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tv   U.S. House Meets for Legislative Business  CSPAN  June 20, 2017 3:06pm-6:00pm EDT

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the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, the chair will postpone further proceedings today on motions to suspend the rules on which a recorded vote or the yeas and nays are ordered or on which the vote incurs objection under clause 6 of rule 20.
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the house will resume oceedings on postponed questions at a later time. for what purpose does the gentleman from virginia seek recognition? i goodlatte: madam speaker, move to suspend the rules and ass h.r. 1393, the mobile work force state income tax simplification act of 2017. the speaker pro tempore: the of will report the title the bill. the clerk: union calendar 1393, a bill r. to limit the authority of states to tax certain income of employees for employment duties performed in other states. the speaker pro tempore: the ant to the rule, gentleman from virginia, mr. goodlatte, and the gentleman rom new york, mr. nadler, each will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from virginia. madam speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and and their remarks include extraneous materials on currently under consideration. the speaker pro tempore:
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without objection. mr. goodlatte: madam speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the mobile work force state simplification act provides a clear, uniform states may r when tax nonresident employees who travel to the taxing state to work. in particular, this bill prevents state from imposing burdens x compliance on nonresidents who work in a days or ate for 30 fewer in a year. the state tax laws that nonresident a must pay a foreign state's income tax and when employers this tax are numerous and varied. some states tax income earned borders by nonresidents even if the employee only works in the just one day. these complicated rules impact travels for work and many industries. as just one example, the heard ry committee testimony in 2015 that the
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patchwork of state laws in a manufacturing company issuing 50 w-2's to a employee for a single year. the company executive also compliance ng the burden that many of our affected employees make less $50,000 per year and have imited resources to seek professional advice. states generally allow a credit for income taxes paid to another state. however, it is not always dollar for dollar when local taxes are factored in. also do not relieve workers of substantial paperwork burdens. substantial burdens on employers as well. the committee heard testimony that businesses, including small businesses that subject nterstate, are to significant regulatory burdens with regard to nonresident th state income tax withholding laws. these burdens distract from activity and job creation.
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nevertheless, some object the if the ill lose revenue bill is enacted. however, an analysis from ernst bill's found that the revenue impact is minimal. there is little motive for and gaming because the amount of money at issue taxes wages is n 30 days' minimal. also, the income tax generally has to be paid. merely to whom. nor does this bill violate federalism principles. contrary, it is an exercise of congress' commerce precisely ority in the situation for which it was intended. the supreme court has explained commerce clause was informed by structural concerns out the effects of state regulation on the national economy. under the articles of nfederation, state taxes and duties hindered and suppressed interstate commerce. the framers intended the clause as a cure for these structural ills. within fits squarely this authority by bringing
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diminute to cases of muss presence by interstate workers in order to reduce compliance cost. year's version of the bill passed the house on suspension by a voice vote. his year's version is nearly identical with two changes. the professional entertainer from a is narrowed person who performs services to assistance who performs -- prominence who services. second, the list of exclusions cover film to production employees if or ciated tax credits are te productions contingent. disruption.t have i commend the bill's lead sponsors, representative bishop and johnson and thank all of bill's co-sponsors and i i the bills a passage and reserve the balance of my time. -- the bill's passage and i
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reserve the balance of my time. the eaker pro tempore: gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from new york is recognized. mr. nadler: thank you, madam speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. nadler: thank you, madam speaker. h.r. in opposition to 1393. this bill represents a major sovereignty of the states and it does particular damage to my home state of new york. of more than $100 million a year of its own tax evenue which hardly fits the diminimus description from the virginia.from this bill would prohibit states from collecting income tax from n individual unless the person works more than 30 days in that state in a calendar year. and harmonizing the rules on tax collection across he country is a worthy goal. i support efforts by the states and the multistate tax resolve the issue. new yorkers wants to reach a fair solution. imposing a solution on states and one that would cause
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large financial burden on particular states is clearly not the answer. key index o tax is a of sovereignty. yet, this legislation would prohibit states from taxing solely within their own borders except prescribed in the bill. that is constitutionally dubious. broadview take a generally of the commerce ause, i doubt it extend to authorizing regulation of a person doing business within that state's own borders. also deeply troubling as a matter of policy. under this legislation, if you you n a state in which are not a resident for fewer than 30 days, your income will that subject to tax by state. that amounts to six weeks of workweeks. diminimus exception, i ardly think six weeks is diminimus. each state should decide for itself.
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if i were still a member of the i would egislature consider the political and economic merits of taxing out-of-state business activity vote based on what right t was based -- for my state. state must ys the forgo $100 million a year. 30-day tates, the threshold may not have a great fiscal impact. for ew york state, example, is home to new york city, the nation's center of mmerce, which sits right across the river from new jersey and a very short distance from connecticut. his makes new york a major destination for out-of-state business travelers and makes it by far the hardest hit state this bill. according to the new york state department of taxation and losses could be up to $120 million a year for new york. enormous financial loss would come at a time that the president and the republican proposing to shift significant responsibilities to
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he states while simultaneously slashing federal assistance. if we further deprive new york year, and ion each limits its ability to tax activity occurring within its borders, vital services like education, law enforcement d health care will all be on the chopping block. during consideration of h.r. 1393 in the judiciary mmittee, i offered two amendments that would have mitigated its impact. the first would have reduced 30-day threshold to a far more reasonable 14 days hich is still almost three weeks of work without being subject to taxation. . the other would have added well paid people to the list of exemptions. had my amendments been accepted, the expected impact on new york would have been reduced by as much as $85 million. while still causing a significant drain on resources it would have gone a long way to
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making the bill fairer while still achieving its underlying goals. unfortunately, the amendments were defeated. therefore i must oppose the bill. i reserve the balance of my time the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. >> i yield myself 30 seconds to respond to the gentleman and poit -- point out that the s that might flow to new york because of their onerous system of imposing taxation for as little as one day's work of new york goes to the benefit of the other 49 state whots will receive that tax benefit as they properly should. mr. goodlatte: it is my pleasure to yield to the gentleman from michigan, mr. bishop, lead sponsor of the legislation, such time as he may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. bishop: thank you, mr. speaker. thank you, mr. chairman, for yielding. i'm grateful for this opportunity to speak on my
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bipartisan, bicameral bill, h.r. 1393, the mobile work force simplification act. mr. speaker, the -- madam speaker, the 10th amendment gives states the freedom to set their own public policy. it's important, however, that they do so in a way that does not infringe on the commerce clause of the united states constitution which gives jurisdiction over interstate commerce to congress. with the constitutional mandate in mind, at a time of rapid expansion in our work force and increasingly global and mobile economy, it's incouple bint on congress to -- it's incumbent on congress to simplify and ease the burdens on interstate commerce activity. in my 25 years as an attorney and small business owner, i am uniquely aware of the task of complying with the complexities of the various state income taxes, especially when you travel to another state for business.
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the burden to comply is a particular burden to small businesses as well as their employees because they simply do not have the resources and cannot absorb the compliance costs. as a result, the current tax framework lets -- -- puts smaller businesses, the backbone of our economy, as a substantial competitive disadvantage relative to larger businesses. complex reporting requirements punish employees too. the time and overall expenses that result from filing all this paperwork is overwhelming and in many cases financially devastating. it's all because they had the audacity to work outside their home state. rather than driving up profits back into their businesses and community by expending payrolls and reducing the price of consumer goods, businesses are being forced to spender that hard-earned, scarce resources on complying with a menagerie of convoluted and ridiculous state income tax laws. while drafting this legislation
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in committee, we heard a lot of anecdotal information a lot of personal testimonials. in fact, we heard firsthand testimony from an employee indicating that his employer had to file over 10,000 w-2's on behalf of their numerous employees, primarily because they had crossed the state lines for work. he went to tell us one of his co-workers had to file 50 w-2's. that's 50 w-2's, just for himself. that didn't make sense to us. doesn't make sense, certainly, to most americans. imagine an individual making less than $50,000, having to file 10, 20, and even 50 w-2 's. it's ridiculous and it's unacceptable. madam speaker, i'm an ardent defender of the united states constitution, in particular the 1th amendment which delegates authority not granted to the
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federal government to the states. that said, the constitution gives plenary authority jurisdiction to congress relative to interstate commerce under article 1, section 8. it is therefore as in this case the constitutional responsibility of congress to identify and respond to increasingly mobile -- to our increasingly mobile and global economy and relieve it of unnecessary burdensome requirements resulting from a patchwork of unique state income tax laws. that's why many groups that advocate on behalf of states such as the american legislative exchange counsel agree with this legislation because h.r. 1393 is the type of simple and streamlined interstate commerce regulation should be enacted. in fact, there are more than 300 outside organizations encouraging support of this bill. with the help of my colleague, hank johnson, on the other side of the aisle, our mobile work force state simple 23i case act
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is a carefully crafted, bipartisan, bicameral measure that streamlines state income tax laws across the nation. it creates a uniform threshold, giving nondez rents 30 days to work in another state without being liable for a state's income tax. this simple and straightforward language ensures employees will have a clear understanding of their tax liability and gives employers a clear and consistent rule so that they can accurately preticket their tax liability, knowing the same rule applies for all states with an income tax. it also means much less paperwork and reduced compliance conses for both states and businesses and their employees. the goal of h.r. 1393 is to protect our mobile workers and that includes traveling emergency workers, first responders, trade unions, nonprofit staff, teachers, and federal and state and local government employees. and much more. any organization ha has employees that cross state lines for temporary periods will benefit from this law.
