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tv   U.S. House Debates Dodd- Frank Repeal  CSPAN  June 7, 2017 1:59pm-4:00pm EDT

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the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the yeas are 228. the nays are 19. the previous question is ordered. the question is on adoption of the resolution. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, -- the gentleman from florida. mr. hastings: mr. speaker, on that i ask for a recorded vote. the speaker pro tempore: a recorded vote is requested. those favoring a recorded vote will rise. a sufficient number having arisen, a recorded vote is ordered. members will record their votes by electronic device. this is a five-minute vote.
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[captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the yeas are 231. the nays are 185. the resolution is adopted. without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. the house will be in order. members, please remove your conversations from the floor, find a seat. the house will be in order. ould members clear the aisles.
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for what purpose does the gentleman from massachusetts seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, pursuant to clause 2-a-1 of rule 9, i rise to give notice of my intent to raise a question of the privileges of the house, the form of the resolution is as follows. mr. capuano: resolution, expressing the sense of the house of representatives that the president shall immediately release his tax return information to the congress and the american people. > the house is not in order. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the gentleman deserves to be heard. the gentleman may proceed. mr. capuano: thank you, mr. speaker. i know it's new to some people but i hope they pay attention.
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whereas the united states system of checks and balances, congress has a response -- >> the house is not in order. the speaker pro tempore: the entleman will suspend. ladies and gentlemen of the house, please be in order. the gentleman may proceed. mr. capuano: thank you, mr. speaker. whereas the united states system of checks and balances, the congress has a responsibility to hold the executive branch of government to a fair and equal standard of transparency, ensuring the public interest is placed first. whereas according to the tax history project, every president since gerald ford has disclosed their tax return information to the public. whereas, tax returns provide an important baseline of reasonable information, including whether the president paid taxes, ownership interest, charitable donations made, and whether tax
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deductions have been exploited. ereas, the disclosure of the president's tax returns could help those investigating the russian influence in the 2016 election understand the president's president's tax financial ties the russian federation and the ussian citizens. including debts owed and whether he shares any partnership this interest, equity interest, joint ventures, or licensing agreements with russia or russians. whereas, the president recently fired federal bureau of investigation director james comey, under whose leadership the f.b.i. was investigating whether the trump campaign included with -- colluded with russia to influence the 2016 election. whereas president trump reportedly stated to russian officials during the white house meeting that he fired director
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comey to ease pressure on the ongoing investigation of russia's influence in the 2016 election. whereas, senate russia investigators have requested information from the treasury department's criminal investigation division, the financial crimes enforcement network, which handles cases of money laundering, for information related to president ump, his top officials and campaign ads -- aides, they have been investigating allegations laundering oney through purchases of u.s. real statement whereas the president's tax returns would show us whether his foreign bank accounts and how much profit he receives from his ownership in myriad partnerships. whereas donald trump jr. said the trump laundering through purchases organization y pouring in from russia and that the russians make up a pretty
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disproportionate cross section, a lot of our assets. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman will suspend. the chair admonishes both sides of the aisle to be in order. if you have to have conversation, just simply take it outside. the gentleman may continue. mr. capuano: thank you, mr. speaker. whereas, congress gave itself the authority to review an individual's tax returns to investigate and reveal possible conflicts of interest of executive branch officials involved dating back to the teapot dome scandal. whereas, it has been reported that federal prosecutors have issued grand jury subpoenas to associates of former national security advisor michael flynn seeking business records as part of the ongoing probe into
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russian involvement in the 2016 elections. whereas, according to the 2016 candidate filing with the federal leaks commission, the president has 564 financial positions in companies located in the united states and around the world. whereas, against the advice of ethics attorneys and the office of government ethics, the president has refused to divest his ownership stake in his businesses and can still to this day withdraw funds at any time from the trust of which he is the sole beneficiary. ereas, the emol ewe meant -- emoluments cass was included in the united states constitution to prevent federal officials from accepting any present, emolument office, or title from any king, prince, or foreign state. whereas, the chairman of the ways and means committee, the joint committee on taxation, and
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the senate finance committee has the authority to request the president's tax returns under section 6103 of the tax code. whereas the joint committee on taxation reviewed the tax returns of president richard m. nixon in 1974 and made the information public. whereas, the ways and means 6103 in 2014 to make public the confidential tax information of 51 taxpayers. whereas, director comey has testified that tax returns are a common tool in investigations because they can show income and motives. whereas the american people have the right to know whether or not their president is operating under conflicts of interest related to international affairs, tax reform, government contracts, or otherwise.
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now, therefore, be it resolved, that the house of representatives shall immediately request the tax return information of donald j. trump for tax years 2006 to 2015 for review in close executive session by the committee on ways and means as provided under section 6103 of the internal revenue code and vote to report the information therein to the full house of representatives. and two, support transparency in government and the long-standing tradition of presidents and presidential candidates disclosing their tax information. the speaker pro tempore: under rule 9 a resolution offered from the floor by a member other than the majority leader or minority leader as a question of the privileges of the house has immediate precedence only at a time designated by the chair within two legislative days after the resolution is properly noticed. pending that designation, the form of the resolution noticed
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by the gentleman from massachusetts will appear in the record at this point. the chair will not at this point determine whether the resolution constitutes a question of privilege. that determination will be made at the time designated for consideration of the resolution. without objection, five-minute voting will continue. the unfinished business is the vote on ordering the previous question on house resolution 375 on which the yeas and nays are ordered. the clerk will report the title of the resolution. the clerk: house calendar number house resolution 375, resolution providing for consideration of the bill h.r. 10, to create hope and opportunity for investors, consumers, and entrepreneurs by ending bailouts and too big to fail. holding washington and wall street accountable, eliminating red tape to increase access to capital and credit, and repealing the provisions of the dodd-frank act that make america less prosperous, less stable, and less free, and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: the question is on ordering the previous question. members will record their votes by electronic device. this is a five-minute vote.
