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tv   U.S. House of Representatives Legislative Business  CSPAN  November 30, 2016 2:00pm-4:01pm EST

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p.r.v.'s. this could pose a burden on f.d.a. drug reviewers when redeemed and could prevent f.d.a. from being able to prioritize its review of drugs based on public health priorities. the bill includes new language added without full consideration by the house or senate regarding f.d.a. oversight of regenerative medicine products, though most of the harmful language was taken out, do i remain troubled that the bill creates a new designation process under f.d.a.'s accelerated approval pathway. i'm pleased, mr. speaker, that this packing an includes the helping family -- package includes helping families in mental health crisis act. i'm specifically proud that the bill expands an important set of medicaid benefits that to kids receiving in-patient psychiatric treatment, however, let's be clear, the benefits of the mental health bill will be far outweighed by the catastrophic harm caused by individuals with mental illness if the republicans move forward with their radical plans to repeal the affordable care act or block
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grant medicaid or cut benefits for low-income individuals. . on balance, this is a good bill. i fully support it. i want to thank all my committee colleagues and the staff following their hard work on this legislation and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new jersey reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. upton: mr. speaker, i yield a minute to the gentleman from illinois, one of the senior members of the energy and commerce committee and one that helped lead support for this bill all across the country, mr. shimkus. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman from illinois is recognized. mr. shimkus: thank you, mr. upton. congratulations. i want to thank frank, as we move forward. thank you for including six of my bills that i had involved. ne that deals with the lack of -- antibiotics in the market in
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the pipelines so that's helpful. four other bills help innovation to get lifesaving devices to the market. i hope i can encourage all of my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to support this bill and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from michigan reserves. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. pallone: i yield three minutes now to the ranking member of the health subcommittee, mr. green of texas, who, again, has been critical, particularly in the last few months, in putting this bill together. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas is recognized for three minutes. mr. green: thank you, mr. speaker. i ask unanimous consent to place the full statement into the record and thank my colleague for -- the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. green: for providing the time. i want to rise to express strong support for the 21st century cures act. almost three years ago we set out a mission to do something positive, to boost medical research and innovation and accelerate the discovery, development and delivery of new cures and treatments.
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after countless hours devoted to round tables, white papers, hearings and drafts, today cures has bipartisan support and endorsements from over 700 organizations representing a full spectrum of stakeholders, and the strong support of the administration. my houston area neighbor, congressman pete olson and mike burgess and i held a roundtable in the houston area with the great institutions from the texas medical center in the houston area. it dead indicates $6.3 billion in new investments to support priorities like cancer moon shot, precision medication initiative within the national institutes of health and to combat prescription drug abuse. there's also -- this also provides money for the food and drug administration to advance the agency's mission and implement the policies in the underlying bill. this influx of investment will be put towards solving today's complex, scientific problems, getting new treatment from the table to the bed side to improve help. there are so many provisions in
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this package worthy of support. from facilitating the development of the new antibiotics, to fight against superbugs, the use of modern clinical trial designs to fostering the next generation of medical researchers. 21st century cures act will develop hope and new treatments for americans in need. while some of these provisions are technical in nature, the real-world impact they will have to be is not abstract. patients and families deserve to have their elected officials respond to their needs and this bill does that. 18 months ago, 344 members supported cures when it passed the house of representatives. since then we've responded to feedback and tailored the bill and now includes improvements in our mental health system and nonpartisan provisions to strengthen medicare on behalf of beneficiaries. i want to thank the chairman upton, ranking member pallone, congresswoman degette and chairman pitts for their leadership and vision and determination. i also want to thank our staff, the house legislative counsel
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and the countless stakeholders without whom we would not be here today. it was a privilege to be part of this landmark effort. as original co-sponsor and co-author of the 21st century cures act, i urge my colleagues to vote yes and thank you, mr. chairman, and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from new jersey reserves. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. upton: mr. speaker, i'd yield two minutes to dr. murphy, one of the subcommittee chairman chairmen, who helped craft the bipartisan murphy mental health bill which passed the house 422-2 earlier this year, a very valuable member of the committee, two minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from pennsylvania is recognized for two minutes. mr. murphy: thank you, mr. speaker, mr. chairman. this is a moment of great joy out of a situation of tremendous tragedy. over the last four years since the time of the terrible tragedy at sandy hook elementary schooled followed by repeated other ones, our nation
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has been awoken from a slumber of ignoring the problems with mental illness in america, one when we close down our institutions decades ago we turned our eye to those who laid homeless on the street, who we filled our prisons, who we filled our cemeteries or laid on a gurney in an emergency room or sent back home to a family who felled helpless and hopeless. we change to a situation where we're coming together on a bill that will save lives. this is a new era of health care and the next generation of hope for americans that really transcends boundaries. to all the families who brought their stories out of the shadows, that dared to share their sorrows, their hopes, their shattered dreams, today is a day of joy. and today is only possible, i say to all those families, because they dared to step
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forward. there's not time enough to thank all those involved but to those families who have helped, i say thank you. also want to make sure i thank chairman upton, speaker ryan, ms. bernice johnson, degette, mr. mccarthy, steve scalise and so many on our committee that worked so hard to make this happen. scott, karen, paul, susan and so many of the staff who worked so hard on this. we can look back on this moment in history and say today although we have much to do, although we didn't get everything we needed, we needed everything we did get, but this is a moment from this day forward we can say today we took action to save lives and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from pennsylvania yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from michigan reserves. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i yield two minutes to the gentlewoman from florida, ms. castor. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from florida is recognized for two minutes. mr. stor: thank you,
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speaker. i rise today in support of the 21st century cures legislation and the important investment that it will make in medical research across america. this legislation supports an dditional $4.8 billion for the national institutes of health, specifically for president obama's precision medicine initiative and the brain initiative so we can tackle the challenge of alzheimer's. it supports vice president biden's cancer moon shot initiative and hopefully we'll keep the young scientists on the job at institutions like the moffett cancer center and the university of florida institute back home in tampa. and while additional support for n.i.h. is vital, and this is a move in the right direction, i much would have preferred we put this in the mandatory category as we voted on in h.r. 6 earlier in the year. i know many of you agree with
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that, that medical research in america shouldn't be subject to the whims of congressional budget battles or political fight. and i will continue to advocate for mandatory funding for n.i.h. so we can remain on the cutting edge of medical innovation and boost hire wage jobs back home. these initiatives save lives and provide investments that we need to make sure that we are developing the cures of tomorrow. i'm very pleased that legislation i introduced with my colleague, representative herrera butler, was included in thising -- herrera beutler, was included to make sure expected mothers and doctors have accurate information about medications used during pregnancy and when nursing to facilitate the best health outcomes. representative herrera beutler has been a champion for families and i'm grateful for her for leading this effort to improve the quality of data and information on medication used during pregnancy and
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breast-feeding. and the language to improve our mental health system. the $1 billion to address the opioid epidemic. this is very positive. i'd like to thank chairman fred upton for his devotion to the issue, to congresswoman degette, to all of my colleagues on the energy and commerce committee. this is the way legislation is supposed to be developed -- in a bipartisan way, through study -- mr. pallone: i yield an additional 30 seconds or so. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized for 30 seconds. ms. carsor: reaching out and working with experts -- ms. castor: reaching out and working with experts across the country because this does not immate from committees in washington. it's very important we tap the expertise across the country to get something done. thank you and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back the balance of her time. the gentleman from new jersey reserves. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. upton: mr. speaker, i'd yield one minute to the vice chairman of the energy and commerce committee, the honorable marsha blackburn from
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tennessee who, again, helped so much with the medical community to rally around and provide us the input necessary to move this bill to where it is today, one minute to the gentlelady from tennessee. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from tennessee is recognized for one minute. mrs. blackburn: thank you, mr. speaker. i congratulate chairman upton and all of our colleagues at energy and commerce for a job well done and done in the appropriate manner. it really has, as ms. degette said, been so interesting to work across the country and work with patients, with physicians, with researchers, with those who are innovating new concepts, who are delving into delivery systems that are necessary for precision medicine which underpins 21st century health care. three components that i want to bring attention to, first of all, section 36-c is there addressing medical technology and software. this is so important that we
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get the f.d.a. on the right track and move components of this away so that it does not face f.d.a. approval processes that will slow down access to the marketplace for patients. also, section 2038, the children's count act. mrs. capps and i worked on this, allowing children access to clinical trials and section 3076, the re-authorization of the reagan-udall language. with that i congratulate my colleagues and yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman's time has expired. the gentleman from michigan reserves. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i now yield two minutes to the gentleman from oregon, mr. schrader. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from oregon is recognized for two minutes. mr. schrader: thank you, mr. chairman. i rise today in strong support of the 21st century cures act and thank chairman upton, my friends mr. pallone, ms. degette and mr. green, for their leadership and willingness to work across the aisle to produce this quality
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piece of legislation. for too long congress has been sh shirking its responsibility when it comes to funding the research that will lead to cures at the n.i.h. our scientists, physicians and medical institutions getting closer every day to medical break throughs, this will help families save lives. my state alone, n.i.h. is funding research into new therapeutic avenues to combat cancer, heart disease and illness borne by pollution. it's time to streamline the path for critically needed medical devices and pharmaceuticals, for vulnerable populations that can't afford to wait. this bill takes a giant step forward to help fix the mental health infrastructure of our country. currently, as a result of the mental health system's inadequacyy, our emergency rooms, our -- inadequacy, our emergency rooms, our homeless shelters are full of people getting the care they need. the status quo is not ok. this bill moves us in the right direction, through innovation and integration of mental health services for the overall