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i would also note that great care was taken with this bill to diminish the impact on state revenues. you heard testimony earlier relative to its impact on state governments. a 2015 study by ernst & young found that h.r. 1393 would actually raise state income tax revenues while other states would only see a de minimus change. with that said, i'd like to take this time to thank all the members of the mobile work force coalition who supported the bill, chairman goodlatte and his world class staff for all their work, my 57 colleagues that co-sponsored this in the house, as well as senator thune, senator broun and nearly half of the united states senate with co--- who have co-sponsored our companion bill. mr. -- madam speaker, as congress continues to work on comprehensive tax reform to jump start our economy and provide relief for american families and business the mobile work force state income tax simplification act is a great state to
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streamline the tax code and roll back unnets and costly administrative burdens. with so much red tape interwoven in today's tax code, bill is a common sense way to cut through the clutter and simplify part of the filing process moving forward. together we can make our work force the priority and help our small businesses grow and prosper. i strongly encourage my colleagues to support h.r. 1393 and with that, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan yields back. the gentleman from reserves, the gentleman from new york is recognize. mr. mcgovern: i ask unanimous into the record the remarks of -- mr. nadler: i ask unanimous consent to enter the record the remarks of my colleague. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. nadler: i yield three minutes to my colleague, hank
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johnson. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. johnson: h.r. 1493, the mobile work force simplification act of 2017 is an important bipartisan bill that will help workers and small businesses across the country, large businesses also. as the proud sponsor of this legislation in both the 110th and 111th congresses, i'm very familiar with how hard legislators on both sides of the aisle have worked since then to bring this bill to this point and i want to thank the chairman of the judiciary committee, congressman bob goodlatte, for ushering this bill through the house to this point. and i'm asking my colleagues to please vote in favor of this legislation. h.l. 1393 would provide for uniform and easy administrateable law that will
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simplify the patchwork of existing inconsistent and confusing state rules. it would also reduce administrative costs to the states and lessen compliance burdens on consumers. take my home state of georgia as an example. if an atlanta-based employee of a st. louis company travels to headquarters on a business trip once a year, that employee would be subject to missouri tax even if the annual visit only lasts for one day. however if that employee travels to maine, her trip would only be subject to tax if her trip lasts for 10 days. if she travels to new mexico on business, she would have only to be subject to tax if she was in the state for 15 days. acuity brands is a leading georgia-based lighting manufacturer that employs over
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1,000 associates and has 3,200 associates nationwide who travel extensively across the country for train, conferences, and other business. in a letter in support of a prior, nearly identical version of this bill, richard reese, acuity's executive vice president, writes that current state laws are numerous, varied and often changing, requiring that the company expend significant resources merely interpreting and satisfying state requirements. he concludes that unified clear rules and definitions for nonresident reporting and withholding obligations would undoubtedly improve compliance rates and would strike the correct balance between state sovereignty and ensure that america's modern mobile work encumbered. unduly
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we should heed the concerns of acuity and numerous other businesses across the couldn'tly ry by enacting h r. 1393 into law. with -- enacting h.r. 1393 into law. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. mr. johnson: if i could get an additional minute? mr. nadler: i yield the gentleman an additional minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. johnson: with over 57 co-sponsors, it's clear that the mobile work force state income tax simplification act of 2017 is an idea whose time has come. i thank my colleagues for their work on this bill and in particular congressman bishop for his leadership on this bill in the 115th congress. he's carried the torch for our esteemed former colleague, the late howard coble, who passed this bill out of the house last
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-- in the 112th congress. i also thank our staffs who have worked tirelessly to build support for this legislation along bipartisan lines. this bill is a testament to the good that can come from working across the aisle on bipartisan tax fairness reforms. i'm optimistic that the passage of h.r. 1393 augurs well for the passage of other fairness legislation which is critical to countless small businesses across the country during this congress. in closing, i urge my colleagues in the senate to -- mr. nadler: i yield the gentleman 30 seconds. mr. johnson: i urge my colleagues to -- in the senate to bring this bill up for a vote soon. this country's employees deserve quick action. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back.
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the gentleman from new york reserves, the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. goodlatte: i am the only speaker remaining and prepared to close, so i reserve the balance of my time. mr. nadler: how much time do i have left? the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman has 1 minutes remaining. mr. nadler: thank you, madam speaker. before i close, i want to quote from a letter from the president of the federation of tax administrators and a member of the commissioner of the oklahoma tax commission regarding this bill. breaches this bill the core of the relationship between the federal government and state government. a relationship that is fundamentally important to the voters of virginia and michigan. it's a clear example of the federal government crossing a line that's seldom breached and in this instance should not be. the attached resolution from the state tax agency, all of them, offers details to explain the state's positions against mobile
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work force. here are the three most compelling facts. states have in place a combination of laws, rules and compliance standards that eliminate an unfair outcome when t comes to tax akes of wages earned in the state by nonresidents. these approaches, which are developed by the state commission, take into account information available to employers an activities. ard three, h.r. 1393 has an unreasonable reporting burden because it takes away the state's rights to require proper wage reporting and withholding when the employer has opportunity to do so, it opens opportunities for tax avoidance closing, let me note this legislation would not just harm a de rk and not just to minimis amount, $120 million is ardly de minimis, but it would have a similar effect on other states. that's why this bill is opposed
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labor oad coalition of and tax coalition, including international union of police associations, the federation of tax the multistate tax commission and many others. ether or not your state is hurt financially by this bill, however, all members should be concerned by legislation that brazenly strips from the state one of the fundamental hallmarks of sovereignty, the to tax economic activity that occurs entirely within its own borders. if we can target new york and other states with this bill, what is to say we will ot come after your state next? i must also add this bill is one of the series of bills we've seen over the last few that chip away at the revenue raising and taxing ility of the states, and especially as we -- the current majority, current president eeks to shift more responsibilities to the states and away from the federal government, we should not be epriving the states of their ability to raise revenues as
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hey see fit within their own sovereignty. i urge my colleagues to vote against this misguided bill, yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new york yields. the chair recognizes the gentleman from virginia. mr. speaker, i yield myself the balance of the time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. enjoys latte: this bill broad bipartisan support. t has 57 co-sponsors from both sides of the aisle. this bill will minimize compliance burdens on both they s and employers so can get back to being productive, creating and jobs.ming we have -- we have received letters of support from undreds of entities across the employment spectrum, but this bill is not just about business. about individuals. one businessman told the judiciary committee that the from the burdens patchwork of state laws falls on his employees who make less $50,000 per year and have limited resources to seek professional advice. whether n questioned this will be revenue loss to the states. is sis shows the impact
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minimal, affecting mainly the allocation of revenues, not the revenue ize of the tax pot. similarly, concerns about tax evasion are unfounded. unlike in the general income tax context, there is little tive here for fraud or gaming. the amount of money at issue, taxes on less than 30 days' wages is minimal. importantly, except in nine states, the employee will ve to pay the tax in any event to the employee's home state, so the only savings minor rate differentials between the two jurisdictions. this legislation is a great in le of congress working a bipartisan way to relieve burdens on hardworking americans. to thank the gentleman from michigan, mr. bishop, the entleman from georgia, mr. johnson, for their bipartisan support on this legislation. urge awful our colleagues to support the bill and yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. e question is will the house suspend the rules and pass the
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1393. r. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed, and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid on the table.
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for eaker pro tempore: what purpose does the gentlelady from indiana seek recognition? mrs. walorski: mr. speaker, i suspend the rules and pass h.r. 2847, the improving services for older act. in foster care the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. a bill to h.r. 2847, make improvements to the john h. chafee foster care independence program and elated provisions. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the mrs. oman from indiana, walorski, and the gentleman from massachusetts, mr. neal, 20 minutes. trol the chair recognizes the gentlelady from indiana. mrs. walorski: mr. speaker, i unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and tend their remarks and include extraneous material on h.r. 2847, currently under consideration.
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the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the entlelady is recognized. mrs. walorski: thanks, mr. speaker. today i rise to support the improving services for older foster care act. in fiscal year 2015, almost of foster h aged out care, meaning they left foster care without a permanent family connection. of them are often poorly prepared for adulthood and lack ome of the basic skills they need to be successful adults. last year the house passed the amily first prevention services act, a bill that would improve the lives and children and families by making sure children can stay safely at home and not enter foster care in the first place, fewer to make sure children age out of care. john l also updated the h. chafee independent program to allow states to assist older up to the er youth age of 23, including providing education and training vouchers help those young people who do age out to have a better future.
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not pass ly, it did the senate so it never became law. m glad my good friend, mr. faso, introduced the improving ervices for older youth in foster care act and i know many bill. nefit from his it would support older youth leaving foster care by allowing xisting funds used for financial housing -- financial, housing, counseling support to older youth leaving care. it would also allow h.h.s. to funds that unspent the -- if the state has money remaining at the end of the fiscal year so more youth can e helped with existing resources. and through this bill we'll also be able to learn more foster care eaving and their outcomes, which will help us develop better policies in the years ahead. grateful for the opportunity we have today to support this bill, and i earn urage my colleagues to support this legislation. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the entlelady from indiana reserves. the gentleman from massachusetts is recognized. mr. neal: mr. speaker, i yield
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myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. neal: mr. speaker, i'm 2847, the upport improving services for older youth in foster care act, which ensure all congressional resources that fost e provided for outh will indeed be -- for foster youth will indeed be utilized to make them independent. karen bass, who visited me a few weeks ago, has been a leader on this legislation and on foster youth a number of years and our committee has worked move it ith her to forward today. i want to note this is one of five bills the house is onsidering today to help at-risk families and children in foster care. ll of these bills passed the house last year as part of the amily first prevention services act, which also provided significant new abuse, t in substance mental health and parenting skills services to help kids
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avoid foster care when possible. continue to work on a bipartisan basis with our leadership and our colleagues to e senate to find a way move forward on broader foster care improvements. provides a action good opportunity to once again highlight the sharp rise of foster care in the united states and indeed in the commonwealth of massachusetts. fueled in part by the opioid crisis. 2011 achusetts, between and 2015, the number of petitions to remove children homes grew 38%. oday, massachusetts is home to nearly 10,000 kids in foster care. are ,000 of them considered at-risk of reaching adulthood without being adopted safely reunified with their birth families. at is why it is so important that we do everything we can to help them finish their
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mental and develop relationships with supportive adults. that the leased committee and the full house are working to help these young eople, we can't ignore the bigger picture, which is the president's attempt to overturn affordable care act, because it will have real and asurable negative effects on these kids. republican medicaid cuts jeopardize health coverage for youth, the same youth we are trying to help with this bill. health ng essential benefits and medicaid, there will be a consequence. endangers access to substance abuse treatment and by extension many of the themselves. ters republican proposals to end the block grant es would reduce states' abilities to provide substance abuse, health care and supportive services to foster parents. are these larger issues deeply troubling, today's five
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children welfare bills, one before us today, represents an improvement over the status quo refreshing to note the bipartisan collaboration that's involved. in addition to congresswoman leadership on this bill to help foster youth, let me colleagues on my the ways and means committee who provided great leadership -- mr. very issues davis, ms. chu and ms. sewell of their work on behalf foster children as reflected in these bills they have -authored and we are considering today. i urge our colleagues to support this bill and the other child welfare improvements being considered today and to work with us to ven do more to help foster youth succeed. i reserve the balance of my time and ask unanimous consent davis, the gentleman from illinois, well-regarded member of the ways and means ommittee, be allowed to manage the remainder of our time. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the chair recognizes the gentlelady from indiana. mrs. walorski: mr. speaker, i eld two minutes to my good
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friend, mr. faso, the sponsor of this bill. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. faso: i come before the house to express support and ask my colleagues to support 2847, the tion, h.r. improving services for older youth in foster care act. to ld also like acknowledge and thank the bill, the of this gentlelady from california, ms. bass, the gentleman from new york, mr. reed, the gentleman mr. davis, the gentlelady from michigan, mrs. lawrence, and the gentleman pennsylvania, mr. cartwright. our legislation is designed to help support older foster youth they transition into adulthood by making limited but john eeded changes to the h. chafee foster care independence program. while the chafee program has enhanced outcomes for former foster youth, there is still room for improvement. individuals who age out of foster care, nearly 20% will after 18, only half will be employed at age 24, and will earn a
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college degree. this legislation seeks to improve on those results. enacted, our legislation would support the education of ster youth who leave care by extending the age of eligibility for education and training vouchers up to the age 26. by changing the eligibility, we an help improve employment outcomes and job opportunities for older youth as they leave the system. legislation this will help youth who age out to maintain benefits by ensuring provided with the necessary documentation that oves they were previously in foster care. finally, our legislation would extend the financial, housing, employment and other services for former foster care youth. are tly support services only available to youth between the ages of 18 and 21. legislation, states will be able to extend coverage for up to the age of 23. also like to 'd note this legislation is supported by many organizations
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throughout the nation, the alliance for children's rights, the american academy of pediatrics, the congress of obstetricians and gynecologists, the california counties, ation of the child welfare league of america, children now, county elfare directors association of california, the l.a. county department of children and services -- the march of dimes and the national pediatric nurse practitioners. i urge my colleagues to support this bipartisan legislation so improve outcomes for some of our nation's most vulnerable individuals. mr. speaker, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the yields back. the gentlelady reserves. the chair recognizes the illinois.from mr. davis: thank you very much, mr. speaker. thank f all, i want to the gentleman from . ssachusetts for yielding , strongly support h.r. 2847 the improving services for older youth in foster care act.
