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tv   Key Capitol Hill Hearings  CSPAN  August 8, 2016 10:00am-4:01pm EDT

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campaign to mobilize latino voters. donald trump will outline his economic agenda at an event hosted by the detroit economic club live at noon followed by your phone calls. mr. trump has picked up new support this morning from a member of the bush family, george p bush, the son of jeb bush. stop short of offering a full endorsement but he told a gathering of texas republicans it's important to back donald trump if only to block hillary clinton from winning the white house. george p bush is the most prominent member of his family thus far to get behind donald trump's candidacy. both george h.w. bush and george w. bush have stayed away from the republican nominee and did not attend the convention last month in cleveland. jeb bush has remained vocal in his criticism of mr. trump even after leaving the election. to read more about this at politico.com.
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c-span.org, you can watch our public affairs and political programming any time at your convenience on your desktop and a laptop or mobile device. go to our home page and click on the video library search bar. you can type in the name of a speaker, sponsored a bill or even the event topic. review the list of search results and click on the program you'd like to watch or refine your search with our many search tools. if you're looking for our most current programs and you don't want to search the library, our current homepage has videos for your immediate viewing. servicerg is a public of your cable or satellite provider. if you are a c-span watcher, check it out at c-span.org. jill stein was officially greented to be the
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party's presidential nominee at its national convention in houston. she highlighted immigration, the criminal justice system, and a proposal for what she calls a green new deal. transitioning to renewable energy by 2030. jill stein was the green party nominee and that 2012 presidential election. she was introduced by her vice presidential running mate. ♪ >> are you ready to make history? [cheers] i am so honored to be with you
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this afternoon. it has been a tremendous experience the last couple of days. before i get into my remarks, please allow me to thank my dear sister. sherry. i want you to understand something. she talks about human rights and the role that i play. when they write the history of the evolution of the human rights movement in this country, front and center will be my dear sister, believe me. [cheers] >> i have to admit, i told dr. stein that running with me is not going to be as adventurous as running with sherry.
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you all know when you run with sherry, you better be ready to go to jail. [laughter] >> i tried to avoid jail, myself. again, running with sherry, it can happen. at new york, what year was that? the national convention, one of those illegal gatherings and they told sherry that there would be no marches in new york. no permits. of course, they organized a rally anyway and the police surrounded the square. they tried to contain is. i had a chance to speak, and i saw was happening. i said i would speak and then i'm getting out of here. you know what? the people are coming out, more and more in the police barricadespolice
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were pushed further and further back. let's see what is going to happen. the people are ready to step off and sherry said we are stepping off and i said when the masses are moving like this, you have to be with the masses and i joined that line with them and we walked and it was the only successful non-permitted march at the convention. that is my sister. [cheers] let me thank the organizers of these last couple of days. as an event planner, i know how difficult it is to organize these events. let me thank the conference of delegates. you did a tremendous job. you took your responsibilities seriously.
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let me thank the green party in general for your consistency. for always being there and raising the critical questions and being a vehicle for progressive politics. [cheers] >> last, but not least, let me thank my leader, jill stein. [cheers] >> brothers and sisters, friends. we are at a critical moment, as jill says, a transformational moment. we have tremendous opportunities before us. the american people are longing for a change. they are ready to do something
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different, and we have to be the vehicle for that difference. [applause] >> you know, there are difficult conditions that the people face. they tell us that there has been a recovery and things are alright from the crisis. you know what? there are millions of people, people who we work with who have not experienced any kind of recovery. there are millions of people who still don't have a place to lay their head at night. there is a reason why the fastest growing population of homeless people are black women with children. there are millions of people who would like to have a job, so they can live a decent life, but they don't have it.
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if they have a job, basically they are making starvation the wages, working two or three different jobs just to make ends meet. they tell us things are better. we have a situation where as a consequence of austerity, across this country, communities where we live and work, they are closing down schools. people live in communities where they can't go to the store because there is no store. you have 48 million people who are living in situations where they are going to bed every night hungry. we have a situation where even with so-called obamacare, we have millions without health care. these are difficult conditions. difficult conditions.
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and people are wondering why. why do we have to accept this kind of situation? when the two parties attempt to try to herd people based on fear, we find that there are millions of people who are prepared to do something different. who are prepared to go another way. we are going to provide that opportunity for a new day and another way. [cheers] >> there are people all over this country engaged in struggle, who believe that we should not have schools closing, who believe that we all have a right to be healthy, who believe that education should be something
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that is going to enhance our human dignity and our spirits who , believe that people should not be going to bed hungry or walking the streets without a place to live, who believe that women have a right to their bodies and bodily integrity, who believe that trans people have a right to live in dignity and equal rights. there are people engaged in struggles all around the world building social movements and part of that motion, they are looking at how do we relate to the electoral process? how do we look at electoral processes as part of a larger, strategic plan? many people say that in terms of building power, we can look critically at how we advance our efforts through the electoral process. when we look for that alternative, we have to be
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there. we have to have the possibility for them to be able to express themselves politically, on the green ballot lines across this country. that is why it is so important that we get as many votes as we can. that we run this election with the intent that we have, which is basically to win. [cheers] >> my brothers and sisters, i have lived my entire life committed to the notion of independent politics, building alternative power, i have understood that we have the real possibilities in advancing that struggle for political independence, using the electoral process. that is where dr. stein and green party come in for me, personally.
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you all get it. dr. stein understands that you can't transform a system without struggle. you have to organize the people. the electoral process is the process of how we build power. for me, that is what is attractive to this process and the basis for me accepting when dr. stein called to say are you ready to join? i said dr. stein, i thought about it and i know where you are coming from, and you can count me in. i'm with you. [cheers]
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>> it is that commitment to the building of popular power. that commitment to the people, that understanding that we have to build a multinational movement in this country, based on the need and the aspirations of working people, that i join this effort. it is that commitment that i stand here proudly and say to all of you, it is my honor to accept the nomination for the vice presidency of the united states from the green party. [cheers]
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raka ticket is one that understands we will struggle. it is a ticket committed to popular power. it is a campaign that says no lies. we don't live to the people. it is a campaign that says no compromise, no retreat, and no fear. [cheers] >> my brothers and sisters, we are not in a position to determine the historical conditions we are born in. but we can determine how we respond to those conditions.
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for many of us, we have determined that we are going to fight. i stand here before you to tell you that the campaign is committed to fight. we are committed to fight not just for you, but with you. we understand it is a collective process. we understand that all we have to keep us back is ourselves. i pledge to you my brothers and sisters, that we are going to do all we can to advance this movement. we will give it everything that we have. [cheers] andas our dear sister fact insays, it is in our hands. let's make history.
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thank you. [cheers] >> thank you. thank you so much. now, my friends, it is indeed my honor, my pleasure, to bring before you, someone who needs no introduction. someone who has been a freedom fighter all her life. someone i have seen work night and day for all of us.
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someone whose dedication is something to be admired. i have been on this adventure for just a couple of days, and i have even more respect for dr. stein now. [cheers] >> so, with no more delays, please my friends, brothers and sisters, join me in bringing out and showing our love for the next president of the united states, dr. jill stein. [cheers] ♪
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dr. stein: we are what democracy looks like. [cheers] dr. stein: yes, we are what democracy looks like and we are what political revolution looks like. [cheers] dr. stein: thank you, thank everyone of you. thank you for that incredible inspiration.
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fork you to everyone of you being here and leading the charge for an america and a world that works for all of us. [cheers] dr. stein: i want to agree with jamu saidything that a and everything that sherry said and i want to reiterate them and add to that, a big thank you to lynn who has been running the show. [cheers] dr. stein: a big thank you to tom hager and hillary hain and the green party for making this amazing convention possible. [cheers] dr. stein: i am honored beyond words to be
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the candidate. i am so honored to be running for president of the united states with the green party, the only party of, by and for the people. that is what we are. we have been ahead of the curve in so many ways, on climate change, green energy, the -- on demilitarization, marriage equality, free public higher education and canceling student debt. on stopping the partnership. on ending the war on drugs and the incarceration state. on providing reparations for slavery and to the indigenous
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people of this nation, on opposing war crimes committed by saudi arabia in yemen and war crimes and occupation committed by the israeli government in palestine. [cheers] dr. stein: am so much more. we have been ahead of the curve for decades, and all of a sudden, that curve is catching up to us. big time. [cheers] dr. stein: i want to recognize the heroes who have kept the party going through thick and thin. so again, stand up if you are part of a state, local or national green party organization, a big thank you to you. [cheers]
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dr. stein: again, a big thank you. it is such an honor to be running in alliance with the bernie sanders movement that i now here call the burning green. [cheers] dr. stein: we are burning green together. we owe you such a debt of gratitude for lifting up this revolution that has been smoldering for decades. you broke through the media blackout, you lifted us up and you refused to be shut down by the dnc. [cheers] dr. stein: so please stand so we the bernieou from
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campaign. thank you so much. together, we are unstoppable. [cheers] dr. stein: thank you so much. it is an honor to be running alongside a powerhouse of human rights who brings a lifetime of dedication and his powerful voice. i have to thank cornell west who has been an incredible hero for all of us for so long, who has broken free [cheers] dr. stein: it is such an honor to have him in one of our two first commercials, speaking to the world. i don't know if people have seen him yet, but he made a powerful speech which is out there now on the tv. when i walked to the airport, when i arrived and walked up to
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the curbside check-in, and i gave to the brothers who were manning the curbside check and i gave them my id card, and they say to me are you the jill stein? [cheers] dr. stein: i knew they had heard the voice of cornell west speaking to the broad community that has not been able to hear our message before. thank you, brother, i am so inspired to have religion on this campaign. i also am honored to run along with the inspired state and local candidates who are also running for office in bringing our message of people, planet and peace. please stand if you are running for office so we can thank you
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and recognize you for carrying this fight into our communities. we are in this together. thank [cheers] dr. stein: thank you so much. i just want to recognize that things have been forever changed. on the day that bernie sanders endorsed hillary clinton, the floodgates opened in our campaign. more volunteers, more ballot access drivers, more funding, we are a different campaign than we have ever been in the history for having joined forces with you. [cheers] dr. stein: it is such an honor to be your candidate in this historic moment of unprecedented crisis
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and unstoppable momentum for transformational change. [cheers] dr. stein: we have not only a historic opportunity, we have a historic responsibility to be the agents of that transformational change. [cheers] dr. stein: as martin luther king said, the arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends towards justice. arc is bending through us right now. we are the actors in something that is much bigger than us as we struggle toward peace, justice and healing together. [cheers] dr. stein: that arc of justice
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is moving through us as we mobilize, to ensure that every black life matters and we end violence policing and broken windows policing as the first go five -- sco 5 and the millions march new york city just achieved by moving out the leadership of their police department that had overseen broken windows policing. they are turning the tide in this crisis of racist policing. that arc of justice is moving through us as we sit in and as wheelock down -- as we locked down and stop fracking pipelines and fossil fuel trains and coal and export terminals and all manner of poisonous
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fossil fuels and nuclear infrastructure. [cheers] dr. stein: that arc of justice is moving through us in philadelphia, like i have never seen, in the city of brotherly love, it was overrun by love in the streets, even inside the dnc as the sanders campaign broke away from that corrupt and backstabbing dnc. [cheers] dr. stein: and the bernie or bust movement that is here today, and i want you all, give a wave, wherever you are, for helping us move to that higher place together, where we cannot be
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stopped. thank you, sister. we moved together in merged oura and we campaigns in raleigh after rally growing stronger by the hour. , the power of this movement was clear, especially during our power rally at fdr park. who was there? raise your hand if you were there. it was not only us and it was a sea of people as far as my i could see. nature erupted in thunder and lightning to say there is a big change coming. [cheers] dr. stein: and as the heavens opened up up and it poured down around us, we sought shelter because we were there inside of this little lightning rod of a tent in the middle of this park and the
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police said hurry up, go underneath that overpass. we moved the rally and we continued under the underpass in the lightning and the thunder and the rain because we cannot be stopped. [cheers] dr. stein: here we are in this movement for justice and democracy that is sweeping the planet, from livine planet. from living wage campaigns to the fossil fuel blockades in the fight to end massive restore then and life of immigrants and indigenous people and lgbtq and .omen and disability rights across the globe we are part of a movement that is rising up like we have not seen for generations.
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because we are facing an unprecedented crisis that demands transformation of all solutions and a new way forward based on democracy, justice, and human rights. that will not come from corporate political parties funded by predatory banks, war profiteers, and fossil fuel giants. us.ill come from from we, the people. mobilize. mobilize in broad, social movements with an independent political voice. as frederick douglass said, power concedes nothing without a demand. it never has and it never will. we will be that demand.
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[cheers & applause] it is recovery, but in fact it is an emergency. those good jobs that we lost have been replaced a part-time, low-wage, temporary, insecure jobs. a generation of young people is locked into predatory student loan debt. black lives are on the firing line. immigrants face massive deportation. wars for oil are coming back at us with a vengeance and the climate meltdown threatens civilization as we know it in our lifetime. [cheers & applause] while the super rich party on, richer than ever and the political elites that serve them are making things not better, but worse as they inflict austerity on everyday people while they squander trillions of
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our dollars on wall street bailouts, tax favors for the wealthy, and on wars that know no end. we are in revolt. [cheers & applause] [cheers & applause] the good news that they don't want you to know is that we actually have the power to turn this around. the minute we stand up with the courage of our convictions. we not only have the vision and the values of the american people that we reflect and that we lift up, but because we actually have the numbers to win the day. as you may know, there are 42 million young people -- and not
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so young people -- who are locked into predatory student loan debt. that is a winning plurality of the presidential vote. right there. and there is only one place that those votes can go. you are looking at it. it is our campaign. it is about time that we bailed out the students. we validated the economy with their waste, fraud, and abuse. it's time to bailout some of the key victims of that abuse. a generation of young people. [cheers & applause] we have the power. don't let them tell you for a minute that we don't.
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just go talk to a millennial who is in debt and let them know. know.em let each other they are the self mobilizing demographic if there ever was one. [cheers & applause] we also have the power to fix the other things that als. by the way, ending student debt, canceling it is our way forward. this is the gateway issue. who is it that actually leads the way forward on transformational change? whether it is the immigrants right movement, the black lives matter or the climate justice movement, the peace movement, ,he women or the lgbtq movement it has always been the younger generation that leads us forward . we need to liberate that younger
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generation for all of our sakes. not just for their sake. it's for all of us. [cheers & applause] them, which,ting by the way, is my first priority when we turn the white house into a greenhouse and make the world a safer place. my first priority is to liberate that generation who can then take us forward on all of the other issues we are fighting for for justice. meaning emergency jobs program that will also solve the emergency of climate change. a green new deal that will create 20 million jobs. create 100% clean, renewable energy by 2030. [cheers & applause] and that will create an
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fossilte ban on all new fuel infrastructure the day that we take office. we will create health care as a human right using medicare for all systems. we will make public higher education free. it pays for itself. we have news for the bean counters. for every dollar taxpayer money that we put into public higher education, we get back seven dollars in return. this doesn't cost us, it benefits us. there is no excuse not to have it now. [cheers & applause] we support the disabled members of our community, to ensure that they have full support. the treatments they need. the housing, the health care, and the jobs to enable them to
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intruding members of our society and to respect the dignity. we will provide public education and fully fund it. ensuring that our young people come to school ready to learn. and nourishedlthy with healthy food. not in food deserts. .hat means free from poverty the biggest obstacle to education that exists. we will end high-stakes testing, which is an obstruction to education. particularly for challenge learners. we will put an end to the school to prison pipeline. [cheers & applause] we will end of the closing of schools because they are poor or
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because they are latino or in communities of color. we will support those schools. not shut them down. we will fund them. will provide them with the real tools of education that they deserve. .etter, small classroom sizes this is not rocket science about how to educate kids. we will provide them with enriched curriculum. that means move -- music, art, recreation and community engagement. [cheers & applause] kids what the our advocates and leaders of so-called education reform are doing for their kids. they are not sending their kids to schools with high-stakes testing. couple of other quick mentions as we are almost out of time, we will create a welcoming path citizenship for our immigrant
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residents who are leading the for a just and sustainable and prosperous community. immigrants on this bus. if you were not bought here on the slave ship or your land was not stolen, everyone else here is an immigrant. [cheers & applause] stop thell deportations. the deportations, detentions, and night raid that are a national scandal while the republicans -- the republicans have become the party of hate and fear mongering, the democrats are the party of dem -- deportation, detentions, and night raids. we are the alternative for a just and welcoming path to citizenship.
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the other thing that we will do to fix the immigration crisis is to stop causing it in the first place. we say to donald trump, we don't need no freaking wall, we've just got to stop invading other countries. how about that? [cheers & applause] a couple of other quick ones. we can end the scourge of racist violence and brutality, not only in policing but in our courts and prisons and in the economy at large. can start by ensuring that every community has a police
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review board so the communities control their police, not police controlling the community. we will make sure that every community has access to an investigator so that all cases of death in the custody of police are investigated. not just the few that get a special thumbs-up from washington and the department of justice. and we call for a truth and reconciliation commission so that we can get to the bottom of this crisis of racism and to provide reparations, to acknowledge the in or missed debt owed to the african-american community for theynimaginable price that paid in building this country and saving our economy for generations while they were denied dignity and freedom.
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[chanting] ms. stein: and we will end the assault on our privacy, on freedom of the press, on the free internet. we will end the war on whistle broke -- whistleblowers. we will free the political prisoners, including leonard affairs, mumia [indiscernible] sans, edward snowden, and edward pinckney. [cheers & applause] finally, we will create a foreign policy based on international law, human rights, and diplomacy not on military and economic domination, which has been a catastrophic failure.
