this matter? but at the end of the day when the w.t.o.ing about or rules to govern the cyber domain and there's a major andck in the united states need to figure out how to attribute, how to respond, how deter, it becomes real for people very quickly. an example on the w.t.o., we are 15 years beyond china to the of w.t.o. and a lot of the basic practices that threaten a fair international trading system today aren't covered by the w.t.o., whether it's currency or state owned enterprises or barriers behind borders that are hard to pin down. got to do something about those things but there's going to be a lot of really weird taxicab lines and window less rooms in the middle of the night with a lot of voices and a lot of competing perspectives and interests in there and it's strong andke
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principled american leadership sopull it all together reshaping the rules of the road will have to be a fundamental project of american foreign policy, not just for the classroom and not just for international relations scholars. matter fundamentally in the lives of everyday americans and we have got to get it right and have got to be pursuing an affirmative, this.sive agenda on so then the question comes, what did we have to watch out for? are the big alligators that boatwimming close to the that can throw us off of this affirmative agenda i've just laid out? challenge ofis the disruptive forces. including forces, aggressive actions like russia ukraine, disruptive forces like the potential for another global finance crisis. i don't believe that's what
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brexit will produce but it's clear from the economic uncertainty generated in the last 24 hours, that decisions taken in countries far away with impact on american family members' pocketbooks at home and we have to pay due that going forward. many of the tools that we had at our disposal to respond to the last financial crisis have been -- have already been deployed and our tool kit doesn't have quite as many tools that for the next one comes around and then, of course, the possibility of major terrorist events. more wordsay one about russia in terms of the thistial for disruption to effort that i'm talking about. it's easy to dismiss russia for a declining power with a one-dimensional economy, population but declining powers can be just as powers andas rising we can not afford to underestimate that is likely to long-term challenge from a
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russia that is at once andieved, aggressive insecure. secretary clinton has talked about the bizarre fascination that donald trump seems to have with strong men around the world, starting with vladimir putin. i don't think he gets this. i don't think he fundamentally russiaands what represents or on the flipside of what the affirmative foreign policy project of the united states is that russia end up being a disruptor to and i think that is one of the things that we are going to have to see play out in the foreign policy debate over the next few months. another major impediment to getting through this affirmative out, what ilaid call the tirany of the in-box. who have worked in government, you realize quickly that laying out a nice affirmative strategy rarely meets first contact with the news headlines and
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whatever's happening in the world and that there is a little a function of the 8-year-old soccer game where everybody runs to the ball of thing that's happening this week. of whatink a big part the next administration has to be thinking about is how do you teams tossion oriented escape and overcome the tear annie of the inbox and that's something i have given a lot of thought to, how do we make sure we're staying on the front foot, when theyth crises arrive but we don't take our eye about the kindme of country and world we're trying to create. thirden finally, the impediment is the impediment of politics in national security. a year or two ago when i talked about politics and national security, i talked about the more ordinary and sad to say
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it's become ordinary, dysfunction between democrats nationallicans on security issues, things like the letter that tom cotton cent to the ayatollahs of iran saying with barack obama. pretty unusual stuff but it compared that was j.v. to the kinds of things that donald trump is bringing forward propositions about national security. this is not a typical democrat versus republican year. this is something else entirely. is hillary clinton, secretary of state, somebody with strength and experience and leadership to be commander-in-chief, against somebody who is truly anderamentally unfit unqualified to lead this country, someone who should not the nuclearinger on button. scotland,k today in donald trump proved that once again in spades.