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[captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the yeas are 228. the nays are 185. the previous question is ordered. the question is on adoption of the resolution. so many as are in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it. the gentlelady from new york. ms. slaughter: i request the yeas and nays. the speaker pro tempore: the yeas and nays are requested. those favoring a vote by the yeas and nays will rise. a sufficient number having arisen, the yeas and nays are ordered. members will record their votes by electronic device. this is a five-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the
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national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the yeas are 231. the nays are 188. the resolution is adopted. without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table.
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the speaker pro tempore: the ouse will be in order. members, take your conversations off the floor. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, the chair will postpone further proceedings today on the motion to suspend the rules if a recorded vote or the yeas
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and nays are ordered. or if the vote is objected to under clause 6 of rule 20. the house will resume proceedings on the postponed uestion at a later time. he house will be in order. for what purpose does the gentleman from virginia seek recognition? mr. goodlatte: mr. speaker, i move that the house suspend the rules and pass the bill h.con.res 33. torp the clerk will report the title of the -- the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the concurrent resolution. the clerk: house concurrent resolution 33, designating the george c. marshall museum and george c. marshall research library in lexington, virginia, as the national george c. marshall museum and library. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the
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gentleman from virginia, mr. brat, and the gentleman from virginia, mr. scott, will each control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from virginia, mr. brat. mr. brat: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and and their remarks include extraneous material on h.con.res 33. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, and the entleman will suspend. the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. brat: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. brat: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today in support of h.con.res 33, a resolution that designates the george c. marshall museum and george c. marshall research library in lexington, virginia, as the national george c. marshall museum and library. george c. marshall was one of
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america's most distinguished soldiers, a dedicated statesman and a genuine peacemaker. general marshall served as army chief of staff during world war ii, special ambassador to china and secretaries of both the departments of state and defense. he was promoted to general of the army in 1944, one of only nine individuals in our nation's history to rise to the rank of a five-star officer. and was also awarded the congressional gold medal in 1946. in addition, general marshall was awarded the nobel peace prize in 1953 for developing the european economic recovery strategy, known as the marshall plan, which was essential to bringing peace to the post-war european continent. to honor the legacy of such an accomplished man, the george c. marshall foundation was created in 1953 to pay tribute to general marshall's contributions to our nation and the world during some of the
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tumultuous and time. it has educational facilities and scholarship programs. the george c. marshall foundation opened the george c. marshall museum and research library in 1964 in lexington, virginia, on the post of virginia military institute. the alma mater of general marshall. the library provides scholars with a documented record of a life of general marshall and his public service and the museum shares his inspiring story with visitors through exhibitions, artifacts and educational programs. general marshall's contributions to our nation and the world cannot be overstated, and i hope to see this resolution adopted to designate the george c. marshall museum and george c. marshall research library as the national george c. marshall museum and library. both institutions work tirelessly to highlight and share general marshall's work
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and service and this is a fitting tribute to a man who spent a lifetime faithfully and courageously serving his country at home and abroad. i urge my colleagues to support this resolution, and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from virginia, mr. brat, reserves his time. the chair recognizes the gentleman from virginia, mr. scott. mr. scott: thank you. thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for as much time as he wishes to use. mr. scott: mr. speaker, i rise today in support of h.con.res 33, designating the george c. marshall museum and the george c. marshall research library in textington, virginia, as the national -- lexington, virginia, as the national george c. marshall museum and library. i appreciate mr. goodlatte for sponsoring the resolution and note that the entire virginia delegation signed on as original co-sponsors. general george c. marshall is a hero, treasure piece of
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virginia's history. located in lexington, virginia, the museum and library are located on the virginia military institute, his alma mater. general marshall served our country as chief of staff during world war ii, special ambassador to china, secretary of state, president of the red cross, secretary of defense and is one of only five army five-star generals in the united states. after world war ii, general marshall was awarded the nobel peace prize in 1953 for his role in developing the european recovery program, better known as the marshall plan. this week we are commemorating the 70th anniversary of the marshall plan speech given on june 5, 1947, at harvard university. the marshall plan contributed to the european integration and growth in the aftermath of world war ii. as the holder of the george c. marshall papers and with a mission to collect, preserve and share information regarding the life and career of general marshall, it is apt to make
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this institution the national george c. marshall museum and library. mr. speaker, considering the important place in our nation's history that general marshall holds, i urge my colleagues to support the resolution and reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from virginia, mr. scott, reserves. the gentleman from virginia, mr. brat, is recognized. mr. brat: mr. speaker, i yield five minutes to the gentleman from virginia. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from virginia, mr. goodlatte, is recognized for five minutes. mr. goodlatte: mr. speaker, i rise today to urge passage of house concurrent resolution 33. this resolution would designate the george c. marshall museum and the george c. marshall research library in lexington, virginia, as the national george c. marshall museum and library. i'd like to thank chairman foxx, ranking member scott and mr. brat for their work in bringing this legislation to the floor today. it is only fitting that we consider this resolution on the
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week of the 70th anniversary of george c. marshall's speech at harvard university where he proposed a comprehensive foreign assistance program, later coined as the marshall plan, to help rebuild the war-torn and devastated economies in western europe after world war ii. general george marshall dedicated his life to public service, serving honorably in the united states army as army chief of staff during world war ii, special ambassador to china, secretary of state and secretary of defense. he was one of only five five-star generals ever to serve in our military. from his allied plan to storm the beaches of normandy to the marshall plan, his leadership changed the world. the history of the united states and the global community would be a different place if not for the contributions of general marshall. at the recommendation of former president harry truman, the marshall foundation was established in 1953.