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health care system. the cures act enhances the capabilities of our law enforcement and first responders, strengthens our crisis intervention programs and ensures that our medicaid program does not deny access to beneficiaries seeking mental health care. it also includes a number of medicare provisions to make sure seniors aren't left behind by bureaucratic red tape. getting to this point wasn't easy. democrats and republicans didn't always agree on every provision of this bill, but we were able to work together and find common ground and produce a bill that takes great strides to getting better health care outcomes. i hope the president-elect is taking note instead of pushing ful ugh divisive, harm policies. let's produce better results for all americans. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from oregon's time has expired. the gentleman from new jersey reserves. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. upton: mr. speaker, i would yield one minute to the
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gentleman from kentucky, again, a leader in pushing this bill forward, a member of the committee, mr. guthrie for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from kentucky is recognized for one minute. mr. guthrie: thank you, mr. chairman, for yielding. mr. speaker, all of us have families that come to our offices and they're advocating for research or cures for disease that they lost a parent over or a child or they have their child with them that has the disease and they're just hoping for a move forward and being on the health subcommittee, at least weekly, sometimes daily, innovators and entrepreneurs come to my office and they talk about a new procedure, a new product, something that's innovative that will change the lives of these families and they're having trouble getting them through the system and getting them approved. it hurts families, like a family in elizabethtown that has a son with a degenerative disease that they're trying to beat the clock. or a son from bowling green, a son that went through a diabetes trial and first time they said they got any sleep when tare kid was on this trial
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through the night and then they called me saying they're out of the trial. it may be another year before they get it. so taking our entrepreneurs, our innovators and putting together these cures that's not getting their product to market, it's changing dynamics of these families, these families that are suffering. . our chaurm, ms. degette from colorado, put this forward and i urge support because it will change family's lives. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan reserves. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i yield two minutes to the gentleman from tennessee, mr. cohen. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from tennessee is recognized for two minutes. mr. cohen: thank you, mr. pallone. thank you, mr. speaker. i think everybody's been thanked that should be. i want to thank mr. upton for all his work. mr. pallone for the time and his work. his degette. i also want to thank roger wicker who worked on a bill that's incorporated into this bill that congressman duncan and i sponsored called the eureka act. will incentivize and reward
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research on diseases where there is not great public-private partnerships but there is a great handicap and problem for the american public because of the particular disease. and it rewards successful treatments through a competition. i think that's a great way to go about encouraging research and then paying for it. roger wicker came up with the idea. i sponsored it with john duncan and it's included in the bill. it was originally aimed at alzheimer's. it's now for other diseases. alzheimer's is one of them. alzheimer's is a disease that's had a particular crippling effect on our country in the future economically, beyond that it will affect many of us and it will affect our pocketbooks. it's important that this bill goes after alzheimer's. it deals with the opioid crisis which is great in my state and across the country. but it works against all diseases and encourages moneys
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in the national institutes of health. i like said while we need to have a strong defense department, that my secretary of defense is francis collins, the head of the n.i.h. because the true enemy of each and every one ever us isn't somebody in south korea or somebody in iran or isis or one of those folk, it's cancer, it's alzheimer's, it's aids, it's diabetes, heart disease, it's parkinson's. it's all those diseases. the dreadful, awful, awful diseases that n.i.h. is looking for cures for. that's our secretary of defense, and that's what we need to invest our moneys in. i don't think there is enough money we can put into the n.i.h. because it's important. it affects all americans. independent of political party, race, sexual orientation, you name it. i thank you for the work on this and proud to vote for it. i thank you for the time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from new jersey reserves. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. upton: mr. speaker, i yield two minutes to the gentleman
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from florida, a valuable member of the house subcommittee, whose father once chaired that subcommittee. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from florida is recognized for two minutes. mr. bilirakis: thank you, mr. speaker. thank you, mr. chairman. thank you for all your hard work on this great bill. i ask today -- i rise to talk out the incredible impact of 21st century cures act that would have on so many americans. deadly diseases like cancers, alzheimer's, a.l.s. and more. within cures we'll find the voices of patients, doctors, advocacy groups, and families i met from throughout florida's 12th congressional district. i'm proud to say that a lot of their input is reflected in this final bill. samantha from florida has alpha 1, a rare genetic condition resulting in serious lung problems. when we met, she talked about the need to use biomarkers for
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faster approval of drugs for rare diseases. we did that. we have a framework for biomarker qualifications in this legislation. wayne taylor from hudson, florida, was a leukemia patient. he talked about the difficulty of participating in the clinical trials that eventually saved his life. this bill has reforms to make clinical trials more patient focused and input driven. dr. david morgan, the c.e.o. of the byrd institute at the university of south florida talked about the need for stable funding for alzheimer's. and reforming institutional review boards. this bill invests in the n.i.h. and reforms the irb system. cures also include my provisions to reform the f.d.a.'s office of combination products to streamline approval of these products. establish a new medicare website to help seniors price
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shop and allow physical therapists to make arrangements they can take maternity leave or sick time without having to turn away patients. for many families, including my own, the potential impact of 21st century cures could change their lives. let's get this meaningful bill across the finish line. thank you, mr. speaker. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from michigan reserves. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i have a few additional speakers on their way. at this time i would like to reserve. the speaker pro tempore: gentleman from new jersey reserves. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. upton: mr. speaker, i would yield one minute to the gentleman from ohio, mr. johnson, again a valuable member of our committee and worked so hard to get this bill to where it is today. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from ohio is recognized for one minute. mr. johnson: thank you, mr. chairman. mr. speaker, i rise today in support of the 21st century cures act and add my o voice to of the claim am
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this has already received. this innovative legislation works to align federal incentives and regulations with the science and technology that make treatments and cures possible and attainable. aim proud to have supported this bill all along the way. this package also includes mental health reform, work that i'm grateful to have been a part of during my time on the o.n.i. subcommittee with chairman murphy. his tireless efforts will benefit many individuals and families struggling with mental illness and substance abuse. this bill also includes $1 billion for grants to states to fight opioid abuse. a recent report shows my home state of ohio leads the nation in opioid overdose deaths. this funding is sorely needed to address this issue head-on. i ask my colleagues to support the cures bill today. with that i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from ohio yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from michigan reserves. the gentleman from new jersey. mr. pallone: we continue to
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reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. upton: mr. speaker, i would like to recognize a member of the important health subcommittee, again a real proponent of this legislation from day one, the gentlelady from north carolina, mrs. ellmers for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from north carolina is recognized for one minutes. mrs. ellmers: thank you, mr. speaker. i want to thank chairman upton, ranking member pallone, ms. degette, my good friend tim murphy from pennsylvania. who worked so hard on the mental health reforms. chairman -- the health subcommittee chairman. there has been a great deal of effort put into this great piece of legislation which basically has a goal of bringing our health care, innovation infrastructure into the 21st century cures so that real hope for patients and loved ones can be achieved. from removing barriers in the mental health system to ensuring collaboration, to modernizing the clinical trial
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pathways, 21st century cures act is a win for everyone. it will accelerate the discovery and development and deliver -- delivery of lifesaving therapies in a safe and effective way. it will also empower families to support their loved ones. if closing, cures will change lives. and i personally as a nurse would like to say that this is one of the most important pieces of legislation we will pass here in the house. thank you, mr. speaker. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from michigan reserves. the gentleman from new jersey. mr. pallone: i yield two minutes now to the gentleman from massachusetts, mr. kennedy, who has been such a strong advocate on mental health issues. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from massachusetts is recognized for taw minutes. mr. kennedy: thank you, mr. speaker. i thank ranking member for yielding. i also want to thank him throughout the entire process as well as chairman upton and congresswoman degette who have been tireless in their advocacy to try to get this bill as a
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bipartisan compromise. created an environment that allows for our committee members to raise their voices and shape this legislation. mr. speaker, when we first passed the version of this bill last year, it was the result of a strong bipartisan compromise and sacrifice. certainly was amazing, but the legislative process is not intended to be. i'm disappointed the funding levels for n.i.h. were cut even further, and the investment is no longer mandatory, i take my republican colleagues at their word that they will be appropriated in the years ahead. i'm also pleased that this legislation includes language to remove obstacles for children covered by medicaid. my real concerns with this legislation lying with the mental health reform proposals which don't go nearly far enough. mental health parity is already the law thank to the mental health parity act and affordable care act. each study we read, mr. speaker, each story we hear,
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proves that insurance companies are zirting those rules. in-- skirting those rules. instead of further guidance or meetings or studies carried years down the road, we need enforcement and transparency today. we need random audits before there have been violations not after. we need insurers to publicly close the rates and reason for denials in a way the patients and families can understand. not in a way that mental health advocates can't obtain. we need to expand access to care not reduce them or roll back expansion. we need to appreciate the difference they have made for mental health patients, especially the most vulnerable. until we do, we cannot consider these proposals comprehensive and we certainly can't pretend they are nearly enough. that being said, this is an important compromise from an awful report of hard work. i'm happy and pleased to support this proposal. i thank my colleagues on both sides of the aisle. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from massachusetts yebs. the gentleman from new jersey
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reserves. the gentleman from michigan. mr. upton: i just ask for 15 seconds. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. upton: i just want to -- i appreciate the gentleman from massachusetts statement. we moved this legislation on all fronts forward. i look very forward to working with you and every member of this body to make sure that the funding is there as we have laid out in this bill and work with our colleagues in the senate to make sure that happens. thank you. mr. speaker, i would ask how much time is each side? the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan has 15 1/4 minutes remaining. the gentleman from new jersey has 12 minutes remaining. mr. upton: mr. speaker, i yield one minute to the gentleman from new jersey, another valuable member of the health subcommittee, mr. lance, the gentleman who pursued this legislation from the very get-go. one minute. mr. lance: i rise in strong support of the 21st century cures act. this bill provides significant