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we must abandon that policy. [chanting " no more war"] people,n: the american the american people deserve to know the truth about these wars. they have cost us six $2 million when you include the health-care expenses of our wounded veterans. trillion comes down to an average of $75,000 per american household for wars that have not made us safer. that have only increased of the terrorist threat and that have created failed states and mass refugee migrations that are
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tearing apart the middle east and europe. we say no to those wars. new -- it's just unthinkable that they want to do more of this same catastrophically failed policy. that's why we need to be on the debate stage. so that we can tell the truth about this. [chanting] so, we have a new kind of offensive for the middle east. offensive. a piece [cheers & applause] embargos with a weapons
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, as we are providing the majority of weapons to all combatants. we can shut down the flow of weapons to the middle east. we can also shut down the flow of funding coming largely from our allies, who have been partners with us in this, what shall we say? skip the premise war on terror. with one hand, starting back in afghanistan, where we and the saudi's created this great idea of the global terrorist enterprise created in order to help the mujahedin fight against the soviet union? this has come back to bite us in a very big way. it's time to shut down the whole enterprise. because with one hand -- with one hand we and our allies are fighting it. with another hand we and our allies have been funding it, training it, and arming it,
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according to even hillary clinton herself, whose leaked memos from the state department revealed that in hillary clinton's estimation, the saudi's are still the major funder of sunni jihad forces around the world. we started this, we can shut it down. that is our answer to isis and to terrorism. [cheers & applause] [cheers & applause] thing] -- chanting]
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ms. stein: hold onto your hat, folks. we have a job to do and the role to play the wilma be played by anybody but us. we are the ones we have been waiting for. when they tell us to get out of the way because we are standing in the way of a lesser evil, the answer to that is that this politics of fear, which we have been told to bow down to has only delivered everything we were afraid of. all of those reasons we were told to vote for the lesser evil because we didn't want the off shoring of our jobs, the meltdown of the climate, the
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massive bailouts for wall street , the expanding prison state, the attack on our civil liberties and immigrants rights, all of those things we didn't want is exactly what we got by allowing ourselves to be silent and letting a lesser evil speak for us. [cheers & applause] remember, when they try to tell you that you are powerless, remember what alice walker says. the biggest way that people give up power is by not knowing we have it to start with. we have it, we are going to use it in the selection. we are saying no to the lesser evil and yes to the greater good. because we are not only deciding what kind of world we will have
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in this election, we are deciding whether we will have a world or not going forward into the future. the day of reckoning is coming closer and closer. on climate change we are told that there will be a civilization ending development in the form of massive sea levels rising as soon as 2050. anybody plan to be here in 2050? a few of us do, myself included. we cannot wait. we have to act now if we want to stop that from happening in 2050. we need to declare a state of emergency right now and undertake a wartime scale mobilization to create those 20 million jobs and create that 100% clean energy now.
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we have a crisis in nuclear weapons and thanks very much to the democrats, bill clinton, who removed us from the anti-ballistic missile treaty framework for nuclear disarmament and barack obama who created a trillion dollar budget for us to spend on a new generation of nuclear weapons and modes of delivery. on the count of climate, on the count of nuclear weapons in this insane nuclear arms race that we are once again headlong plunging into, and on account of these endless and expanding wars that are blowing back at us all around the world, we cannot afford to sit this one out. the lesser evil is a losing strategy. people stop coming out to vote. ,or lesser evil politicians throwing them under the bus. the republicans will win anyhow.
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to look at donald trump? donald trump does not stand alone. the rise of right-wing extremism. not only in this country but in europe. as bernie sanders himself so often said, the only solution to the likes of donald trump is a truly radical, progressive agenda that restores our needs and ends the economic misery that promotes the kinds of demagogues that we are seeing in donald trump. we are the ones we have been waiting for. hillary clinton is the problem, she is not the solution to donald trump. we are the solution. we are the ones we have been waiting for. our moment. together we do have the power to create a america and a world that works for all of us.
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the power to create that world is not just an hour hope, not just in our dreams. right here and now it's in our hands. we will make this happen together. we are unstoppable. thank you so much. on we go. thank you. [cheers & applause] [chanting] [cheers & applause]
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[captioning performed by the national captioning institute, which is responsible for its caption content and accuracy. visit ncicap.org] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2016] to the white house
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coverage continues this afternoon as donald trump outlines his economic agenda before the country at an event being whole -- hosted by the detroit economic club starting at noon eastern huron c-span. a live picture from the national press club this morning as we wait for the start of a news conference by a group of political strategists launching a campaign to engage and mobilize latino voters in this year's elections. set to start and a few minutes, we will have it live for you here. at why some republicans are deciding to support libertarian candidates for president this campaign season, on today's "washington journal."
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>> live here at the washington press club as we look at a campaign to mobilize latino voters. it should start in just a ment and we will have a look at why some republicans are deciding to support libertarian candidates for president this campaign season. at lopez joins us. what point did you decide you
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would be voting libertarian the cycle? : -- guest: i never expected the trump would win the nomination. but i think the crucial point for me was when bill weld was announced as his vice presidential nominee, gary vice presidential nominee, at that point i need to tweak to see with the libertarian party was going to do. it was cemented for me when they were nominated by the libertarian party. it felt like these were two governors with a great record and certainly more executive experience than hillary clinton or donald trump. from there it was a matter of trying -- trying to understand why some were on board. background, someone who has worked a long time for republicans and republican candidates.
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-- guest: correct. i've worked on a lot of campaigns. i was the national vice chairman of the republican minority caucus. had aeague of mine conversation and decided we wanted to launch this effort and support and, the the organization came together very quickly and it has been a really surprising and welcome thing. try to put that in context for us. how many republicans will be out there and voting for the johnson weld ticket. the two of us are cochairmen and we have a steering committee of six or seven people, including an attorney by the name of lyle sampson in philadelphia who chaired a letter for bush effort and michael in utah, a young americans for liberty leader and a delicate at the convention in
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cleveland. we have cyrus krohn, michael chertoff, people who have worked in the republican national committee. more importantly it's important to note that we have a lot of support in bringing these people in, from mark noon you as and liz mayor, both very well-known and outstanding republican trip strategists. we got a great team pulled together in a short amount of time. we have about 30 people already in place and a lot more e-mailing us to be a part of what we call the national leadership committee, a larger group of people including elected officials and passed party officials and leaders, republican activists and even some people who haven't had much experience in the political arena but are really enthusiastic. honest with you, we've had a hard time keeping track of the people who said they wanted to join.
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their background lends themselves so well to giving voice to the majority of americans and the number will be much higher than what i'm giving you right now. we've only been together as an organization for about a week and a half. that's where we are right now and it's growing. host: let me give you some numbers for our viewers. if you support third-party 202-784-8000. 8001 if you are supporting donald trump. hillary clinton, 8002. that's how we broke down the phone lines in the segment. you can start calling it now. if you have cut questions for ed lopez, folks are calling in. you have worked on campaigns, you know what the polls say. what sort of odds would you give the johnson wells ticket right now? to what ing back stated earlier, as someone who has been involved in politics since i was a republican back in the 1990, i never expected trump
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to win the nomination. it was outside the realm of what i thought was possible. so, when we look at the johnson wells ticket, we are concerned with approaching this -- directorhe executive .of diles que voten a.c we are focused on advancing democratic culture and democratic values within the spanish speaking countries and communities. we are here to launch our first campaign. as you may know, latino voter turnout is less than the average turnout. here in america. we are here because we believe needs to be reduced. we need to make an additional effort to get out eligible voters. as you will see in our first campaign, it is
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basically focused on raising the latino voice. >>[speaking spanish]
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the time is now. roberto: gracias. how group is formed by political
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and advertising experts with experience in the u.s. and almost every spanish-speaking country in the continent. andave representatives offices in mexico, colombia, ecuador, argentina, chile, and here in d.c.. our campaigns have helped elect presidents, governors, and members of congress. strategy, some of the names of the companies involved in this, here in the those responsible for the design and advertising and all the artwork that you will see. in the my partner here strategic communications institute.
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and he used to be the international director, the international operations director of campaign elections. this is of course a part of the team. the team is much more broad. diego is the spokesman for columbia, director of columbia investigations. spanish] we have many more. what i'm trying to state here is that we have offices and representatives of this campaign and most of the countries. why are we doing this? why are we doing it this way? , and wehave learned will go deep on this later, what we have learned about latino voters in the united states and
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in all of the countries we have worked at is that latino voters are moved by family values and friend values. latino voters and hispanic voters in general in their own countries learn democratic values from their homes, from the families. so, this campaign tries to go back to the families of the to importune them to adopt democratic values. let me see, what else? this is important, we will not endorse or support any specific candidate or political party. this is not about them. this is about raising the latino
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voice. we will not support a specific candidate or party. we are here to raise the latino voice. it's up to them to listen. now, to explain a little bit more about the insight that let us to this specific advertisement advertising work that we are presenting. much, roberto.ry thank you to the press who have joined us today. as he mentioned, we had to do some insight and based on our experience we created a campaign based on the following pillars. number one, latinos are emotional. for don't just vote rational things like social security, health, education, the typical offer the politicians make, that's not enough for them. you might win their minds for a rational offer, but not their hearts.
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that's why translating political ads from english to spanish seem uninspiring to them. number two, they like to be empowered and taken as an example of a hard-working community helping to build this country. that is part of what i love about what it means to be a latino. number three, their main drive is their family and well-being of their relatives. we believe that we can motivate u.s. latino eligible voters abroad. based on these pillars we decided to communicate a more emotional vision and develop some of the communication pieces we are going to show right now. thank you. you, israel.k now we can play two more videos. this is the presentation video.
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we are going to be sharing it throughout the web. as ane decided organization is that all of the content that we produce is open source, so we're giving away to anybody of any medium who needs it or who shares these values and who wants to use it. it's free for their use. well, obviously of the community and the people involved. >> [speaking spanish]
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roberto: the last thing we are going to see is, as you can imply, this second video, it appeals to me friends and families of latinos.
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the last is a call to action for the community. by the way, this is our art director and a great graphic artist. >> [speaking spanish]
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roberto: one last remark before we go to the q&a section. this is a question we have been asked throughout this process. why do we do this? what moves us? we do this because we believe in democracy. most of us studied political science. some of us studied it here in the united states. we know that america is the leader in democratic culture. it's a role model in democracy and be believe in the elections of democracy in america and why it is so robust. it is so because of the participation of the public. this civic engagement.
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the participation of the public in public decisions. without the latino community with what theynd have in terms of voter turnout, democracy, we feel, is not complete. so, we feel that we are trying to, in terms of our own principles and what we need, second we are political consultants and are workforce is with democracy. without democracy, we wouldn't have a job. we need to protect democracy not only here but in our own countries. ons is also focused protecting and on promoting democracy in our home countries. of all, we have talked and seen over and over only a few organizations and campaigns being able to capture the hearts
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and minds of u.s. latino voters. we believe we can add value to those efforts by giving this -- by promoting this campaign. intervention. my thank you very much. now we are open for questions. yes? hello, i'm suzanne, with nbc news latino. most of the ads are in spanish. are you making any effort to reach english speaking latinos who matt not speak as much in spanish as well? roberto: yes, we are going to translate the ads. this is our first launch. we have the commission on the numbers right here. we know that on facebook at 8.7 million users prefer spanish. any ofon users prefer
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the -- of all of the hispanic facebook users, they prefer spanish. their second preference is any language. sorry? >> this has subtitles in english and we will have materials in english with spanish, too. speaking spanish] roberto: si, claro. >> [speaking spanish]
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roberto: [speaking spanish] in going to go in english. we are seeking to raise the latino voice and it's up to the campaigns to listen, of for the races to listen. up to hillary, trump, and all of the other candidates to listen to the voice that we are here to raise. question, about different nationalities, of course different nationalities behave differently. ecuadoreans do not have the same culture as argentinians. central americans. that is why this campaign has represented this and all of these countries. thisnduras we represented
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with most of the team we had negotiated that they also promote this. the campaign is going to be translated to all of the spanish, only to english, but two other kinds of spanish. [speaking spanish]
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>> [speaking spanish] roberto: let me just state this in english. this is an open source project and we are inviting anyone, the countries we haven't mentioned, anyone who wants to add value to contact andn,
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please become part of the team. >> [speaking spanish] basically, you know, there have been many other organizations hooked on these over the years.
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what makes you think -- did you come to the conclusion that these efforts have not been enough before? either not enough now or enough to help you create this campaign? similar to others done throughout the years? first of all -- roberto: first of all, we have seen the growth over the years but it is clearly .ot enough it hasn't grown to the same average as the rest of the communities. we have been in contact with some of these organizations. them aten worked for one point in our professional life. comes to add value to those efforts. it's not substituting anything.
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the focus is to go back to the families. that's what's different about this campaign against the others. we are going back to the original communities to attack the program at its root. what we have learned in years working here in the u.s. is that caste democratic culture and value is learned at home. home tore going back the countries of origin and promote and educate those values and that's what's different. no other campaign or effort in mobilizing latino voters is done in their countries of origin. heref the efforts are done , with the voter. i think that's the main difference. spanish, [ -- in
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speaking spanish]
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>> i'm bill lamb, of "san antonio express news." i'm unclear, do you anticipate these ads running widely in the u.s. and other countries? and what kind of a budget do you have here for this project? personal, the ads are mostly going to be running online. the intention is for them to be viral in this first phase. they are free for anyone who wants to run them, any medium that wants to run these ads can run them.
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if we produce more, we will have more. that's up to how we go. with, withg this self resources. it's our own resources here in this campaign. we have invested around $10,000 and a lot of professional thanks. that's what's more costly right now. >> [speaking spanish]
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roberto: what he said is that because were lesser have a producer and advertising costs -- we are placing those costs here, right now? i don't know if i answered your question. >> with libby widely in the u.s.? -- will it the widely in the u.s.? roberto: it depends on the public's response. but what we are promoting -- and we have the resources, the permanent -- the professional resources in latin america.
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in latin america this campaign distributed because of all of the professionals involved. we have communications experts from 5, 6 countries. they have their resources there. not talking about money. i'm talking about public relations and the capacity of this content. >> [speaking spanish]
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roberto: [speaking spanish] >> [speaking spanish]
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translated to spanish what he stated before. i am going to answer your question, why are we doing this? how this story started. it is a professional challenge, first off. we have been working for many years -- working campaign for many years. been working campaigns for what, 12 years now? campaigning in latin america. we have had some experiences here with ngos.
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and that inspired us to go forward. that.e inspired by i have a personal story, too many to share with you. or mother was born and raised in brooklyn. american emigrant that went to mexico. us on american democratic values. vote for my grandmother who could not vote because she was an american citizen. personally, i think the american democratic culture should be present and other countries. but well help democracy, are self campaigning. democracy, wehave
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would be out of a job. as a professional challenge. i think that is basically it. there is no more. [speaking spanish]
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>> [speaking spanish] >> [speaking spanish]
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i will repeat my question. i want to know what drew you to that motivating these people's families in other countries in central and latin america will make them vote here? buenos dias. [speaking spanish]
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>> what he said right now is
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what we are learned in our research and experience is there by -- a national dynamic and relationship between the latino electorate and their families and their friendly ties. to new technologies, the distance is shortening. short.tance is quite these influences these families have on their friends and on their families here israelites. what we know about latin america behavior is most of the decisions are taken in the primary. americans tend to communities, and groups, and tend to decide electoral and choices in groups and
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in families. learned int we have years of experience. so that is another thing that us know that it is the families who are going to help educate in democracy and vice.atic >> i think there is still something missing here. strategist. you know what is going on in the elections. this 2016 we are seeing elections were one of the candidates has stood up and been sentican to have here drug couriers, drug traffickers. very hard for me to believe that that has not in any way influence what you are doing here today. not that there is no feeling there something at stake here. at the same time you have things going on in venezuela, honduras, salvador. is it true that has had no influence at all on your decision to see there is a need
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for latinos to have a stake in in 2016?tion as we have stated before, we believe the latino voice, that are help to -- year to help rights, andoice here to decide. >> [inaudible] well, first of all we started year, andth that last insist, i do not know the information, the consequence of not have beence recent enough in the past. with the latino voice
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rising more those campaigns will probably have a different attitude in the future. >> [inaudible] >> [speaking spanish] >> >> [speaking spanish]
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>> i will go in spanish first. speaking spanish]
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people in latin america, families, would be interested in american politics, and what we're saying is right now, due to the the contents of
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the campaign, it is interesting for latin americans back home, what is happening, and the conversation about the american election is in the every day table, and that is what makes this campaign also possible. it is an opportunity to resonate . conversation back in countries, back in our conversation tables and all of our countries, and we are adding new ingredient to the conversation. >> [speaking spanish]
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>> gracias. spanish]
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she asked us what are the numbers and the expectations. there is an expected number 27.3 oflion eligible voters, 12% eligible voters. because it isoal not about this campaign only, we want to contribute to all of the that were mentioned reach thewe should average motor turnout, which is 50%.tle above
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we are talking about a little voters, then 15 million 15 million latino voters in the next election. goal.s the thank you very much. if there is no other questions, we will be out here for additional -- -first of all,s - the director. he has been writing speeches. mexican and latin politicians. [speaking spanish] and brought us merchandise for you and back there. the table back there.