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expand l will eligibility for the chafee independence act services and for older foster funds nd ensure that all and education vouchers are used. colleague, mmend my representative bass, for her leadership on this bill. as has been indicated by the , this important bill and the other child elfare bills we consider today come from the families first prevention services act. the families first act begins a fundamental shift in federal welfare policy to reserve families rather than separating them. i look forward to working with my colleagues to ensure we the larger bill with these important child welfare we consider d as the other bills separately today.
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i would like to note that there are indeed five child welfare billses on the floor this afternoon. which is a real testament to the leadership of chairman brady and ranking member neal, i commend both of them for their leadership in bringing the ways and means committee together to the extent that we can have five bills that have been researched, that have been ke e-- that have been debated, levels of agreement have been reached and i strongly support improving services for older youth in foster care act and reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from illinois reserves. the chair recognizes the gentlelady from indiana. mrs. walorski: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield two minutes to my good friend, mr. franks of arizona. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. franks: i thank the
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gentlelady and mr. speaker, i also want to sincerely thank chairman kevin brady and the members of the ways and means committee for their continued and invaluable work to protect america's children and strengthening our welfare child policy. as is evidenced in these phi bills we are considering today. foster care issues rarely drive our national media headlines. yet to the children who are in the child welfare system, the importance of finding solutions and eliminating the barriers that would ensure better futures, better outcomes, and permanent connection to a loving family can make fundamental lifelong differences to those who are some of america's most vulnerable children. a goal of the family first legislation, of which those bills are components, is to respond to the devastating data pertaining to the outcomes for foster youth who age out of care. often without any permanent
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connection and without the life skills and support systems necessary to thrive as independent adults. mr. speaker, we've heard so many times from the states that there is a need to make our federal child welfare funding flexible enough so that we never incentivize the placement of children into foster care who would safely receive care in their homes or with safe, loving relatives. this bipartisan package of child welfare system improvements makes important steps toward improving our child welfare system to better protect children and families and i'm certainly delighted to support its passage. i want to thank, mr. speaker, again, those colleagues that have worked on this for their invaluable work on this critically important legislation. with that, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentlelady reserves. the chair recognizes the gentleman from illinois. mr. davis: thank you, mr. chairman. it's my pleasure to yield two minutes to the gentlelady from
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alabama, representative sewell. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized. ms. sewell: thank you, ranking member davis. i want to give a big thanks to my friend and colleague, representative karen bass of california. she's a true champion for our foster youth. i was happy to participate in her foster youth shadow day last month which gave me an opportunity to meet with a constituent of mine that directly benefits from the chafee program. i strongly urge my colleagues to host a foster child next year. i also want to voice my strong support for representative bass' bill h.r. 2847, the improving services for older youth in foster care act. the current chafee independence program plays an important role in our larger foster care system and the services it provides should be extended to cover older youth up to the age of 23. i was able to hear firsthand from my foster youth shadow, kadija moore, about the
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struggles that foster youth face when they age out of the system. these young adults are thrown into the real world with little to no support system. it is incredibly frightening time for these young youth. but if we can extend the chafee program and also allow youth more time to use education vouchers, they have a better chance of having the opportunity to graduate college and successfully enter the work force. these are important common sense bills and i want to thank both representative bass and representative faso for introducing this legislation. i urge my colleagues to support h.r. 2847 and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. the gentleman reserves. the chair recognizes the gentlelady from indiana. mrs. walorski: i i -- having no further speakers i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentleman from illinois. mr. davis: thank you, mr. chairman. i'm pleased to yield two minutes to the gentlelady from california, representative chu.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized. ms. chu: i rise in strong support of h.r. 2847, the bill offered by my friend and colleague, karen bass, a tireless leader on foster youth and child welfare. i recently hosted an amazing young woman named ruth during foster youth shadow day here on the hill. the message ruth wanted lawmakers to hear is that the obstacles she faces every day as a 19-year-old have not suddenly stopped now that she's aged out of foster care. ruth has a resilient spirit and unstoppable determination but she should not be left out in the cold as she pursues her education and her goal of helping other foster youth in the future. the improving services for older youth in foster care act will help people like ruth by making vital changes to the chafee foster karin dependence program, an important source of funding for foster youth. currently foster youth are only eligible for chafee services if
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they are between the ages of 16 and 21. this bill expands access to the services, providing by the program to include -- provided by the program to include youth between 14 and 23. this is such a crucial change to the program since foster children like ruth face so many daunting challenges during the period of young adulthood as they transition toward independence and self-sufficiency. providing essential services such as access to older mentors and role models, connection to employment opportunities and education vouchers for foster youth after they reach the age of 18 are key sources of support for foster youth. this bill helps ensure that foster youth have the resources needed to become healthy, thriving adults. thanks again to representative bass for her work on this bill and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. the gentleman from illinois reserves. the chair recognizes the gentlelady from indiana.
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mrs. walorski: i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentleman from illinois. mr. davis: i'm pleased to yield five minutes to the sponsor of this bill, the gentlelady from california, ms. karen bass. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized. miss -- . bass: i rise in support of this legislation. i want to thank the representative for his leadership on this issue and want to thank chairman brady and ranking member neal for their leadership on behalf of the nation's foster youth. i do think it's very remarkable, as several other speakers have said that today we are bringing forward five bipartisan bills to improve the nation's foster care system, and each one of the bills adresses serious challenges or gaps in that system. h.r. 2847 improve serg vises for older youth in foster care allows states to expand the
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chafee grant program to foster youth up to the age of 23. currently the program ends at 21. the chay thee -- the chafee program provides educational grants and other services to help young people transition into adulthood and become independent. in may, as part of national shadow day that is organized by the national foster youth institute, i had the opportunity to meet a young woman named anisha thomas. she's from los angeles and spent 20 years in foster care before she aged out. she described her foste -- foster home as abusive and eventually she had to move several times. against tremendous odds, she has continued to persevere and is currently a college student at los angeles trade tech college, majoring in the administration of justice and minoring in paralegal studies. she's just one of a small number of foster youth who actually make it to college. this is despite nearly 70% of
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foster youth expressing a desire to attend college. those like danesha who are accepted and attend college face another hurdle, which is graduating. currently only 3% of foster youth who attend college graduate. programs like chafee are designed to help foster youth advance in college, trade school and employment. during the shadow week i had the opportunity to speak to many other young people and several of them described challenges that they face after -- if they were lucky to graduate high school, or they attend college and then something happens, either they run out of resources or their housing falls through and they have to leave college so their college is interrupted. that's why this legislation is so important because it allowers in flexibility of -- if a young person is not able to complete college in four year they do have a couple of other years. one of the things that many people don't realize is that when young people age out of the
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foster youth system, which typically is at 18, sometimes is at 21, depending on the state, that many times we literally put these young people on the streets. they're 18 years old, they're in their foster home, they're given a bag, typically a large-size trash bag work all of their belongings, and they're put out on the street, left to fend for themselves. with today's economic challenges, there are no 18-year-olds that can fend for themselves without a safety net. if we think of middle class children, transitioning into adulthood is typically what happens at college. they go to college, they have housing, but if they have any challenges they can always call home they can text their parents they parents are there to rescue them in case they run out of money or something happens with their housing or their grades. if we think of a young person out of the child welfare system who are literally put on the streets at the age of 18, you can only imagine what happens
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which is why so many children in the foster care system wind up incarcerated, many young girls wind up trafficked, and we did legislation on that a few weeks ago, and so if we want to stop what happensen the other end, which many young children winding up incarcerated, early pregnancies or other challenge well, need to make sure we provide support for them early on. h.r. 2847 will allow the flexibility for a student, again who might need more time to complete their education. i urge my colleagues to support this legislation, to give foster youth the same type of flexibility and support that we provide our own children. thank you. i yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields. the gentleman reserve the gentlelady reserves, the gentleman from illinois. mr. davis: i have no further requests for speaker so if the gentlelady is prepared to close,
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then i will close now at this point. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. davis: thank you very much, mr. speaker. h.r. 2866 would provide important assistance for youth aging out of foster care. in my state of illinois, 22% of the more than 16,000 children placed in foster care in 2015 are aging out. illinois' widely regarded as a leader among states when it comes to foster youth. aging out of care. it is indeed one of the first jurisdiction in which young people in foster care on their 18th birthday were able to remain in beyond the age of 18. research conducted by the university of chicago found that allowing foster youth to remain in care beyond the age of 18 is associated with an increase in
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child well being, including post-secondary educational attainment, specifically former foster youth from illinois are twice as likely to have ever attended college and more than twice as likely to have completed at least one year of college by age 21, compared with foster youth in other states. that have not been given the option to stay in care beyond 18 years of age. ue to school mobility issues experienced in high school, only 58% of foster youth graduate from high school by age 19, which makes it unlikely that they would be graduated from college by age 21. xtended access to chafee program, age 23, rather than cutting these young people off
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at age 21, ensure these youth are able to be supported beyond their first year of college. we know that when students lose access to critical financial aid resources, such as the education training voucher in the middle of their college journey it forces them to drop out of college and seek employment. last saturday i spent two hours with a group of young people who had been organized by a young ken -- by a young fellow, caleb bennett, the younger brother of chance the rapper. he is 21 years of age. and had d organized young people who were transgendered, who were homeless, who were out of in need of were help. nce of
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i said to them -- and they were pleased to know we were going be considering this legislation today, which i , urge all of rt my colleagues to support it and yield back the balance of my ime. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentlelady from indiana. walorski: mr. speaker, i urge my colleagues to vote yes. remainder of he my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. the question is will the house and par h.r. es 2847. hose in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 having responded in the affirmative, the -- rs. walorski: mr. speaker, i'd like to ask for the yeas and nays. the speaker pro tempore: the yeas and nays are requested.