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investments, accelerate the discovery, development, and delivery of new cures and treatments for millions of americans. passage of this legislation, protect and create american jobs, ensure that the united states remains the global leader in biomedical innovation and discovery. measure rear forms and strengthens the country's mental health system and makes it a strong national priority. legislation includes critical funding for states to prevent opiate abuse and provide needed treatment for those suffering from this public health crisis. reducing bureaucratic red tape, advancing lifesaving research, reforming our broken mental health system, and tackling abuse in our communities will reduce health care costs and give many americans to live long, healthy, and productive lives. i thank chairman upton for his unparalleled leadership on this issue. it's an honor to have worked with him and all our colleagues on the committee to craft this landmark legislation. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new jersey yields back. the gentleman from michigan
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reserves. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. pallone: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield two minutes to the gentlewoman from ohio, ms. kaptur. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from ohio is recognized for two minutes. i thank ranking member pallone for yielding me the time and rise in strong support of the bipartisan 21st century cures act. which dedicates more than $6 billion to implement key health priorities such as combating the heroin and prescription opioid epidemic across this country and the vice president's cancer moon shot. it also takes steps to improve mental health. including provisions that build on the work of the president's mental health and substance use disorder task force and includes policies to further modernize the drug approval process. this will mean so much to researchers across this country trying to unlock the mysteries of the human brain and heal. the legislation includes $1
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billion over two years, including $500 million in fiscal year 2017, to combat the prescription opioid and heroin epidemic as well. the legislation dedicates support for other key research initiatives with the goal of helping researchers find new ways to treat, cure, and prevent brain disorders such as alzheimer's, epilepsy, and traumatic brain injury and a much needed renewed emphasis on evidence-based strategies for treating mental illness, include coordination between services, re-authorization of important programs focused on suicide prevention, and other prevention services and mental health and substance abuse provisions. which like to thank a doctor at case western reserve university in cleveland and my good friend, representative tim murphy, who came to ohio and hosted a round table on mental health that can be added to this major bill in order to move america forward. i want to thank chairman fred
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upton, knowing the deep commitment he has to so many americans who desperately need the help that this bill will provide. again, to congressman frank pallone of new jersey, i want to compliment both men for doing something great for so many americans who are trying to find answers for those that are ill. i want to thank congresswoman do ian degette of colorado who has shepherded this to this point. although not perfect, this advances health that outweigh any concerns we might have and i'm proud to add my strong support for the 21st century cures act. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the the gentleman reserves. . e gentleman from michigan is mr. upton: i'd like to yield to mr. bucshon who has hosted round tables throughout the country, very valuable member of the committee, and would yield him one minute.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from indiana is recognized for one minute. mr. bucshon: i urge my colleagues to support the senate amendment to h.r. 34, the 21st century cures act. over our country's history, american innovators have proven among the best in the world, especially in the field of drug and device research. 21st century cures streamlines the process for american innovators to see their research and development reach patients faster than ever while maintaining a safe and effective review process. it also invests in areas that we need it the most, to advance research and testing on the most complex and devastating diseases in our country. and it also gives young scientists the support they need to bring new ideas to the scientific community. the mental health and opioid abuse provisions in this legislation are also critical. as a physician who has relied on medical innovation to care for patients, working to pass the 21st century cures and ensuring american remains on
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the cutting edge research has been one of the myelitis of my time in -- my highlights of my time in congress. i want to thank you for your commitment to this legislation and yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan reserves. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i yield two minutes to the gentlewoman from connecticut, ms. delauro. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from connecticut is recognized for two minutes. mr. speaker, i rise in opposition to this bill, the 21st century cures bill aims to promote biomedical innovation, mental health, noble goals that i share but unfortunately this bill sets a dangerous precedent and has the potential to do more harm than good for millions of americans. in its attempt to speed up the drug and device approval process, this legislation neglects the very people who clinical trials are meant to help, that is the patients. rather than protect those that
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rely on the health care system, it reduces the already weak regulations on medical devices, allows drugs to be approved with only limited evidence of the drug safety and efficacy and rushes the new and unproven antibiotics. compasm, 13 models of the st. jude defibrillators are currently being recalled for sudden battery failure that has been linked to two deaths. 10 people fainting and 37 people feeling dizzy. when the cost of our prescription drugs is skyrocketing, this bill does nothing to combat excessive prices. finally, this bill strips away funding from the public health and prevention fund. and while the bill authorizes $4.8 billion to the n.i.h. over the next 10 years, on average a mere $480 million a year. this is barely a quarter per year of what the house passed last year. let us not forget that we would need to provide $7 billion a
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year to keep up where we were in 2003. there's also no guarantees that the appropriators will follow through and provide funding each year. as we have seen with the public health prevention fund, which has been used to fill appropriations shortfalls. illness touches us all. we owe it to the patients who depend on the standards that we set and unfortunately i believe the standards in this bill are both weak and dangerous. this legislation is the wrong path forward, and i strongly oppose it and i thank you and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back. the gentleman from new jersey reserves. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. upton: mr. speaker, i'd yield two minutes to the gentleman from new york whose personal knowledge of the maze of the regulatory approval process made him a very valuable member of the health subcommittee in pushing this legislation forward, the
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gentleman from buffalo, new york, mr. collins, two minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new york is recognized for two minutes. mr. collins: thank you, mr. chairman. i'd like to thank all the people who worked tirelessly to make this legislation a reality. simply stated, the goal of this legislation is to incentivize innovation to defeat disease. today, the 21st century cures act will do that and much more for patients suffering from currently incurable diseases. this legislation provides substantial funding to the national institutes of health, including $1.8 billion to speed up cancer research, $1.5 billion to improve our understanding of debilitating diseases such as alzheimer's and another $1.5 billion to assist in genetic and other individual-specific research efforts. this bill provides funding to fight the opioid addiction crisis which has been particularly devastating to western new york, and includes mental health legislation to improve those services
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nationwide. i'm excited that this final bill contains a few provisions i authored and worked on over the past two years. section 3021 encourages the broader application of innovative clinical trial design to enhance and accelerate affected clinical trials. section 3071 will exat the died and approval drug -- expedite d approval drug processes by making the salaries more competitive with the private industry. section 9023, which i worked on with representative joe courtney, incentivizes child and adolescent psychiatrist to begin their practices in underserved areas like those in rural western new york. lastly, section 5006, which i worked on with congressman paul tonko, includes the house poifed medicaid doc act which house-passed medicaid doc
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act which shows physicians that billed medicaid in the past year and whether they're accepting new patients. none of this would have been possible without the tireless work of chairman fred upton and the entire staff on energy and commerce. i thank them for their tremendous effort and look forward to seeing innovation defeat disease because of this game-changing legislation. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from michigan reserves. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. pallone: mr. speaker, can i ask how much time remains on both sides? the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new jersey has eight minutes remaining. the gentleman from michigan has 11 1/4 minutes remaining. mr. pallone: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield three minutes to the gentleman from new mexico, mr. lujan. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for three minutes. mr. lujan: mr. speaker, i'd like to thank chairman upton and ranking member pallone of the energy and commerce committee as well as come woman degette for their bipartisan cooperation during -- congresswoman degette for their bipartisan cooperation during this long legislative process. this will provide vital funding
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for the national institutes of health and the vice president's moon shot while taking steps to strengthen our mental health system. but i want to focus my remarks on the critical investments this bill promises to combat, the opioid epidemic. in communities across our country, families are struggling with the pain of addiction to opioids. earlier this year, congress took an important step by compre hencing the -- comprehensive cara act. congressional republicans did not support the necessary funding to cara's success. this was a missed opportunity. in the months since congress passed cara, we've lost parents, siblings, children and friends. 129 people every day. when i talk to new mexicans on the front lines of this crisis, the most urgent need is for more resources. that's why i produced the opioid and heroin investment
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act. this bill, co-sponsored by nearly 100 of my colleagues, sought to combat this epidemic. this legislation we're considering today, like my bill, promises $1 billion for the opioid crisis. though we cannot bring back those we lost, we owe it to them and their families to pass this bill. this funding will make a real difference in people's lives. while i'm relieved we will soon be able to get the resources to our communities, i am fearful that some of my colleagues will see this as a mission accomplished instead of what it must be which is only a first step toward healing our communities. but i can't help but ask my republican colleagues who support the advances we're making today for mental health. why are they preparing to roll back the most important advances we made for mental health in the past years by promising to repeal the to direct the secretary of veterans affairs to carry out a pilot program to provide access to magnetic eeg/ekg-guided resonance therapy technology to veterans? the 21st century cures act -- repealing the affordable care
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act. the 21st century cures act will show what we can do when we work across the aisle and strengthen our nation's health system. with that i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from new jersey reserves. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. upton: mr. speaker, i'd yield one minute to the gentlelady from california, original co-sponsor of our bill and a great proponent from day one, the gentlelady from california. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from california is recognized for one minute. mrs. walters: thank you, mr. speaker. over the last two years i worked with organizations in my district, including the children's hospital of orange county, the juvenile diabetes research foundation and alzheimer's orange county. during my visits with these groups, i have met with constituents who are suffering from incurable diseases. i've met with parents of children suffering from prescription drug addiction and families struggling to find adequate mental health care for their loved ones. all of these people have one thing in common -- the 21st century cures act would directly improve the care they