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on may 23, 1964, the marshall museum and library was dedicated on the post of the virginia military institute, general marshall's alma mater. for over 50 years, the marshall foundation has devoted its mission to educating the public about the important contributions of general marshall. the museum has five extensive exhibits and houses general marshall's 1953 nobel peace prize. the research library collects, preserves and shares the largest collection of documents pertaining to general marshall's life. just last year, the marshall foundation reached a huge milestone with the completion of the papers of george c. marshall. this project began in 1977 with the goal to create a published record of every document that general marshall produced. . the final project consists of seven vols and includes 4 had, 260 documents spanning over
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5,666 pages. in addition to its extensive research work, the marshall foundation provides educational opportunities for college students and future military leaders. the marshall undergraduate scholars program sends college history students to the marshall foundation to conduct primary research in the library's archives. the marshall army rotc award seminar also provides the top rotc cadet at each college in the united states the opportunity to participate in a national security conference with fellow award recipients and current army leaders. the marshall arnold air force rotc award seminar provides a similar opportunity to top senior cadets at each college with an air force rotc program. two years ago the marshall foundation began the marshall legacy series. this multiyear series of exhibits, lectures and events to showcase general marshall's
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contributions during the 20th century and connects those contributions to today's world. this is just a snapshot of the important work the marshall foundation conducts to honor and preserve the legacy of general marshall. i am honored to have such a distinguished institution in my district, the sixth congressional district of virginia. general marshall once said, sincerity, integrity and tolerance are to my mind the first requirements to many -- of many to a fine, strong character. i applaud the marshall foundation's work in sharing marshall's vision and character with a new generation of americans and i urge the passage of this resolution, to honor one of america's most sincere and distinguished public servants, by congressionally designating the museum and library in lexington, virginia, as the national george c. marshall museum and library. i thank the gentleman from virginia and yield back the
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balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from virginia reserves. the gentleman from virginia, mr. scott. mr. scott: thank you, mr. speaker. i thank my virginia colleagues for their leadership and urge my colleagues to support the resolution and yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from virginia, mr. bratt. bratt bratt mr. speaker, i yield -- mr. brat: -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from virginia, mr. brat. mr. brat: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself the remainder of the time. i'm pleased we're advancing a bipartisan proposal today. one that means a great deal to the people of virginia, to designate the george c. marshall museum and george c. marshall library as the national george c. marshall museum and library. we do this to honor a great american hero and his enduring legacy. i urge my colleagues to support this resolution and yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the question is, will the house suspend the rules and agree to house concurrent resolution 33. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3
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of those voting having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the about concurrent resolution -- the concurrent resolution is agreed to. without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table.
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for what purpose does the gentleman from texas, mr. mccaul, seek recognition? mr. mccaul: mr. speaker, pursuant to house resolution up the bill, h.r.
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2213, to amend the anti-border corruption act of 2010, to authorize certain polygraph waiver authority, and for other purposes. and ask for its immediate consideration. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: union calendar number 74. h.r. 2213. a bill to amend the anti-border corruption act of 2010, to authorize certain polygraph waiver authority, and for other urposes. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to house resolution 374, the amendment in the nature of a substitute recommended by land ommittee of home security, printed in the bill, shall be considered as adopted, and the bill as amended shall be considered as read. the gentleman from texas, mr. mccaul, and the gentleman from texas, mr. vela, will each control 30 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from texas, mr. mccaul. mr. mccaul: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days within which to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous materials on the bill, h.r. 2213. the speaker pro tempore: without
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objection. mr. mccaul: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that the question of adopting amendment number 1 to h.r. 2213 may be subject to postponement, as though under clause 8 of rule 20. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. mccaul: mr. speaker, with that, i yield myself as much time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for as much time as he wishes to use. mr. mccaul: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today in support of the anti-border corruption re-authorization act of 2017. mr. speaker, the failed immigration policies of the previous administration have kept our borders open, weakened our national security, and put millions of american lives at risk, from an increasing number of grave and growing threats. these threats come from drug cartels, gang members, human trafficers, and international terrorists who seek -- human traffickers and international terrorists who seek to do our country harm. fortunately we now have a partner in the white house who understands that we cannot rely on the oceans or other natural
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boundaries alone to separate us from those looking to infiltrate our homeland. this morning i was once again pleased to welcome secretary kelly before the committee on homeland security and listen to him articulate the importance of border security to the trump administration. we know we need a 21st century border to meet 21st century threats. sadly, every few days we hear a story on the news that reminds us of the dangerous consequences of washington's inability to achieve that goal. as a former federal prosecutor and the chief of counterterrorism and national security and the u.s. attorney's office in texas, i've seen how people take advantage of our nation's open borders. over time those who are determined to come here illegally become agile. they adopt to the measures that we take to stop them -- adapt to the measures that we take to stop them and it's obvious that we need a new approach. when it comes to strengthening our borders, additional funds
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and new technology will be necessary. however, our strongest assets are the courageous men and women who serve as border patrol agents and custom and border protection officers. these patriots put their lives on the line every single day to protect us, while also safeguarding our economic relations that boost american jobs -- relationships that boost american jobs and grow american businesses. however, we are almost 1,800 border patrol agents and 1,000 c.v.p. officers short of having the force that we need to keep our borders secure. our forces are stretches thin and our efforts to recruit additional officers and agents have slowed due to strict requirements for new applicants. currently it takes an average of 113 applicants to hire just one new officer or agent. this is a major problem that must be addressed.
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this legislation offers a solution, by providing the c.b.p. commissioner with the flexibility to hire state and local law enforcement officers who have already served for three years without a break in service, are not under investigation, or have been found guilty of misconduct. and have previously passed a law enforcement polygraph exam. it also provides a c.b.p. commissioner with the authority to hire members and veterans of the armed services who have held security clearances and who have already completed a robust background check. to put it simply, this bill will make it easier for some of america's finest law enforcement officers and soldiers to help protect our borders. as drugs continue to creep into our neighborhoods and wreak havoc in our communities and terrorists advance their plans to attack our country and
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disrupt our way of life, we must make sure we have an adequate force to protect our borders. this needs to be a priority. this should not be a partisan issue. in fact, mr. speaker, this bill passed unanimously out of my committee. members from both parties should come together, as they did at the committee level, as mr. vela did, and support this effort. american families deserve to know that we're doing everything we can to keep the homeland safe. this legislation gives us a chance to do just that. i'd like to thank my colleague and chairwoman of the subcommittee on border and maritime security, congresswoman mcsally of arizona, for all of her hard work on this bill. as a representative from a district along our southern border, she fully understands, probably more than any member, the seriousness of this issue.