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all those in favor of taking this vote by the yeas and nays will rise and remain standing until counted. a sufficient number having arisen, the yeas and nays are ordered. prade -- pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, further proceedings will be estion postponed.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania seek recognition? the speaker, i move house suspend the rules and pass h.r. 2866, the reducing barriers for relative foster parents act, as amended. the eaker pro tempore: clerk will report the title of the bill. 2866, a bill to review and improve licensing standards for placement in a relative foster family home. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from pennsylvania, mr. kelly, and the gentleman davis, each mr. will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from pennsylvania. mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and and their remarks include extraneous material on currently under consideration. the speaker pro tempore:
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without objection. mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. kelly: thank you for giving me the opportunity to speak on h.r. 2866, the reducing for relative foster parents act, introduced by my riend from pennsylvania, mr. smucker. in introducing this legislation, congressman mucker was joined by colleague, congressman terri sewell from across the aisle. the bill has strong bipartisan including mine. i'm a co-sponsor. and the child welfare league of strongly endorsed this legislation. so what does this bill do? ell, in short the bill would reduce the bureaucratic process for placing children in foster when th relatives possible, and is in the best interest of the child. this just makes common sense. year alone, there were almost a half million children care. er more than 16,000 in my home state of pennsylvania alone. there are countless family members of these foster children who are not only
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they're ready to have these children placed in their homes when one of their can't take care of them. as a matter of good public policy, we should be making the much easier cess for family members, not more difficult, because it's often of the est interest child. studies show that placing foster children with relatives problems y of the children face when being placed into foster care. re over, it improves the outcomes for those -- moreover, it improves the outcome for these children. will most likely succeed if they can stay with a relative of their own. children placed with relatives tend to spend less time in oster care and also experience much more stability. the problem is that while to nt law allows states wage certain licensing standards when placing children with relatives, many states slow to implement the law. one of the purported reasons is they kers are slow or simply don't know how to place children with relatives because
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training on their part. today, caseworkers may not be adequately trained regarding waive certain standards when licensing relatives. this has resulted in delays in with relatives . now, when these children are facing a tremendous amount of turmoil and uncertainty in their lives, we hunedshunting tying them up in bureaucratic -- shouldn't be tying them up in bureaucratic tape. now do we do that? well, representative smucker's will help 866, remedy this problem by making ur foster care system more family friendly by ensuring states take proactive steps to process he licensing for relatives. specifically, the bill would require health and human to identify reputable model standards for licensing october ily homes by 1, 2018. states subsequently would need submitting art by their plans to be in compliance with model standards for family
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placement. additionally, states would need to explain how caseworkers in respective states are being trained. is commonsense bill is absolutely no cost to taxpayers but it would pay tremendous ividends to our nation's children. every child deserves to be raised in a loving home. e smucker-sewell bill will ensure many more children can live safely and happily with loving family members when they in their own home with their nuclear family. hope my colleagues will join me in supporting this important legislation. passing this legislation is the ry least we can do for these children. i reserve the balance of my ime. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the chair recognizes the gentleman from illinois. mr. davis: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. r. davis: i'd like to yield to the gentlewoman from alabama sewell. loquy, ms. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized. ms. sewell: thank you, ranking member davis.
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engage time i'd like to in a colloquy with the gentleman from pennsylvania, mr. kelly. h.r. 2866 iscussed identify .h.s. to reputable model licensing can rds so that states determine whether their current equirements are in accord. is it your expectation that the for al association regulatory administration's model family foster home standards would be the kind of standards envisioned by the bill? to the time i yield gentleman from pennsylvania for his response. mr. kelly: i thank the gentlelady. sewell. my feeling is the national association for regulatory model family 's foster home licensing standards is what h.h.s. should consider back. ield ms. sewell: i thank the gentleman from pennsylvania and i reserve the balance of my ime. the speaker pro tempore: does
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he gentlelady yield? i -- well: actually mr. davis: i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the yields.dy the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from pennsylvania. to yield i'd like four minutes to the sponsor of this legislation, mr. smucker rom my home state of pennsylvania and key member of the keystone coalition. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from pennsylvania is recognized. smucker: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise in support of and to ask to support h.r. 2866, the reducing barriers for foster parents act. and i'd like to first thank my from and colleague pennsylvania for his leadership this bill. hip of i'd like to thank the chair of , e ways and means committee representative brady, members of the ways and means committee to the ging this bill floor and i'd like to thank my
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-introducer of the bill, representative sewell from alabama as well for the work to foster in regards care issues over the years. every child, mr. speaker, a loving home. when a child's home is no often because of abuse, neglect or behavioral sues, children are placed in foster homes. n fact, in 2015, more than 670,000 american children, , my in pennsylvania district, more than 16,000 foster nt time in care. countless families across the eager are willing and to accept foster children into their homes. placement ows that with relatives is better for the child. therefore, federal policy should make it easier for ster children to be placed with family members. our bill will be considered
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again i he floor and ask for my colleagues' support. finding loving homes for children, this is a bipartisan issue. here are no republicans or democrats. just mothers and fathers, aunts nd uncles and sons and daughters who believe each child should have a bed to be and a nto at night loving home. mr. speaker, i'd like to also note that the following expressed s have support for h.r. 2866 -- the academy of pediatrics, the american congress of and tricians gynecologists, child welfare league of america, first focus, dimes and the national association of pediatric nurse practitioners. again, i'd like to thank representative sewell from her work on foster care issues and for her leadership on this bill. really appreciate your work. i yield back, mr. chair.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields. he gentleman from pennsylvania reserves. the chair recognizes the gentleman from illinois. r. davis: thank you, mr. chairman. i yield myself such time as i might consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. davis: i strongly support .r. 2866, the reducing barriers for relative foster parents act. helps portant bill relative caregivers by to examine ates whether their licensing standards align with the best in licensing and foster home. in doing so, h.r. 266 requires states to set reasonable for family homes. standards that consider and culture ms differences and standards that emove artificial barriers to family care. i have advocated these rovisions within my own bill to improve support for kinship proud to and i'm
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support congresswoman sewell bill. gressman smucker's more than 25% of children in a grandparent or other relative. my congressional district has highest percentage of children living with caregivers in the nation. followed closely by two other ngressional districts in illinois. n illinois, 37% of all children placed in out-of-home with relatives. less than half of these ildren are placed with relatives in homes that are licensed. relative ajority of caregivers are not able to caregivers ed because the standards do not ake sense with their circumstances. such as requiring a grandmother expensive city like chick
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to have e -- chicago one bedroom for all three of her rand babies, requiring to take dozens of parent training each year. 2008, i worked with congressman jerry from illinois states to waive nonsafety licensing standards basis to help se to follow givers the connection act. unfortunately, many states ose not to exercise this waiver authority to assist kin aregivers. for example, in 2011, although linois had more than 3,600 nonlicensed relatives caring 72 licensing waivers for relatives were approved. received waivers. requires states to
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modernize their licensing the ards to align with best practices and licenses. his is a commonsense and important change. further, this bill advances our states nsuring that follow the waivers to meet the . st interests of the children to understand these waivers, they should collect data on waivers for non safety licensing standards for the number ncluding of relatives applying for waivers. number of waivers issued or denied and the reason for denial. . i strongly support the reducing barriers for relative foster parents act and urge my colleagues to support it. and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the chair recognizes the gentleman from pennsylvania.
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mr. kelly: continue to reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the chair recognizes the gentleman from illinois. mr. davis: i yield four minutes to the gentlelady from alabama, o is a sponsor of this bill, representative sewell. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized. ms. sewell: h.r. 2866 the reducing barriers for relative foster parents act is a commonsense piece of legislation that has strong bipartisan support right here in the house. i want to especially thank the gentleman from pennsylvania, representative smucker, for joining me in introducing this bill. i want to thank him for his leadership on foster care and foster youth and again say thank you for looking for what's in the best interests for the most vulnerable children in our society. by 2866 has been supported not only bipartisan support here in the house, but has the support of many foster care
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advocacy groups, including generations united, n.e.a. casey foundation and american academy of pediatrics. mr. speaker, we need to do everything in our power to make the foster care system family friendly. and h.r. 2866 takes an important step in that direction. by motivating states to update their foster care licensing regulations, we can reduce red tape and make it easier for family members to become foster parents. research conducted by the department of health and human services academics and advocacy groups all show that children experience better outcomes when they are in the care of family members compared to children in nonrelative care. when kids are placed with a relative like a grand parent, they experience fewer school changes, less likely to re-enter the foss at the ter care system
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and more likely to be adopted. foster youth experience better behavioral and mental health outcomes, more likely to report that they, quote are loved and more likely to stay connected with their communities. i want to thank representative smucker from pennsylvania for his leadership and sponsorship of this bill with me, as well as my democrat and republican colleagues in the house and ways and means committee for unanimously supporting this legislation. i'm encouraged this body values our foster youth and i hope we keep up the spirit of bipartisanship. i urge my colleagues to support this commonsense legislation and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. the gentleman from illinois reserves. mr. smucker: i continue to reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the chair recognizes the gentleman from illinois. mr. davis: i yield three minutes to the gentlelady from california, representative karen
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bass. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from california is recognized. ms. bass: i rise in support of h.r. 2866 and i want to congratulate my good friends, representatives sewell, kelly and smucker for this legislation, improving -- reducing barriers for relative caregivers. ironically in the 1990's when cocaine epidemic hit, families fell apart. and one of the things that happened in the middle 1990's, in the middle of the night, three grandchildren are delivered to her by children's protective services and the grandmother would take the grandchildren without any support or any knowledge how to deal with the trauma and during those years we discriminated against relatives and we said very negative things about them, such as the apple doesn't fall far from the tree.