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receive. this innovative legislation will provide them with faster and better cures and treatment. in passing this legislation, we have the opportunity to accelerate the discovery, development and delivery of lifesaving and life-improving therapies. i urge my colleagues to join me in supporting 21st century cures act. it's time for cures now. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from california yields back the balance of her time. the gentleman from michigan reserves. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i yield now three minutes to the gentlewoman from colorado. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from colorado is recognized for three minutes. ms. degette: thank you so much, mr. speaker. and thanks to mr. pallone for yielding me the time and for being an airing partner on this quest that we had. i just want to take a few minutes to talk about the extraordinary journey that we've had here. when fred upton came up to me on the floor about three years
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ago and asked if i would help him work on a bill to help modernize and update the way we do biomedical research in this country, little did i realize the road that laid ahead and there have been a lot of twists and turns in that road. there have been some very interesting sightings along that road, and it has been an extraordinary effort for all of us. it's really brought the energy and commerce together in a bipartisan way. i'm hoping that we can continue those efforts in the next congress. so many of my colleagues are right, we still have a lot that we have to do in the area of mental health, in the area of biomedical research and so much more. but i want to thank a number of people because they really all deserve to be thanked. of course, chairman upton and ranking member pallone. gene green, the ranking member of the health subcommittee, and joe pitts, the chairman. i want to thank the entire committee, as i said. i want to thank the patient advocacy community who has been
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with us throughout this process. i want to thank the researchers. i want to thank the entrepreneurs who came and talked to us about what they needed. i want to thank the agencies themselves, specifically the f.d.a. and the n.i.h., for technical assistance and the entire executive branch. i want to thank a number of people. first of all, i want to thank lisa cullen, my chief of staff, who's been with me for 20 years through sick and then. i want to thank polywebster, my health policy director, who -- poly webster, my health policy director, who got married, passed the bar and helped in this process. i want to thank lynn. eleanor, my legislative director. i want to thank rachel stowe, my former health care director, who started this. and matt enzio, who is lynn's predecessor. i want to thank from the upton staff, joan, paul, john stone, carley mcwilliams, audrey anna,
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and j.p., all of you guys have worked together as a team with my team. i want to thank kristen o'neil from mr. green's staff. i don't think i thanked mr. green. i want to thank mr. green who has done such an extraordinary job and really been my wing man. i want to thank wendall who is leader pelosi's senior advicor and -- advisor and charlene, who is mr. hoyer's advisor. i want to thank mr. pallone's team who has worked tirelessly. jeff, tiffany, kim, waverly and megan. you guys have been fabulous. we haven't always agreed on everything but in the end we all worked together. it really is a great team. i hope we can use this in the next congress to get to even greater heights. thank you so much, and i urge the house to pass this bill on a strong bipartisan basis and then i urge the other body to take it up. i yield back.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman's time has expired. the gentleman from new jersey reserves. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. . mr. upton: i yield one minute to the gentleman from georgia, mr. carter, the only pharmacist in the congress. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from georgia is recognized for one minute. mr. carter: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, i rise today in support of h.r. 34, the 21st century cures act. this long awaited legislation promotes medical innovation by streamlining the discovery, development, and delivery of critical medicines. it also helps reform our nation's deteriorating mental health system to ensure that millions of americans receive the care they need. such reforms include the reduction of regulatory red tape that slows prescription drugs' entry into the market. the breaking down of barriers that restrict data sharing. and expediting the review of potentially breakthrough devices. while some may believe the resources needed to develop new cures or new devices are too clausly and time consuming, the potential savings to the broader health care system will be significant.
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by modendizing the government surrounding the development of new medicines and treatment, we ensure that the lives of millions, not only here in the u.s. but across the world, will improve. i want to thank chairman upton and chairman murphy for their unrelenting determination to bring this negotiated piece of legislation to the floor for a vote. i urge my colleagues to support h.r. 34, and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from michigan reserves. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. pa clone: i reserve. i have -- mr. pallone: i reserve. i have no other speakers except myself at the end. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new jersey reserves. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. upton: mr. speaker, we have a good number of speakers left. we'll use all of our time. i yield one minute to the gentleman from pennsylvania, mr. rothfus. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from pennsylvania is recognized for one minute. mr. rothfus: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today in strong support of this important legislation that provides significant investments and reforms to accelerate the discovery of new treatments and cures for americans.
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i also applaud the inclusion of provision i offered crucial for our seniors. it would restore the open enrollment period for medicare advantage beneficiaries until 2011 had the ability to change advantage plans during the first three months of the year. unfortunately, those three months of flexibility have been replaced with an annual medicare advantage disenrollment period during the first 45 days of the year. given the popularity, seniors should be given the choice of changing to a plan that addresses their needs. restoring this 90-day open enrollment window will allow seniors who find their plan is not working for them to make the change that does work. this bill also contains very important legislation authored by my colleague from pennsylvania, representative murphy, to help families dealing with the mental health crisis by significantly reforming our mental health care system. these reforms are crucial for families, veterans, and all individuals dealing with the mental health crisis and drug addiction that is can often accompany such illnesses. i commend chairman upton's work on bringing this critical
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legislation to the floor. i urge its passage. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from michigan -- mr. upton: mr. speaker, i yield one minute to my dear friend, who i served with all my years here in the congress, the honor chris smith from new jersey. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new jersey is recognized for one minute. . smith: mr. speaker, in 1992, 24 years ago i met along with a great advocate, pat smith, with top officials of n.i.h. and c.d.c. on federal guidelines that precluded the existence of chronic lime disease. subsequently every congress i would introduce legislation trying to get a diversity of viewpoints so that clinicians, patients, and other advocates could be heard. today c.d.c. estimates that about 380,000 cases of lyme and provision in this bill, important game changing provision, insisted upon by majority leader kevin mccarthy and chairman upton, requires
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that a new working group on tick-borne disease includes members with a diversity of viewpoints, including patients, clinicians, and researchers. this working group will make a difference. those patients, there are tens of thousands of them, have been told chronic lyme doesn't exist. what's your feeling can be attributable to some of the disease and they don't get better. i want to thank the chairman for doing this. i also was co-founder and co-chairman of both the alzheimer's caucus 16 years and the autism caucus 16 years ago. thank you for the great work that this will do for those patients as well. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. mr. upton: i yield one minute to the gentlelady from washington state, the honorable butler. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from washington state is recognized for one minute. miss butler: thank you, mr. speaker. i'm really excited about this bill and about an inclusion that will -- in the 21st century bill we are voting on today that's going to help moms
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and babies. nearly all of the 400 million women who give birth each year in the u.s. and the three million women who breast-feed will take medications or take a vaccine during their pregnancy or nursing. this bill contains a provision that we are voting on that we hope will pass and be signed into law that will reduce health risks faced by these moms. here's where the risk lies. pregnant women are often not included in clinical trials on medication so we don't know what the effects are of drugs on a woman and on her pregnancy. without reliable information, women and doctors are playing a guessing game trying to figure out the impacts of medication. that could be on medication that's a prescription for a chronic disease, hypertension, iabetes, or severe depression. the other choice is whether or not to choose not to treat their condition. if they don't know the impact, maybe they'll forgo their therapy all together. moms should be able to manage
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ongoing conditions throughout their pregnancies and breast-feeding without playing this game. form, the safe medication for moms and babies act is included in this bill and i urge support. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady's time has expired. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. upton: mr. speaker, at this point i would yield one minute to the gentleman from pennsylvania. long time supporter of this legislation, mr. costello, one minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from pennsylvania is recognized for one minute. mr. costello: i rise today in support of the 21st century cures act and thank the chairman and ranking member for their advocacy and leadership to bring this bill to the floor today. i also congratulate my colleague and neighbor, congressman joe pitts, for his leadership as chairman of the health subcommittee. mr. pitts and i represent adjoining and similar districts in pennsylvania, each including parts of chester and brooks counties. he has done outstanding work for our constituencies by incorporating the concerns and issues important to southeastern pennsylvania and the cures act. this bill will make an immediate long lasting impact on the families and communities
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we represent. it supports medical research, helps fight the opioid epidemic, and would improve the delivery of mental health care by putting patients at the center of the process. this bill includes major priorities that will make our communities healthier and safer. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from pennsylvania yields back. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. upton: mr. speaker, at this point i would yield one minute to my friend from new york, who this may be his last speech on the house floor as he announced his rirme some time ago, a good member, support of this legislation, the gentleman from new york, one minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new york is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i rise in strong support of 21st century cures. i want to thank the chairman and the majority leader, kevin mccarthy, and my colleague, chris smith, for insisting that we restore original language that deals with chronic lyme and tick-borne diseases. this is important to my district and the nation. i have so many friends and
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neighbors that are sick, chronically sick, and they are desperate for cures and solutions. mr. gibson: thanks to this bill they now have a voice and a fighting chance. deeply grateful. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. upton: i yield one minute to my friend, the gentlelady from arizona, again the strong dvocate of this legislation, a minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from arizona is recognized for one minute. >> i rise in strong support of this important legislation. ms. mcsally: i thank chairman upton for his tireless leadership on the 21st century cures act. the bill is a result of years of hard work and brings hope to countless americans suffering from incurable diseases in all of our districts around this country. i also want to recognize the work of congressman tim murphy who served as a leader and champion on a critical issue of mental health and author of legislation included in this bill that will overhaul our mental health system for the first time in 50 years.