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and i urge my colleagues to support this bill. thank you, mr. speaker, i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas, mr. mccaul, reserves. the gentleman from texas, mr. vela, is recognized. mr. vela: mr. speaker, i rise in support of h.r. 2213, the anti-border corruption re-authorization act of 2017. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for as much time as he wishes to use. mr. vela: thank you, mr. speaker. i have forcefully rejected the president's mass deportation efforts from the beginning and i will continue to do so. many of us have appropriately criticized our president for wrongfully attributing the criminal actions of a few undocumented individuals to the entire undocumented population. equally here, it would be hypocritical to attribute the criminal actions attribute the criminal actions of a few rogue agents to the hardworking men and women that protect our nation every day and who uphold the ethical standards that we should expect. the anti-border corruption
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re-authorization act of 2017 will assist c.b.p. in fulfilling its mission to facilitate legitimate trade and travel at our ports of entry. according to the joint economic committee, the volume of commerce crolsing our borders has more tran -- commerce crossing our borders has more than tripled. $5.9 billion in good enter and exit the u.s. at 328 u.s. ports of entry every day. and in fiscal year 2016, c.b.p. officers and agents seized and/or disrupted more than 3.3 million pounds of nar cot across the country, including -- narcotics across the country, including methamphetamine means, heroin, and 440 pounds of fentanyl, keeping these harmful drugs off of our streets. c.b.p. has struggled with recruiting new officers and agents to fill its front line ranks at our nation's air, land and sea ports. currently there are 1,400 unfilled positions within the
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c.b.p. work force at our nation's ports of entry. delays and short staffing at our ports of entry cost the united states economy up to $5.8 billion each year. under this bill, the c.b.p. commissioner may on a case by case basis the exempt certain veterans and state and local law enforcement officers who meet specific standards such as holding a security clearance and previously passing a polygraph from having to take c.b.p.'s polygraph examination as part of the hiring process. all other vetting requirements in the 12-step hiring process for these applicants will still apply. this bill simply grants c.b.p. limited authority to waive a single step in its robust vetting process for qualifying applicants who hold security clearances or who have successfully completed polygraphs. i would like to thank chairman mccaul, ranking member thompson, and chairwoman mcsally for the work on this bill and chairman mccaul and chairwoman mcsally
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for accepting changes offered by the minority to improve this bill. ranking member thompson offered an amendment in committee to require c.b.p. to report to congress how many of these waivers are requested, granted and denied. the reasons for these denials. as well as whether these applicants are ultimately hired or not. additionally, it requires c.b.p. to inform congress on the number of applicants who are granted a waiver but undergo a polygraph examination anyway based on information discovered during their background investigation. congress must remain vigilant about how the waiver authority is used and this amendment will ensure we have the information to do so. in short, mr. speaker, the men and women on the front lines of c.b.p. need our help. i urge my colleagues to support this bill and with that i reserve the balance of my time. . the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from texas, mr. mccaul is recognized . mr. mccaul: i yield to the
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gentlelady from arizona, ms. mcsally, the sponsor of the bill and chairwoman of the subcommittee. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from arizona is recognized for as much time as she wishes to use. ms. mcsally: i rise today in strong support of my bill, h.r. 221, anti-border corruption re-authorization act of 2017. u.s. customs and border protections has missions facilitating the border to power economic growth. but in accomplish they need officers and agents to make arrests, interdict drugs, screen cargos and move passengers through air, land and seaport of agency. officers are at the end of the day the most important border security and trade resource we have. unfortunately, they are in short supply these days, which has created a national security and economic vulnerability that this congress must address. c.b.p. is understaffed and
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remains under its staffing levels by more than 1,000 c.b.p. officers and 1,800 border patrol agents. we are losing grouped every single month. and no end in sight without the ability to efficiently hire new officers. c.b.p. has inveesed $200 million in arizona alone over the last eight years but there is not enough staff to open up every lane that is available. i want to emphasize this point. officer and agent shortages did not happen overnight. u.s. board patrol has not met its numbers since 2014 and they have been losing officers. at the current hiring rate, approximately 113 applicants go through the process in order to hire a single officer or agent. that means c.b.p. needs to have hundreds of thousands people apply just to meet the current
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needs. we need more manpower to properly secure our border, screen passengers and facilitate cross-board commerce. but there are several underlying issues that are responsible for these current staffing woes. it takes more than 292 days for the 12 distinct steps on average to hire a new officer or agent. and even with the new system -- is supposed to convince condense these steps, it takes an average of 1 0 days to complete the process. very few people can wait between six months to a year for a job. we are losing very experienced and already vetted pliggets. several years ago, the committee began work directly with the previous administration to find solutions to these staffing problems and the hiring process. the bill under consideration represents the fruits of that bipartisan work and as a result was passed out of the homeland security committee unanimously
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last month. my bill would allow to waive the polygraph requirement for current state and local law enforcement officers who have already passed the polygraph examination. federal law enforcement officers who have passed a stringent background investigation and veterans with three consecutive years in the military who have held a security clearance and passed a background check. these exemptions are discretionary, not mandatory. if there is something in the background that causes c.b.p. concerns, they can use the polygraph exam to answer those questions. this will provide immediate relief to quickly hire officers and agents from a pool of qualified applicants who already maintain the public's trust and put their lives on the line for our security and our safety on a daily basis. i want to make my position very clear. everyone who applies to be a c.b.p. officer or border patrol
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agent should be thoroughly vetted so there are no issues in their background and not at risk at corruption. nothing in this bill would change that. congress required polygraph examinations and stringent background checks for agents in the first place. i fully support the use of polygraph examinations to weed out people who are unfit to wear the badge or carry a gun. we should make these narrow, sensible and straightforward allowances for c.b.p. to hire those who have been proven by their service in uniform that they are suitable to become officers and agents. he national employee s' union, noncommissioned officers association who represent our veterans, the fraternal order of police, border trade alliance and u.s. chamber of commerce all support this bill. indeed, this is a rare bill that has united management and labor and i ask unanimous consent that these letters of support be