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instead of a copy station, we have merchandise. pins.ts and , feel free to grab your own merchandise. thank you. [captioning performed by the national captioning institute, which is responsible for its caption content and accuracy. visit ncicap.org] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2015]
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6]
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>> we will have more of her road to the white house coverage in withunder 15 minutes donald trump delivering what is being called a major economic speech here at the detroit economic club. picture laying out his financial agenda for the country. after his remarks, we plan to open the phone line and get your take. live coverage starting at noon on c-span. we have also learned hillary clinton will be giving an detroit address and happening this coming thursday. watch c-span for coverage of the speech. we spoke with the reporter who us a preview of donald trump speech today. good morning to you. the speech will be at the
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detroit economic club. goal of the speech from the trump camp perspective? he has talked about that at link before. th before. the number of times he is had longer discussions on that have few. what we expect today is a more in-depth look at what he plans for the economy. host: who is his audience today? is one of the more esteemed regional groups in the country. detroit has a lot of people associated with the auto industry. politicians, business people. gilbert. you will have that kind of
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crowd. that getst a crowd together and does huge cheering doin -- booing. this is a very business-oriented group, and they expect to hear policy. coming off of new economic job numbers, what were the job numbers specifically, what do they tell economy?michigan's guest: michigan's economy has better.ng a lot given a state that has one of highestest if not the and of limit rate during the recession, it has come back in terms of the unemployment rate. you will see rick snyder taking some of the credit for that. i think one of the harder trump'sof not only
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message with this group may be trade deals. these are people who in large degree are in favor of trade the one mr. trump has criticized at length. there is also question about the car companies. if you are going to come in and hit the obama administration's plans over the years, part and parcel of that was to rescue general motors and which frequent most i had notl say if happened, it could have taken the automotive industry apart for at least several years. that did not happen. you were seeing the car companies have some of their best orders ever in recent quarters in recent years. host: before you go, when is expected to next the in michigan? is this a battleground donald the economic fight message you will be talking about today in michigan? guest: we know that secretary
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clinton is supposed to have an economic speech of her own in this thursday, which is interesting. michigan hasles not gone quite as much as attention because it has not gone for a republican candidate since george hwb bush in 1998. is considered mostly blue and presidential years. there seems to be something at stake here. feeling thereinly are disaffected white working-class voters across ohio and michigan. that mr. trump will need to turn somehow if he is really going to win this election. scott spangler with the detroit free press. thank you for your time this morning. >> donald trump will make those
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remarks live here on c-span at an event taking place at the club.t economic live picture. scheduled for noon eastern. reactionlso get your to his speech via phone calls and social media. wait, a discussion on recent changes to voter id law and strategy by some states to impose stricter standards for voters. this is from today's " washington journal." host: she joins us now to talk about the latest developments in efforts i some states to impose more voter identification roles box.e ballot first, jennifer clark, how many states are trying to impose or stringent rules -- more rules this cycle? guest: there are 15 states in voters when they go to the polls this november will be facing new restriction for the first time in a presidential election.
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those 15th eights are part of a large -- larger trend since 2010 in 21 statesvoters across the country are facing new restrictions over the past 5-6 years. host: are they all the same kind roles,r identification or are there some that are more stringent where you could see november? there is arranged for the types of restrictions we are seeing. some of them are voter id laws, as you have identified. among those concerning are those that are often referred to as laws. voter id voters can show ofy one of a small number government issued photo identification documents in order to vote, and if they do thoseve any one of documents, they are pretty much out of luck. we have seen states such as texas and wisconsin over the
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past few years attempt to put those kinds of strict voter id laws into place. to voteron identification restrictions, we are seeing different types of restrictions. we have seen cutbacks to early opportunities come of elimination of the opportunity to register to vote in both all and vote all in one trip. this has been seen as making it more difficult for those with prior criminal restrictions to boat restored. vote restored.to there have been several victories in recent court rulings. can you walk us through for those who may not have seen weeks.tories in recent guest: you are right, in the weeks we have seen stepping in to protect the in advance of this november's election.
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one of the states i have artie is texas. already mentioned is texas. it was blocked by one court and long litigation process, and ending up where we are today, which is about two the fifth circuit court of appeals, an appellate texas's lawthat discriminates on the basis of and has a disproportionate effect on latino-american and voters and texas will not be able to enforce the law as written this november. voters will need an opportunity the ballot with other types of identification that are not one of the demented motor ids that i talked about. that i talked about. in wisconsin we have seen two court cases of the past couple weeks. one that is somewhat similar to
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the texas decision in effect and withouters identification will have to give another opportunity to cast a this november. a court speakeen out against restrictions on opportunities. passing a law making it harder offer early voting to citizens. in addition, we saw a very big victory against restrictions in carolina where about a was and a half ago there nether federal appellate court that issued in a canyon saying carolina restriction law, which was passed a few years back and a bunch of other restrictions, that federal court passed with the intent to discriminate against minority voters. that law has been wiped off the
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books. north carolina has said they will take that up to the supreme court. we will stay tuned to see what there.ppen we've seen a court in north dakota say the state cannot voter id law. there was litigation victory in kansas. there has been a concerted effort to push for documentary proof of citizenship many did not which so when they registered to vote. the court recently said that in vote.hey have to there has been a lot of court over the to follow past couple of weeks that pushback on the restrictions. host: for those that are more visual learners, a helpful map access.r the light blue states on the map has been recent litigation victories. states -- dark
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states, where restrictive voter legislation is taking place. those that want to chime in on this -- jennifer clark, remind us what the brendan center is. the brennan center is a nonprofit, nonpartisan law institute. nyu school ofat law, and we were founded to defend the two pillars upon which our country is built, justice. and in addition to work in voting, we do work in other areas as well, such as justice reform and responsive to liberty and national security issues. if you have been involved in the various litigation efforts that you were just
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talking about? guest: yes, we are attorneys for texas case iin the talked about. , we have notes actively participated in those litigations. are -- i serve as one of the texasiff attorneys in the case i talked about. susie is in birmingham, alabama. good morning. you are on with jennifer clark. caller: there are a few situations where you have to present identification, apply for medicare, social security, unemployment, rent or buy a or rent a car, get on an airplane, get married, , a dr. of pets, and on and on. wrong with when we
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vote, which is a very important present photo id? i don't see the problem. the: thank you for question. jennifer clark. re, you are right, is an incredibly important thing, and people should have to be able to prove they are who they say they are. agrees that everybody that electoral integrity is of utmost importance. i think everyone is on the same that.ith the problem with the types of laws that restrict voter identification laws comes in the strict and photo identification part. there are a large number of americans who simply do not have , and a lot of them do not board airplanes or do some of the other things you mentioned. homeowners, have areowned a home, or they
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able to use other types of event of haitians that is not accepted law. this for example, in texas, you can use a drivers license from past ballot. licenseot use a drivers that is expired more than 60 days. those things -- thank you for joining us. first of all, we would like to ask you as we'll is due to silence those cell phones. i would like to invite you to please and and join me for the pledge of allegiance. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america, republic, for which it stands, one nation under god with liberty and justice for all. kindly remain standing. today will be delivered by john bright from the first presbyterian church of
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dearborn. let us pray. we are thankful you let us live in this free land in a time of .risis moving from an industrial age to technological age, challenges our best and brightest. 24 hour news cycles gives us a of voices in a day. slaughter of innocents, , global political ,conomic turmoil, water crises god, we feel immersed in pain, ,uffering, fear, hopelessness and as we search for meaning in hope.d of chaos, we seek it is faith that offers a way to cope. civic leaders illustrate our loss of moral compass. from the time of kennedy's, what can we do for our country, to reagan's belief that all must be based on a return to values that
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advice,had, two kings morning follows. brings light to the dark chambers of pessimism. friends are not facebook numbers. .ommunity is not pokemon go remind us to walk humbly. beenof god's children has given an alienable rights. rights.nt secures those grant us leaders at all levels who walk that talk to make great. land of the free, home of the .rave keepsake our distinguished rio,s, the athletes in heal our tigers and lions at, and god bless america. amen. [applause] have a seat, folks.
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wright.u reverend we appreciate that. thisquickly we will get show on the road. ask the elected officials, i am sorry i cannot call you out by name. stand so we can show her appreciation. please stand. thank you. [applause] ok, folks, this will be a little than our usual economic club meetings. we will not have time for q and a, but we do encourage you to tweet if you are so inclined. or you can follow or join the #econclub.on at time, it is my pleasure to turn this meeting over to our officer today, john were culture junior -- john recoulter jr.
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wife, terri, and do sowonderful family much and this community. please join me in welcoming john ricoulta. [applause] john: great. what a crowd. wanted to tell you a little story before i make introductory to do withnd it has how fast this thing grew over a 24 hour period of time. i got a call wednesday from beth asking if i would serve as the officer of the day. i said how big will the crowd be? plan on 300.ill i said that is a good size, at we will be able to manage that. within 24 hours it went from 300
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700 two 1100, and ultimately 1500, which caused us to look at other venues to hold speech. all that happened within 24 hours. we in fact created for the very ofst time that kind momentum, and in many respects i mimics or replicates what this campaign has been all trump.or mr. with that, it is i pleasure to begin the meeting. winning teams bringing together contrasting complementary files skills. is the case with this year's republican candidates for president and vice president of the united states. month in cleveland when hisrnor mike pence accepted party nomination for vice addressed just how
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different he is from his running , donald trump. there is no question that our differentday brings personalities and experiences to the republican ticket, but the lives work iseir strikingly similar. his business career in the private sector, grading tens of thousands of jobs and billions of dollars of value. the other has excelled in the public sector, also creating indexhile lowering taxes ending educational opportunities for our most vulnerable citizens. the level of shall we say,
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directness, rarely experienced in public life. the other is reserved and soft-spoken. one has unapologetically most pressing issues of our time. the other has been one of our most unflinching voices of conservative values. for all their differences, donald trump and mike pence have in common. both have wonderful families and deep sense of gratitude for the opportunity that their nations have given them. came to this next great challenge in their lives as s, disruptors, .isrupting the status quo both needed change in the dysfunctional washington at a time when seven out of 10 americans feel our country is wrong direction. both seek with clarity and
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conviction -- because with terrorism and disaster -- disastrous effects government that companies both large and small in michigan and across the country with job killing regulation. pence was born and .aised in the hoosier state he entered private law practice after graduating from the indiana law school in 1986. he served six terms in the house representatives before being elected governor of his home in 2013. office, he has passed the largest tax cut in indiana history, attracting new x and -- expanding school chilies and investing in homes and bridges. he is work with the indiana general assembly to balance without gimmicks, generating surplus and maintaining indiana
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triple-a credit rating. he is demonstrating to the world responsibility, smaller government, and common sense tax reform can make again int work washington's gridlock, they are proving that one struggling state can be made great again. [applause] >> thank you all.
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you, john, members of the board, recession committee, detroit economic club, i am welcome.for that warm it was just a few short weeks ago as a fellow midwesterner, a governor from a state just south here, that i was humbled to accept the republican nomination as vicend it serves president of the united states of america. [applause] in the midst of the weakest economic recovery since the , today at this historic forum republican nominee for president of the united rates will do what so many american leaders have done podium,t this very simply put, today you will hear keynote speaker outline a
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, a new economic vision to make america great again. [applause] and it is an honor for me to , a man who i have just gotten to know personally over the past couple of months. friends.ecome fast it seems like someone i have life, quite frankly. so -- like so many other entrepreneurs in america, donald trump is a dreamer, builder, a driver, and a man who speaks his mind. sayhe is also a man i would -- what is so refreshing about donald trump and explains the connection he is literally made to millions of americans, thatse even as he is told -- skyscrapers to the sky, the largest cities, he is never forgotten the men and
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women who work with their hands, who grow our food, build our roads, who protect our families. sense, he has who has built alongside the men and women who have done the work. far off theim campaign trail, to see him among the people of work with him and for him for years, you see that connection. level around donald trump, and he is the kind of leader that is continuously andng questions of everyone at everyone in his organizations. it is truly inspiring to see him work. is quite the contrast from other party's nominee. they tell us this economy is the best we can do. american people know it is a little bit different than that. the last quarter gdp report, 1.2% growth, the slowest and smite 49. extraordinary to think the rate and labor in
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since the the lowest 1970's. and probably most heartbreaking of all, the number of americans increasedpoverty has million over the years.5 the american people know it is nowhere near the best we can do, it is just the best they can do. and donald trump is going to this nation back to a dynamic and growing economy that people.r all of our today donald trump were outlined in vision that will unleash the thedless potential of american people and the american economy by empowering working large andbusinesses small, and entrepreneurs to hire to invest, to build and to grow americaroduce here in again. --let me say [applause] it is truly a privilege, but also a high honor or me to
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iou a man who believe will make america great again and will be the next president of the united states of america, your speaker, donald trump. [applause] mr. trump: thank you, everybody. thank you very much. thank you. such a crowd. beautiful. thank you very much. thank you. thank you. please. thank you for the invitation to speak to you today. wonderful to be in detroit
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. many times. we now begin a great national conversation about economic renewal for america. a conversation about how to make america great again for , especially, and i say those who have at the very least. ourcity of detroit is where city begins. detroit was once the economic envy of the world. the people of detroit help to america for the position of global dominance in the 20th century. [crowd cheers]
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thank you. thank you very much. when we were governed by the detroitfirst policy, was absolutely booming. engineers, laborers, shippers and countless others went to work each day, provided for families and lived out, out the american dream. many living in this city that dream has long ago vanished. we abandon the policy of america first, we started countries other instead of our own. skyscrapers went up in beijing and many other cities around the world while factories and neighborhoods crumbled right
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here in detroit. roads and bridges fell into disrepair, yet we found the money to resettle millions of refugees at taxpayer expense today detroit has a per capita $15,000, about half of the national average. resident live in poverty. times -- over 2.5 times the national average. half of all detroit residents do work. detroit tops the list of the most dangerous cities in terms of violent crime. >> [indiscernible]
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[applause] thank you. detroit tops the list of most dangerous cities in terms of violent crime. these are silent victims whose stories are never told by clinton, but the victim suffering is no less real or permanent. in short, the city of detroit is living, breathing example of failed economic agenda. [applause] every policy that has failed to it -- this city and so many others is a policy supported by clinton.
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she supports high taxes and regulation that forced and out of your community the crime policy have made you far less safe and the immigration policies that have strained local budgets and the nafta, signedke husband, that have shipped your jobs to mexico and , and shentries supports the education policies that deny your students choice, freedom, and opportunity. [applause] she is the candidate of the past , ours is the campaign of the future. [applause] this is a city controlled by democratic politicians at every , and unless we change policies, we will not change
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results, 100%. [applause] today i will outline my economic vision. in the coming weeks we will be offering more detail on all of these policies and the ones we out [applause]ed thank you, everybody. this is what happens when you go from 35 people too close to 2000 guess.i , we will beg weeks on all ofore details
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these policies, and the ones we have artie rolled out can be viewed on my campaign website. our opposition, on the other hand, has long ago run out of ideas. all hillary clinton has to offer same.e of the more taxes, more regulation, , moreureaucrats restrictions on american energy and more restrictions on american production. if you are a foreign power looking to weaken america, you could not do better than hillary clinton's economic agenda. [applause] nothing would make a foreign than for ourpier country to tax and regulate our right out of jobs existence. everye common feature of
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hillary clinton idea is it punishes you for working and doing business in the united states. [applause] every policy she has builds the playing field for other countries that are its ends, and tries tohy she distract us with tired political rhetoric that seeks to label us, divide us and pull us apart. my campaign is about reaching everyone as americans and returning to a government that the american people first. [applause] thank you.
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thank you. here is what an american first economic plan looks like. first, let's talk tax reform. taxes are one of the biggest race.ences in this hillary clinton, who has spent her career voting for tax increases, plans another job killing $1.3 trillion tax increase. big increase, one of the biggest ever. would tax small businesses by almost it be percent. recently, at a campaign event clinton short-circuited -- you know this one, short-circuited again to use a term when she accidentally told the truth and taxeshe wanted to raise
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on the middle class. [applause] i am proposing an across-the-board income tax reduction, especially for middle americans. this will lead to millions of new and really good paying jobs. rich will pay their fair share, but no one will pay so that it destroys jobs or undermines our ability as a compete. [applause] as part of this reform, we will eliminate the carried interest induction. reduction. thank you. as part of this reform, we will carried interest
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, well-known deduction, and other special interest loopholes that have been so good investors andt people like me, but unfair to american workers. tax simplification will be a major feature of the plan. [applause] our current tax code is so burdensome and so complex that we waste 9 billion hours per year in tax code compliance. my plan will reduce the current number of rockets from seven to three and dramatically streamline the process. [applause] we will work with house republicans on this plan using brackets they have
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proposed. 12%, 25%, and 33%. for many american workers, their tax rate will be zero. [applause] while we will develop our own assumptions and policies, areas while not an all or in others, we will be goalsd on the same shared and guidance of the same shared principles, jobs, growth, and opportunity. [applause] reforms will open the revolution since the
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reagan tax reform, which unleashed years of continued economic growth and job creation. america grow again. [applause] in the days ahead, we will provide more details on this you,and how it will help and most importantly, your families. it will present a knife and a taxrast to the job killing raising, poverty-inducing, obama -clinton agenda. [applause] so important, the state of new already lived through leadership.led -- soshington post
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important, the state of new york has artie lived through hillary pledged 200,000 jobs for upstate new york when she was a senator. what happened? writes and in post quote, upstate job growth stagnated overall during her tenure with manufacturing jobs plunging to record-setting force was --y 25% nearly 25%. she was unable to pass big-ticket legislation. many promised jobs. vote for jobs, she will bring back jobs. many promised jobs never materialized and others migrated
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to other states. she turned her first presidential run, which also was a disaster. [applause] thank you. then it shows that upstate actually lost jobs, a lot of them, during her first term. she was all talk, no action, upstate new york, a disaster. it is a disaster, what's happened to new york. reason. a big compare that to my record. in a recent new york post
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article, how donald trump helped save new york city. the paper writes that i, and this is a direct quote, in other words, not from me. [booing] [applause] thank you. all very well planned out. [applause] quote. a direct anald trump waded into landscape of empty 5th avenue. balls, central park so
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dangerous and a wall street area seemingly on its last legs as companies moved out. then, almost by sheer force of rescue, rode to the expressing rare faith in the future. he was instrumental in kickstarting the regeneration of neighborhoods and landmarks, almost given up on for dead. i did not say it, they said it. this is what i want to do. remember, new york city was a disaster. we made it great.