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if your daughter wound up on drugs, why should we give the children to you. during those years, we would rather pay a stranger and there can be wonderful foster parents, but a stranger to take care of children instead of families. one of the things we did in los angeles is we organized the grandmothers and trained them how to go before the board of supervisors and advocate on their own behalf. there was a movement of relatives who rose up and said we want our children, we just need help. we might be on a fixed income and can't really support the children. it's actually more expensive to put a child in foster care. so there began a national movement for relative caregivers to fighting for their rights and for services. so over the years, we really evolved to the point where we have legislation like this where we recognize the benefit of having relatives take care of children. the last piece of legislation we
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were talking about was about children aging out of the system. before we prioritize relatives, what would happen, a young child that was aging out, we would put them on the street and first thing they would do is to look for their families, because they might have family somewhere and they would often do that. this legislation is extremely important to allow flexibility for licensing of relative caregivers. examples of grandmothers that i worked with directly who wanted to take in their grandchildren but told they didn't have enough bedrooms in their house, so we were going to put the children in more expensive foster care and break them up and send them to different foster homes instead of leaving them with a grandmother or sister. legislation like h.r. 2866, i believe, will begin to address some of these challenges and do what every child needs, which is to be in a loving home with
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family. i yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. the gentleman from illinois reserves. the chair recognizes the gentleman from pennsylvania. mr. smucker: i continue to reserve. mr. davis: i have no further requests for time and if the gentleman is prepared to close, i'm prepared to close. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. davis: h.r. 2866 is important because it supports conditionship care givers. children placed in kinship care are safer, more stable placements, are more likely to be connected with their siblings d community than nonrelative placements. in addition to these positive outcomes, for children in relative care, research shows that kinship care placements are more cost effective. in illinois cost studies
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$4,778 inn average of savings with title 4-e administrative expenses over an eight-year period compared to a matched control group that did not have this option. more than 400,000 children make up our nation's foster care population. with more than one in four of these vulnerable children living with a grand parent or other relative. we should do as much as we can to strengthen these families and children. h.r. 2866 takes an important step forward. and mr. chairman, i have two facilities in my congressional strict that have outstanding programs. they are 45-unit buildings that have been constructed for grandparents raising
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grandchildren. one is operated by the safe child entity. the other by the a.m.e. church community development agency. both of these are tremendous examples of what can happen when children have the opportunity to be nurtured by grandparents. i strongly support this legislation. i urge its passage. and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the jap yields. the gentleman from pennsylvania is recognized. mr. kelly: i yield myself such time as i may consume. the t to take a minute american people look to the people's house and isn't it something they can actually agree and actually think with their hearts, isn't it something they can come together on an issue that is so basic and so simple and so easy to understand.
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and we are talking about our most precious assets, our children. as i heard ms. sewell talk and ms. bass talk, i know in their hearts, i know how they feel about this and this isn't something they thought about this today or this week. they think it's good because it's good for america. and mr. smucker to join with ms. sewell to have this legislation come forward, it is a breath of fresh air for the people's house. legislation that protects children. legislation that puts children with their families in case they can't be taken care of in their own homes. it is an incredible effort by both sides. and i want to tell you it is a great privilege to serve with you. ms. bass, always, mr. smucker. and good to be here with you today. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. will the house suspend the rules
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and pass the bill h.r. 2866 as amended. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 being in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed and without objection the motion to reconsider -- mr. kelly: i would like to request the yeas and nays. the speaker pro tempore: the yeas and nays are requested. those in favor of taking the vote by the yeas and nays will rise and remain standing until counted. a sufficient number having arisen, the the yeas and nays are ordered pursuant to clause 8, rule 20, further proceedings on this question will be postponed.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from south carolina seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i move the house suspend the rules and pass h.r. 1551 to amend the internal revenue code of 1986, to modify the credit for production from advanced nuclear power facilities as amended. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: union calendar number 124, h.r. 1551, a bill to amend the internal revenue code to modify the credit of protection from advanced nuclear power facilities. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from south carolina, mr. rice, and the gentleman from
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massachusetts, mr. neal, will each control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from south carolina. mr. rice: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days within which to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous material on h.r. 1551 currently under consideration. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. rice: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. rice: mr. speaker, i stand in strong support of h.r. 1551, a bill i've sponsored, that modifies the advanced nuclear production tax credit. the nuclear production tax credit has been a vital incentive to jump start a dormant nuclear industry that has been dormant for almost 40 years. unfortunately, due to overregulation, ambiguities in the law and other anticipated events, the first in a
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generation nuclear plants that began construction because of this tax credit are in danger of being shut down mid-construction. without certainty -- without certainty that these facilities will have full access to the allocation of their tax credits, it may be another 30 or 40 years before this country builds another cutting-edge nuclear facility. thankfully, the legislation we are considering today provides these facilities the certainty they so desperately need to move forward. almost 12 years ago, congress established the nuclear production tax credit as part of a broad package designed to ensure our energy independence. not waiting -- not wanting to oversubsidize the nuclear industry, congress set out to limit the credit in a number of ways, including a national production capacity that effectively capped the amount of
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the credit available. south carolina and georgia responded to this incentive, making large investments in nuclear facilities that represented the opinion call of safety and innovation in the industry. . after planning and rig yuss oversight, these plants began 2013, receiving sizeable allocations of the tax credits tion national capacity. t, it quickly became clear changes to the underlying provision were necessary in order for these plants to the capacity allocation as congress originally intended. right now not-for-profit entities like utilities, are unable to transfer their share of the credits, leaving the majority allocated to dits these two plants unusable.
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additionally, strict placed in-service date rules would make hese plants to decisions between finishing making deadline or sure they're constructed in the safest way possible. to make matters worse, a third-party contractor unexpectedly filed for bankruptcy, putting jeopardy of in finishing before the placed date, if at all. in the coming weeks, both must go before the state regulators and provide a plan on how they'll continue construction. availability of the $2 billion in tax credits will be regulators' in the assessment of whether to pprove the plans to continue the facility or shut down the construction completely. taking a step back for a second, i think it's important to note that one of my top is to es in congress
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help restore our country's through a ness comprehensive overhaul of our tax system ideal that promotes parity between resources and gets the government out of the business of picking winners and losers. ideal tax et to that system, we must create a smooth transition from our current tax and to the new system this legislation is an important part of that transition. ways and means chairman brady said at our markup last is a uclear power critical component of an all-of-the-above strategy for and y independence national security. ithout this legislation, the nuclear power industry may cease to exist as we know it today in this country. exactly where passing this legislation today is more important now than ever. nuclear power is crucial to our energy independence. these ally, if
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facilities shut down tomorrow, t will immediately cost 12,000 jobs in south carolina and ratepayers cost the hundreds if not thousands of their bill ses in and most importantly, our national security will be jeopardized as countries like continue to ia make massive investments in nuclear power production. need to give these plants the certainty of the tax edits as congress originally intended, not just for south carolina and georgia, but for innovation of in the security our country. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from south carolina reserves. the gentleman from is recognized. mr. neal: mr. speaker, i rise support of h.r. 1551, a ipartisan bill to modify the section 4457b j production tax
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credit for advanced power. 445-j production tax power.for advanced this bill enjoys bipartisan support of members of the committee as well. ang of this bill is critical to thousands of jobs in south carolina and in -- assage of this bill is critical to thousands of jobs in south carolina and in want to keep americans in good-paying jobs. highlight my disappointment that the committee has not acted on in r important priorities the energy tax space. for example, there's bipartisan interest in this congress for 48 investment on tax credit for nonsolar, eligible tell nolings. h.r. 1090, the technology for introduced ity act, by our colleagues, mr. reed of new york and mr. thompson of supported by a bipartisan group of 93 members congress.
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the committee is overdue in considering this important legislation as well as other vital to renewable energy, renewable fuels and efficiency and alternative fuel vehicles that 2016. at the end of as the gentleman from south rolina noted, all of the above. i hope we can act before the 11th hour to extend these provisions. conclude by reminding my colleagues that ited states government invested a tremendous amount of money through the tax crode. help create ents good-paying jobs nationwide. as we continue discussion on reform, i hope and anticipate chairman brady will consider focusing on fully integrated energy strategy reform as well. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from south carolina is recognized. . rice: mr. speaker, i yield two minutes to the gentleman om south carolina, in -- mr.
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duncan. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from south carolina is recognized. mr. duncan: i want to thank the gentleman from south carolina, his work on this. i rise today to keep the lights on for american nuclear energy. being left behind in the nuclear energy race. nuclear energy in the united is lagging behind our new ition to forge a generation of reactors in south carolina and georgia is the construction since the 1970's. the watts-barr 2 reactor in which was first permitted in the 1970's only ecently came online in 2016. needs to r, america base they have a 24/7 load of electricity and also the foundation of america's security. civilian nuclear energy sector is key to support needs. s military nuclear needs to be approached wholistically.