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every time there is a significant national or global again thatroves once basically proposition that he's theeramentally unfit for job and my observation based on what he did today -- for those of you who haven't seen his press conference, i would recommend looking at it. are seeing an emerging donald playbook in reaction to a crisis. the first step is, rather than ofpond with any sense strength or leadership, he beages in what can only called pathological self congratulation. rather than think about how he can lead or reassure or talk about what we're going to do, he literally pats himself on the back. we saw that in orlando. we saw that in scotland today. second, rather than consult with people who might actually know something about the particular event, he consults only with himself. what heyou have heard
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said about isis, that he doesn't need to consult with anyone on a quote,use he has very good brain, and that he, quote, knows more about isis do, believeerals me. today, from the donald trump playbook, he got a question at his press conference, had he advisers, foreign policy or economic advisers about brexit. he said, no, because, quote, there wasn't anything to talk about. third, rather than get the asserts false hoods, makes things up, has basically factual errors. that scotlanded was, quote, going wild over the vote. even though scotland voted overwhelmingly against leaving union.opean fourth, rather than talk or think about what's good for americans, he talks and thinks what's good for himself and then he always says something that shows he doesn't bee a clue what it means to
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commander-in-chief. in this case, in his press conference today, he said that course is a lot like running a country. [laughter] in retrospecte all of this was utterly predictable. that it neversay seeses to -- ceases to be astonishing and it should never cease to be astonishing. one of the things that concerns me is that as time goes on, bizarreill treat this and dangerous behavior as normal, or to talk about it through the political lens, was that a smart move or not a smart move. really urge all of you and everybody out there who cares deeply about this country to it would meanat to have donald trump in the oval roome in the situation making decisions of life and death. many people in the truman ormunity are either veterans
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are active members of the u.s. or the -- or our reserves. guys know so much better than i do that what it actually takes at the end of the day to country and keep us fact isa and the sad that donald trump has consistently displayed a sort of it actually what takes to support our military, veterans and to support the things that makes america the greatest country in the world. and so in particular to the community,the truman who have relationship with, are and of the broader veterans military community, i would just ask all of you to join us in to show the people out there who are standing on the front lines and defending our country that we're behind them, secretary clinton has spent a
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career supporting veterans and military families and active wey service members and that can collectively stop donald so becauseave to do we believe -- i believe that he a real danger. there is a bizarreness to it. there are things that make you actually want to chuckle but at the end of the day this really a laughing matter because the stakes are just so high. so, let me close by saying that it's not enough to just scoff at reject this person. all of us can get trapped. can get trapped into saying, can you believe he said that? can you believe he said that? neither going to win this election nor is it going to advance an effective foreign country.enda for this we've got to do more and better than that. vision of affirmative
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the kind i laid out today. i have enough humility to say first a start, that's the draft, the thoughts that i have. but together we have to come up sustainable, smart, strategy for advancing our interests and values in the world and keeping our people all, we have to maintain a basic sense of humility. if you just think about the past few years, the arab spring, the with whicherocity isis spread, brexit. in we cannot accurately predict the trends or or howthat will unfold they're going to unfold and we have to understand that we don't answers, that we need to be reaching out broadly in the democratic community but beyond, independents and republicans, to try to restitch a basically bipartisan fabric that returns to the first about at thetalked outset of my remarks. being let's not confuse
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humble with hanging back. behave to be out there and engaged. the world is looking to us and all of this has to be strong and sustained american leadership. i'll leave you with this thought, donald trump's slogan butake america great again it's apparent every day that he doesn't have a clue about what it takes, what made america great in the first place. and there is a kind of pattern, over 30 years of relentless down this country, calling our military a disaster, saying just the other day, bizarrely, going to make it. he's wrong. and hillary clinton believes deeply that the united states has the capacity to be the greatest force for good the ever known and at our best days, we are. also believes that we have all the tools we need to do able to do that. the strongest in the history of the world. our economy is on the rebound. biggest, most
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resilient and most innovative in too many even as families are struggling. energy is a massive advantage, become thepacity to clean energy super power of the world. geography gives us two liquid assets, the pacific and atlantic insulate us top some extent from the kinds of afflict threats that many other states. demography is an enormous strength, compared to other major nations in the world today, our population is younger mobile and if we get immigration reform right, we can help ensure that advantage for generations. we have an unrivaled capacity to , to spreadtions values with more allies and potential partners than anyone else out there and greater scope for diplomatic problem solving so i'm confident that our best days are ahead of us and i will just say that for all of you who have had the opportunity to a cabinet member or