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this is what i want to do. thank you. this is what i want to do for our country. america, andpstart it can be done, and it won't even be that hard. [applause] let's look at what the obama policies have done nationally. their policies produced 1.2% growth, the weakest recovery since the great depression. debtbling of the national during the obama years. there are now 94.3 million americans outside of the labor force. million when
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president obama took office, an increase of 14 million people. agenda haslinton created a silent nation of jobless americans. homeownership is at its lowest rate in 51 years. [shouting] [applause] thank you very much. i will say the bernie sanders people had far more energy and
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spirit. [applause] nearly 12 million people have been added to the food stamps and these people are growing and growing so rapidly. since president obama took office. another nearly 7 million people, great americans are right now living in poverty. forcee the lowest labor participation rates in four decades. 58% of the african-american youth are either outside of the labor force or not employed. one in five american households do not have a single member in the labor force, not a single member of the household.
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are real under -- unemployment numbers. the 5% figures is one of the biggest hoaxes and american modern politics -- in american modern politics. [applause] meanwhile, american households lessarning more than $4000 today than they were 16 years ago. the average worker today pays 31.5% of their wages to income and payroll taxes. on top of that, state and local taxes consume another 10%. a very grim picture. the united states also has the highest business tax rate among the major industrialized nations of the world, at 35%.
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almost 40%. [shouting] [applause] it's almost 40% when you add in taxes at the state level and in many cases and many states, it is higher than that. in other words, we punish companies for making products in america, but let them ship products into the united states tax-free if they move overseas. this is backwards. all of our policies should be geared toward keeping jobs and
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wealth inside of the united states. [applause] under my plan, no american company will pay more than 15% of their business income in taxes. [applause] in other words, we are reducing the taxes from 35% to 15%. thank you. small businesses will benefit the most from this plan. hillary clinton's plan will require small business to pay as much as three times more taxes than what i am proposing.
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her regulations will put them totally out of business, and you won't be able to start. you cannot ever start a small business under the tremendous regulatory burden that you have today in our country. we are going to end it. cut regulations massively. [applause] alsoower business tax will end job killing corporate inversions and cause trillions in new dollars and wealth to come pouring into our country. by the way, into cities like right here in detroit. [applause] to help unleash this new job
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creation, we will allow businesses to immediately expense new business investment. no one will gain more from these proposals than low and middle income americans. [applause] reduce thel also cost of childcare by allowing parents to fully deduct the average cost of childcare spending from their taxes. [applause] we are also going to bring back trillions of dollars from american businesses that are now parked overseas. they can bring their money back into our country. bring that cash home, applying only a 10% tax.
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this money will be reinvested in states like michigan. [applause] family will have to pay the death tax. american workers -- [applause] workers have pay taxes their whole lives and they -- it ist be taxed just plain wrong and most people agree with that. we will repeal it. next comes regulatory reform. as with taxes, i will have one overriding goal when it comes to regulation. wealthjobs, and i want to stay in america.
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motor vehicle manufacturing is one of the most heavily regulated industries in the country and even in the world. is 25%. economy today smaller than it would have been without the surge of regulations since 1980. it is estimated that current overregulation is costing our economy as much as $2 trillion a year. that is money taken straight out of cities like detroit. so many of our cities are suffering so gravely, right out of detroit and others. the federal register is now over 80,000 pages long. at the wall street journal noted, president obama has issued close to 400 new major ,egulations since taking office
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each with a cost to the american economy of $100 million or more. alone, the obama administration unilaterally issued more than 2000 new regulations, each a hidden tax on american consumers and a massive lead weight on the american economy. anchorime to remove the dragging us down, and that is what it is doing. it is dragging us down. [applause] upon taking office, i will issue a temporary moratorium on new agency regulations. [applause] pence, ag mate, mike great guy, signed --
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[applause] signed a similar order when a -- when he worked so hard in indiana as its governor. this will give our american companies the certainty they our to reinvest in communities, get cash off of the sidelines and start hiring, new jobs and expanding their businesses. that is what it's about. i will also immediately cancel all illegal and overreaching executive orders. [applause] next, i will ask each and every federal agency to prepare a list of all of the regulations they impose on americans which are not necessary, do not improve
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public safety, and which needlessly kill many jobs. those regulations will be eliminated quickly. [applause] we are in a competition with the world, and i want america to win. [applause] anymore, but when i am president, we will start winning again, big-league. [applause] one of the most important reforms of all is trade reform. as bernie sanders has said, hillary clinton has bad judgment. we have seen this bad judgment overseas, in libya, iraq and syria.
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iran, we havet in seen it from president obama when he gives $150 billion to iran, the number one terrorist state and even gives them $400 million in money laundered cash as a ransom payment. we have also seen the terrible obama, clinton judgment, right here for everybody to see in detroit. hillary clinton has supported the trade deals, stripping this city and this country of its jobs and it's well. she supported bill clinton's nafta. she supported china's entrance into the world trade organization. she supported job killing trade deals, and that was a really bad one, with south korea and she supports the transpacific partnership. not now, but very soon, if she wins.
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that will be a disaster for detroit and everybody else. [applause] korea,alk about south because it is perfectly illustrating the broken promises that have hurt so many american workers. and the usuala so-called experts who have been wrong about every trade deal for decades predicted that the trade deal with south korea would increase our exports to south korea by more than $10 billion, resulting in 70,000 jobs. like clinton's broken promises to new york, these pledges all turned out to be false. instead of creating 70,000 jobs, it has killed nearly 100,000 jobs according to the economic
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policy institute. our exports to south korea have not increased at all, but their imports to us have surged more than $15 billion, more than doubling our trade deficit with that country. what else is new? it is happening with everyone. the next the trail will be the transpacific partnership. hillary clinton's closest friend confirmed what i have been saying, and this is from the beginning. if sent to the oval office, she will enact the tpp as sure as you are sitting there. her donors will make sure a vote for hillary clinton is a vote for the tpp, and it is also a vote for nafta. our annual trade deficit in goods with mexico has risen from close to zero, think of that,
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close to zero in 1993 to almost $60 billion today. our total trade deficit in goods hit nearly $800 billion last year. almost $800 billion. this is a strike at the heart of michigan and our nation as a whole. according to the bureau of labor statistics, before nafta went into effect, there were 285,000 autoworkers in michigan. today, that number is only 160,000 autoworkers. detroit is still waiting for hillary clinton's apology. she has been a disaster. obama has been a disaster. i expect detroit will get that apology right around the same time hillary clinton turns over the 33,000 e-mails she deleted.
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[applause] hillary clinton's transpacific partnership will be an even bigger disaster for the auto industry and even worse than nafta. ford motor company has announced its opposition to the deal. according to the economic policy institute, the u.s. trade deficit with the proposed tpp member, all the member countries, cost is over one million manufacturing jobs in the year 2015. by far, the biggest losses occurred in motor vehicles and parts, which lost nearly 700 -- 740,000 manufacturing jobs. what are we doing?
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michigan ranks first for jobs of trade share workforce due to the deficit with tpp members. imagine how many more automobile jobs will be lost if the tpp is actually approved. it will be catastrophic. that is why i have announced we will withdraw from the deal before that can ever happen. [applause] clinton will never withdraw from tpp. she is bought, controlled and pay for -- paid for by her donors and special interests. [applause] because my only interest is the american people, i have previously laid out and detailed a seven point plan available on
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my website. it includes strong protections ,gainst currency manipulation tariffs against any countries that cheat by unfairly subsidizing their goods, and it includes a total renegotiation of nafta, which is a disaster for our country, a total renegotiation. [applause] if we don't get a better deal, we will walk away. at the center of my plan is trade enforcement with china. this alone could return millions of jobs to our country. china is responsible for nearly half of our entire trade deficit. they break the rules in every
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way imaginable, including militarily. china engages in illegal exports , subsidies, prohibited currency manipulation and rampant that of intellectual property. it is out of control. they also have no real environmental or labor protections, further undercutting american workers. just enforcing intellectual property rules alone could save millions and millions of american jobs. [applause] according to the u.s. international trade commission, improved protection of america's intellectual property in china would produce more than 2 million more jobs right here,
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right now in the united states. [applause] add that to the same jobs protected from enforcing -- cracking down on cheating and currency dumping and we will bring new wages back to our country, the united states of america. thank you. [cheering and applause] so simple. trade has big benefits. thank you. benefits, and i am , but i wanttrade trade deals for our country that create more jobs and higher wages for american workers. isolation is not an option. [shouting]
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thank you. [applause] isolation is not an option. holy great and well-crafted trade deals -- only great and well-crafted trade deals where we are once benefit instead of being taken advantage of. to benefit, and our workers are going to benefit or we will not make those deals. also critical to our economic renewal will be energy reform. obama/clinton administration has blocked and destroyed millions of jobs through their anti-energy regulations while raising the price of electricity for both families and businesses.
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as a result of recent obama epa actions, coal fired plants across michigan have either shut down entirely or undergone expensive conversions, making them noncompetitive. the obama/clinton war on coal has cost michigan over 50,000 jobs. hillary clinton says the plan will put a lot of coal companies and coal miners out of business. we will put our coal miners and our steelworkers back to work, where they want to be. [applause] clinton not only embraces president obama's job killing energy restrictions, but wants to expand them, including going after oil and natural gas production that employs some 10 million americans.
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according to the heritage foundation, by 2030, the obama/clinton energy restrictions will eliminate another half a million manufacturing jobs, reduce trillionoutput by $2.5 and reduce income by $7,000 per person. a trump administration will end this war on the american worker and unleash an energy revolution that will bring fast new wealth to our country. according to the institute for energy research, lifting the restrictions on all sources of american energy will do the following. than $100dp by more billion annually. add over 500,000 new jobs annually and increase annual wages by more than $30 billion
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over the next seven years. [applause] additionally, it will increase federal, state and local tax revenue by almost $6 trillion over four decades. activitytotal economic by more than $20 trillion over the next 40 years. the reforms i have outlined today are only the beginning. trade, reformed our tax, energy and regulatory policies, we will open a new chapter in is soan prosperity, which desperately needed. we need a new chapter. we can use this new wealth to rebuild our military which is desperately needed and our infrastructure.
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as part of this new future, we will also be rolling out proposals to increase choice and reduce cost in childcare, offering much-needed relief to american families. they are suffering. we are going to get them as much needed relief. i will unveil -- thank you. i will unveil my plan on this in the coming weeks that i have been working on with my daughter, who is here. [cheering and applause] stand up. she feels so strongly about this. an incredible team of experts. likewise, our education reforms will help parents send their kids to a school of the work -- of their choice.
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it will be so good for detroit. we will also give our police and law enforcement the funds in support they need to restore law and order to this country. [applause and cheering] thank you. without -- without security, there can be no prosperity. [shouting] [cheering] security, there can be no prosperity. we must have law and order.
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we must have law and order. [applause and cheering] way, our police in this country are really unrecognized for the incredible job that they do. thank you. [applause] in the coming days, we will be rolling out plans on all of these items. one of my first acts as president will be to repeal and replace disaster is obamacare, saving another 200 million american jobs. [cheering and applause] we will also rebuild our military and get our allies to
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pay their fair share for the protection we provide to them, saving us countless more billions of dollars to invest in our own country. [applause] we also have a plan on our website for complete reform of the veterans administration. [applause] something so desperately needed, to make sure our that's and getare supported the care they deserve, which they have not been getting, not even close. [applause] city, wille motor come roaring back. [cheering and applause]
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offer a new future, not this same old failed policies of the past. our party has chosen to make new history by selecting a nominee from the outside, and that is outside of the very, already proven rigged system. the other party has reached backward into the past to choose a nominee from yesterday who offers only the rhetoric of yesterday and the policies of yesterday. take a look at what happened to new york state manufacturing and take a look at her promises before this happened. there will be no change under hillary clinton, only four more
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years of weakness and president obama. we are going to look boldly into the future. we will build the next generation of roads, bridges, railways, titles, seaports and airports. that is what our country deserves. american cars will travel the roads. american planes will connect our cities. american ships will patrol the seas. [applause] will send new skyscrapers soaring all over our country. we will put new, american metal into the spine of this nation.
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[applause] it will be american hands that rebuild this country, and it will be american energy mind from american sources that powers this country. be american workers who are hired to do the job. americanism, not globalism, will be our new credo. reach amazingll new heights, maybe heights never obtained before. all we have to do is stop relying on the tired voices of the past.
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system by a rigged relying on the people and just remember, this is so important, we are reliant on people. we can't fix it if we rely on those people. we can't solve that problem. [applause] we can't solve our problems if we are going to just go back and rely on these politicians, because that is what we have been doing. only by changing to new leadership and new solutions will we get new and great results. thank you. we need to stop believing in politicians and start believing in our great country. [applause]
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before everything great that has happened, the doubters have always said it could not be done. they say it right now, it could not be done. they actually said it when i ran for political office, not going to happen. it happened. prove the ready to doubters wrong. they want you to think small. i am asking you to think big. we are ready to dream great things for our country, once again. we are ready to show the world that america is back, bigger and better and stronger than ever before. thank you very much and god bless you. thank you very much. [cheering and applause]
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thank you very much. [applause] >> thank you, ladies and gentlemen. i want to apologize to all of you and to mr. trump for the disruptions. that is not what the detroit economic club is all about. and nobodyfollow-ups will be allowed back in any of our meetings that behave that way. my apologies to you. on a brighter note, how awesome that governor pence came along
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with mr. trump. thank you so much. if you would all like to join us for lunch, we will have a strolling lunch. we need you to leave through this door. the food is in the next ballroom and you can eat in the atrium, outside on the patio, so please join us and thank you for coming. with that, this meeting is adjourned. [applause. ] >> it was called a speech an economic policy but it was quite broader than that, donald trump speaking to the economic club on the economy, taxes and regulation in trade, but more, things like crime and punishment, veterans and more. we would love to hear your reaction as well. here is the number two join the conversation.
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three months until election day, and some real policy now, announced from donald trump in a number of areas. dominated they first part of the conversation in detroit. on the corporate tax proposal, touting corporate tax drop. he also talked about other issues, education and childcare and said further policies will be rolled out. after we finish with your comments and phone calls, we
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will show you the speech once again in case you missed it, mike pence, the vice president, but he also spoke and we will re-air all of it tonight at 8:00 eastern. esther in ohio, a trump supporter. caller: we are so happy to see donald trump on stage. we have been supporting him ever since he started to run. i wanted to let you know, we have eight people in our family, and we are all for donald trump and we thought he had a wonderful speech. host: jackie, next up on the others' line, new york city. caller: thank you. shock that anyone can support this person. he is insane. all you have to do is read the new york times like i do and all of my friends do, every single
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day, there are articles. today, charles blow in an op-ed, donald trump's troubles in the black belt. every single day, bad, bad businessman. they have been doing this for a year. anyone who is a critical thinker cannot possibly be backing this mentally ill person. he should be checked by a psychiatrist at the mayo clinic. he is insane. host: there were numerous interruptions. people at the washington post keeping track of those. some 14 or 15 interruptions in this speech that with a little bit over an hour or so. economy,sue of the donald trump, who actually does not allow washington post reporters into his campaign events quoted a washington post piece that was published on the front page about how the clintons record -- about hillary
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clinton's record as senator. they write that in her presidential bid, hillary clinton has made job creation a centerpiece of her platform, but nearly eight years after her senate exit, there is little evidence that her programs had a sustainable impact on -- on upstate employment. again. we will re-air of the donald trump speech tonight at 8:00 eastern, and this coming on today, seven weeks away from the start of the presidential debates. there will be three presidential debates, beginning on monday, september 26 in new york. sunday the ninth, washington university in st. louis and october 19, at the university of not -- university of nevada.
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in virginia, we go to a trump supporter. know,: i just want you to i am a supporter of donald trump, i think he will fix the economy and i do want him to build that wall. i do believe he will bring jobs back where they belong. factories and like you said, we shall explode. host: what is the job situation where you are in mark -- where you are? caller: there are jobs, but not many. right now, i got laid off and i am looking, but i think he is the answer to the job market. he is a businessman. he will fix all of that. there is only one thing that scares me about him, he is a
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very headstrong person, and he does not like listening to if there would ever be a world war iii, it might happen with him because he is so bullheaded. do you think that headstrong nature of donald trump as you described it is the sort of president you want in terms of negotiating trade deals or in terms of his interactions with our trading partners? caller: exactly, and i hope he stands up for what he is saying, today and if he does, and i know gets intry, and once he the, because i know he will, things are going to change. host: let's hear from james on the other line from ohio. tell us the name of your town. caller: i am in dallas -- gallup
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ohio. i am on the ohio river. host: go ahead with your comment. caller: i don't like donald trump. he is not fit to be president. he is talking about bringing ties,ack, but all of his his dinnerware, everything that he makes is made overseas. people for his hotels from other countries. if he is going to hire people like that and make all of this how in the overseas, world is he going to bring jobs back to the united states? i think it is wrong and i think he is a liar.
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i will not vote for him and i hope everybody listening to me will vote their conscious. he seems a total idiot when it comes to talking about the other countries. the way he talks about it is wrong. host: here is nancy, who supports donald trump. i am calling in regards to supporting donald trump. host: go ahead. caller: i feel that it is time for a change, and i believe that changingump will be the way our government is, today, and i can't believe that anybody would want hillary
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withon in the white house, all i hear is negative about dhat donald trump has promise to do for the country, when she , andold nothing but lies he is not a politician, he claims not to be a politician, he is a businessman, and i think he is going to bring this country around, turn it around and be on the right path. host: this theme has been to make america great again. the used a , today, all for a new future. we are getting your reaction to the detroit speech. we will show it again, momentarily and once again at 8:00 eastern. you can always find it again on our website, c-span.org. it has been a couple of weeks
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since the republican convention in cleveland, and the democratic convention in philadelphia, the next landmark or -- we are looking for is the three presidential debates coming up, seven weeks from now. monday, september 26, the first debate. sunday, october 9 and wednesday, after the, the bumps convention the candidates get may have dissipated. a poll this morning just came out in new jersey. clinton opens a postconvention lead. say that hillary clinton has taken a double-digit lead over donald trump according to the latest university poll. currently warty 6% of registered voters support hillary clinton.