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from new -- holistically. facilities, it is in national security interest the policy keeps all nuclear life cle with the rest of the world. by passing this bill, the world america is at serious about this. they'll not evaluate the project likely leading to the approving the continued construction of the plants. the united states must not turn er leadership in nuclear technology to rush aand china. china's recent nuclear deals south africa, kenya, argentina and great britain. one which administers the soviet weapons complex said it 13 ived orders from countries, including iran. together russia and china are 30 new ing almost
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advanced nuclear units whereas sumner units the d.c., and vogel plants will be our first nuclear plants in almost 0 years. nuclear energy is the cornerstone of america's economic and national security. colleagues to support an not turn the lights out on nuclear energy. 1551.n favor of i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from massachusetts is recognized. r. neal: mr. speaker, i'd like to yield five minutes to the gentleman from south carolina, the assistant democratic leader friend, mr. clyburn. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from south carolina is recognized. mr. lyburn: thank you, speaker. i thank mr. neal for yielding me this time and for his of this bill that is very important to the states of outh carolina and georgia. r. speaker, 1551 will take two critical modifications to the nuclear production tax credit program. this bill will allow electric wned nuclear utilities and nonprofit electric could he opt
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are a tiffs to utilize the credit which current law for profit utilities ly it will also remove the placed-in-service deadline for completed. o be since the tax credits' original ass ang in the energy policy act of 2005, four new advanced , the site in south carolina, and the vogel te in georgia, have been licensed by the nuclear are atory commission and under construction. both projects are partly owned state or municipal-owned nonprofit utility co-operatives. power entities that have taken the first steps n instructing new advanced nuclear facilities should not instead zed but should be treated simile to the
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for the utilities purpose of these tax incentives. e construction that is currently under way in south carolina and georgia employ 12,000 skilled workers and epresent billions of dollars of investment. hen complete, they will be the largest addition of carbon-free will in either state and replace older fossil uel-emitting plants. recently, the contractor building both the south facilities georgia has entered into bankruptcy proceedings, raising the of further delays in the completion of these projects. critical that the placed-in-service deadline be tended so that these projects, the first new advanced nuclear construction projects in this country in 30 years, may be
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completed. china and other untries around the world invests in nuclear energy, we cannot afford to walk away from important sources of clean energy for future generations. modifications in this bill do not expand the tax credit as such have little additional cost to the taxpayer. thank my colleagues, tom rice and earl blumenauer sponsoring this legislation and chairman kevin brady and richie neal for the support they have given to it. back. ou and i yield the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from south carolina is recognized. mr. rice: mr. speaker, i yield minutes to the gentleman from georgia, mr. hice. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from georgia is recognized. hice: thank you, mr. speaker. i thank the gentleman. i thank all my colleagues for the comments that have been regarding this very
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important piece of legislation. securing w that american energy independence is absolutely critical to the of this osperity nation and nuclear power plays in that mission. at plant vogel in georgia, and nds of engineers craftsmen, many of whom live in my district, are hard at work at ng the united states the forefront of advanced uclear technology. plant vogel and sister plant in south carolina, plant sumner, state-of-the-art reactors under construction. low-cost, safe energy that's produced from will pave and sumner the way for future reactors and mark a new era for nuclear in the united states. makes relatively small changes to already credits, but this legislation will have
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ensuring mpact on nuclear power remains a viable source of energy. nd so i again just want to thank my good friend, mr. rice, this sincerely important piece of legislation, all my colleagues here to support h.r. 1551. r. speaker, i'm honored to support this bill and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from massachusetts is recognized. mr. speaker, i'd now like to yield five minutes to the gentleman and my friend from texas, mr. doggett. the speaker pro tempore: the texas is from recognized. mr. doggett: i thank the gentleman. how very appropriate today that is interrupting onsideration of child welfare, foster care bills in order to nuclear gift for the industry. an indifferent congress that refuses to put an extra dime in deficiencies of our foster care system doesn't giving for a moment in
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a few more million dollars to the nuclear industry. hear 't it amazing to what we will accomplish with a ere $16 additional tax subsidy? our national security will be protected. first concern i've heard on the floor in months from a things n about giving to russia and china. maybe the better place to look bill is down the street at the white house is what the real concern we are giving to the russians. to hear supporters of this bill talk about the glories -- dangers to georgia and south carolina, you would the march on atlanta and south carolina and georgia was nothing compared to the if this congress would do it failed to enact this bill. ll, the devastation that faces consumers in these states has nothing to do with what the done s has or has not but it has to do with the nuclear industry seeking there much as nt
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it is seeking taxpayer subsidies here today. an industry that has disregarded long-standing compel georgians to pay higher electric bills r utility investments before they ever deliver one kill owe watt of power -- kilo watt of and they may in fact not any energy. his is a bill that's a glorious new day for nuclear power and makes this tax credit available to 20-year-old nuclear technology and for last september try uranium mining, this book, this bill, hardly matches its cover. it's true that $16 million of additional help to the nuclear industry is a mere footnote compared to the taxpayer resources that have been lavished on this industry in the past. and in georgia, the nuclear
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power industry literally turned decades of utility law upside down in demanding that electric ratepayers pay for what stock holders traditionally have paid for. and even after doing that, west ing house a once distinguished american company, a blue ribbon company, went belly up. and so have the local utility ratepayers. as the "new york times" reported recently, many of the companies' injuries are self-inflicted. bankruptcy will make it harder for business partners to collect money they are owed by the nuclear plant maker. now it's unclear whether the company will be able to complete any of its projects which in the united states is about three years late and billions over budget. the cost estimates are already higher o $1.3 billion according to a recent report and
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could eventually exceed $8 billion right onto the shoulders of those ratepayers in georgia and south carolina. of course, you would have thought that after the disaster in japan and the many questions raised about nuclear power in japan that congress would be rethinking nuclear power as a pana seea. but even if you overlook this and dangers to health and safety and when the nuclear industry makes a mistake, it's a mistake that lasts forever. if you look at the economics alone, this kind of tax subsidy is unjustified. with an a.m. will amount of natural gas coming on the market with so much renewable energy, nuclear has not made economic sense. and the history of this particular legislation demonstrates that. when this tax break was originally set up back in 2005,
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there were some 32 nuclear plants that were going to take advantage of it and hasn't been because of the failure of congress that they didn't. out of that 32, exactly four have even begun to be built and not a single one of them has been completed in over a decade and a half. over this record of miserable failures, there is good reason to ask why taxpayers should be called on to give even more. mr. chairman, i would ask unanimous consent to place in the record a letter from 13 environmental groups expressing opposition to the legislation. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. doggett: i believe there is an important additional concern raised by our colleague, mr. neal, already, and that is the fact that there are so many other -- may i have an additional minute. mr. neal: i yield an additional minute. mr. doggett: there are so many
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other additional measures that colleagues, bipartisan efforts that are pending in our committee on energy efficient residential property, on fuel cells, on small wind energy, on geothermal heat pumps to mention only a few. these mention energy conservation that will address climate change. instead of today's measure, our focus should be on safe, healthy forms of energy instead of an industry that costs too much and poses too much danger to humans. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from south carolina seek recognition? mr. rice: i yield two minutes to the gentleman from texas, the chairman of the ways and means committee, mr. brady. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. brady: i rise in strong support of h.r. 1551, legislation supported by republicans and democrats
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focused on strengthening america's energy security. this bill is sponsored and led by representative rice and clarifies an existing law dealing with tax credits for nuclear energy production and making sure these credits worked effectively for america. it addresses an urgent problem that now poses a threat to america's energy security and by extension our national security. as a result of uncertainty with respect to the nuclear tax credit, there is a risk of construction grinding to a halt on several cutting-edge nuclear power plants in our country. meanwhile, our global competitors are pushing forward a nuclear power to bolster their own energy sectors. nuclear power is critical to an all of the above strategy for america's independence and our national security. it's urgent that we take action now to solve this issue in our tax code and provide the certainty that our energy
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innovators need to continue moving forward with construction. that's exactly what congressman rice's bill will do. and to be clear, i would rather be standing hire to say this is part of the overall tax reform. but the fact is, the focus doesn't prevent us to serve existing problems. the fact this is not what washington calls the extender. that circus isn't coming back to town. this bill is a solution to a serious and immediate problem that threatens our energy security. that's why we are moving it forward right now. i want to thank congressman rice for his leadership on h.r. 1551 and the strong support from the south carolina and georgia delegations. as we continue to work with president trump and the senate to deliver comprehensive tax reform, we should pass this bill
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now to provide greater certainty for our energy innovators. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from south carolina reserves. the gentleman from massachusetts. mr. neal: i reserve. mr. rice: i yield two minutes to the gentleman from georgia, mr. allen. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. allen: i thank congressman rice for this important legislation. president trump and i agree on many issues facing our nation today. we share our number one priority, national security. energy independence is critical to our mutual mission to safeguard the united states. that's why i stand before my colleagues in the nation today in support of h.r. 1551 to modify the nuclear tax credit. enacted in 2005, the energy policy act provided production tax credits for reactors of a deadline of 2020. when the law was enacted, congress did not anticipate the
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sunset date would place a hardship. as every business owners now, the unmistaken happens in the real world. this is helping to construct the first two nuclear reactors in the united states in more than 30 years. the 12th district of georgia will have more than 75% of the nuclear-generating capacity of the southern company. also, because georgia has been ranked in the number one place to locate your business for the last four years is because is we enjoy extremely low power rates. unfortunate turn of events, west ing house filed for bankruptcy which could result of nuclear units coming online in 2020. h.r. 1551 will assist our nation's energy producers to complete units three and four. mr. speaker, this is absolutely
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critical. this change will not cost the taxpayer an additional dime. you may ask, why is this a national security issue, and as as been mentioned, china makes progress. we cannot signal to the rest of the world that nondemocratic countries are leading the world and america not investing. plant vogel is critical to provide clean low-cost energy to the people of georgia. i urge you to join me in supporting this critical important legislation and i yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from south carolina reserves. mr. neal: i continue to reserve. mr. rice: mr. speaker, i yield two minutes to the gentleman from -- distinguished the gentleman from south carolina. mr. canford. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. sanford: i rise in support of h.r. 1551 and i thank mr. rice for his hard work on this
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bill and the way he goat it through the legislative process. i think it's important for the reason -- the environment. i come from the low country in south carolina and we are seeing sea levels rise and we could have a huge debate about what's causing it. there is a clear scientific consensus of co-2 emissions being tied to global warming. a lot of places around the world, too. there is no perfect energy source out there. but of the available choices out there, something that addresses the question is equally important and nuclear does. and it is important from base load in terms of energy in this country and importance in terms of competitiveness around the world. gordon sullivan wrote a book entitled "hope is not a method"
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and said we may hope for alternatives and i hope they come through, whether it is solar or tidal. i think there are emerging technologies here. but the meantime we have to handle this issue of base loads from the standpoint of our ability to compete with the rest of the world in terms of baseline energy as it relates to business and the ability to cool one's house in the warm air of south carolina or the west. it is important from the standpoint of energy independence. this idea of domestic production becomes incredibly important given the way in which we are dealing with a whole host of different places around the globe that don't want what's best for america to the solution at times. this idea of energy independence is an important consideration into h.r. 1551 and for that reason i thank tom rice for his hard work in bringing this bill
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forward. and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: having no other speakers, mr. speaker, i reserve. mr. neal: is the gentleman prepared to close? mr. rice: i am. mr. neal: i yield myself such time as i my consume. with reference to the previous gentleman's comments, it's helpful for the acknowledgement that there is broad agreement amongst scientists as to how global warming is occurring and there is a suggestion that it is because of problems that have been generated by man and womankind and president obama said clearly all of the above, as part of the solution. so the suggestion that we have had on this side that this legislation advances is to use the pulpit of the ways and means committee to move forward with advancing meaningful job creation in terms of alternative
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and renewable energy as well and create a greater energy efficiencies and i would think there should be an opportunity in this house to find some common agreements on legislation similar to what we are witnessing today on the renewable front as well. and greater energy efficiency for all of us should be of paramount concern. and with that, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from south carolina is recognized. mr. rice: i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. rice: in closing, i cannot overstate the importance of this legislation represents to the nuclear energy production in the united states. as the ways and means committee noted when it approved the same measure last year, while the committee continues to work on comprehensive tax reform as a means of creating job creation
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it is important to provide immediate clarity and certainty on tax issues affecting american businesses and this legislation will provide just that. i would also like to thank chairman brady for his continued support of h.r. 1551 as well as the bipartisan support we received when this bill was voted out of committee by voice vote last week. i ask for continued bipartisan support from my colleagues here in the house in passing this legislation, not just because it makes commonsense changes to the credit but because of the extreme sense of urgency to provide certainty to our industry. thank you. and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the question is will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill h.r. 1551 as amended. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 being in the affirmative, the rules are suspended and the bill is passed and without objection,
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the motion to reconsider is laid upon the table. for eaker pro tempore: what purpose does the gentlewoman from indiana seek recognition? mrs. walorski: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that the and suspend the rules pass h.r. 2742. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. 2742, a bill to amend title 4 of the social security act to require states system an electronic to help expedite the placement of children in foster care or adoption, , or for across state lines, and to provide funding to aid states system, ing such a and for other purposes.