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president or vice president, and white planesue and land with united states of america emblazoned on the for four did that years with secretary clinton, two years with vice president well more thand a million miles to more than 115 countries around the world and i seeing thatred of plane because i knew what it could represent. and i think that that, at the end of the day, is what this election's about but the world november 8. on the work only really begins on november 9 for us to take this lookingard and i'm just forward to working with all of you in that effort over the next few months to think about what we can do together to win this election, but then going to win a better, smarter, surround -- sounder strategy for the united states years ahead that carries forward that basic project of american foreign policy i talked about today. thank you guys. let's all go out and do this and truly, deeply let's
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make the truman community proud. let's make this country proud and let's just win this thing. thank you. [applause] escape, before you before we allow you to escape and return to the endless work been taking on, masterfulfor that discussion. we have a few things to offer very least important of copy of theramed inaugural program from harry truman's inauguration but much more importantly -- yeah. [laughter] that's for your, i'm sure,
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cavernous office in brooklyn. importantly, you spoke about the truman family. that is a family brought together by commitment to to work.commitment above all, we're brought faither by an unshakeable in the potential of america to be a force for good in the world belief that the greatness of this country must be reearned in every and generation. we know that you spoke of first principles. we know that the first principles that bring not only define america's role in the but defineho we are the family are at stake this year so we're proud, all of us, led that the fight is being by one of our own, by you. but you have our iron clad commitment that this community will fight with all of our strength and without fear for us as a family. thanks. [applause]
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[captioning made possible by espn, inc.] 3w4r >> hillary clinton travels to indianapolis this weekend where give an address to the u.s. conference of mayors. you can see that live sunday at 4:00 p.m. eastern on cspan. same day we're show you our
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one-on-one interview with bernardo osuna. bernie sanders. he talks about the presidential race and future plans. 2016 primaryought season is over with hard-fought content -- conventions to follow. >> florida, ohio. is the delegates considered the nomination of the first woman ever to head a major political party. watch live on c-span. listen on the c-span radio app. row seat toront every minute of both conventions on cspan. all are beginning on monday, july 18.
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>> coming up, from washington journal, a discussion on what is ahead for congress when it comes to gun violence. after that, british prime minister david cameron announces his resignation in response to the u.k. decision to leave the european union. donald trump holds a news conference overseas in scotland. david hawkings is senior editor with rollcall. we continue our look at the democrats it in this past week. the 25 hour protest. really surprised at all when they began this action? i was peered i did not know what was coming. members of the democratic leadership were only told it was coming a few hours in advance. we did not have much word. we do not have worried about how long it was going to last. that's word about how long it was going to last.
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democrats and we will be here as long as it takes. they said such things before in these protests have petered out. like it had ad flavor of the making it up as we go along a little bit. guest: i think that is fair. you talk to the most prominent members on the floor for this, they would concede as much. yesterdaying around for a comprehensive roster of everyone who has spoken. we doswer i got back was not know what was going to go long enough to have a comprehensive list. if you look at www.c-span.org, look at the closed caption of that, it has a pretty good roster -- guest: all but 11 members
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participated in some way. there were 188 at the time of the protest. there were a couple who were attending to family emergencies, couple who were out of town for long scheduled trips with of the reasons and only a handful of members who are democrats who are also aligned with the nra, including the only two members, one from texas and one from georgia. host: your piece on the sudden title "inside the house's first social media non-filibuster."
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why aren't there filibusters in the house? guest: the fundamental difference between the house and wherenate -- the house is there is proportional representation and each state has a delegation to the house that is relative to its population size in the country. the idea is it is majority rule. all the rules you and i think about everyday when we pay attention to the house are designed so that the majority can run the place and get what it wants unless they misunderstand what they want. be ahave designed it to regular routine march through the legislative process. that'sganize how much how many amendments will be up and how long the debates will last. the whole system is designed to protect the rights of the minority in the senate and that
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means extending the debate. host: is there anything like this in the house history that has approached this in terms of duration and magnitude? guest: only a few that have been around in the last half-century that i could find. ago,as only eight years the last time we were in the summer before an open presidential contest. nancy pelosi was this because the house and republicans were in the minority. they had a different idea of what the top legislative issue -- was.ed they were about lifting a moratorium on offshore drilling nancy pelosi at the start of the august recess gavel the place to a close around 11:00 in
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the morning and the republicans refused to leave. hostage. the floor and stayed for about five hours that night. point the democrats which the lights in the chamber off dishes switched the lights in the chamber off. republicans came back the next week and use the floor to make speeches. didn't speaker ryan do some thing like that? guest: the only way to get more attention for this protest by the democrats would have been for speaker ryan to send his own law enforcement team in there to break it up. you have john lewis leading this protest command icon of the civil rights movement. you have elizabeth warren, tim kaine, harry reid, nancy pelosi herself.