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additionally, this legislation includes parts of a bill that i introduced with senator john cornyn to improve mental health collaboration between federal, state, and local justice systems to allow better responses to mental health crises. these provision also also divert low-level offenders to treatment programs. help reduce recidivism, and provide support to offenders re-entering the community. many diverse groups came together to support this. including mental health advocates. i i urge all my colleagues to vote in favor of this bill. i thank the chairman for his leadership and yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from michigan has been is recognized. mr. upton: i have no further speakers and therefore will take my time to close. 'll let mr. pallone -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan reserves. the gentleman from new jersey. mr. pallone: could i ask how much time remains? search the gentleman from new jersey has 2 1/2 minutes.
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the gentleman from michigan 3 1/2 minutes. mr. pallone: i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i'd like to conclude by referencing the statement of administration policy, because i believe it reflects my position for the most part. if i could just read some sections, i'm not reading the whole thing, it says the administration strongly supports passage of a bipartisan house amount to the senate amendment to h.r. 34, the 21st century cures act, which dedicates more than $6 billion to implement key priorities such as the president's proposal to combat the heroin and prescription opioid epidemic shall the vice president's cancer moon shot, and president's signature biomedical research initiatives. the precision medicine and brain research through advancing innovative neurotechnologies or brain initiatives. it also takes important steps to improve mental health. the administration is committed to taking immediate action and lay the groundwork to ensure the funds in the bill would be
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distributed quickly and effectively so we can begin to address these important public health challenges. there are provisions in the bill that raise concern that have been modified from previous versions to help address those concerns such as provisions that allow for the marketing of drugs to payers for off label uses. in addition a number of effective dates will be challenging to meet, especially without additional funding. that said, this legislation offers advances that far outway the concerns as such the administration strongly supports passage of the house amendment to the senate amendment to h.r. 34. the 21st century cures act. let me just say also in conclusion, i believe that this is an important piece of legislation that we need to pass. i hope that the senate would take it up and pass it. obviously the administration of the president will sign it. from the very beginning when we passed the 21st century cures act, i thought it would make
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important strides in actually dealing with those diseases for which we have not made a lot of progress in terms of advancing and finding cures. but at the same time i'm happy that this legislation has now become little more than a catch all, or a lot more, because it's addressing funding for opioids, many know that we ssed an opioid package the president signed in july but it's not funded. there will be funding now. as far as the mental health reforms, our committee spent a tremendous amount of time over the last two years trying to address that legislation. we passed a bill here in the house, and again i'm happy that this is included because those are the kind of reforms that are in that bill are now in this bill. i think are important strides in terms of addressing some of the mental health concerns we have in this contry. and the same is true for cancer moon shot. the president spent a lot of time, vice president as well, this will make at least a down payment on that. overall this is a good bill. i support it. i urge my colleagues to support
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it as well. thank you, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan is recognized to close. mr. upton: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. upton: mr. speaker, i just want to thank all the people that have been involved. this chamber, our staff, our members, senate as well. i want to thank all the people outside the chamber who brought their message to us. one of the things that we want to to from the very start was to listen. you tell us what we need to do so we can find these cures, name the disease. i'll confess some of us probably never heard of some of the diseases. and some of the disease patient advocacy groups that came to us. but we are doing the right thing. yes, we listened. yes, we knew we needed more research. as fiscal conservatives, we all care about the deficit, we all
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do. we want to make sure that we can actually have the resources and the timeline to spend it in a prudent manner, outlining the priorities that both sides of the aisle share. . the president was personally involved in this issue. not johnny come lately. but coming up this aisle, his last couple of state of the union addresses, both on precision medicine and the cancer moon shot. vice president biden spent weeks of his time, many hours with us, helping us draft legislation that we all care about. and is included in this legislation. lamar alexander, mitch mcconnell, patty murray, others, chuck schumer in the senate, caring about this legislation, knowing its impact on so many millions of people. our researchers who have devoted their lives.
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again, many of us here, we traveled to m.d. anderson, the , sorry nic, ann arbor about that, mr. tiberi, ann arbor, the cleveland clinic, and other great places that do research that actually can save people's lives. and we learned a lot. we learned a lot that working together we can get something done. -- a lot, that working together we can get something done. that's what this bill does. i'll tell you why it's important. we don't want to win by a narrow margin. we want to win by a huge margin. we want to send the message to the senate that what we did, the countless hearings and round tables, has made a difference. that it is a strong, bipartisan message. including the mental health legislation, again, which we debated for weeks and months here in the house. not only in the committee, but on the house floor.
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very important, it's important to people like joe kennedy who spoke on the floor a little bit earlier today. the ways and means provisions, which passed on a voice vote here, are included so we can get the job done. our leadership on both sides. john boehner, paul ryan, kevin mccarthy, steve scalise, cathy mcmorris rogers, nancy pelosi, steny hoyer, they have really been outstanding. they knew from the get go that we needed to get this thing done. because patients can't wait. they cannot wait. we're going to have the cure to get this thing done, and, yes, it will impact millions of lives . so in an hour or two when we vote on this, i would urge all of my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to vote yes for patients. i yield back the balance of my
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time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from texas is recognized. for 10 minutes. tom brady thank you, madam speaker -- mr. brady: thank you, madam speaker. i yield myself as much time as i may consume. america has always been a leader in cutting-edge medical treatments and technologies, breakthroughs that have saved countless lives. due to outdated and burdensome federal health care policies, medical innovation in our country is failing to keep pace
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with the 21st century challenges facing doctors and families. today's americans nationwide are being forced to wait for life-saving treatments they need while important advancements are held up by unnecessary red tape. chairman upton's 21st century cures act provides an opportunity to put america back at the forefront of medical innovation and the delivery of cutting-edge care. this legislation will empower america's researchers and doctors with the tools needed to solve the biggest health care challenges of our time. and includes many bipartisan solutions that will increase health care choice, access and affordability for the american people. thanks to chairman upton's leadership and the hard work of many members of congress from multiple committees, the 21st century cures act brings together a variety of solutions that will help americans throughout the country. 10 of these patient-focused measures are from the ways and means committee. all 10 are bipartisan, more than
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20 of our members of congress crafted and introduced these bills and many more helped move them forward. in particular, i'd like to recognize the leadership of congressman pat tiberi and jim mcdoer met, the chairman and rank -- mcdermott, the chairman and ranking member of our committee. rank member mcdermott, by the way, is retiring at the end of this congress. i want to take this moment to thank him for his years of service and friendship. want to thank he and chairman tiberi for their efforts and support of the 21st century cures act. the ways and means health care provisions in the bill will remove harmful regulations on providers, impede the delivery of care, they will increase health care options for job creators and families, and they'll expand access to high-quality, affordable care for america's most vulnerable patients. most excited -- most exciting, this legislation includes a policy to ensure patients have access to new home infusion
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benefits. we look forward to working with the energy and commerce next year to quickly implement this solution so more patients have access to this vital service at an earlier date. in closing, i want to thank all members on betting sides of the aisle who helped develop the bill before us today and i again want to thank chairman upton for his leadership. this historic legislation has been years in the making. we would not be here today without chairman upton's dedication, vision and commitment to bipartisan collaboration. 21st century cures act is an incredible opportunity to help americans from all walks of life for generations to come. i urge all of my colleagues to join me in supporting this passage and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from washington is recognized. for 10 minutes. mr. mcdermott: madam speaker, i reserve as much time as i may consume. this bill is a typical lame duck bill. it has one provision in it that
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people really want. and that is a giveaway to the pharmaceutical industry. every provision that mr. brady's talked about, with respect to the ways and means committee, has already been passed out of here and it's not -- none of them are harm l. but the issue here is reducing the affect of the f.d.a. in protecting the american public. my colleague, ms. delauro from connecticut, was absolutely right. the weakening of the f.d.a. in protecting the american public is the central part of this bill. now, it's wrapped in $4 billion worth of inadequate money for n.i.h. it would take $7 billion to keep us where we are today. the money, when it went out of here a few months ago, was mandatory. and now it's subject to appropriation. and everybody says, oh, well there's commitments made. there's commitments made. anybody who believes in the
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tooth fairy will believe that money is going to go to n.i.h. but the changes in law in how we push drugs, that's going to be in law. let me tell you what the problem with that is. you push drugs out there quickly, people, there are some side effects, some people die, people say, well, it's too bad, the f.d.a. approved it. we put the f.d.a. in the position of protecting the american public and then we cut them off at the knees. and once we've done these cures, we've come up with these great rugs, who can afford them? the other thing that's wrong with this bill, and that this house has failed to do, is to deal with the cost of pharmaceuticals in this country. there's not one single thing in this bill. however, there's a specialty drug. it's a treatment for hepatitis c. there are several hundred thousand -- actually, several million people in this country
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who need that drug. one pill costs $1,000. full treatment costs $84,000. who can afford it? who's going to pay for that? are you going to be willing to put the money into part d of medicare to pay for it? the question here is what are we doing in giving away to the pharmaceutical companies an open door to push any drug out they want, or that they can get through the screen, make the screen big so the easy to get them out -- it's easy to get them out, and then we pick up the pieces for the american people. and that's the reason i oppose this bill. i think there are good things in it. i come from the university that is the number one recipient of research money in this country. university of washington is umber one public university. and it takes -- we have so little money in n.i.h. now that
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you have to be 40 years old until you get a grant from n.i.h. or a research project. that's -- it used to be that 17% of all the grants were approved. now we're down to 6%. that's because we've been squeezing the life out of n.i.h. and this $4 billion sounds like a lot of money, but it isn't even the $7 billion it would take to keep us at the present level. that's what's wrong with this bill. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. brady: madam speaker, i'm pleased to yield one minute to the chairman of the health subcommittee, who shepherded these bills through the house earlier, leads the effort to correct issues so important to our hospitals and cancer hospitals, as well as some new reforms from fusion health care, i yield one minute to the gentleman from ohio, mr. tiberi. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. tiberi: thank you, chairman brady, for your leadership on this issue. chairman upton unveiled 21st century cures back in 2014.