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the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the indiana, mrs. walorski, and the gentleman om illinois, mr. davis, each will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentlewoman from indiana. mrs. walorski: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and and their remarks on de extraneous material r. 2742, currently under consideration. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mrs. walorski: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized. mr. walorski: thank you, speaker. i rise in support of my bill, modernizing the placement of children in foster care act along with mr. davis. we know the importance of a for a nvironment child's development and success later in life. unfortunately, we don't live in n ideal world. we've seen too many instances addiction, neglect, incarceration or death necessitates removing a child from their home. right now in my state of there are more than --
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there are more than 20,000 children in the foster care than there were 18 months ago. this is due in large part to opioid epidemic. in spite of this great need for foster care and adoption, if a to be placed in another state, caseworkers from both states must literally hundreds of out pages of paperwork and mail them back and forth. crmbs umber -- cumbersome process can take months. these are precious months that is stuck in ld limbo waiting for the certainty of a more permanent home. t's time to bring this process into the 21st century. luckily there's an effort under do just that. in november, 2013, five states, cluding my home state of indiana and the district of columbia, launched the national interstate compact
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enterprise, or neice. cloudy-based lectronic system that allows work between states. placement wait times dropped by half. and a states spent less time on money copying and mailing and valuable saved time. is now in mr. davis' home state but we can't stand at 16. a child in my district in south bend, indiana, needs to placed in their grandparents' home, they need arduous paperwork process because neice is not -- of use michigan is not part the neice system. this bill comes before us comes in. represents a very important investment in the future of at-risk youth. states to join the 27 ce system by october 1, 20
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and sets aside $5 million in to ting federal funds facilitate states in joining our expanding their services neice. that money does not come without strings. states must apply for the funds plans.mit detailed the secretary of health and human services will have to bmit periodic reports to congress so we can monitor the states join this .rogram in the 114th congress this bill passed the house of representatives but come up tely did not for a vote in the senate. it's our hope we can cross the nish line this year and help at-risk youth find their forever home more quickly. i want to thank the gentleman illinois, mr. davis, for being a great partner in introducing this legislation. to thank senators young, grassley and gillibrand for broe deucing companion introducing companion legislation in the senate. i'd like to list the list in ons that
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support of h.r. 2742. i ask my colleagues to vote yes i this important bill, and reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves. the gentleman from illinois, mr. davis, is recognized. davis: thank you, mr. chairman. as i d myself such time might consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. davis: i strongly support 2742, modernizing the interstate placement of care act.n foster cross-state placement of youth foster care is particularly sill yant to children living with kin -- sail yant to living in kinship caregivers. given my congressional district of he highest percentages grandparent caregivers in the nation, i'm pleased to join congresswoman colors key in leading this important legislation. this bill helps reduce the barriers and delays that when the best st a home for a child is in
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different state than the unsafe the child had to leave. eliminating barriers is a within bipartisan goal congress. this bill addresses an important factor in those . lays the ability of state computer to process ink up he paperwork the current paper-based system is antiquated and slow. part of an h.h.s. pilot project, seven states and the currently columbia articipate in the national electronic interstate compact -- neice, or niece online tool that allows states offer systems to process terstate placements more quickly.
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i am indeed proud that illinois s one of those states. an early evaluation found this times educed waiting for affected children by about a third. 10 other states have already announced plans to join the over the next two years. would accelerate the number of participating states and ensure run that all states participate in he long run. the more states that join the ore it speeds up the process for everyone. the director of the department and family services often emphasizes we need to in, and i quote, kid time, and not adult time. that we need to recognize the urgency of -- oring perm nancy
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permanency for children in rather than allowing adult bureaucracy to impede permanency. modernizing the technology to increase efficiencies and placements is common sense and respects the urgency finding permanent loving homes for children. , and i good bill thank congresswoman walorski staff for their excellent work. and our states are joined and so we join with his legislation. i urge its support and reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. he gentlewoman from indiana is recognized. mrs. walorski: mr. speaker, having no other speakers, i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves. r. davis: mr. speaker, i'm pleased to yield five minutes o the outstanding legislator from texas, mr. doggett.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. doggett: i thank the salute all of those who are here today offering these bills. other e and the four related bills that are being considered. now ularly mr. davis who holds the position as ranking democrat on the human resources a job i held for the last several years, and ms. ably led our foster care caucus. think it's unfortunate that they're here, unfortunate because all of this business last have been resolved year. all five of these modest bills helping ady be children today but for the way the so-called family first services act was bundled last year. each of these five bills were a of it. but unfortunately families and particularly families caring foster children have not and are still not among the this riorities of
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congress. of course, here in the house there are many speeches. we had extensive hearings year after year concerning foster ildren, and the horrors of child abuse, but speeches alone can't do the job and there are of good will le who genuinely care about this oster care problem in both parties. ms. colors key is certainly one of -- mrs. walorski is rtainly one of those individuals. but we encountered a big problem last year in the ways and means committee when the first prevention services act came up. it was the same problem we the last congress when senator wyden and i offered a same version of the piece of legislation. the ways and means committee jority leadership objects to adding a dime of additional venue to accompany our speeches. the majority rejected my recommendation for a tax to simply easure require the reporting of alimony payments. a form et alimony, it's
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of income, but there's no report required. an increased tax. it is a way of avoiding tax vasion and it would have raised the revenues necessary to fund the additional family services.ention when this bill reached the to te, the house's decision reject that approach or any pay-for was le nstead relying on what you could call basically a rob peter to pay paul approach, cutting funds in support of and shifting funds from one part of the foster care system to another part. and that, unfortunately, became the excuse in the senate to lock the bill from being passed. and i'll have to say that my home state of texas, fund court order, to correct its many unconstitutional buses in the foster care system, wrongfully led the way in blocking the family first bill. to the particular bills that
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we have up today, this one our nizes how mobile society is and how much we need to be able to go across the addressing this problem. we arlier bill that considered concerning children who age out of the foster sponsored, ms. bass really important. we heard time and again about he challenges that those children face when they are essentially dumped out on the 21, t at age 18 or age depending on which state they're in and challenges for young women who find themselves in that adequate ithout preparation or adult help. that we considered addressed the primary problem investment ederal in helping these vulnerable older youth prepare for independence. any objection to it or to any of the bills that re being considered today.
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i object only to the ideological insistence of some majority that any additional revenue from any source, no matter how be placed in nnot a deficient foster care system which too many of our states not fix. and today's changes do not new to add any actual resources to foster care and they are likely to be overwhelmed by one cut after president trump is proposing, particularly the medicaid cuts that are being congress ugh this that are very important to foster youth and to all children. in this congress, so indifferent to the education service and health needs of children of all types perhaps r country, only taking a little step is to meet e can expect the needs of the the most vulnerable children in our society. all of us must be
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ommitted to work together to find a day when we are willing to take truly meaningful action rather than after more children are needlessly lost. yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from illinois eserves. mrs. walorski: i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the ntleman from illinois is recognized. mr. davis: mr. speaker, i yield three minutes to the gentlelady ms. bass.ornia, the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized. s. bass: mr. speaker, i rise support of h.r. 2742, the modernizing the interstate placement of children in foster care act. children who cannot be safely home deserve to be placed in the best setting possible for them, regardless of the state where the setting located and no child should have to wait to move to that best setting because it is state line. separation from a parent or long-term caregiver is always a child. for
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even if relatives come forward right away, it may takes months licensed, months in which the child may bond with the foster family. when the relative lives in state, the licensing process can often take as long as six months. might mean six months in foster care. sometimes our well-intentioned to protect children actually does them more harm. 2742 provides states with resources to automate this workers that social no longer have to photo copy documents and submit them on a succession of offices. last year, the national foster outh institute organized a listening tour in representative vicky hartzler's district, and during a meeting welfare professionals, they described the challenges they face when relatives are identified in states and they are unable to quickly place the child with family and must keep the child in foster care.
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the judge, social workers and families specifically asked congress to change the law and asked the national foster care institute to advocate for change. i look forward to hearing from representative hartzler and her constituents about this legislation and i ask my colleagues to support the legislation sponsored by representative walorski -- representatives walorski and davis, h.r. 2742. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves, the gentlelady -- mrs. walorski: is the gentleman ready to close? mr. davis: i am. thank you, mr. speaker. we have in further -- no further speakers. i will say my staff and i have been pleased to work with representative walorski and her staff in preparing this commonsense, good legislation. i strongly support it, urge its passage and yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the
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gentlewoman from indiana is recognized. ms. whats alreadykey: i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized. mrs. walorski: i want to close with the words of someone on the ground, living with every day. sharon pierce is the president and c.e.o. of villages of indiana, the largest not-for-profit provider of child and family services in my state. i quote, the nice system, she said, will be invaluable in helping public and private child welfare system to improve the length of time a child needs to wait far forever family. this isn't just about numbers, but the most important thing we're doing here is we're giving at-risk youth a more permanent home sooner, giving them hope sooner, giving them a chance to actually thrive soonerism urge my colleagues to vote yes and i yield back the remainder of my
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time. the speaker pro tempore: the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill h.r. 2742. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 being in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from south dakota seek recognition? >> i move that the house suspend the rules and pass h.r. 2834, the partnership grants to
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strengthen families affected by parental substance abuse act as amended. 13r0 up the -- the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: h r. 2834, a bill to improve outcomes of children of families affected by heroin, opioids and other substance abuse. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from south dakota, mrs. noem, and the gentleman from illinois, mr. davis, each will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentlewoman from it'd. mrs. noem: i ask unanimous consent that all members have five legislative days within which to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous material on h.r. 2834, currently under consideration. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mrs. noem: i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized. mrs. noem: i rise in support of the partnership grants to strengthen families affected by parent substance abuse act as amended. i applaud mr. davis for his work
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on this issue. most substantiated child abuse cases involve substance abuse by a parent or guardian. this is something we're seeing all too often in states like my home state of south dakota. substance abuse result in far too many instances of child abuse, nest exabuse and other violent crime and behavior. historically a lack of collaboration has hindered head to work -- those working in the field of child welfare and subs an abuse and even the courts from supporting the substance abuse crisis. no two cases are alike. it's for this reason that improving outcomes for parents and children requires a coordinated effort among all systems this bill strengthens the regional partnership grant program which provides funding regional and state grantees seeking to provide substance -- provide support relating to child abuse and substance abuse.