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to send the police and there to break it up would have raised the public's awareness of this protest. is with us,hawkings the senior editor with rollcall. we are talking about the house democrats in -- house democrat sit in. we welcome your comments and calls. republicans --r for republicans. 202-748-8000 for democrats. all others, 202-748-8002. first call is our republican line in buffalo, kentucky. good morning, james. caller: thank you for taking my call. here's the whole scenario -- first of all, they are a bunch for the most--
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part, they sat there and talk about we need to secure our guns -- the need to secure the borders and stop letting all these people in. with all thelicit we just had an illegal kill three people. you don't hear them on tv talking about we need to secure our border. they are two-faced. they want to secure our guns and place sono-fly list in control -- they will put everybody on it and nobody will be able to carry guns. if they don't want to be independent in this country, moved to russia. if we get invaded right now and we've got guns, we can protect ourselves. we can meet them halfway out in the fields.
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host: he talked a little bit about immigration. by the supreme court yesterday, reaction from both the president and speaker ryan appeared where is that issue in congress? guest: it is nowhere in congress. the republicans were delighted at the outcome come this nine were decision by the supreme court. decision by the supreme court. a tie in the supreme court means the most recent appeals court ruling stands. the most recent ruling said the president could not move forward with this. is an issue that is on hold through this presidential election. the president has now stymied and it will be up to the next president to propose an immigration agenda. host: his nominee is on hold as
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well. guest: merrick garland is definitely on hold. some people on the hill suggest should the presidential election be won by hillary clinton and should the -- the senate be one back for the democrats, the republicans would move to nominate merrick garland during the lame-duck session. you mention this, going back to the issue of the house floor -- 2008, then speaker pelosi shutting down the debate. this was during a pro forma session for it back then, there was no facebook streaming, only some video we got from john culberson of texas. as the pro forma
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session was ending. [video clip] >> historic day in the united states congress. republicans have taken the floor and have continued to debate after the house is adjourned. the democratic leadership has adjourned the house, turn out the lights on the mic and yet, the republicans are still talking about the need for an energy plan so we can drive down the price of gas. can tell, this has never been done before. let's all speak out on behalf of the american people and get .hese prices down all we are asking for is a vote. the speaker will not even allow a vote.
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he has a plan to cover all energy sources. down.ive us a vote up or they are the majority. if all their members feel so strongly, they should not have -- many of our democratic colleagues also want a chance to vote. the cameras have been turned off. television cameras have been turned off, the microphone has been turned off. the only way we are able to do anything is through life streaming video through twitter accounts of people in the gallery. the technology has improved, but the tactics have not changed. host: it's remarkable to hear them say all we are asking for is a vote. guest: language you heard
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hundreds of times during this week's protest. the republicans did get what they wanted -- there was a ban on domestic oil and gas drilling in the republicans wanted an end to that moratorium. the republicans got there up and vote.- up or down the ban was lifted and they won. that's what has happened the other two times, in 1995, before there were even the most visualve -- there was no could newt gingrich was the new speaker. they got into a big budgetary standoff with bill clinton. the government shutdown. felter gingrich famously
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slighted by the president on a trip to israel for a funeral on air force one. the daily news made a famous cartoon of him as a crybaby dressed in an effort -- dressed in a diaper. the republicans gaveled the place closed for the evening, the democrats formed back on the floor and turn on the lights and got all the intention that attention of the print reporters turn ongot all the -- the lights and got all the attention of the print reporters. host: here is house democratic leader nancy pelosi from thursday from the overnight wednesday. this is the periscope video from scott peters. [video clip]
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pelosi: mr. speaker, turn on this microphone. [applause] what is happening on the floor of the house -- i have a for --from jim begin i don't wantfford to read her letter without it being heard by everyone in the gallery. -- whats, our guests would be the reason the republican majority in the house are saying we will not turn on the microphone? [applause] there a rule that
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members cannot take pictures or video on the house floor? guest: there absolutely is. smoking --ntions there can be no smoking or use of any electronic devices that might demean the decorum of the house. even when the house is not in session, which come as we know by now, the house was not technically in session. once in a brave while, members will bring their families onto the floor for a tour or hometown mayor and they will be allowed to take a quick photograph. even then, it is frowned upon. what speaker ryan did here by allowing the social media ing of this event was a more relaxed response then perhaps some speakers in the past.
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carolinais of north said yesterday that if he had been back in the north carolina state house, he would have shut this down but quick. host: does it open the barn door for more of these types of things to happen? guest: the theme of our conversation this morning, turnabout is fair play. turnabout will eventually happen. time, we were talking my supreme court nominations, the someday the democrats will be back in charge and the republicans will be the minority and there's no reason to think otherwise that the republicans will take this tactic and try to ramp it up yet again. host: adam on our independent line. caller: thank you for taking my call. this vote on the house is just a distraction.