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quicker development and pathway to approve treatments and cure diseases. this bipartisan and bicameral bill is another example of how the house is delivering on patient-focused solutions for americans. i'm incredibly pleased that three of my initiatives are included in this final package. the first of which is a bill that provides necessary regulatory relief to providers and fixes a site-neutral policy for hospitals that were in the middle of construction when the policy went into effect last year. second, the 21st century cures act gives relief to long-term care hospitals, from the 25% rule and commonsense medicare reforms. lastly, the bill includes a provision of a bill i sponsored that provides infusion therapy to medicare beneficiaries in their home. i look forward to continuing work on these issues with my colleagues in the next session of congress. i want to congratulate chairman upton for his incredible work on this. he solicited feedback from stakeholders, from members, from patients and has worked tirelessly to make this bill the best version possible.
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his accomplishments during his chairmanship are admirable and i'm grateful to call him a close friend. let's pass 21st century cures on a bipartisan basis and get america back in the driver's seat on medical innovation. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. does the gentleman reserve? the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from washington is recognized. mr. mcdermott: madam speaker, i yield three minutes to the gentleman from texas, mr. doggett. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. doggett: thank you. mr. speaker, while certainly saluting the many members who have worked so diligently on this measure, i cannot vote for it. you know, in the desert, a wide and endless desert of support for research funding, even getting a few drops of rain is understandably welcomed by the thirsty. under republican rule, we have seen a dreadful drought in research funding. this is a bill that attempts to address that and i voted for it
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when it was here on the floor of the house at a previous time. at that point it promised the hope after this long drought of lmost $10 billion in assured certain funding for research so that we might find cures for some of these diseases before we get it ourselves. the concern so many people have. now thunderstorm new measure we have -- under this new measure we have only about 1/4 of the funding previously approved and the no longer certain mup money, the maybe -- money, it's maybe money for the future. there may be bipartisan agreement but there's not a bipartisan advancement. at the same time that research dollars are dramatically cut, the very research dollars that were the reason for having this bill in the first place, bill phrma got a few of its wish list approved. and how very appropriate that this measure and so many other living parts have been packed into what is called the tsunami
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warning bill. because if there's one thing we can be sure of, this past year, is that those people who rely on life-saving drugs, who want to be able to have a prescription that the doctor prescribes, they have had a real tsunami, they have been buried in one wave after another wave after another giant wave of pharmaceutical price gouging. whether it is epipen or a child who's going to have an allergic reaction, whether it is insulin or someone who is diabetic and relies on thains lynn, whether it is -- on that insulin, whether it's a drug that costs over $100,000, it is wave after wave of a tsunami of price gouging. and what has this congress done about that? absolutely nothing. i must say, the administration has done very little more. they have looked at it, there have been a few speeches about it, but there has not been
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effective action. so what we get in this bill are that big phrma wants, that has been on its wish list for a long time, and consumers, they get nothing to look forward to other than more of those big waves of huge price increases. i'm also concerned that the policy arm that publishes "consumer reports" magazine has expressed deep concerns about additional patient risk as a result of some of the provisions that the pharmaceutical companies and the medical device manufacturers have insisted as the price for getting a little additional research funding. so i'm voting no, not because this provides some research dollars, it ought to be providing the level of certain research funding we approved already, but because it fails to address this critical health need. i yield back. . the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. brady: i yield one minute to the gentlelady from kansas, one
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of the key members of the health subcommittee that focuses on rural communities, the gentlelady from kansas, ns jenkins. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized. ms. jenkins: i rise today to support this legislation. it improves access to health care for rural communities through measures like the continuing access hospitals act which stops regulations from interfering with rural health care facilities providing services. and will ensure the work that p.a.'s and practitioners are recognized so rural hospitals can afford to remain open and serve our rural communities. it will help the 40 million americans who deal with a mental illness each year to inclusion of my mental health first aid act. it delivers $15 million every year to train police officers,
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teachers, veterans, advocates and others to identify and aid those with a mental illness, building a stronger mental health safety net in america and addresses the needs of millions of americans. i urge my colleagues to pass this legislation. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields. the gentleman from texas reserves. the gentleman from washington is recognized. mr. mcdermott: i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. brady: i yield one minute to one of our leaders in medical devices, innovation and bringing lifesaving cures, the gentleman from minnesota, mr. paulsen. mr. paulsen: madam speaker, i rise in strong support of the bipartisan 21 century cures act. there are more than 10,000 known diseases and there are only 500 rare diseases that have approved
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treatments and americans feel powerless because they have a deadly disease and no hope for a cure because there are no resources for research or barriers discouraging innovation. this gives patient new hope and supports more n.i.h. research and streamlines the regulatory approval priest and more treatment. and i'm pleased that we are providing important reforms to our mental health system. for too long patients and families, mental health care first and law enforcement have been crying for help. this legislative effort represents the most significant improvement to the mental health system that we have seen in over a decade. this is an innovation game changer and once in a generalational transfor mational opportunity to treat disease and expedites the delivery of new treatments and cures and ensures that america will be a leader in
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the global fight for medical innovation. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from washington. mr. mcdermott: i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. brady: i yield to the gentleman from ohio mr. renacci. mr. renacci: i rise in support of the 21 century cures act. this legislation, although not perfect, ensures our country will be at the forefront of medical innovations and break-throughs and what the bill does for states like ohio that are fighting the opioid epidemic. ohio has seen more deaths than any other state in the nays. this bill would help reverse this devastating trend. i applaud the inclusion of my bill, the establishing equity
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and re-admission program. it was created due to concerns that too few resources were being spent on reducing acute care hospital readmissions. while it is important, my bill ensures that we are not disproportionately penalizing those who see a large number of our most vulnerable patients. this is one of the many reforms to improve our health care system included in the 21 sent -- 21 century cures act. and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas reserves. mr. mcdermott: i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. brady: i'm pleased to yield one minute to another key member of our committee who has focused on health care, in this case increasing information to seniors and improving physical
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therapy so critical to so many in health care. the gentleman from health kay, mr. meehan. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. meehan: the 21st century cures ookt is legislation that will eliminate the barriers standing between us and cures for diseases like alzheimer's, diabetes and cancer. we encourage the n.i.h. and f.d.a. to establish a global study network with the hope that more collaboration will lead to more treatments and build our undering to lead to cures for children. three years ago, sarahmona han is a 10-year-old who has received an adult lung transplant. and to sarah's heroes we highlight stories where children
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are trying to overcome challenges. mental illness are among other conditions without a cure. it increases the number of health care professionals trained to treat parets and strengthens the requirement that mental health coverage be on par for coverage with physical ailments. i urge my colleagues to support this. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from washington is recognized. mr. mcdermott: i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. brady: i yield one minute to one of our smartest members on the ways and means committee and has carved out a niche in support of this bill. mr. dold, one minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. dold: i want to thank the chairman for your leadership. i also stand here today in strong support of the 21st
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century cures act. i thank chairman upton for his leadership and ranking member pallone, congressman did he get and congressman murphy for their great work on compiling things that are in this bill. i have been an advocate for the 21st century cures act because i believe it's important that we modernize and we treat mental health and develop lifesaving cures. this accomplishes both of these important goals. and in support of groundbreaking medical research and additional $500 million to help bring drugs and devices to patients more quickly. we will be providing states with a billion dollars in grants to help combat the opioid epidemic which is impacting every single community. we will increase, choice, access and quality in health care by
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making serious improvements to medicare. this package is proof -- braid -- mr. brady: i yield an additional one half minute. mr. dold: when we are willing to work together, we can improve our health care system through changes large and small. i encourage all of my colleagues to join me in supporting the 21st century cures act and thank chairman upton, congressman murti and congresswoman did he get and all those who put this together and the staff that were instrumental in making this becoming a reality today. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from texas reserves. mr. mcdermott: i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. brady: we have no further speakers and are prepared to close if the gentleman would like to do so. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from washington is
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recognized. mr. mcdermott: madam speaker, i want to thank my colleagues for their interest in children. i hear some of these speakers stand up and say they are really interested in kids and yet they oppose the chip program. they talk about cutting back the help to children. now the problem here is that if you're talking about cures and you are going to create a magnificent cure that costs $80,000, if you don't provide medicaid, the children who are poor in this country aren't going to get access to that cure. that's a cure for rich people who can pay it out of their clippings on their bonds and their stock. epstd program which is the program that covers kids, the president-elect has put in
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the charge of that, a woman from indiana, who testified against it. this is the benefit that ensures sick kids will get cures. now you are setting in motion something for pharmaceutical companies to find a way to take as much money out of the system as they can with every drug they can put out there and you are at the same time moving in the direction of making it impossible for poor children to be taken care of in this country. how many states have the governors said, we don't believe in medicaid. we don't believe the government should give medicaid. we believe the government should stay out of medicine. so they deny their own people health care, simple every day, ordinary health care and we are talking about cures of a disease that somebody said, there are 50
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cases in the united states in the last year. one feels for those 50. i'm a physician. i have listened to those people. i know that's awful. but you have to keep in balance and say to yourself, are we going to spend all the money there or spend it with dealing with all americans. and that's what's wrong with this bill. the pharmaceutical industry has no controls on it whatsoever. you, when you put in that benefit in part d, tied the secretary of health and human services' hands and he or she cannot negotiate lower prices. you said whatever the pharmaceutical company says the cost is, that's what we're going to pay. now the veterans administration, veterans are different than ordinary people in this country, they have an administration that has the right to negotiate changes in prices. and their pharmaceutical prices are down 50%, 60% from what
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people pay in medicare. now as long as you have that kind of give-away going onto the pharmaceutical companies, this bill is just frosting on the cake. members will vote for it. you are going to pay down the down the line. you pay now or pay later. if you do not screen those drugs carefully and make sure they are really doing something and let the pharmaceutical companies, they are simply putting drugs out on the table that cost too much for the americans to buy. i urge a no vote. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. brady: i yield myself the balance of the remaining time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. brady: there are so many americans who could be watching today who wonder when that life
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saving drug, that new treatment will be made available to them. it is in other countries and read about it in other places but can't get it here in america. the cures act changes that. when you are in that tough situation, provides options for health care and experimental drugs never available to them. this is important to the patients. i urge its support. and i yield the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. all time for debate has expired. would the gentleman make a motion -- would you move the previous question. mr. brady: so move. the speaker pro tempore: the previous question has been moved. all time for debate has expired. pursuant to house resolution 934, the previous question is ordered. the question is on the motion by the gentleman from michigan, mr. upton. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no.