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registeredy 46% of voters support hillary clinton. in georgia, on our others line. caller: hello. say, as icalling to watch, i don't listen to much of the news, but i always wait to see what donald trump is going to do, what he is going to say. say they continues to wall, make america great, those are his words over and over again. i'm not hearing exactly how he is going to do this. when we finally do the debates, that is what it is going to come down to, because he has not given us anything about what he is going to do. host: donald trump today
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following through with some of his comments a week ago, over the next couple of months unveiling some policies, certainly unveiling some today on taxes and regulation, some specifics. on the campaign front, the fundraising front, abby livingston tweets about some of the stops for donald trump in texas, adding a ft. worth fundraiser. brookhaven, new york and a trump supporter. caller: good morning. i would like to voice my opinion. is head andld trump shoulders over hillary clinton in terms of his ability to get the employment rate -- unemployment rate under control. his ability to negotiate with
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these foreign trade deals that have absolutely crucified the -- facturing and i think that sometimes he speaks off-the-cuff and because he is not a politician, but he has the expertise to get these things done. take a look at his businesses that he runs. billions of dollars worth of construction. he brings an in, under budget and under time, because he runs a great organization and he just has a natural ability to make our country great again. host: you can send us a tweet. referring back to another caller talking about where donald trump makes his ties. i don't see anything wrong with outsourcing ties while bringing what appears to be economic gain
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to the u.s. -- gains to the u.s. marina in new york city, go ahead. caller: i wanted to say that i think donald trump is the answer, going forward. hillary clinton and her pack have had their chance, they have been around a long time. they have been encircled by scandal after scandal and it is by a baz -- by avast right wing conspiracy that she would have you all believe. they are documented liars, they are only cravenly ambitious for their own wealth, as was demonstrated when she made a tour of the world with her hand out for donations to the clinton foundation. if you wonder why she was made secretary of state, obama and clinton were at such odds after
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the election, that he wanted her as far away out of state as he could possibly get her, because he did not want her in there. between his alliances with the muslim brotherhood and hers with her assistant being active in the muslim brotherhood, i have nothing against muslims, i have nothing against anybody, nor does mr. trump. people, that he does not hate people, he is a very intelligent man, he loves this country, he doesn't have to be running for this round of abuse after abuse. he gets it from all sides because everyone is afraid he is going to shake up status quo. host: donald trump certainly did try to compare his policies to hillary clinton. the washington journal tracking his speech writing that it 10 -- try to cast other clinton's government appeal to much on
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regulations. -- by promising twice as much infrastructure spending as the democratic nominee. a couple more calls, we go to munro, louisiana. caller: yes. you are kind of breaking up. trump is think donald -- host: i am losing you, sorry about that. huntington station, richard in virginia. caller: huntington station, new york. i think tilting the wall and kicking illegal immigrants out is $25united states, it
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billion a year being spent on this country. people in my experience spend hundreds of dollars a week for their country, money taken out of our economy. that is a major issue with me. it definitely hurts the economy. the government wants you -- why not a great businessman to try and run the country? it can't hurt us and can only improve our military, economy, wages, taxes. i believe in this man. i have been waiting many years for this man to arrive. speech from-ranging donald trump that touched a little bit on immigration, certainly a lot on the economy, on taxes, trade. and regulation we will show all of it again tonight at 8:00 eastern and you can find it online at c-span.org.
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next up, we will show you the speech. donald trump is introduced by his fight presidential running mate, governor mike pence. [applause] >> thank you. thank you members of the board, members of the reception committee and the detroit economic club. i am grateful for that warm welcome. few short weeks ago as a fellow myth -- midwesterner, as a governor from the state just south of here that i was humbled to accept the republican nomination, to run and serve as vice president of the united states of america.
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[applause] in the midst of the we get economic recovery since the great recession, today at this historic forum, the republican nominee for president of the united states will do what so many american leaders have done before, at this very podium. simply put, today, you will hear your keynote speaker outline a vision, a new economic vision to make america great again. [applause] it is an honor for me to introduce him, and man who i have just gotten to know, personally over the last couple of months, but we have become fast friends. it seems like someone i have known all my life. like so many other american entrepreneurs throughout our history, donald trump is a
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dreamer, a builder, a driver. he is a man who speaks his mind. say, also a man i would what is so refreshing about donald what explains the connection that he is literally made to millions of americans is because, even as he has built skyscrapers to the sky, to the summit of our largest cities, he has never forgotten the men and women who work with their hands, who grow our food, who build our roads, who attend our sick, who protect our families. to see him far off the campaign trail, among the people that have worked with him and for him for years, you see that connection. aroundund is level donald trump and he is the kind of leader continuously asking questions of everyone at every
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level in his organization. it is truly inspiring to watch him work. he is quite the contrast of the other party's nominee. they tell us this economy is the best we can do, that the american people. they know it is different from that. 1.2 quarter gdp report, seven wrote, the slowest since 1949. extraordinary to think -- inipation rate in our labor in america is the lowest since 1970. the heartbreaking of all is number of americans living in poverty have increased nearly 7 million over the last seven and a half years. the american people know it is nowhere near the best we can do, it is just the best they can do, and donald trump will lead this nation back to a dynamic and growing economy that works for all of our people.
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today, donald trump will outline an economic vision that will unleash the boundless potential of the american people and the empoweringonomy by working families, businesses large and small, and entrepreneurs to hire, invest, and to build and grow, and to produce here in america again. [applause] privilege but it is also a high honor for me to introduce to you a man who i believe will make america great again, and will be the next president of the united states of america. your speaker, donald trump. [applause]
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>> thank you, everybody, thank you very much. you. such a crowd, beautiful. thank you. thank you for the invitation to speak to you today. it is wonderful to be in detroit. i have been here many times. we now begin a great national conversation about economic renewal for america. it is a conversation about how to make america great again, for everyone, especially for those .ho have the very least
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the city of detroit is where our story begins. detroit was once the economic envy of the world. the people of detroit help to power america to its position of global dominance in the 20th century. [crowd boos] [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. when we were governed by the america first policy, detroit was absolutely booming. engineers, builders, laborers, shippers, and countless others went to work each day, provided for their families, and lived
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out, totally, lived the american dream. but for many living in this city, that dream has long ago vanished, when we abandoned the policies of america first. we started rebuilding other .ountries instead of our own the skyscrapers were not in beijing and many other cities around the world while the factories and neighborhoods crumbled right here in detroit. our roads and bridges fell into disrepair, yet we found the money to resettle millions of refugees at taxpayer expense. today, detroit has per capita income of under $15,000, about half of the national average. 40% of the city's residents live in poverty. over 2.5 times the national average.
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the unemployment rate is more than twice the national average. half of all detroit residents do not work. detroit tops the list of the most dangerous cities in terms of violent crime. [crowd boos] [applause] >> thank you. detroit tops the list of most dangerous cities in terms of violent crime. these are silent victims whose stories are never told by hillary clinton, but victims whose suffering is no less real or permanent. in short, the city of detroit is
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the living, breathing example of my opponent's failed economic agenda. [applause] every policy that iledhas fa this city and so many others is a policy supported by hillary clinton. she supports the high taxes and radical regulation that forced jobs out of your community, and the crime, policies have made you far less safe, and immigration policies that have strained the local budgets, and the trade deals like that stuff -- nafta, signed by her husband, shifting your jobs to mexico and other countries, and she supports the education policies that denies your students
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choice, freedom, and opportunity. [applause] she is the candidate of the past. ours is the campaign of the future. this is a city controlled by democratic politicians at every level. unless we change policies, we will not change results, 100%. [applause] today, i will outline my economic vision. in the coming weeks, we will be offering more detail on all of these policies, and the ones that we have already rolled out -- [crowd boos]
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[applause] >> thank you, everybody. this is what happens when you go from 35 people to close to 2000 people, i guess. in the coming weeks, we will be offering more detail on all of these policies, and the ones that we have already rolled out can be viewed on my campaign website. our opposition, on the other hand, as long ago run out of ideas. all hillary clinton has to offer is more of the same, more taxes, more regulations, more bureaucrats, more restrictions on american energy, and on american production. more of that. if you were a foreign power looking to weaken america, you
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could not do better than hillary clinton's economic agenda. [applause] nothing would make our foreign adversaries happier than for our country to tax and regulate our companies and our jobs, right out of existence. the one common feature of every hillary clinton idea is that it punishes you for working and doing business in the united states. [applause] every policy she has tilt the playing field toward other countries, at our expense, and that is why she tries to distract us with tired political rhetoric that seeks to label us, divide us, and pull us apart. my campaign is about reaching out to everyone as americans and
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returning to a government that puts the american people first. [crowd boos] [applause] >> thank you. here is what an american first economic plan looks like. first, let's talk tax reform. taxes are one of the biggest differences in this race. hillary clinton, who has spent her career voting for tax increases, plans another massive job killing $1.3 trillion tax increase. big increase.
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one of the biggest ever. her plan would tax many small businesses by almost 50%. recently, at a campaign event, hillary clinton -- you know this, you have heard this one. hillary clinton short-circuited again, to use a now famous term, when she accidentally told the truth and said she wanted to raise taxes on the middle class. [applause] i am proposing an across-the-board income tax reduction, especially for middle income americans. this will lead to millions of new and really good paying jobs. the rich will pay their fair share, but no one will pay so much that it destroys jobs, or undermines our ability as a nation to compete. [applause]
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as part of this reform, we will eliminate the carried interest deduction. [crowd boos] >> thank you. as part of this reform, we will eliminate the carried interest reduction, and other loopholes that have been good for wall street investors, and people like me, but unfair to american workers. tax simplification will be a major feature of the plan. [applause] our current tax code is so burdensome and so complex that we waste 9 billion hours a year
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in tax code compliance. my plan would reduce the number of brackets from seven to three and dramatically streamline the process. we will work with house republicans on the plan using the same bracket they have proposed, 12%, 25%, and 33%. for many american workers, their tax rate will be zero. we will develop -- [crowd boos] >> we will develop our own
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services and policies, agreeing in some areas but not in all or others. we will be focused on the same shared goals and guidance, the same shared principles. jobs, growth, and opportunity. [applause] these reforms will offer the biggest tax revolution since the reagan tax reform, which unleashed years of continued economic growth and job creation. we will make america grow again. [applause] in the days ahead, we will provide more details on this plan, and how it will help you, and most importantly, your family. it will present a night and a
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day contrast to the job killing, tax raising, poverty inducing obama-clinton agenda. [applause] so important, the state of new york has already lived through hillary clinton's failed leadership. "the washington post" today published an article on her broken promises. she pledged 200,000 jobs for upstate new york when she was a senator. what happened? the washington post writes and i quote, upstate job growth stagnated overall during her tenure with manufacturing jobs
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plunging to record-setting levels, nearly 25%. the former first lady was totally unable to pass big-ticket legislation. many promised jobs. many promised. i remember so well. hillary, i will bring you jobs. vote for jobs, she will bring back jobs. many promised jobs never materialized and others migrated to other states. she turned her first presidential run, which also was a disaster. [applause] thank you.
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then it shows that upstate actually lost jobs, a lot of them, during her first term. she was all talk, no action, upstate new york, a disaster. it is a disaster, what's happened to upstate new york. nafta is a big reason. compare that to my record. in a recent new york post article, how donald trump helped save new york city. the paper writes that i, and this is a direct quote, in other words, not from me. [crowd boos]
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thank you. all very well planned out. [applause] this is a direct quote. donald trump waded into a landscape of empty 5th avenue. the dust balls, central park so dangerous and a wall street area seemingly on its last legs as companies moved out. then, almost by sheer force of will, he rode to the rescue, expressing rare faith in the future. he was instrumental in kickstarting the regeneration of neighborhoods and landmarks,
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almost given up on for dead. i did not say it, they said it. this is what i want to do. [crowd boos] remember, new york city was a disaster. we made it great. this is what i want to do. thank you. this is what i want to do for our country. i want to jumpstart america, and it can be done, and it won't even be that hard. [applause] let's look at what the obama policies have done nationally.
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their policies produced 1.2% growth, the weakest recovery since the great depression. a doubling of the national debt during the obama years. there are now 94.3 million americans outside of the labor force. it was 80.5 million when president obama took office, an increase of 14 million people. the obama/clinton agenda has created a silent nation of jobless americans. homeownership is at its lowest rate in 51 years. [shouting]
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[crowd boos] [applause] thank you very much. i will say the bernie sanders people had far more energy and spirit. [applause] nearly 12 million people have been added to the food stamps and these people are growing and growing so rapidly. since president obama took office. another nearly 7 million people, great americans are right now living in poverty.
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we have the lowest labor force participation rates in four decades. 58% of the african-american youth are either outside of the labor force or not employed. one in five american households do not have a single member in the labor force, not a single member of the household. these are the real unemployment numbers. the 5% figures is one of the biggest hoaxes and american modern politics -- in american modern politics. [applause] meanwhile, american households are earning more than $4000 less
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today than they were 16 years ago. the average worker today pays 31.5% of their wages to income and payroll taxes. on top of that, state and local taxes consume another 10%. a very grim picture. the united states also has the highest business tax rate among the major industrialized nations of the world, at 35%. almost 40%. [shouting] [crowd boos] [applause] it's almost 40% when you add in taxes at the state level and in many cases and many states, it
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is higher than that. in other words, we punish companies for making products in america, but let them ship products into the united states tax-free if they move overseas. this is backwards. all of our policies should be geared toward keeping jobs and wealth inside of the united states. [applause] under my plan, no american company will pay more than 15% of their business income in taxes. [applause] in other words, we are reducing
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the taxes from 35% to 15%. thank you. small businesses will benefit the most from this plan. hillary clinton's plan will require small business to pay as much as three times more taxes than what i am proposing. her regulations will put them totally out of business, and you won't be able to start. you cannot ever start a small business under the tremendous regulatory burden that you have today in our country. we are going to end it. i am going to cut regulations massively. massively.
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[applause] our lower business tax will also end job killing corporate inversions and cause trillions in new dollars and wealth to come pouring into our country. by the way, into cities like right here in detroit. [applause] to help unleash this new job creation, we will allow businesses to immediately expense new business investment. no one will gain more from these proposals than low and middle income americans. [applause] my plan will also reduce the cost of childcare by allowing parents to fully deduct the average cost of childcare spending from their taxes.
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[applause] we are also going to bring back trillions of dollars from american businesses that are now parked overseas. they can bring their money back into our country. our plan will bring that cash home, applying only a 10% tax. this money will be reinvested in states like michigan. [applause] states like michigan which are having serious. -- serious problems. finally, no family will have to pay the death tax. american workers -- [applause] american workers have pay taxes their whole lives and they should not be taxed -- it is
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just plain wrong and most people agree with that. we will repeal it. next comes regulatory reform. as with taxes, i will have one overriding goal when it comes to regulation. i want jobs, and i want wealth to stay in america. motor vehicle manufacturing is one of the most heavily regulated industries in the country and even in the world. the u.s. economy today is 25% smaller than it would have been without the surge of regulations since 1980. it is estimated that current overregulation is costing our
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economy as much as $2 trillion a year. that is money taken straight out of cities like detroit. so many of our cities are suffering so gravely, right out of detroit and others. the federal register is now over 80,000 pages long. at the wall street journal noted, president obama has issued close to 400 new major regulations since taking office, each with a cost to the american economy of $100 million or more. in 2015 alone, the obama administration unilaterally issued more than 2000 new regulations, each a hidden tax on american consumers and a massive lead weight on the american economy. it is time to remove the anchor
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dragging us down, and that is what it is doing. it is dragging us down. [applause] upon taking office, i will issue a temporary moratorium on new agency regulations. [applause] my running mate, mike pence, a great guy, signed -- [applause] signed a similar order when a -- when he worked so hard in indiana as its governor. this will give our american companies the certainty they need to reinvest in our communities, get cash off of the sidelines and start hiring, new jobs and expanding their businesses. that is what it's about.
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i will also immediately cancel all illegal and overreaching executive orders. [applause] next, i will ask each and every federal agency to prepare a list of all of the regulations they impose on americans which are not necessary, do not improve public safety, and which needlessly kill many jobs. those regulations will be eliminated quickly. [applause] we are in a competition with the world, and i want america to win. [applause]
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we don't win anymore, but when i am president, we will start winning again, big-league. [applause] one of the most important reforms of all is trade reform. as bernie sanders has said, hillary clinton has bad judgment. we have seen this bad judgment overseas, in libya, iraq and syria. we have seen it in iran, we have seen it from president obama when he gives $150 billion to iran, the number one terrorist state and even gives them $400 million in money laundered cash as a ransom payment. we have also seen the terrible obama, clinton judgment, right here for everybody to see in detroit.