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entered into the record. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. . ms. mcsally: i served in the air force for 26 years. in that time, i held a top secret clearance with access to come partment tallized programs as well, some of the most sensitive information that our government poses. i was entrusted to fly a $12 millionaire craft and combat search and rescue operations retiring as a colonel yet i never took a polygraph exam. if i wanted to be a border patrol agent after i was retired. i was subjected to periodic very detailed background vestigations, now called a tier 5 examination. it is a very invasive and thorough investigation. they talk to your neighbors, your co-workers and look at your financial records, employers, you name it, to make sure you are qualified. this example is a mismatch of
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public trust and doesn't make any sense. and we need to give discretion on a narrow case by case basis to make sense to fill these positions. i would like to thank chairman mccaul and ranking member thompson and my ranking member vela. and with that, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. the gentleman from texas, mr. mccaul reserves. and the gentleman from texas, mr. vela is recognized. mr. vela: i yield a minute and a half to the the gentlewoman from california, mrs. love green. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recknizz. ms. lofgren: i don't question the intentions of the proponents of this bill. i understand that the entire rationale is to expedite hiring because of the vast number of vacancies. i do however question the wisdom of this approach. i think it's worth noting that
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the currently 2/3 of the applicants for c.b.p. failed the polygraph test. and that's important, not as a barrier, but because that polygraph test reveals misconduct that makes them ineligible. now the current department of homeland security inspector general, john ross, has expressed strong reservations about polygraph changes and waivers and about these bills. he indicates that we need to identify other ways of making hiring more efficient without sacrificing integrity and effectiveness. auditing o.i.g. is the polygraph program as is the g.a.o. if you look at the bill, it allows for exemptions for certain categories of people,
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one of which is law enforcement officers who have undergone a polygraph examination as a condition of employment within the past 10 years. well, you know, there was a freedom of information request on who flunked the polygraph test in the c.b.p. and what has come out is that people who fall into this ex emhon admitted to conduct that would make them ineligible, including child pornography, smuggling of drugs, theft and it's fine to say this would only be used when you know there wasn't a problem. the problem with that argument is sometimes you don't find out what the problem is until you subject the applicant to a polygraph or they know they are going to be subjected, in which case they own up. the border patrol is to be honored. they do a great job for us, but a cartel is trying to recruit
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pliggets. the last thing we need is for them to succeed for our sake as well as our brave men and women in the border patrol. and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. the gentleman from texas reserves. mr. mccaul. mr. mccaul: i yield five minutes to the the gentleman from louisiana, mr. higgins. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. mr. higgins: i rise in support 3213. this bill is about standing up for border patrol cops. border patrol is under demand. in order to stand strong against jihadist terror and cartel-organized crime, we must have an adequate number of boots on the ground. mr. speaker, i served my community as a street cop. i know exactly what it is to
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work patrol under dangerous, exhausting conditions. my border patrol brothers and sisters are stretched too thin. these are not my words. these are high caller professionals but well below the staffing levels mandated by congress. this bill isn't lowering standards. to the contrary. this bill allows for a commonsense approach to hire experienced, highly qualified patriots to fill the ranks of our front lines. this bill allows reasonable degrees of discretion that streamline the vetting and hiring process at customs and border patrol. i thank chairwoman mcsally for introducing this bill. vote urge my colleagues to in favor of this important legislation. and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from texas, mr. mccaul, reserves. the gentleman from texas, mr.
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vela. mr. vela: i yield a minute and a half to the gentlewoman from new mexico. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized. ms. lujan grisham: i thank the gentleman for yielding and i heard comments of my colleague and i appreciate my colleagues on the other side, because agreed, we all there to be the right national security protections at the border, but we want to make sure we are maximizing those opportunities and recognize there has been an issue being able to address the shortage of officers. but to address a work force shortage, minimizing the very requirements that not only preserve our national security and protect the men and women at our border, i would agree is not the way we should be proceeding. so, mr. speaker, in fact, i rise in opposition to the anti-border corruption re-authorization act. from a border state that heavily
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trades with mexico, i certainly understand the value of having sufficient customs officials manning our ports of entry and manning our borders, but eliminating the polygraph requirements undermines our nation's safety. given this agency's historic connection to organized crime, drug cartels and corruption. the d.h.s. inspector general has warned weakening polygraph requirements would make our southern border more vulnerable and we should identify ways to make hiring more efficient without sacrificing integrity and effectiveness. in fact, mr. speaker, i live in a community that the f.b.i. has identified as one of the most dangerous cities in the city country, albuquerque, new mexico because of the drug cartel. the drug trade in our city is
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significant. we understand having sufficient officers. while i strongly oppose this bill, i'm committed to work with my colleagues to identify solutions that won't jeopardize national security. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. the gentleman from texas, mr. vela reserves. the gentleman from texas, mr. mccaul. mr. mccaul: i yield three minutes to the gentleman from texas. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas is ecognized. mr. arrington: our founding fathers explained a more perfect union required the federal government to do a few things and do them. at the top of the list is the federal government's responsibility to provide for the common defense and secure our freedom. there is no freedom without security. these concepts, these pillars upon which this great nation was founded must be proactively protected every day by men and women across this nation. a select few of those men and
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women wake up every morning to patrol and protect our sovereign nation's border in the face of drug smuggling, human trafficking and violent criminal activity. they work to safeguard our nation, enforce the rule of law and promote free trade and commerce through our ports of entry. yet the previous administration's policy left our border patrol and customs' operations hamstrung and significantly understaffed. as someone who represents a border state, i have seen and experienced those vullnerkts firsthand. to say our operations are woefully understaffed is woefully understated. we are almost 3,000 officers and agents short of the minimum that is mandated by congress. one reason for this understaffing is the unreasonable and protracted hiring processes. 2015, it took more than 460
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days on average and 11 separate steps to hire a new agent. this is absolutely absurd even by government standards and must be fixed. that's why i'm proud to co-sponsor 2213. this is common sense and effective process for we also need customs officers for a robust economy. a recent study found every batch of 33 c.p.b. officers hired could lead to an increase in g.d.p. of $60 million and an employment gain of over 1,000 jobs. for too long the federal government has abdicated its chief responsibility of securing our borders and protecting our citizens. we must put the safety and security of the american people first. and give our border patrol and the c.p.b. the staff they need to do their job. therefore, i urge my colleagues to support h.r. 2213 and i