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the ayes have it. the motion is agreed to. mr. mcdermott: madam chair. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from washington. mr. mcdermott: i ask for a recorded vote. the speaker pro tempore: a recorded vote has been requested . those favoring a recorded vote will rise. a sufficient number having arisen, a recorded vote is ordered. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, and the order of the house of today, further proceedings on this question will be postponed.
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pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, the chair will postpone further proceedings today on motions to suspend the rules on which a recorded vote or the yeas and nays are ordered. or on which a vote incurs objection under clause 6 of rule 20. recorded votes on postponed questions will be taken later. for what purpose does the gentleman from utah seek recognition? mr. bishop: mr. speaker, i move that the house suspend the rules and pass h.r. 6302, the overtime pay for secret service agents act of 2016. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: union calendar number 658, h.r. 6302, a bill to
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provide for an increase in premium pay for united states secret service agents performing protective services during 2016 and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from utah, mr. chaffetz, and the gentleman from massachusetts, mr. lynch, each will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from utah. mr. chaffetz: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. chaffetz: i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days in which to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous materials on the bill under consideration. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. chaffetz: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today in support of my bill, h.r. 6302, the overtime pay for secret service agents act of 2016. the united states secret service has a zero fail mission. to protect the president and other protectees at all costs. 2016 presidential campaign year was especially busy for the secret service. they've done an exceptional job. i'll give you some metrics of what this agency was dealing
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with. they staffed more than 2,500 candidate trips, 8,580 total protective travel stops, and 62 foreign travel trips with the president and the vice president. most recent presidential election saw secret service agents working record hours to fulfill their mission, incredibly this was accomplished despite the secret service suffering from historic levels of attrition and low staffing levels. in our december, 2015, bipartisan report, the committee on oversight and government reform found that the secret service was, quote, experiencing a staffing crisis that threatens to jeopardize its critical mission, end quote. the secret service was at a peak staff level of 7,024 employees in the year 2011. that number has declined every year until the beginning of this year when the agency had 6,289 employees. the staffing numbers are beginning to improve, now at 6,500. but the problem is the agency
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hopes to have between 8,000 and 9,000 employees by the next presidential election in 2020. it's hard and difficult to hire a secret service agent and once they're hired you can't simply put them out in front of the white house or next to a candidate or one of the protectees and expect them to simply flip on the switch and do their job. as a result, the current power shortage, the lack of employees, secret service agents had to work significant overtime to ensure round the clock protection of presidential candidates. no matter the number of hours worked, secret service agents are subject to a title 5 statutory cap on their biweekly pay. as a result, agents were not compensated for overtime hours worked that would have resulted in compensation beyond the cap during any pay period. within the secret service, this became known as a max-out problem. these so-called max-outs contributed the agency's low morale and exacerbate attrition.
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the excessive overtime also negatively impacts protective efforts. the agency needs fresh and energetic agents to fulfill a critical mission, one that they have to be in tune at every moment while they're on the job. the bill, the overtime pay for secret service agents act of 2016, offers relief for agents who have not received pay due to the so-called max-out program -- problem. secret service agents who worked on the 2016 presidential campaign would be eligible to receive compensation above normal levels up to the basic pay currently given to members of the executive schedule, level two, for the calendar year of 2016. every secret service agent with outstanding overtime would receive an additional compensation for 2016 under this bill. this is not a bonus, this is not extra pay, this is simply trying to compensate them for hours that they worked. we heard story after story about secret service agents who would literally go weeks on end with
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no pay and yet continue to do their job. at the same time the limitation of the 2016 presidential election in the bill presents a good balance and encourages secret service to fix its current staffing problems instead of relying on excessive and expensive overtime pay in the future. it is my expectation that the secret service meet its staffing goals by the next election cycle and does not have to rely on scheduling excessive overtime. it is also my expectation that the secret service will focus its staffing capital away from increasing nonessential investigative and cyber-related missions, which distract from the core mission of protecting the president and other protectees. these are current -- there are currently three ongoing studies analyzing the secret service's nonessential mission of cyberinvestigation. by the way, these nonprotective missions usually take more than half of their time. but certainly during a presidential election cycle, you can see the demand that was there. i'm very pleased in the
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bipartisan nature in which the committee came together to make sure that we're supporting the men and women who serve in the secret service. they have done so in a very admirable fashion, they provided a great service to the nation. but when you hear stories where people would go 43 days without a single day off, when they would work literally 100-plus hours in a week and they would go to work knowing that they weren't going to be compensated for that work, that's un-- inexcusable. this bill would provide the relief to them, again, it's not a bonus, not extra pay, but it's some compensation for the work that they did protecting our nation and protecting those protectees. and by all accounts, they did an exceptional job, without any major incidence -- incidents in this 2016 election psych ale. i would urge the passage of this bill -- cycle. i would urge the passage of this bill. with that i'll reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the
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gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from massachusetts is recognized. mr. lynch: good afternoon, mr. speaker. i yield myself as much time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. lynch: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise in support of h.r. 6302, the overtime pay for secret service agents act of 2016. which was approved by our committee unanimously by voice vote. this legislation would authorize an increase in the current pay cap, up to level two of the executive schedule, so that secret service agents are permitted to receive comment sation for the hours of overtime they -- compensation for the hours of overtime they worked in 2016. as the chairman has indicated, the presidential campaign of 2016 has been a year of extraordinary challenges and strain on the secret service. the secret service has provided information to the committee indicating that more than 1,000 secret service agents, 1/3 of the agents onboard have bjorked -- worked so many hours that they maxed out their annual overtime and salary. some agents started working
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overtime for free as of early june and are exceeding the pay cap by as many as $50,000 to $60,000 per agent. current law prohibits them from receiving any additional overtime pay and that is what this bill is intended to fix for calendar year 2016. i would hope that at some point, and these spikes in overtime are a necessary factor in these election campaigns, as we know there were 16 republican candidates in the primary, all that received secret service protection, as well as several candidates on the democratic side. there were countless stops across the country over the months of the campaign, and i don't think there's any way to avoid the need for overtime. i would hope, and i'm glad that this is a bipartisan bill, but every four years we have to have agents working without pay. and there's got to be a way that
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we can estimate roughly what the overtime needs will be every four years and incorporate something that at least eliminates the need to have secret service agents working for free. in a very dangerous job. i think we can figure that out. i had a proposal in committee to make this an every four year thing and incorporate that. it did not succeed. but i'm hope ing -- hoping that in a bipartisan manner the chairman and my republican colleagues on the committee, i think we can solve this with that -- this. with that i would reserve the balance of our time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. without objection, the gentleman from arizona will control the remainder of the time. the gentleman from arizona is recognized. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i'd like to make representative lynch aware that we have no further speakers and i am prepared to close. mr. lynch: ok. mr. speaker, i have no further
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testimony on my side and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from arizona is recognized. >> mr. speaker, i urge the adoption of the bill and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass h.r. 6302. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 of those voting having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed and, without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid n the table. for what purpose does the gentleman from arizona seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i move the house suspend the rules and pass h.r. 6303. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 6303, the bill to designate facilities of the united states postal service to establish new zip codes and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from arizona, mr. gosar, and the gentleman from massachusetts, mr. lynch, each will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the
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gentleman from arizona. mr. gosar: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days in which to revise and extend their remarks and to include extraneous material on the bill under consideration. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. gosar: mr. speaker, i rise today in support of h.r. 6303, introduced by chairman jason chaffetz. this straightforward legislation would consolidate 10 postal naming bills and solve important local issues by designating five new zip codes. the 10 postal naming bills have all been passed by the house already this congress. the five zip codes designated by the bill will address significant issues faced by those five communities. in each case, the zip code designated is driven by local leaders and strongly supported by the relevant member of congress. local communities are not asking for a new postal building and no new construction will be required to accommodate the changes. in the case of southampton, new york, chairman chaffetz personally met with individuals
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and businesses impacted by the delivery problems that could be solved with the addition of a new zip code. i look forward to hearing more about the specifics of the situation from representative zeldin of new york who is here today. in another example, the community of florida faces a lack of identity. additionally, some of the residents there are forced to pay nonresident rates or flatly denied services because they're not identified by the correct zip code. these concerns aren't just limited to mail delivery. communities without a unique zip code are at higher risk for extended response times when calling 911 due to confusion in similar street names. zip codes are also used to determine the appropriate distribution of tax revenue and insurance funds to local communities. without the proper zip code designations, some local communities may not receive their fair cut of local tax revenues. in many of the situations, local leaders within the new zip code
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designations have exhausted all options to obtain the requested changes. some of these communities have even offered to pay the postal service for the cost of new zip codes, sbru been rebuffed. this -- but have been rebuffed. this legislation is the last path forward for these communities. i urge my colleagues to support this bill and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from massachusetts. mr. lynch: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. lynch: thank you, mr. speaker. zip codes are used to organize our country, to ensure the effective and efficient delivery of the mail for millions of americans. the postal service has the authority to establish zip codes and to adjust their boundaries based on changes in delivery and volume of operational concerns. however, communities and businesses and other local entities can also voice their concern with zip code boundaries and petition for corresponding adjustments. h.r. 6303 would make the
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adjustments by requiring the postal service to establish new zip codes for five individual communities that have requested and subsequently been denied zip code changes. these communities have based their zip code requests on delays in mail delivery and emergency service response times, debt nile of inconsistent application of services to their communities, and other similar community concerns. . the postal service has worked with affected communities to find solutions and i commend those efforts by the postal service. the oversight committee has looked to find solutions in the proposed legislation and most of these communities would receive unique zip codes as part of this bill. i support h.r. 6303 today and i highlight my strong support for the language in this bill that would name 10 post offices after honorable men and women who made
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important contributions to our nation. the naming has passed the house and awaiting action in the senate. i urge my colleagues to support this bill and i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from arizona. mr. gosar: i'm pleased to yield two minutes to the gentleman from new york, mr. zeldin. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for two minutes. mr. zeldin: i rise in support of h.r. 6303 which would create a zips for three hamlets in my district. they share the same the same zip code with river head. this causes a number of issues including delay of mail and packages which could hold important goods like medications. shared street names delay the
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response time of emergency medical personnel, where every second counts. this could be avoided by assigning a new zip code to the three hamlets, which is why i have been working with chairman chafe et cetera and bringing him to long island to speak to those impacted in the community. i thank chairman chafe et cetera for his exceptional help on this issue. residents and local officials and community organizations have been aware of this issue and the problems it brings, but despite the previous efforts, it still serves to be a burden in this area in the first congressional district of new york. i thank chairman of the flanders, riverside and northhampton and president of the community association and all the members of these organizes for continuing this effort over the years.