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hillary clinton has supported the trade deals, stripping this city and this country of its jobs and it's well. she supported bill clinton's nafta. she supported china's entrance into the world trade organization. she supported job killing trade deals, and that was a really bad one, with south korea and she supports the transpacific partnership. not now, but very soon, if she wins. that will be a disaster for detroit and everybody else. [applause] let's talk about south korea, because it is perfectly illustrating the broken promises that have hurt so many american workers. president obama and the usual so-called experts who have been wrong about every trade deal for decades predicted that the trade
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deal with south korea would increase our exports to south korea by more than $10 billion, resulting in 70,000 jobs. like clinton's broken promises to new york, these pledges all turned out to be false. instead of creating 70,000 jobs, it has killed nearly 100,000 jobs according to the economic policy institute. our exports to south korea have not increased at all, but their imports to us have surged more than $15 billion, more than doubling our trade deficit with that country. what else is new? it is happening with everyone. the next the trail will be the transpacific partnership. hillary clinton's closest friend confirmed what i have been
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saying, and this is from the beginning. if sent to the oval office, she will enact the tpp as sure as you are sitting there. her donors will make sure a vote for hillary clinton is a vote for the tpp, and it is also a vote for nafta. our annual trade deficit in goods with mexico has risen from close to zero, think of that, close to zero in 1993 to almost $60 billion today. our total trade deficit in goods hit nearly $800 billion last year. almost $800 billion. this is a strike at the heart of michigan and our nation as a whole. according to the bureau of labor statistics, before nafta went
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into effect, there were 285,000 autoworkers in michigan. today, that number is only 160,000 autoworkers. detroit is still waiting for hillary clinton's apology. she has been a disaster. obama has been a disaster. i expect detroit will get that apology right around the same time hillary clinton turns over the 33,000 e-mails she deleted. [applause] hillary clinton's transpacific partnership will be an even bigger disaster for the auto industry and even worse than nafta. believe me. ford motor company has announced its opposition to the deal. according to the economic policy
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institute, the u.s. trade deficit with the proposed tpp member, all the member countries, cost is over one million manufacturing jobs in the year 2015. by far, the biggest losses occurred in motor vehicles and parts, which lost nearly 700 -- 740,000 manufacturing jobs. what are we doing? michigan ranks first for jobs lost as a share of trade workforce due to the deficit with tpp members. imagine how many more automobile jobs will be lost if the tpp is actually approved. it will be catastrophic. that is why i have announced we will withdraw from the deal before that can ever happen. [applause]
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hillary clinton will never withdraw from tpp. she is bought, controlled and paid for by her donors and special interests. [applause] because my only interest is the american people, i have previously laid out and detailed a seven point plan available on my website. it includes strong protections against currency manipulation, tariffs against any countries that cheat by unfairly subsidizing their goods, and it includes a total renegotiation of nafta, which is a disaster for our country, a total renegotiation. [applause]
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if we don't get a better deal, we will walk away. at the center of my plan is trade enforcement with china. this alone could return millions of jobs to our country. china is responsible for nearly half of our entire trade deficit. they break the rules in every way imaginable, including militarily. china engages in illegal exports , subsidies, prohibited currency manipulation and rampant that of intellectual property. it is out of control. they also have no real environmental or labor protections, further undercutting american workers.
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just enforcing intellectual property rules alone could save millions and millions of american jobs. [applause] according to the u.s. international trade commission, improved protection of america's intellectual property in china would produce more than 2 million more jobs right here, right now in the united states. [applause] add that to the same jobs protected from enforcing -- cracking down on cheating and currency dumping and we will bring new wages back to our country, the united states of america. thank you. [cheering and applause] so simple.
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trade has big benefits. thank you. trade has big benefits, and i am in favor of trade, but i want trade deals for our country that create more jobs and higher wages for american workers. isolation is not an option. [shouting] [crowd boos] thank you. isolation is not an option. only great and well-crafted trade deals where we are once benefit instead of being taken advantage of.
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we are going to benefit, and our workers are going to benefit or we will not make those deals. also critical to our economic renewal will be energy reform. the obama/clinton administration has blocked and destroyed millions of jobs through their anti-energy regulations while raising the price of electricity for both families and businesses. as a result of recent obama epa actions, coal fired plants across michigan have either shut down entirely or undergone expensive conversions, making them noncompetitive. the obama/clinton war on coal has cost michigan over 50,000 jobs. hillary clinton says the plan will put a lot of coal companies
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and coal miners out of business. we will put our coal miners and our steelworkers back to work, where they want to be. [applause] clinton not only embraces president obama's job killing energy restrictions, but wants to expand them, including going after oil and natural gas production that employs some 10 million americans. according to the heritage foundation, by 2030, the obama/clinton energy restrictions will eliminate another half a million manufacturing jobs, reduce economic output by $2.5 trillion and reduce income by $7,000 per person. a trump administration will end this war on the american worker
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and unleash an energy revolution that will bring fast new wealth to our country. according to the institute for energy research, lifting the restrictions on all sources of american energy will do the following. increase gdp by more than $100 billion annually. add over 500,000 new jobs annually and increase annual wages by more than $30 billion over the next seven years. [applause] additionally, it will increase federal, state and local tax revenue by almost $6 trillion over four decades. increase total economic activity by more than $20 trillion over the next 40 years. the reforms i have outlined
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today are only the beginning. when we reformed our tax, trade, energy and regulatory policies, we will open a new chapter in american prosperity, which is so desperately needed. we need a new chapter. we can use this new wealth to rebuild our military which is desperately needed and our infrastructure. as part of this new future, we will also be rolling out proposals to increase choice and reduce cost in childcare, offering much-needed relief to american families. they are suffering. we are going to get them as much needed relief. i will unveil -- thank you. i will unveil my plan on this in the coming weeks that i have
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been working on with my daughter, who is here. [cheering and applause] stand up. she feels so strongly about this. an incredible team of experts. likewise, our education reforms will help parents send their kids to a school of the work -- of their choice. it will be so good for detroit. we will also give our police and law enforcement the funds in support they need to restore law and order to this country. [applause and cheering] thank you.
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without security, there can be no prosperity. [shouting] [crowd boos] without security, there can be no prosperity. we must have law and order. we must have law and order. [applause and cheering] by the way, our police in this country are really unrecognized for the incredible job that they do. thank you. [applause] in the coming days, we will be
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rolling out plans on all of these items. one of my first acts as president will be to repeal and replace disastrous obamacare, saving another 200 million american jobs. [cheering and applause] we will also rebuild our military and get our allies to pay their fair share for the protection we provide to them, saving us countless more billions of dollars to invest in our own country. [applause] we also have a plan on our website for complete reform of the veterans administration. [applause]
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this is something so desperately needed, to make sure our that's -- vets are supported and get the care they deserve, which they have not been getting, not even close. [applause] detroit, the motor city, will come roaring back. [cheering and applause] we will offer a new future, not this same old failed policies of the past. our party has chosen to make new history by selecting a nominee from the outside, and that is outside of the very, already proven rigged system.
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the other party has reached backward into the past to choose a nominee from yesterday who offers only the rhetoric of yesterday and the policies of yesterday. take a look at what happened to new york state manufacturing and take a look at her promises before this happened. there will be no change under hillary clinton, only four more years of weakness and president obama. we are going to look boldly into the future. we will build the next generation of roads, bridges, railways, titles, seaports and airports. that is what our country deserves. american cars will travel the
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roads. american planes will connect our cities. american ships will patrol the seas. [applause] american steel will send new skyscrapers soaring all over our country. we will put new, american metal into the spine of this nation. [applause] it will be american hands that rebuild this country, and it will be american energy mind from american sources that powers this country. it will be american workers who are hired to do the job.
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americanism, not globalism, will be our new credo. our country will reach amazing new heights, maybe heights never obtained before. all we have to do is stop relying on the tired voices of the past. we can fix a rigged system by relying on the people and just remember, this is so important, we are reliant on people. we can't fix it if we rely on those people. we can't solve that problem. [applause] we can't solve our problems if
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we are going to just go back and rely on these politicians, because that is what we have been doing. only by changing to new leadership and new solutions will we get new and great results. thank you. we need to stop believing in politicians and start believing in our great country. [applause] before everything great that has happened, the doubters have always said it could not be done. they say it right now, it could not be done. they actually said it when i ran for political office, not going to happen. it happened. america is ready to prove the doubters wrong. they want you to think small.
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i am asking you to think big. we are ready to dream great things for our country, once again. we are ready to show the world that america is back, bigger and better and stronger than ever before. thank you very much and god bless you. thank you very much. [cheering and applause] thank you very much. [applause] we were shown to speech again tonight at 8:00 on c-span, and you can watch and share on www.c-span.org. on this economy issue, hillary clinton will have her own economics speech.
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gainill push this week to further ground against republican nominee donald trump on the economy, countering his speech today. she planned to cap two weeks of campaigning focused on jobs and the economy, including a post-democratic national convention bus tour with running mate tim kaine with a speech in detroit that campaign officials say will highlight the stark contrast between her views and those of donald trump. read more at bloomberg politics.com. saturday, c-span looks at trade deals, their impact on the economy, jobs, and the presidential election. american jobsend and american workers by saying no to bad trade deals like the transpacific partnership, and unfair trade practices -- >> the state of pennsylvania has lost one third of their manufacturing jobs and the clintons put china into the wto.
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>> the program includes a look , the free trade agreement between the united states, mexico, and canada. >> this will result in more jobs for our people, more exports for our market, and more democracy for our allies. >> at a discussion on how the founding fathers viewed trade -- >> the u.s. was simply not a free trade nation, for most of american history. the u.s. is, in fact, a tariff-protected economy. this goes back to our constitution. >> an in-depth examination of the wto. >> at the time the wto was being negotiated, or it's the role naft eightaer hundred more, pages of specific rules and regulations. my book would be very different. when these two were being negotiated, the u.s. had its
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official advisers, 500 corporate advisors. >> watch our issue spotlight on trade deals, 8:00 eastern on saturday on c-span and www.c-span.org. ♪ >> this week on q&a, civil war historian and virginia tech professor emeritus james robertson. he discusses his book "after the civil war." >> professor james robertson, can you remember the first time you ever cared about the civil war? boy, i amwas a little sitting in my grandmother's lap, she was 94, her mind was clear as a bell.
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i remember sitting next to her telling me what her father had done at the battle of gettysburg. the link with the civil war is very direct with me. i grew up in the south side of a virginia town full of civil war history. ,rom the time i was a young boy i was interested in history. i'm glad i am because history is the best teacher we have ever had. >> how many years were you a professor at virginia tech? >> 44. it was another division, and electedrse, course, students took it because they wanted to. i saw 22,000 students. >> how many books have you read? >> i don't know, 20 or 30. i just write them and hope they do well. >> i have read the stonewall jackson book is your most interesting. little to say for
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it. it is heavy, 957 pages of small print, 170 pages of notes, about . conservative general yet, it has gone through 13 printings, still selling well. i wrote notause about the general, but the life story of a man. i got very involved with the jackson. he had an incredible life, hardships to overcome. he was an orphan. he never knew his father, his mother died when he i wanted to try to get a hold of this man, and she told me, i would not tell my therapist -- and she described what he should be, it introverted, quiet, humorless, not a conversationalist at all. that was stonewall jackson to
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t. he grew up like that. we always had a mother and father to whom we could go. he did not. he grew up not knowing what real deep personal love was. he had not had feelings like that before. i cried writing chapter one. i just felt so sorry for him. and yet, he would become the most brilliant general in the world. host: why? professor robertson: his tactics and the deception. even more than that, jackson was fighting for god in this war. i think it makes him a very unique individual. he searched throughout his young adult years for a safe, and he finally found it after he went to lexington, virginia.
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he became a presbyterian, not really. he became a calvinist in every sense of the word. he dedicated his life to god. and indeed, although it may sound evangelical, god was his heavenly father. he became the father that jackson never had. everything he did was for god. he gave thanks to a glass of water. knowing this was a gift from heaven. when the war comes, jackson concludes god has placed a scourge on america for reasons human beings cannot understand. but whichever side wins in this war, it is the side that god has blessed. he goes into this war not to fight yankees but to slay the amalekites and to kill the old enemy of biblical times. this is why when the war began, jackson advocated -- take no prisoners.
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host: where did he get that from? professor robertson: he got it from the old testament. joshua took jericho and killed every man, woman, and child in town. he saw god also. the belligerent god. he has his love for children. as a therapist told me, the love he had for children came from the love he had not received as a child. in the movie, they developed a wonderful scene based on fact. he met young janie corbyn who was five years old and that was an attraction between the two of them. and when jackson was not directing the war, he was down
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on his knees, just loving her to death. just before the battle of chancellorsville, where he was mortally wounded, janie fell ill of scarlet fever. we would know it today as strep throat, and she died. it was just a blow. it just struck him down. in the movie "gods and generals,," you just see them walk out of the field. he just lowly goes to pieces over the loss of janie corban. if you were to walk into a big auditorium full of people, he would be repulsed. too many strangers. too much talking he have to do. but if there was a little child, you would go to that child and say, hello. and he and that child would become close because jackson
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felt satisfaction from giving a child to love he himself never had. host: how many years did he live? professor robertson: he was 39. host: that is not why we asked you to come here. we really appreciate your time. you are retired but still active. professor robertson: i am more active now than when i was teaching. host: we wanted you to talk about a book you did called "after the civil war." you talk about things that happened after the civil war -- one of the things i wrote down, you started off in your preface about this, james hanger's loss of a leg. professor robertson: jim hanger went off with his unit.
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that was in june of 1861. a union attack came from robert crews fighting robert crews and jim hanger was wounded very badly and he lost a leg. the surgeons of that day who saved his life gave him the usual peg leg that we all hear about. it was very uncomfortable. after his capture in treatment, he went back home. he stayed in upstairs room. he was good at furniture making and carpentry. for about three weeks, they could hear him banging around. suddenly, one day he comes stomping down the steps. he had carved a leg like his original leg. he began to make prosthetic limbs. it all went with a young
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teenager who did not like a stump for a leg. host: i counted 70 people you wrote about in this book. i'm just going to toss out some names. i don't know how you remember all this stuff, but i will ask anyway. jubal early -- you said the cult of lost causes. what was that? professor robertson: he never surrendered mentally. he just thought that yankees overwhelmed them. after the war, totally reconstructed, he tried to keep the confederate dream alive. he began to perpetuate on what today we call the lost cause period, mainly that the south was correct in what it wanted to do, but it was overwhelmed by heathen forces and robert e. lee as the 13th disciple. his associates in many prominent places had animus against anyone
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who went against the old confederate feeling. they had particular animus against longstreet whose cousin had married u.s. grants. long street becomes the judas all the lost cause and they just butchered long street in print and speeches. john mosby joined the republican party, and they went after him, too. he would never accept defeat. when he died at the turn of the century, and he was buried in his confederate uniform. he is the personification of an unreconstructed southerner. in contrast, a general from
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louisiana, his first battle was may of 1962. his left leg was shot off. he came that she went home and recuperated, he came back, and then his left arm was shot off. in 1877, when the democrats finally got into power, they ran nichols for governor. they used a unique motto. "we are running all that is left of general nichols." he won in a landslide on amongst the x confederates -- ex-confederates. host: would you give a quick synopsis? when was the civil war fought? professor robertson: 1861 to 1865. host: how many search? prof. robertson: 3 million men roughly. one million southerners.
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yes, women did serve. how many we do not know but there were a lot that got into the army. it says something. i've seen figures. i don't know, i'm not sure if anyone really knows. there are many women. host: how many were killed in the north -- i mean southern soldiers -- and in the south? professor robertson: the total fatalities, the war department way back made a computation of 612,000 dead. i think it is woefully inadequate. i would say three quarters of a million. host: how many in the north and how many in the south? professor robertson: probably
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two to one. 250,000 here, there. probably because the numbers were smaller. but you have to add another half-million who were mentally or physically disabled by that war. amputated limbs and whatnot. you're talking about a 33% loss. host: knowing what you know now, if you were a southerner back in those days, what side would you have fought on? professor robertson: fought for the south. because states rights were so embedded. this is what a lot of students fail to see. let me use my own state as an example. when the united states constitution was established and the nation began, virginia was 180 years old. 180 years old. in 1861, when civil war comes, the lee family had been in virginia for 225 years.
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when robert e. lee said i cannot draw my sword against my birthplace, he was referring to the commonwealth of virginia. the united states was not old enough to have wisdom. much less efficient government. state allegiance was very deep. it went as far back in generations. i think one has to keep that in mind. i am not belittling slavery. slavery is, without question, the major cause of the civil war. but you could explain the actions of good, decent men like robert e. lee and the pious stonewall jackson. they fight because virginia needs them not that they support the confederate cause. they did not believe in slavery. his state needs them, and so he went to war. host: so, you taught 20,000 students at virginia tech over the years.
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how many in a classroom when you did your lectures? professor robertson: when we were on the quarter system, there were 577. then when we went over to the semester system, so you did not haven't as many -- you did not have as many electives, so it went to 350. host: after you spend a semester with the students, what did they most often say what they change their mind about? professor robertson: the human element. that is the way i taught history. history should be the most exciting subject of all because it is the story of human beings. god's most unpredictable creatures. no two human beings are alike. you can't say that about the other species. mark twain once said that human beings are the only animals that need to blush. we are unpredictable. feelings are most lacking in
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civil war history. we just don't realize how to control the feelings. it is easier to make a college class laugh, but is difficult to make them cry. but i worked at it. i wanted them to feel that heartache and sadness. i wanted them to feel patriotism, which incidentally, first comes out in the civil war. we had no country to feel patriotic about until we fought ourselves. if you doubt that, go to a national cemetery. where men who love their country most, more than life itself, now live. you will see men who gave themselves for the country, north or south. we must remember that. i can make a class cry. i've succeeded. host: what story, over time, has made a class cry? professor robertson: you just
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start quoting. why not let the soldiers do the talking? i have presented about 130 vignettes, none of which have a bearing on the outcome of the war, but they invest with the emotions and feelings. sally was the mascot and the men in the regiment loved her and she loved them. she hated civilians. she was dedicated to her soldiers. pardon me. at gettysburg, they lost her and they thought she was dead, but cleaning up the battlefield, they found her lying, guarding 11 members who had been killed. in early february, 1865, at a heavy scrimmage, sally was killed.
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two soldiers took down their muskets and with their hands, they dug a grave and very little sally. and as paul harvey would say, that was not the end of the story. pennsylvania put up a monument in gettysburg and from afar it looks like all other monuments with a soldier standing, but down on the ledge at the bottom, there is the little figure of sally and her eyes are wide open. she is keeping watch into eternity. that story, i think, affected people more than any other. animal stories. the human interest stories are there, 20. there are some funny things involved. young grace is around 10 years old in 1860.