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applaud chairman mccaul, ranking member vela, and representative mcsally for their leadership on this critical issue. thank you, mr. speaker, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from texas, mr. vela. mr. vela: mr. speaker, i yield two minutes to the gentleman from texas, mr. gonzalez. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas is recognized for two minutes. mr. gonzalez: mr. speaker, i rise in support of h.r. 2213, the anti-border corruption re-authorization act of 2017. this legislation aims to address a staffing issue that has plagued the united states customs and board par petroleum for many years. h.r. -- border patrol for many years. this would give the option to waive a polygraph test for a select few individuals who have taken and passed a similar polygraph test in the past. these individuals are veterans, members of our armed forces or law enforcement officers with clean records and years of honorable service. a veteran with secret clearance
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and an honorable discharge, three years of service and a background check is someone i would hold in high regard. and exempt from an unnecessary polygraph. i would not be in favor of this bill if it was exempting a polygraph test to the general public. this is a special group. our veterans and our law enforcement. this legislation would not change the united states customs and border patrol requirements for background checks or interviews. customs and border patrol would still have their candidates undergo their regular batteryry of tests and checks -- battery of tests and checks. they would still ask a candidate who waived the polygraph under these proposed changes to take the examination. this bill will not lower the standards for entry. rather, the flexibility it provides would prevent potential bottle necks in the hiring pipelines and eliminate redundancy. mr. speaker, i would like to appease the concerns of several of my colleagues and say that
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this is not about building up a deportation force. mr. speaker, i would like to reaffirm that this legislation exclusively applies to customs and border patrol and it will not change the hiring procedures for immigration and custom enforcement. this bill is about ensuring the agency hires only the best and the most honorable candidates. this bill is about providing employment and advancement opportunities for our service members and law enforcement and creating job opportunities for those living in our border communities. as many living in border states, i also live in a border community and i support this bill and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from texas, mr. vela, reserves. the gentleman from texas, mr. mccaul, is recognized. mr. mccaul: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield two minutes to the chairman of the homeland security appropriations subcommittee, the gentleman from texas, mr. carter. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas, judge carter, is recognized. mr. carter: thank you, mr. speaker.
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this polygraph waiver provision that is proposed here is a darn good idea that's long-time overdue. the reality is the hiring process of the border patrol, and in fact i would argue almost everything under my jurisdiction in homeland security, is slow asthma lass he is in the wintertime -- as malasses in the wintertime. it just doesn't move. meanwhile, we have skilled law enforcement people applying, skilled former veterans with high, high clearances, that are ply -- that are applying for these jobs and being zummabled by the lack of polygraph operators -- being stifled by the lack of polygraph operators able to do it. these are people who have proven their worth and are asking to be part of the defense of our national borders. and i support this wholeheartedly. i support chairwoman mcsally's
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concept here. it's great. it starts a new way of doing things. if we need more than anything else in the federal government, the new way of doing things is the right way we ought to be doing it. nobody's going to keep from checking on people. nobody -- you can still make them take a polygraph if you run something you don't like. but it's a good idea that time modern and let's be americans and have new ideas and make those new ideas work. i commend everyone here in support of this. er proud to be a co-response of this bill -- co-sponsor of this bill and i think it's, for a change, government is making good start at new ideas. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from texas, mr. mccaul, reserves. the gentleman from texas, mr. vela. mr. vela: mr. speaker, i yield to the gentleman
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from illinois, mr. gutierrez. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from illinois is recognized for two minutes. mr. gutierrez: thank you, mr. vela. mr. speaker, i will not minutes words. anyone who votes for this bill is voting to support and implement donald trump's views on immigration. his desire to militarize our southern border, and his fantasy of a mass deportation force. you cannot spin it any other way. if we want to lower the standards for screening and hiring, c.b.p. officers, eliminate checks that could help weed out candidates with criminal histories or criminal intentions, and water down the integrity of this important national security source, this bill's for you. if you care about border security and the integrity of the officers, you should join me in voting against the bill. to me and a lot of other people watching this debate this is about something else. remember that man descending golden escalators in trump tower announcing his campaign for president by saying mexicans who come to the u.s. are rapists, drug dealers and murderers, remember him? do you want to buy into his vision of immigrants as a brown hoard intent on doing america hard? -- harm?
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if you are on board with this, you are also on board with building a wall. on board with billions to be spent on deporting moms and dads who have lived here for decades. going after dreamers, as the trump administration is doing today, deporting dreamers from the united states of america. where do you want to draw the line on the trump deportation agenda? i say draw the line right here, right now, and don't give another inch. there are many ways to secure the nation. but watering down the hiring standards of our men and women in uniform should not be one of them. let's secure the border. let's have them have the same test at the border that you have a d.e.a. agent, f.b.i. agent, secret service agent, what are we going to do? not have them take polygraph tests? that is going make america safe. i doubt it. thank you very much. i return the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. mr. vela reserves. mr. mccaul: mr. speaker, i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas reserves.
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the gentleman from texas, mr. vela. mr. vela: mr. speaker, i yield two minutes to the gentleman from texas, mr. cuellar. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas, mr. cuellar, is recognized. mr. cuellar: thank you so much. i want to thank representative vela for yielding time to me and also chairman mccaul and the folks that have been working on this particular bill. c.b.p. currently has a staffing deficit of $3 -- of 3,000 individuals. for the uniformed component. that's the u.s. border patrol office of field operations, which jeopardizes our national and economic security. this legislation does not cover i.c.e. c.b.p., border patrol, and air marine, nobody else. so this has nothing to do with deportation. long before president trump became a candidate for the office, congress authorized c.b.p. to hire an additional 2,000 officers. that was about four years ago, long with chairman carter,
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michael mccaul, we hired up to 2,000 officers. up until now we haven't beenaire able to hire those 2,000 officers because of the polygraph exam. in fact, 65% of those individuals that ally for c.b.p. are rejected, which is twice the amount, twice the amount that you have for other federal officers, f.b.i., d.e.a., when they take their polygraph. i'm talking about polygraph exams. so again, this does not cover i.c.e. what this bill actually does, it will strengthen c.b.p.'s efforts to secure our border by filling those positions. i represent laredo, the largest inland port, 14,000 traders a day. they've been delayed because we don't have enough c.b.p. officers. we need to get them. what this bill does, it does not lower the standards. i emphasize it does not lower the standards. it streamlines the background investigation for a limited number of veterans, military officers, law enforcement.