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with the democrats don't want people to know is that violent crime in the u.s. is at a 50 euros low. -- 50 year low. thousands account for of deaths every year -- there are more people killed by clubs and other means. they are using this as a passed --n to get there are 30 million people out of work. we have a ballooning budget. we have all these other problems. they want to distract us and talk about guns are the major killer in the u.s. when we are having 50 year lows in violent crimes. that is my point. thank you very much. i think that it's
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interesting you say they are trying to distract -- this is a diversionary tactic -- i suppose it may be, but it is certainly not from an issue that was in the american psyche since what happened in orlando a couple weekends ago. yes, the republicans have no interest in this discussing gun control what happened -- interest in discussing gun control before what happened in orlando. if nothing else, they were able to put back on the national political agenda and legislative agenda an issue that the majority did not want to talk about. diversionary tactic, but it has succeeded in changing the conversation in washington. week to doan unusual this because it is a busy newsweek in washington.
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the last few days of the supreme court plus term. the vote in britain yesterday. and yet, they were able to get front-page coverage everywhere. host: it was a surprise to democratic leadership that they learned at that caucus meeting the other morning. guest: there was even a best miss of the clark and mr. lewis and the others organizing this thought actually keeping it from the leadership and they decided that was a bad idea. the leadership bought into it and said have added -- have at it. host: the senate did have a test vote on the susan collins proposal. guest: technically, the amendment survived. the motion to table her eminent. -- her amendment. 52 senators voted against tabling it.
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senator collins and this had made good on best the republican leadership had made good on the promise to have this vote. 52 is short of 60. it is still alive, but it does not have the votes to get all the way through the senate. host: they will have to work hard to get those eight additional votes. guest: that is a lot of votes to move in the senate. host: david hawkings is our guest. in five minutes or so, we will break away from here for what we expect to be a short pro forma session in u.s. house. linda from texas on our independent line. caller: i support what the democrats are doing on the floor. when you could turn something into a constitutional amendment don't i wonder why they
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do that and turn the boat over to the people. i guess what you're saying is the advocates of gun control could somehow propose a constitutional amendment that would alter the second amendment? that would be a much taller order than what is being discussed now. to get a constitutional amendment added to the constitution, two thirds vote in the house and senate. 37 of the states. the legislatures of the states. a constitutional amendment is not voted on by the country. it is voted on by elected officials, voted on by congress and the two thirds of the house and senate go for a constitutional amendment, it goes out to the states and 37 states have to ratify the
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amendment. host: lewis on the independent line. -- the nra for having all the gun ranges -- i have to be a member of the nra to join any of these gun clubs. i disagree with their politics. i did that one year. host: how many gun ranges did you visit? caller: i called all the way from brunswick to portland to augusta. they all come of the criteria was you had to be an nra member to join the gun club.
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it takes money to be in the nra. i get their calls during political seasons telling me who is going to take my gun away from me. it makes me mad because i know nobody is try to take anybody's gun -- it is a smokescreen to scare the american people. that's all it is. can you name any time in history that guns have been taken away from us? host: you can talk a bit about the impact of the nra on capitol hill. a couple of democrats did not participate in the incident -- in that sit in. guest: the nra is one of the most influential advocacy groups in congress. as the color just mentioned -- haver just mentioned, they
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an extreme narrowly well organized not only fund-raising operation but also around -- also a ground game, a great ability to get her message out and spread it around. more -- inecome a part because of the membership of congress has changed, but they have become more partisan in their political giving. the nra gave time paying contributions to more than a dozen, two dozen members and now, only two democrats this time have received campaign money. you the graphic from opensecrets.org. you can find that at
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opensecrets.org. the house is gaveling in momentarily here for what we expect will be a short pro forma session. but it is the house of representatives. you never know what could happen. [captioning performed by the national captioning institute, which is responsible for its caption content and accuracy. visit ncicap.org] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2016]
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>> as a result of my work, thousands of families in philadelphia now live in affordable housing. major investments have been made in infrastructure and mailing of dollars have been invested in k-12 research and outreach efforts. none of my success would have been possible without bipartisan support. the dedicated work of my staff, the votes of the citizens and the support of my family. i am honored to have had the privilege to serve.

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