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she wrote candidate abraham lincoln a letter and she basically said, mr. lincoln, you are an ugly man. my friends and i agree that if you grow what beard, it might lessen the ugliness of your face and make you more attractive to the voters. lincoln got the letter, he said ok, and he grew that beard for which he is now famous. she changed the face of history with that letter she wrote. it makes you human. you have to do that with history. you can't sit back and pass judgment on events over 150 years ago. i get upset when i hear someone say at gettysburg, if generally had done this or if he had not done that, the self might have won that war. if generally had 100 50 years did think it over, i guarantee you he would have done something different at gettysburg.
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you cannot pass judgment like that. you have to think about the narrow lens that these men had at that particular time. that is the only way you will understand history. host: how much money did the north cap to support the war, and how much money to the south have? professor robertson: it's almost incomparable. the union had everything, especially industry. the south was leaning heavily on agriculture. cotton in particular. william t. sherman, whose sanity many people question, lived in louisiana until before the war started, and he said, you people are crazy. no nation of farmers is going to wage a successful war against industrialists. you and the south are doomed to failure. it was this industrial revolution that killed them. you see these mass charges when you go back to the middle ages.
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before long, the rifle has replaced the musket, which means the range of killing power has jumped five times farther. the weapons have become bigger and more destructive. we have the gatling gun, all kinds of new weapons coming out. even artillery, increased ranges, deadly firepower. so these soldiers are coming across the field. they are just destined to be slaughtered. it ends in civil war where the advantage shifts to the defense. host: you named bedford forrest and your book. you wrote a chapter about him, but you connect it to the german blitzkrieg in world war ii. professor robertson: these cavalry, these men would gallop miles and miles. these men would have a sub present tack, be successful, go back on their horses, and ride
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back. the germans did that same kind of thing on the eastern front especially. in poland and in russia. nathan bedford forrest was the godfather of the blitzkrieg. host: how did you teach yourself about the civil war? professor robertson: i don't know. i just kept learning. i was fortunate in my top time -- in my time and circumstance. i studied under an outstanding social historian. but then, i had the good fortune to be appointed by president kennedy as director of the united states centennial commission. i got a postgraduate education. the chairman, the most listing which is story and of our day, and we became almost like father and son. host: these are historians? professor robertson: yes, all
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first-rate, top historians. i just learned from them. you can smell the gunsmoke and hear the screams when he writes. he taught me a lot about writing. he told me the blanket research, that is, you cover everything. you just don't go out looking for particulars. you cover everything in the search. from them, i learned these tidbits. i may be self-made but it was done at the inspiration and directorship of many others. host: you have a phd from emory? in what? professor robertson: in history, and i have a doctor in letters in a doctor of humanities from shenandoah as well. host: how many battlefields did you go to? professor robertson: how many? host: how many did you travel to, yeah? professor robertson: all of -- i've been to all of the major ones. i'm not too interested in strategy and tactics. i'm interested in the common
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soldiers. i wrote a popular book called "soldiers blue and grey," letting the soldiers tell their own story. that is what i am interested in. the people. the people and how they feel. how they think and react. host: you talk about seven presidents being pushed by the civil war, and i'm going to ask you about each of those. but first if you are 19, 20, 21 years old or even older in the days of the civil war, how did you get out of it? professor robertson: you could buy your way out. if your father owned 20 slaves, you were automatically exempt in the south. host: why? professor robertson: you are determined by the congress you are more valuable at home overseeing the slaves.
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host: did anyone go buy slaves? professor robertson: yes, they went to great lengths. you may get yourself out of service at you have to have it to stay out. jay gould, the great business magnets were able to convince union authorities they knew so much about making machinery and guns and materiel for the north. host: you write about them in the book? what is a rear pinion of somebody you what -- what it cost them to buy their way out? >> it would start at $500 and then go up basically in that range, but that was a lot of money back in those days. it was certainly 10 times more than it would be today.
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host: where were that money go to? who do they pay it to? professor robertson: to the men who went in their place. if i interpret it correctly, after you have bought him, you hope he gets killed. because once he is dead, you are dead. host: was it legal? was it know that people were buying -- professor robertson: oh, yes. you get a whole class of bounty jumpers who have made a living going around signing up his substitute and my substitute and just buying up all these payments and no one reporting for duty. probably the best or the worst of the love was in indiana bounty jumpers who was executed on christmas day 1864, i think it was. i think he had done it 38 times. he was accepted substitute. just made a hunk of money. host: i remember grover cleveland bought his way out.
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professor robertson: mm-hmm. host: any other presidents? professor robertson: i don't think so. that would be a disadvantage in a political campaign. host: george mcclellan, you write about. general george mcclellan. tell us about him. professor robertson: brilliant. brilliant commander. probably one of the greatest organizers of armies in american history. mcclellan's problems were many, but i think leaving them was he was a perfectionist. he was never ready. his army was never polished. it was never completely sound and shining and equipped and ready to go into battle. host: who was he? where did he come from? professor robertson: he was from pennsylvania and he graduated second in his class, he was a rising star in the prewar years. so much so, he was sent to
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monitor the crimean war. he was the american officer who went over to learn what the european said to offer in terms of strategy and tactics. he was a very promising young man. they got tired of the slow pace of army promotions. he resigned and became president of a big railroad. when the war started, he went back to pennsylvania to offer his services to the state. when he passed by ohio, the governor asked him to come by columbus. he was so impressed that he gave him a major general's promotion and put him i and charge of the ohio troops. mcclellan was over the mountains of west virginia winning little skirmishes when the disaster at manassas occurred. mcclellan's report of these skirmishes sounded like he thought armageddon here in apocalypse there. he glorified himself. mr. lincoln was impressed,
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called him in east, put him in charge of the largest union army. mcclellan spent the next nine months building this army and making it the largest fighting force the country at ever seen. 120,000 men all decked out. when it comes battle time, he just cannot put that creation into battle. to see a dented and injured. so he hesitates and he drags his feet there. he blames all the problems he has on officials in washington's, who hamper his conduct in the war. mcclellan was greatly influenced by a french military man. he always taught that you mass as many men into position.
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then the enemy will equip. mcclellan was a great chess player. down the line, the men who eventually won the war grant and sherman don't know a hoot about chess. but they are great checkers players. they know how to clean the board. wiping out all the opposition. that is how the north winds. maccallum's cannot win the war. brian: how did the general run for president in the middle of the civil war? james robertson: mcclellan was fired and went home. the army of the potomac for the most part still loved him. he kept them out of battle. he did not risk their lives by extending a needlessly into combat. he has strong support in the military. brian: how would he have been? james robertson: early 40's. in new jersey, the democratic
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party got a hold of him and his ego was such. he ran for such president's. initially the remick adds -- democrats are running on the piece for prayer -- platform. mcclellan did not believe in that. he did not convince enough people. everybody thought that mccullen was going to end the war. mainly because lincoln was the beneficiary of some timely victories. by the spring -- summer of 1864 lincoln was convinced they were going to lose. one of the arguments we historians have is when the climactic moment of the war. gettysburg, antietam, the summer of 64? i think it is the summer 64. everyone is losing. sherman had taken off with atlanta and they waltzed all the
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way down. other offenses coming up the james river were disastrous. a campaign in southwest virginia fell apart. mr. lincoln wrote a conciliatory loader -- letter concerning defeat. and things turn around. suddenly they when enabled victory at mobile. a few months later, sherman takes control of the shenandoah valley. sherman takes atlanta. and the tide is beginning to shift and although grant has believed him down and seemingly nothing has happened, that is important stagnant points of the war. nevertheless, down momentarily. by autumn, the unions on to victory. brian: how big did abraham lincoln when? james robertson: it was not
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close. he allowed the soldiers to come home and vote. the soldiers who previously had been so much in support of mccullen now see that it is not an empty piece, but in the course victory we're capable of getting. the ownership was a determining force. brian: in your chapter on torture:, handed up -- george mcclellan, handed up governor? james robertson: new jersey politics is like anyone else's, nobody else was around. the opposition disgraced themselves and go off a boat and drowned. today, the state capital of
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heavily in -- helena beautiful statue. mcclellan had a short life. he died of pneumonia in the mid-50's. one of the things i do in this book and largely because i work myself the graduate school in the funeral business in atlanta, i determined the cause of these deaths of these men who died. stanton, asthmatic. the secretary of war. he had a heart attack from wheezing. and yet, talking to medical associates, you can say he died of asthma but it might've been long cancer. they knew so little in those days. the causes you have to guess at. brian: back your statement about
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working in the funeral business. what kind of work to do to? james robertson: everything. thousand the days when the funeral homes maintain services and i worked on the and bombing. i have conduct funerals and i did my work. can you think of a quieter place to study than a funeral home? i thoroughly enjoyed it. i did it for four years. brian: what did you learn about death? james robertson: i learned a lot of things. i have great respect, i love the business. it is a accounting business. -- a caring business. you see people in their most honorable and you don't you can to help. i thought it was an honorable thing to be involved in. i can sell of the business, but i enjoyed the work and helping people. brian: you mentioned several times the impact of the civil war on medicine. can you tell us more?
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james robertson: certainly. if you wanted to be a physician in 1860 and he wanted to be the best, you went to the jefferson medicaid -- medicine cause. the curriculum was two years. the second-year was a repetition of the first year. they could teach you everything known about the field of medicine in one year. although they are called surgeons, i doubt if one in 25 had ever held a scaffold or wanted to. they are basically trained pharmacist who had a bag load of pills and not a great friday. opium. simple drugs. they don't know the basics. they are never taught graduate school, medical school anything about military medicine. how do you treat a gunshot room -- wound? they don't know.
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i have great sympathy for physicians, most historians do not. even the limitations of the knowledge, i think they did a remarkable job. one of the individuals after the civil war, the father of modern military medicine, it was letterman who just conceived of all kinds of things, three stages of hospitalization. a first aid station on the battlefield. a field station behind and a dental hospital back of the rear. he established lines of transportation and he prioritized injuries. stages of hospitalization. it was not who got here first. he initiated medical records, each man has his own medical record. he organized an ambulance corps to get the wounded off the field as quickly as possible. i think a good comparison would be to the battle of shiloh.
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this was before letterman came to the forefront and the battle was friday and several days later, the day the wounded were still on the field. the wounded were mostly desperate battle of gettysburg, by july 5, the benefit was clean. all the wood had been removed. -- wounded had been removed. he literally saved thousands of lives by his medical treatment. the chief of the medical services in eastern europe and in 1945, he once wrote not a day goes by in world war ii that i did not think god for jonathan letterman. brian: if you are a soldier during the civil war and you had a leg blown off, what would they do? what about the pain and operating? you mentioned opiates. do they have medicine?
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james robertson: they had crude medicine. signal crawford had chloroform. if you want a cigarette or cigar you have explosion so they used chloroform. depending how often they operated with anesthesia or without, we don't know. oftentimes when it was said to given a shot of looksee -- whiskey and the men held you down and the amputation occurred. positions were often criticized for quick to abdicate. i dispute that. you keep a man lineup there and you have nothing -- know nothing about antiseptics and you're just inviting gangrene. and other diseases to take over. rather than giving it daily to get -- treatment, just cut it off and start afresh.
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i think was the most promising of the treatments. they were free to amputate. and they did it. brian: seven presidents, i will avoid abraham lincoln at the moment. started before the civil war, james buchanan. james robertson: worst president. he was a man who just got caught up in the chaos of the 1850's. he had a dilemma. on the one hand he did not think secession was constitutional on the other hand, he cannot find anything in the constitution to stop them. and enable him to stop the secession process. his closest friends were southerners. he was just can't miss tremendous dilemma and all he could hope for was to get out of
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office before the explosions came. which he managed to do. you can -- didn't you can it was an attorney -- james buchanan was an attorney and out of touch with the people. he had no gracious hostesses to make to the white house enjoyable. he just bungled badly. a revisionist today are saying and coming to his defense. revision does not -- brian: right after the civil war and when abraham lincoln was killed, andrew johnson. james robertson: he is next to last. johnson was a total mistake. he was a democrat. 1954, lincoln thought it would be politically to his advantage to have a democrat run on the republican ticket and johnson did.
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when lincoln died, there was a democrat and republican administration and nobody liked him. he had a terrible personality. yet come out of poverty. he had this ingrown enmity to men of wealth and property. men of influence, he just did not get along with. he merely gets into trouble with radical republicans in congress and nobody wanted him or paid attention to him. he ends up getting impeached. brian: what is a radical republicans stand for? james robertson: they were hardline a problem can's -- republicans who did not agree with lincoln's construction. lincoln asked that 10% of residents pledge allegiance to the union and the state can come back. the radical republicans said, my god, we thought a four-year war.
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the sense of secession must be punished. they went out to the south with a vengeance. a were led mostly by abolitionists who proved to be abolitionists of the moment. was the 13th amendment is out and blacks are free, once piece comes, it is apathy over the north while involved -- the radical republicans really helped the black man is very open to argument over the long-haul. brian: u.s. grant. james robertson: he is a hero of the civil war. it is grants determination that wins the war. after the war, he fully expected to be elected president. both properties -- parties wanted him to run. he did not know anything about politics. the confirmation -- compromising, political acumen
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of altar he just sat back and accepted all the gifts and the accolades for two terms. he runs on a simple statement, let us have peace in the country is on apart. he introduced a system of nepotism never challenged until the kennedys came into office and every relative was put on the payroll and several of his most comic cabinet members for a most indicted for high crimes and misdemeanors. it was a terrible eight years. which proves once again that the nation can survive the voters. we survived the great regime and there are revisionists who disagree with that. brian: two well known historians writing major books on u.s. grant. while the sudden -- why all of a sudden? james robertson: the previous writing has been so critical
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that i suspect there try to find new points and give branches do. -- grant his due. he was not captivating. i don't know, he was determined. he just would not quit as a general. you see this in vicksburg and petersburg. you just keep patting and patted. indeed i'm talking about the 1854 election, grant had not beaten lee, but he had him pinned down. he had taken away the one thing his great army had going for them and that was mobility. they cannot move. it was trapped. he was quite willing to let time, desertion, disease do what the army cannot too. brian: how many horses killed? james robertson: 1.5 million. killed.
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all died. macy's, vital ones, when when the half-million. james robertson: miss use -- misuse, one in half-million. it is heartbreaking. brian: how many books are yours and print? james robertson: a half-dozen. brian: i counted 11 on amazon. which is the best seller? james robertson: stonewall jackson. it is in the 15th printing. and the untold civil war is second. it is very attractive thanks to national geographic's hard work. brian: rita byrd -- referred the case -- hayes? james robertson: part of the
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1864 all-encompassing campaign that great initiated and hayes went from that to the white house. yet had distinguished career in ohio and was elected president in 1876 and his one remember will act was to order the end of reconstruction. the occupation of the south and officially ends. one thing the voters liked about him where his, sister served one term. it was an interesting term. president hayes and his wife were teetotalers. they were very evangelical. no alcohol, no smoking. the first lady became known as lemonade lucy. they had a state dinner and after this date during the -- dinner the secretary of state came out and said what a wonderful evening and the water for the campaign. -- flowed like champagne.
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brian: how many men were wounded in battle that cannot be presidents -- came to be presidents? james robertson: hayes and grant. he thought with crutches, grant. mckinley was ok. two of them were hurt. brian: we move into a couple presidents and you have their assassins in your book. to start with, garfield. what did he do? james robertson: garfield was a brilliant man and probably the last president of poverty that we've had. he worked himself up. he was chief of staff to union general until 1863 when he went to congress and served as a
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loyal republican until 1880 and was more or less the compromise candidate. the republican party was split into two wings and each of those wings could not get its potential nominee nominated so want to garfield. he had been in office for months. again, showing a lack of medicine. the bullet they get to surgeons was somewhere in his body and each day they were going with a finger and try to find the bullet. garfield lingered on her 59 days before he died. -- for 59 days until he died. the assassin statement in court, i did not kill garfield, the doctor did. i do something. -- just shot him.
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i felt that people should know what is in the mind of an assassin, so they know what is in the mind of the people they weren't. -- wound. i felt that both assassins needed some kind of identification. what makes a man want to kill the president? especially in the case of mckinley who probably was the most popular president in office during his heyday. everybody loved him. except for the absolute poor. he served a second term and everybody loved him. why would somebody to shoot him? the assassin ended up being an anarchist. to equal the thing, he would kill the habs group -- have's group to balance the status.
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brian: what about mckinley and the civil war? james robertson: he was a sergeant. brian: did they know each other? james robertson: yes they did. he did what he could to help. though he was in poor health. brian: from your knowledge of history, is there any comparison with the civil war era and today? james robertson: yes. it is what worries me. i see in today's politics the polarization and negativism. the chaos of a dysfunctional
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government. i see the 1850's all over again. i'm truly alarmed. the country seems, people seem to think that america can exist over any kind of impediment and that is not true. democracy is the most tenuous form of government. it can't take much of a beating as only people are involved. yet our leaders don't seem to know this. what disturbs me and i hate to get political, but what disturbs me are our leaders who just don't know history. harry truman once said the best news i get is the history i did not know. leaders today are not like that. they are politicians. and politicians think of the next generation. statesmen think of the next
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generation. brian: what do you think is happening? james robertson: we don't have heroes. we lost that love of country that has brought us so far. one reason, we have lost sight of the one thing, the only thing that holds this country together and it's a willingness to compromise. united states compromise -- constitution is the greatest manual of comfort my street it shows the give-and-take of the founding fathers and we don't to this today. i cannot understand how our national leaders can make the statement that i will not compromise and feel himself worthy of an office in a democratic government. coppermine and democracy are the same thing. -- compromise and moxie of the same thing. -- democracy are the same thing. brian: were we better off as a country that the north one? james robertson: absolutely.