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so if you're local law enforcement and you take -- you have take an polygraph exam, then you can ask for this waiver. or if you're a service member with veterans with the highest background investigation, you can get a waiver. or if you're current federal law enforcement with the highest background exam, you can get a waiver. but again, if somebody finds out that those vetted individuals still need to take a polygraph, then you will take it. finally, the last thing to conclude is, members, this is not the first time we've got an waiver -- i can get 30 seconds? mr. vela: yes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for 30 seconds. mr. cuellar: thank you, mr. vela. if you look at the national defense authorization polygraph waiver language, c.b.p. has already gone -- gotten requests for waivers. in fact, it's already been done. so this is not the first time we're doing this. it's already the law. so it doesn't bring down the standards. it allows us to have more men and women at the border. and this is why i ask you to
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support this legislation. i yield back the balance of my time. thank you. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from texas reserves, mr. vela. the gentleman from texas, mr. mccaul. mr. mccaul: i continue to reserve. the speaker pro tempore: reserves. the gentleman from texas, mr. vela. mr. vela: i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: everybody reserves. mr. mccaul: i have no additional speakers. and i'm prepared to close. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas, mr. mccaul, is prepared to close. the gentleman from texas, mr. vela. mr. vela: mr. speaker, i have no further speakers and am prepared to close if the gentleman from texas is prepared to close. the speaker pro tempore: he is prepared to close. so the gentleman from texas, mr. vela, may close. mr. vela: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for the remainder of the time. mr. vela: h.r. 2213rk the anti-border corruption re-authorization act of 2017, relief to thesome tremendous staffing shortages at our ports of entry by providing c.b.p. with limited authority to
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waive its polygraph requirement on case by case basis. for certain veterans and state and local law enforcement officers in its hiring process. h.r. 2213 is endorsed by the nteu, the union that represents front line c.b.p. officers. with that i urge my colleague to support the bill and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas, mr. vela, yields back his time. the gentleman from texas, mr. mccaul, is recognized for the remainder of his time. mr. mccaul: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield my myself as much time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. mccaul: in concluding this debate, it's important to note this bill is a bipartisan effort pass unanimously out of my committee -- passed unanimously out of my committee. it is supported by ranking member thompson, congressman vela, and we thank you for that, and others. and it again passed out unanimously. i was pleased to see also a dear colleague letter sent by my democratic counterparts on the homeland security committee. urging the passage of this bill. this only further underscores
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the bipartisan nature of this effort. it's also supported, mr. speaker, by the u.s. chamber of commerce, the border trade alliance, the c.b.p. officers union, and the fraternal order of police, among others. the issue is very clear. not passing this bill will continue to keep american families at risk from dangers of human trafficers, drug smugglers and international terrorists. right now we simply don't have adequate number of board par petroleum agents and c.b.p. -- border patrol agents and c.b.f. officers to safeguard our nation's border and we need to fix that. that's what adequate number thi does. it will allow us to bolster our forces with talented law enforcement officials, and military personnel who have been previously vetted and have already demonstrated their commitment and patriotism to their fellow americans. as i've stated before, while new infrastructure and technology will be important in protecting this nation, the brave men and
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women who confront direct threats to our homeland are our greatest asset. so i want to thank congresswoman mcsally, ranking member vela, and thompson, and all of those who supported this bill. and it will help strengthen our borders, mr. speaker. with that i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. ll time for debate has expired. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from new mexico seek recognition? ms. lujan grisham: i have an an amendment at the desk. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will designate. the clerk: amendment number one printed in house report 115-162 ms. lujan grisham
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of new mexico. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentlelady from new mexico. ms. lujan grisham: thank you, mr. chair. this is a national security issue. no other federal law enforcement agency in the country, not the f.b.i., d.e.a., a.t.f. or secret service makes any exceptions to their polygraph exam. i understand the c.b.p. has a hiring shortage but this is danger and lead to corruption to the largest law enforcement agency in the country. in fact, 2,170 c.b.p. personnel were arrested for sexual assault, excessive force, conspiring with international drug trafficking organizations 2005 her offenses between and 2015. in response, congress enacted legislation to require every
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applicant to undergo a polygraph exam. no exceptions. d.h.s.'s own advisory panel and the g.a.o. have both recommended that the testing be expanded, not reduced given the higher rates of corruption at c.b.p. than any other federal law enforcement agency. this bill takes us backward and some current and former d.h.s. officials have expressed concerns that the bill could expose the agency to corrupt individuals who could undermine the integrity of the work force. d.h.s. inspector general warned that the proposed legislation could pose c.b.p. at significant risk and even though you could waive requirements, border patrol agents work in a different environment that is not as controlled as the military. former c.b.p. head of internal
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affairs stated that very few members of the military take polygraphs or have comprehensive background checks and the quality of state and local law enforcement polly gaffes various widely. my amendment would delay the implementation of the bill until one, c.b.p. completes its ongoing pilot program of an alternative polygraph test that may help speed up hiring while maintaining vetting standards and two, the d.h.s. inspector general determines that the bill would not endanger our national security, undermine work force integrity or increase corruption. i recognize that c.b.p. has managing and hiring issues, but passing this bill without knowing its risks or consequences is not only shortsighted but irresponsible. we shouldn't blindly experiment with our nation's securities given that drugs and human
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trafficking and terrorism are threats that we are facing at the border. i urge my colleagues to vote yes for my amendment to help safeguard national security and protect the integrity of the c.b.p. and its officers. i yield one minute to my friend nd colleague the speaker pro tempore: iffle the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> i thank the gentlelady from new mexico. i appreciate your leadership on this issue and as a co-sponsor, i rise in strong support of this amendment. our customs and border patrol officers face a difficult mission in a challenging environment. polygraph testing is an important tool to make sure they are not corruptible by drug traffickers. i'm is is sympathetic to the hiring challenges facing this agency, but we cannot cut