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this has been a priority for them for many years and an honor to be their voice in the house. i know this legislation includes a new zip code for the area including glendale and spoken with my colleague, ms. meng, who has been an advocate for the residents of glendale. thank you, mr. gosar, for your support and efforts and the entire staff of the oversight and government reform committee. chairman chafe et cetera has an amazing team working with him. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from massachusetts. mr. lynch: i yield to one of the other champions of this legislation, ms. meng of new ork. . ms. meng: i rise in support of h.r. 6303 which glishes a new
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zip code for the community of glendale, new york. it is similar to h.r. 657. i thank chairman chafe et cetera for this legislation and ranking member. the residents of glendale, new york have sought to obtain a unique zip code and experienced problems due to sharing a zip code with the neighboring community of ridgewood. these include medications that were spoiled or not received due to mail processing errors, delays in first responder services to residents in need of care and inaccuracies with g.p.s. devices. roughly one-quarter of the population is eligible to receive medicare or will become
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eligible in the next decade. many use a mail order pharmacy to receive their prescription drugs and many more will use more services in the years to come. a single unique zip code for glendale will ensure that mail delivery will be improved in the future. creating a new zip code has been a bipartisan challenge for members of congress who previously represented the area. i commend them for their efforts on behalf of the community, especially my predecessor, representative bob turner. when i took office in the 113th congress, the only recourse left to address this matter was through legislation. i'm grateful to chairman chafe et cetera for including glendale in this legislation. it has been a long fight for the community to receive its own zip code. mr. speaker. before i close, i thank the
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local elected first, civic soirkses and community activists who have voiced their support for this issue over the years. in particular, i would like to thank melinda katz and new york state senator and adembly members and new york city council woman elizabeth crowley. i would like to thank the glendale property owners association, and citizens for a better ridgewood for their advocacy. i thank you for allowing this legislation to the floor for a vote today and i urge my colleagues to support this important measure. i yield my remaining time to mr. lynch. mr. lynch: having no further speakers, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from arizona. mr. gosar: mr. speaker, i would
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like to yield two minutes to the mr. eman from nevada amodei. mr. amodei: we appreciate the fact that the committee has taken this issue. as the person who represents the only district west of the mississippi that was fortunate enough to be considered as deserving in this, i just want to make a couple of points and that is and from the earlier talks, too, none of these zip codes were ones that people said hey, let's create a new one. everybody went to the postal service and said here's our stuff. and what we got and while the people in my state were good about, but what we got from the folks, we kind of don't do that and if you are turned down you can't ask for a number of years. it's almost an implied threat
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for asking one. i can't thank you enough for looking into this issue. this is the largest industrial park in the nation, the marketing people tell me, so i assume they're right and helps in another area which the state department collects sales taxes and it is based on zip codes. it will make sure the sales tax dollars are generated and credited to where the materials are going. thank you very much. and i want to note for the record that what you have here apparently is the three greatest states in the nation, new york, florida and nevada. and the other 37, keep trying. thank you very much. and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from arizona. mr. gosar: i yield two minutes to the gentleman from florida, mr. diaz-balart. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. diaz-balart: let me thank
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the gentleman from arizona for the time and i need to thank chairman chafe et cetera for introducing this, a very important piece of legislation. we heard what the issue is. the city of miami lakes has attempted to receive a unique zip code and for all the same reasons that you have already heard. and this would help with auto insurance rates and branding and economic development and would lead to less lexicon census confusion. it's a no-brainer but the postal service has continued to stoneball the city despite no opposition from anyone in the miami lakes. i have had meetings with the mayors from the areas around it and everybody supports it. so this legislation solves the problem and grants miami lakes its own zip code. i need to give credit to the mayor-elect of miami lakes.
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he has made this a priority and told no time and time again. and refused to accept that as an answer and came to us. it has been a privilege to work with him and because of his hard work, together, we were able to get the committee with the chairman and ranking member and all of the rest of the members of this committee to get this done through the house. again, i want to thank congressman chafe et cetera and thank the committee, the staff, his staff has been great to work with. with that, mr. speaker, i would urge the passing of this legislation. i want to thank mr. gosar again. and with that, i yield back the rest of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from arizona. mr. gosar: mr. speaker, i urge adoption of the bill and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the question is will the house suspend the rules and pass h.r. 6303. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it. 2/3 being in the majority --
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being in the affirmative, the bill is passed and without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid upon the table. for what purpose does the gentleman from arizona seek recognition? mr. gosar: mr. speaker, i move the house suspend the rules and pass h.r. 5384, federal register printer savings act of 2016. the clerk: union calendar number 65, h.r. 5384, a bill to amend title 44, united states code to restrict the distribution of free printed copies of the federal register to members of congress and other officers and employ quees of the united states and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from arizona, mr. gosar, and the gentleman from massachusetts, mr. lynch, each will control 20 minutes, the chair recognizes the gentleman from arizona. mr. gosar: i yield myself such time as i may consume. i ask unanimous consent that all members have five legislative days in which to revise and
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extend their remarks and include extraneous material on the bill under consideration. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. gosar: i rise today in support of h.r. 5384, federal register printer savings act of 2016 introduced by my colleague, representative steve russell of oak. this will curb government waste. the federal register is described as the official newspaper of the federal government. its daily editions include proposed regulations, request for comment, executive orders and information concerning other government activities. today, virtually every member of congress, the white house and any federal agencies receive printed copies of the federal register. it is important to note that members of congress do not proactively request or pay for this service. however, for the public, an annual subscription costs $929. in the days before the internet,
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this paper brought great value to members of congress and the white house allowing them to keep track of activity across the government. today, the full federal register is available online in a completely searchable and downloadable format. offices on capitol hill and white house throw the paper version resulting in hundreds of thousands of dollars of waste. this legislation, h.r. 5384, would change this by banning automatic subsubscriptions. instead members of congress and offices across the federal government who still want to receive printed companies would be required to request individual copies or an annual subscription. this is a good piece of legislation that will samb the taxpayer hundreds of thousands of dollars every year. i urge my colleagues to support this legislation. and i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the
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gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from massachusetts. mr. lynch: i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. lynch: mr. speaker, i rise in support of h.r. 5384, the federal register printer savings act of 2016 and i gee with the the gentleman from arizona that this is a commonsense good government bill about cutting waste. this bill would allow the government printing office to avoid sending printed copies to members of congress and other federal offices unless those offices want the printed copies. the federal register would continue to be available online. this bill would be good for the environment and good for taxpayers. the congressional budget office estimates this bill would save $1 million a year. i urge my colleagues to support h.r. 5384 and i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from arizona. mr. gosar: i would like to make sure that representative lynch is aware that i have no further speakers and i'm prepared to
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close. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from massachusetts. mr. lynch: we have no further speakers on our side and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from arizona. mr. gosar: i urge the adoption of the bill. and i yield. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the question is will the house suspend the rules and pass h.r. 5384. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 being in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed and without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid pon the table. for what purpose does the gentleman from arizona seek recognition? mr. gosar: i ask that the house suspend the rules and pass h.r. 6009. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 6009, a bill to ensure the effect i have processing of mail by federal agencies

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