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there's no question about that. if the south had won we would have become the balkans of the western hemisphere try to get together in a nebulous bit of methods. california and montana have nothing,. massachusetts and kansas would have had nothing in common. the union had to be. it would have been disastrous for the nation to try and continue to exist. brian: you were born in 1930. and you are still at it. why? james robertson: i love what i do. i love history. it is the most exciting subject that there is. it is the study of human beings, or they are and what they could be and what they were not.
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i have great respect for history. one of the first adages, in the nation that forgets his past has no future. it would cut 3000 years of documents the point that out. it is exciting. i get up in the morning excited. brian: this is a personal thing from we invited you a couple must come on the program and the day you were to come here you fell down the steps and posted your left arm -- busted your left arm. how is it you are so repaired? james robertson: i had probably the best elbow orthopedist in the nation. brian: how much damage did you do? james robertson: i was working onor on this program and the doorbell rang and it disrupted my thinking and i went down the steps and halfway down i went elbowing and fortunately, i landed on the elbow. it could have been on my head or
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my writing arm or an arm or leg or hit. -- hip. the first orthopedist said on a scale of 1-10, you have a 12. but he put me in touch with this orthopedist and douglas chapman and all he does his elbows and in 53 minutes he inserted a new elbow and cleaned up the old one and here i am. there are certain things i can't do yet and maybe never can but i'm alive. brian: we are glad that you are here. i'm sorry our first appointment did not work out. are you writing anymore and lecturing? james robertson: i'm lecturing all the time. writing, not really. i've done a little book about a huge collection at a big library in virginia called civil war echoes in virginia and comes out late this month.
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i'm looking around at the history of the peninsula between the potomac which was seemingly isolated during the war and if i can find enough letters and diaries are my think there's a good story to tell of the suffering and isolation. brian: stonewall jackson, eliminating him for the moment, if you had one person that you wrote about that you would like to sit down with, who would it be? james robertson: generally. james robertson: -- general lee. i would just to why he was the nation's greatest reconciliatory when northerners and southerners are butting heads, he was talking about reconciliation. it was a necessity of bringing the nation back together again. he demonstrated that by taking a bankrupt college and making it an international institution.
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washington and lee university. and the way, one of the ways he thought about reconciliation was to his credit and this, sounds critical, to his critical he forgot the past. he would not talk about the civil war. he would not grant you know breeze -- interviews or right memoirs. he would be certainly violently opposed to the confederate flag in any shape or phone -- for being shown. the war is over. i have lead people into battle and now i must leave men to peace. brian: our guest is professor james robertson. teacher at virginia tech. the book we are talking about, he has about 20 of them, after the civil war, the heroes, villains, civilians who changed
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america. we thank you for coming in. glad you are well. james robertson: thank you so much for having me. ♪ >> for free transcripts or to give us your comments about this program, visit us at q and a.org. q and a programs are also available at c-span.com and at c-span progress -- podcasts. next "q&a" airs on sundays. rafael talksifton about the award-winning documentary his students have made including several
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prizewinners from c-span's studentcam competition. it is three months to election day and the new york times reports the presidential field may get more crowded. evan mcmullen, a former cia whocial and republican passionately opposes donald trump will file papers to run for president as an independent candidate. he recently worked on policy development with the house republican conference and has missed the ballot access deadlines and more than two dozen states but is a church -- a member of the church of jesus christ of latter-day saints and could take votes from mr. trump in that heavily mormon state. susan: dr. jill stein is on your screen. she has joined as from houston, where the green party is meeting this weekend. she will once again be their standard bearer for the presidency. joining us is bob cusack of "the hill" and olivier knox of yahoo!.
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susan: olivier, you're up first. olivier: i have a question for you about the presidential debates. a case has been dismissed that you brought to be part of the debates. how severe of a blow is that to your campaign? jill stein: i am not surprised to hear that. we assumed that would be the outcome. we do have a second case. i am not holding my breath that we are going to get a favorable decision in a court of law. i think we've already won in the court of public opinion. the public is not happy with the two candidates from the democratic and republican parties. they are the most disliked throughout history. they are the most disliked throughout history. the public is clamoring for more choices. i think the pressure will
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continue to grow. we are coming up in the polls. today's poll says we are at 6%. we tripled our numbers in the course of a couple of weeks. we hope to do that again and get to the 15%. i think the american public has a right to vote. they have a right to know who they can vote for. i encourage people to go to our website. you can join our campaign for open debates. the american people deserve in this time of great discontent with our rigged political system, the people deserve a full and fair debate. bob: you try to get bernie sanders to join your movement. he were very critical of hillary clinton in the wake of the leaked e-mails from the democratic national committee. did you ever talk to bernie
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sanders? jill stein: we are ready to put all options on the table. the delegates did decide their candidate. if he saw the green light after having been thrown under the bus by the democratic party. if he came to understand why we need a different politics that is not controlled either big banks and the fossil fuel giants and the war profiteers. we're the only party that is not poisoned by that corporate money. if he came to understand why he needed the revolutionary product to support a revolutionary campaign, i was ready to go to bat for him. he did not respond. that was no surprise. the green party has been trying to open a conversation with him for many years. he has his own perspective.
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it is not ours. we remain open it to what happens in a shifting political climate. it's not like he can enter into the nominating process. that is over and done with. i see a lot of opportunity for collaborating down the line. his movement is not sitting like happy campers with the campaign that is hillary clinton's campaign that represents the opposite of what they were working for with bernie sanders. that is an economy that works for everyone. it is not driven a buys a big banks and the billionaires. that remains a critical issue for his supporters that don't want to see their hard work go down the drain. the campaigns are running in the big dough of the insurance companies and all the rest. that movement is alive at our convention where many of the former spokespeople for the sanders campaign are now continuing that work bringing that movement into our party to support it, not just through november but until we prevail.
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that remains a critical issue for his supporters that don't want to see their hard work go down the drain. the campaigns are running in the big dough of the insurance companies and all the rest. that movement is alive at our convention where many of the former spokespeople for the sanders campaign are now continuing that work bringing that movement into our party to support it, not just through november but until we prevail. olivier: you have mentioned ernie repeatedly. he has clearly cast his lot in with hillary clinton. he said the most important goal is to defeat donald trump. i have talked to democrats who support hillary and bernie. a vote for you amounts to a vote for making america great again. how do you respond to that?
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jill stein: the numbers show that even hillary's supporters for the most part don't actually support hillary. they are just afraid of donald trump. the same is true of donald trump's supporters. the majority actually really object to hillary clinton. at the same time it, majority voters are calling for an independent candidate that represents everyday people. before we call the election it, we ought to have a full and fair debate. we should allow voters to actually meet. there are urgent needs for a real debate and more choices. let me emphasize what ernie said. the only answer to donald trump is a true progressive agenda that addresses the economic
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misery that gives rise to this right-wing extremism it -- extremism. it's a surge in america like it is in europe. this is a very much a response to the policies of neoliberalism, the policies of austerity. these are policies that are great for bankers and billionaires, but terrible for regular people. hillary clinton has been part of the problem. it's the policies that hillary supported that have driven this crisis to great extremes. that includes nafta, which bill clinton signed. it sends our jobs offshore and puts downward pressure on wages. they have been supporting the transpacific partnership.
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hillary has waffled a little bit. even her close political allies say she will be back when the election is over. we saw the dnc refused to repeat ea the transpacific partnership. the problems that have created the rise of donald trump will be continued high hillary clinton. we mention wall street deregulation that led the way to the crash. this is very much what the clinton agenda has been about. hillary continues to be sponsored by the big bankers. she still won't share with the public. it's very clear that she may be talking the talk. she is not walking the walk. the real solution is to stand up to the progressive policies that i provide.
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olivier: bernie sanders suggested hillary clinton is not fit to be president. is she fit to be commander-in-chief? jill stein: according to the prevailing paradigm, she is celebrated. she is a representative of that prevailing paradigm. in my opinion, this is not what the american people need. she has represented a war. hillary led the way into libya.
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it carries on. we have a new bombing campaign over libyan out. she is a failed extreme militarism. she represents the policy of the bankers and, having served on the board of walmart, she represents an economy that is good or the ceos, but is very hard and working people and women. i would say this traditional paradigm of neoliberalism is not fit. it is not fit for the american people. olivier: what is your position on mandatory vaccines for children? jill stein: it's clear vaccines are a critical part of our public health infrastructure and of made a major contribution to
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public health. the point that i have been making is that all medications need proper regulation. when you have an fda that is part of the revolving door from the pharmaceutical industry and when you have a political environment where $700 million was contributed between 2009 in 2011, we need to restore the integrity and the public trust in our regulatory apparatus. that's not rocket science. you only have to look at the fda regulations. there were serious cases of heart disease that developed while the fda was suppressing information they had about its side effects. they were preventing physicians from knowing.
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we need to keep these things from happening. olivier: there is a video in which you appear to say that internet access in schools is having a bad health effect on children's brains. you described them as guinea pigs. it's a fairly remarkable statement. there is no evidence that wi-fi has a verse health effects. what were you trying to say? what is your position today on that? jill stein: maybe you did not see the studies that were just released by the national institutes of health. they made known the results of their most detailed and accurate scientifically rigorous study
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that raises questions. throughout europe, several countries, many countries have seen fit to protect vulnerable people from that sort of radiation. i am not saying that science is done this. the science has just begun. i support a precautionary principle, having studied at great detail i would recommend the book that i wrote on this. it was published in the early 2000's. we actually reviewed the history of regulation. our system catches up after the fact. lead is a classic example. why do we have the disasters now
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in flint, michigan. we have lead everywhere. the public was a guinea pig for lead. it took decades after it was well understood that high-dose lead exposure was devastating. we did not have regulations in place. we have paint in our homes and in our gasoline. we did not regulate lead until about a century after it was known that it was a great hazard. had we had a more precautionary approach, if it protected people instead of profits, we would be a much healthier place today. susan: we are at the 10 minute mark. bob: the top tax rate is 40%. in 1981 it was 70%. what should be the top tax rate if you were president? jill stein: i think we need to
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ask our wealthiest corporations and individuals to pay their fair share. they have in making out like bandits. the wealth of the nation has shifted into very few hands. in the words of louis brandeis, we have a choice between an economy and the contribution of the richest. i think we need a graduated income tax so that these superrich are paying their fair share. that should be in the range of 70% on income tax. bob: how would you define the superrich?
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how much do people make as far as individual or married? jill stein: i don't have that number for you offhand. when people are making in the millions and billions of dollars, they need to be contributing at a much higher level than they are. i am not talking about making $300,000. i'm talking about the very highest level of income where people are making millions or billions of dollars. they need to be taking in their fair share. olivier: you mentioned the new military campaign in libya. we are in a seven military campaigns. in your administration, what would the war on terrorism look like?
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where would you be involved? where would you not be involved. where would you commit people to conflict? jill stein: according to a recent harvard study, iraq and afghanistan have cost us $6 trillion when you include the health-care costs cost of caring for our veterans. that $6 trillion comes out to $75,000 per american household. that is absolutely staggering. $6 trillion on its own is an incredible amount of money. what do we have to show for it? failed states. mass refugee migrations that are tearing apart europe and the middle east. we have worse terror threats. every threat we have been fighting is bigger and stronger because of this fight. that includes the taliban, al qaeda.
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the new crisis of isis came out of the disaster in iraq and libya. this is a catastrophically failed policy. you cannot bomb terrorists out of existence. there are things we can do it would pull the rug out from under them. let's remember where this enterprise began. this was part of a strategy between the saudis and the united states in afghanistan to strengthen the mujahedin and make them a cause very much in conjunction with the saudi religious and interpretation. they establish their schools for terrorists in training. this has been a catastrophic policy. it was intended to cause the problems with the soviet union in afghanistan. it has backfired tremendously. they have continued to support this movement. they've continue to fund it and arm it. we cannot simultaneously fight
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terrorism while we or our allies are funding the army and training them. we call for a weapons in bargo. we are providing the majority of arms to the region. we call for a weapons embargo. we call for a freeze on the bank accounts of those countries they continue to fund terrorism. hillary clinton herself in a leaked series of state department memos when she was secretary of state identified the saudis as the major source of funding for sunni jihadist terrorism around the world. we got it started. we can put it to a stop. those of the first two things we would do. we would also work with turkey. they have been persuaded to
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close their order to the flow of refugees. they can be persuaded to close their border to the flow of jihadi militias. those are the critical first steps. i would say more broadly we need a foreign policy that is based not on military and economic domination and securing oil or other fossil fuel resources. we did a foreign policy based on international law and human rights in diplomacy. bob: you criticized barack obama. i want you to give him a grade. does he deserve an a as president? is he an f?
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jill stein: according to the conventional view, he has been a great president. in my view, the climate crisis is far worse today thanks to all of the above. we massively increased fossil fuels. i think the climate policy has been a disaster. i think the foreign policy has been a continuation of george bush. we have outrageous drone wars. i think on nuclear weapons the policies of the obama administration have continued the policies of his predecessors. we have a new nuclear arms race which process a great peril.
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this is to the is. i don't want to criticize the man. i think it is the wrong politics for the 21st century and this crisis we are facing, which is a pervasive crisis. we need a new way forward. the american people are clamoring for a new way forward that puts people over profit. this is what we get with that political system. this is why we need system change and not just small change around the margins. susan: we have three months left. olivier: you want to end this cycle above the 5% threshold. where is the green party going to win in november?
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are there congressional battles where you think you have a good shot? where are you going to do best? jill stein: let me just say that all bets are off. the word is only beginning to break through. our campaign has only begun to reach mainstream media. donald trump had $2 billion worth of free mainstream media. we are only beginning to enter into the conversation at a time when people are clamoring for the systemic change that we represent. just to look at young people that are locked in student debt, they do not have a future. as they hear that we will cancel student debt, we bailed out the bankers to the tune of trillions
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of dollars. we can do that for the victims of those on wall street. we are at 6% in this poll. how did we get there without media coverage? this is basically word-of-mouth. i would say hold onto your hats and see where this conversation goes. if we can double our numbers and a little bit more, we will be in the debates. all bets are off about what the american people are going to do. this is the perfect storm for a voter revolt did we are looking at what kind of future we want to have. we are looking at the nuclear arms race.
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we are at a unique moment. susan: there are realities of the ballot process. you are in fewer than half the states. what will that really look like? how many states to anticipate being on the ballot? jill stein: between 48 and 50. those numbers are going up rapidly. we also have ongoing cases. we hope to be on the ballot for every voter. it's not realistic to keep shooting ourselves in the foot with the two parties that are throwing us under the bus. we need to get ahead for the down ballot races. we need an america and a world that works for all of us. susan: jill stein is joining us from houston.
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thank you for your time. jill stein: thank you so much. great talking. susan: by her admission, this is a nonconventional election year. where does the green party fit in? olivier: i don't think we know where they fit in. we're still looking at the libertarian numbers and independent voters. i don't think we know. i think she is not wrong to say all bets are off. she has a very long climb to achieve success as she defined. doubling their numbers to get in the debates, good luck. bob: it's going to be tough.
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this is the year that she is getting more attention. she is media savvy. she has a message. she doesn't hold back in criticizing the conventional candidates. she needs to get to 15% to get in the debates. that is highly unlikely. she is in single digits now. whether she gets in the debates is a big thing. it is a catch-22. without a doubt, she was criticizing the media, the media has been focused on these third-party candidates more so than ever because donald trump and hillary clinton are unpopular. susan: she is polling in double digits with younger voters. olivier: even if it doesn't impact the election this year, people are looking at 2020 and beyond. one of the amazing legacies of the bernie candidacy, people are looking at changing demographics. i think those things are going to be important. she is playing a difficult hand.
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she is getting attention in a year in which people are rejecting institutions and the establishment. maybe not in the number she needs to really pull this off. susan: you asked a number of questions about bernie sanders. can you explain to people watching this when there seemed to be alignment in his positions? bob: she was putting up press releases calling on bernie sanders to join the movement. of he did not answer them. there were supporters who might be her running mate. bernie sanders said that he was going to help the nominee. she needs to appeal to the bernie sanders supporters. that is clearly her strategy. even though she did not get
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bernie sanders, she says things that went overwhelmingly for bernie sanders. she needs to get those voters fired up her candidacy. i think she has a message that if you care about climate change, you listen to what she has to same. susan: i am still curious about senator sanders'strategy going forward. olivier: his campaign manager said it when he goes back to the senate he will be an independent again. he showed the true potential of an online fundraising strategy. he showed the progressive message. he was vastly different from the other second-place tenets.
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there is the head and the heart. the question for me is how different he is. is he just that person in this cycle? is he a vessel for these aspirations? what drew these voters in? i'm not clear yet. people completely underestimated him as a political strategist. he is extremely organized. i know he looks like a tenured professor. he is extremely organized and he has great online presence. he knows where his audience is in a way few politicians do. susan: does he see his voters going and changing the democratic party? is there a third-party option he sees going forward that might give voice? bob: it's a tough one. if hillary clinton does become the next president, they worry about four years from then.
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he is not going to shut the door on possibly running again. i think the hillary clinton people, she's got to worry about a primary challenge whether that's bernie sanders or elizabeth warren. what kind of movement, where does his movement over here? he has a huge following and the fundraising has been a astounding. susan: thanks to both of you for your questions this week. we appreciate it. [captioning performed by the national captioning institute, which is responsible for its caption content and accuracy. visit ncicap.org] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2016] >> in a speech earlier today in -- in detroit, donald trump laid out a number of the economic poses. you laterow that to tonight. discussion turn it in broadband
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access following the d.c. of appeals decision over the open internet order, art of the net neutrality rules and reclassifying broadband providers as common carriers, giving the fcc more authority to regulate them. this panel of experts debated the claims of legal authority of the fcc and the chances that the supreme court will rule on the case. it's an hour and a half. >> let's get things started here. for those of you watching this livestream, we ask that you use the hash tag title to. interestingsome russians, i will throw it out to the group. let's see. yes, at first i want to thank our sponsors.

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