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corners or jeopardize the security of our border. c.b.p. needs to complete its ongoing tasks of alternative more efficient polygraph tests. this requires d.h.s. determine these changes in the underlying bill so it doesn't endanger our national security. i urge my colleagues to ensure we do not create unnecessary risk to the security of our border. and with that, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from new mexico is recognized. ms. lujan grisham: i yield to my coleeg from california one minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized. ms. lofgren: i think this is a good solution to the dilemma that faces us. we do have hiring deficits in the border patrol but we cannot give up on the need to fully vet these people. you know, the inspector -- the
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independent inspector said that the polygraphs have stopped dozens of applicants who have admitted to participation in human trafficking, defrauding the government, links with artels, intent to infiltrate c.b.p. and there is a release from the freedom of information act -- these are people who would be eligible for the exemption who admitted under the polygraph to sexual assault, to child pornography, to taking classified information from afghanistan, to taking classified information from iraq , a sheriff's employee who engaged in theft, a police ficer who was a smuggler, we can't -- the border patrol cannot afford this. so i think the gentlelady's amendment actually preserves what we want and i would
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recommend that we approve it and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady's time has expired. ms. lujan grisham: i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. the gentleman from texas, mr. mccaul. mr. mccaul: i claim time in opposition. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. mr. mccaul: i rise in opposition to the lujan grisham amendment. the secretary of homeland security testified before my committee this morning, a decorated four-star general serving in iraq and afghanistan. he was the head of south delem com. this man knows the border. secretary kelly supports this legislation. find it a bit offensive that decorated veterans who received clearance somehow present a threat to the united states. i reject that amendment.
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this strikes me as a delay tactic that would prevent them from giving the much needed flexibility. the delays called for in this amendment were put in place, c.b.p. would have to sit and wait until certain and unnecessary obstacles, some of which are completely out of their control. they would continue to hemorrhage officers and agents threatening the nation's border security and the flow of commerce in and out of the country. this could put our national security at risk and would be detrimental to the flow of legitimate trade and travel. c.b.p. has missed targets for four years and c.b.p. officers for almost 18 months. we need additional officers and agents now, simply to meet the congressional mandated c.b.p. staffing levels that have been put in place for a year. we cannot wait for more reports and evaluations. sadly, this amendment looks to
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me like an attempt by opponents of the bill to prevent the important provisions of this bill from going into effect in a timely manner, thus preventing the hiring of already trusted and vetted individuals who have served their nation in the military with honor and distinction. it is also important to underscore two points here. one, that all applicants will continue to be fully vetted, including a rigorous tier 5 background investigation which is the equivalent to the investigation performed for all service members who hold a top secret clearance. second, the authority granted under this bill is discretionary. if the c.b.p. commissioner wishes to require a polygraph examination for any applicant for any reason, he can and should still do so. mr. speaker, we cannot afford to
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wait any longer. as the speaker knows who is briefed on the threats as i in a classified setting. the threats are real. this nation is at risk and can't afford to wait. i oppose the amendment and urge y colleagues to reject it. let me just close by saying i oppose the amendment. the men and women wearing the uniform on the front lines of our borders need relief now and any delay tactics should be rejected. therefore i urge opposition and i yield the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the previous question is ordered on the bill as amended. and on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from new mexico, ms. lujan grisham. the question is on the amount offered by the the gentlewoman
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from new mexico. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. the ayes have it. the amendment is agreed to. mr. mccaul: call for the yeas and nays. the speaker pro tempore: the yeas and nays are requested. those favoring a vote by the yeas and nays will rise. a sufficient number having arisen, the yeas and nays are ordered pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20 and the order of the house of today, further proceedings on this question will be postponed. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from massachusetts seek recognition?
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>> question of the privilege of the house as previously noted. the clerk: expressing the sense of the house of representatives that the president shall immediately release his tax return information to congress and the american people. whereas in the united states systems of checks and balances congress has the responsibility to hold the executive branch of government to a fair and equal standard of transparency ensuring the public interest is placed first. every president since gerald ford has disclosed their tax return information. whereas tax returns provide an important baseline of reasonable information including whether the president paid taxes, ownership interests, charitable donations made and whether deductions have been exploited. whereas disclosure of the president's tax returns could help those investigating russian influence in the 2016 election understands the president's financial ties to the russian federation and russian citizens and the debt owed and whether he
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shows any partnership interest, joint ventures or licensing agreements with russia or russians. whereas the president recently fired federal bureau of investigation director james comey. the f.b.i. was investigating whether the trump alcohol uded with russian. whereas president trump reportedly stated to russian officials during a white house meeting that he fired director comey to release pressure on the ongoing investigation of russia's influence in the 2016 election. whereas senate russian investigators have requested information from the treasury department's criminal investigation division, the financial crimes enforcement network which handles cases of money laundering relating to president trump, his top officials and campaign aids and has been addressing investigations through purchases of real estate. the president's tax returns
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would show whether he has foreign bank accounts and how much profit he received from his ownership. whereas donald trump junior says a trump organization saw money pouring in from russia and russians make up a pretty disproportionate cross-section of a lot of our assets. congress gave itself the authority to review any individual tax returns to investigate and reveal possible conflicts of interests of executive branch officials involved creating to the teapot dome scandal. whereas it has been recorded that federal prosecutors have issued grand jury subpoenas to associates of former national security adviser seeking business records as part of the ongoing probe into russian involvement in the 2016 election. whereas according to the 2016 candidate filing with the federal election commission, the president has 564 financial positions in companies located in the united states and around th

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