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program s the r.p.e. address the heroin and opioid epidemic. it will encourage states to address the well-being of the family as a whole, using evidence-based approaching to help parents and children at the same time so more children can stay safely at home with their family. finally this bill is noncontroversial and bipartisan. provisions of the bill were contained in a bail last year that passed the house by voice vote. the family first act was supported by a number of organizations. i appreciate the opportunity to stand with mr. davis in supporting this bill today and with that, i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from illinois is recognize. mr. davis: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i might consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. davis: i strongly support for theship e nart
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grants to strengthen families affected by parental sub stns abutze act. i'm pleaded -- pleased to join with congresswoman noem to lead in this field to help families by addressing parental substance abuse and decrease the number of children entering foster care. our bill is common sense. it takes research lessons from the smallest scale regional partnership grant and expands those efforts to the state level. we know that substance abuse underlies a substantial percentage of child welfare cases. affecting between one third and 2/3 of children in care. aside from neglect, alcohol, other drug use is a number one reason for removal from the home. were 4, over 77,000 youth
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removed from their homes due to drug abuse. what is exciting is that we have strong empirical evidence that working with parents experienced in substance abuse significantly helps children and families. specifically working with these families helps children to experience fewer days in foster care. higher reunification rates. less recurrence of child maltreatment and better permanency over time. h.r. 2834 provides the opportunity to scale up these successes from smaller, targeted interventions into full state interventions while building the esearch to better inform
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federal policy overall. my home state of illinois has led the nation in adretsing substance abuse issues in child welfare. we know that we need to do more to address this problem, and we know what works. and we know we can work bipartisanly to support families in addressing substance abuse so we can increase permanency and safety. when i ask foster youth what policymakers could do to make child welfare better, they almost always say, you could have helped my mom and dad. that is what we do today. so i urge passage of this important legislation and reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentlelady -- the gentlewoman from south dakota is recognized. mrs. noem: having no other speakers i reserve the balance
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of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from illinois is recognized. mr. davis: i yield three minutes to the gentlelady from california, representative bass. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized. ms. bass: mr. speaker, i rise in support of h.r. 2834, the partnership grants to strengthen families affected by parental sub stants abuse. this piece of legislation is responsive to countless pleas of youth and families seeking necessary assistance and support without fracturing critical family bonds and relationships. the majority of children who are removed from homes are actually removed for neglect and not physical or sexual abuse. over 60% of children are removed for neglect and neglect is secondary to substance abuse, mental health issues and abject poverty. in the 1990's when the crack cocaine ep democrat exhit we didn't understand much about addiction so we punished, we
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were angry, we punished the mothers, imprisoned the mothers, took the children away, and we didn't realize that actually not addressing the underlying substance abuse issue would really be more harmful to the children than removing them and put them into foster care. now that we are experiencing another epidemic related to drugs, both with meth and with heroin, at least our knowledge base has grown a lot. we have drug courts, we have evidence-based treatments, we have a lot of ways that we can address families. one of the things that we have learned is that if you can put the entire family in treatment, then that way one, the parents are not separated from their children, the children can get help, and the parents can get help as well. what often happens if you remove the child from the parent is that you set the parent up to relapse or to never actually go into treatment because they will
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cycle into depression and they will continue their seekle of addiction. we have had many children tell us, who actually wound up growing up in foster care because their parents were removed, they don't -- they ask us why didn't we help the family? why didn't we help their parents? and sadly what has happened to many of these children when they grow up, they continue the same cycle, going into depression, winding up in addiction, over the years the -- addiction. other the years, the national foster care institute in conjunction with the caucus on foster care youth organized many delegations and trips around the country looking at different foster care systems. our very first listening tour was in left side and we visited a program called shields for families. shields for families is a very large drug treatment program that has functioned for over 0 years by keeping the entire family together and some of these families can remain in the
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residential care for as long as a year. they have been able to reduce the number of children who were removed and go into the foster care system because they provide treatment for the family as a whole. this bill would modify the award criteria for health and human services to continue to to -- to consider whether a partnership has a track record of selective collaboration among child welfare, substance abuse disorder treatment and mental health agencies. simply put, this bill is designed to keep families together and i urge my colleagues to support h.r. 2834. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields. the gentlewoman from south dakota is recognized. mrs. noem: i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from illinois, mr. davis is recognized. mr. davis: thank you, mr. speaker, i'm prepared to close. mr. speaker, over a decade of research shows that successes of helping families involved in the
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child welfare system who struggle with substance abuse. through this research we know that there are seven common ingredients that help improve families' outcomes. one a system of identifying families earlier access to assessment, and treatment service, increased management of recovery services and mpliance, increased judicial oversight, responses to participant behavior based on proven contingency management approaches, collaborative approaches across service systems and ports, and improved family services and repair of parent-child relationships. again, mr. speaker, it's been a pleasure for my staff and i to have the opportunity to work
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with mrs. noem and her staff in preparing this legislation. i might note that on saturday of us inast week, a group of illinois took two bus loads of children to a special program run by the illinois department corrections at the sheridan penitentiary to see their fathers who were all involved in a special program established for individuals who were incarcerated for crimes dealing with substance and who themselves were substance users. . this experience was so exciting of these individuals inding help and their children being able to interact with
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em even though they were incarcerated. and so someone asked me what father's to do for day, and i told them after we eturned that i've had my father's day experience. help these ndividuals to rid themselves of the tremendous habits and of culties that they have substance use, then father's day would be good enough. thank you, again, mrs. noem, and yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields. the chair recognizes the gentlewoman from south dakota is recognized. mr. noem: thank you, speaker. and i yield myself such time as i may consume. mr. speaker, i again want to applaud mr. davis for all of work on this issue. i know he's passionate and has a big heart for our children, are in y those that difficult situations such as what we're discussing today. protect will help us the fundamental element of our
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society and that is the family. together. p families it will empower courts and child welfare workers to ordinate for the good of children, and i am proud to support this bill. so i'll yield back the balance the time and ask for support of this legislation that's before us, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back. the house is will suspend the rules and pass the ill h.r. 2834, as amended. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed, and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from south dakota seek recognition? i move : mr. speaker, the house suspend the rules and pass h.r. 2857, the supporting substance abuse treatment act, as amended. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. 2857, a bill to support foster care maintenance payments for children with a licensed
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residential family-based treatment facility for substance abuse. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentlewoman from south dakota, mrs. noem, and the gentleman will linois, mr. davis, each control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentlewoman from south dakota. mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and and their remarks include extraneous material on h.r. 2857, currently under consideration. e speaker pro tempore: without objection. mrs. noem: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the eaker pro tempore: gentlelady is recognized. mrs. noem: mr. speaker, i rise in support of my bill, the pporting families in substance abuse treatment act, which i have co-sponsored with my colleague, ms. chu of alifornia. across the country opioid abuse has reached epidemic proportions. south ome state of dakota, drug use tears families apart. it results in gang activity, kinds abuse and other of violence, including many of our native american communities state. ut the congress has worked to provide first responders and health providers with tools they need to address this crisis.
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but we need to do more. ensure o do more to the stability of families affected by these terrible drugs. supporting families in substance abuse treatment act provides much-needed support or families fighting to endure through substance abuse. foster permits federal care payments for children who re placed with a parent in a licensed residential treatment cility for a period up to 12 months. programs that house families together have been found to be highly effective in supporting bonding and reducing substance abuse elapses. unfortunately, these programs aren't utilized to the fullest extent. ensures states incur little to no additional cost if with a is safely placed parent in a treatment abuse rogram rather than placing the parent in an individual program. i would remind my colleagues will ovisions in bill included in the provisions
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first families act in 2016 the house by voice vote and received support from over 500 different state and representing a wide range of practitioners and advocacy organizations. support colleagues to this bill and with that i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the yields. an the gentleman from illinois, mr. davis, is recognized. mr. avis: thank you, speaker. i'll yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. speaker, i , rongly support h.r. 2857 supporting families in substance abuse treatment act. had a ce abuse has families impact on in the u.s.. of een 60% to 80% substanding waited child abuse child substantial waited abuse by a custodial parent or uardian. early access to substance abuse
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partal, improves family and child focused outcomes. however, treatment access can at the cost of removing a care. rom their parent's this separation disrupts pportunities for mothers and children to develop emotional the , increasing likelihood of childhood emotional and behavioral roblems. although research shows that keeping children in a parent's while they seek treatment has benefits to the parent and , access to parent-child treatment centers have been limited. address this concern, a significant number of programs illinois and nationally have substance in family abuse treatment. one example in my congressional is the haymark center
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16 pregnant and postpartum program that allows to two to bring up children with them. evidence-based practices for trauma, family children's and velopment, haymark has demonstrated significant positive outcomes through an ndependent evaluation. for example, women experienced significant decline in at both three and six-month followups. improvements in mental and physical health. victimization, homelessness and criminal , increased safely -- and healthy pregnancieses. addition, the center has -- healthy pregnancies.
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in addition, the center has expanded the residential include a enter to responsible fatherhood program, which they document as playing crucial part in achieving strong outcomes. example is in chicago south side of chicago and west side of side of nd the north chicago and the east side of side , but on the south f chicago the harriet tubman program, which is a 16-bed accommodate can up to 10 children under the age f 5. women who participate in these program emain in the longer and have lower rates of recidivism. also the women's treatment center on the west side. has a pregnant and
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postpartum women's program for 12 women and up to 12 the ren as well as residential i reserve the balance of my time hab for up to 14 -- residential rehab for to 14 women and 23 children. all of these programs provide to strengthen real families. is common sense. these family-based treatment have demonstrated relapse rates, ecreased detachment trauma for children and they build families and health. colleagues to support passage and reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentlewoman from south akota is recognized. mrs. noem: mr. speaker, having no other speakers, i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the reserves.
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the gentleman from illinois is recognized. mr. davis: thank you, mr. speaker. i'm pleased to yield four minutes to the gentlelady from , who is the sponsor of this legislation, epresentative chu. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized. today to urge my colleagues to support h.r. 857, the supporting families in substance abuse treatment act. co-sponsor this bipartisan bill with congress kristi noem. this would encourage states to prioritize keeping families parent is en a receiving substance abuse treatment. under current law, states federal eive reimbursement if they choose to place both the parent and child substance abuse treatment program. however, if that child is separated from their parent and with a foster family, the state can receive a match 50% or l funding of
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more. this discrepancy effectively reates an incentive to separate children from their parents when one is receiving substance abuse treatment. however, studies have shown that keeping children in the while their parents they seek treatment can increase family bonding, child ttachment and family functioning all while minimizing the trauma of children. for today, solutions to parental the buse that prioritize families are increasingly necessary as the opioid epidemic continues to place strains on our communities. according to one estimate, drug now be the leading cause of death among .mericans under the age of 50 and as more parents require substance abuse treatment, more into foster placed care. in fact, studies found that between a third and 2/3 of enter foster care at least partly because of parental substance abuse. we know that foster care
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does wonders for many children every day. not be the best match for every child, and the decision should not come down cost. in my district of los angeles, for instance, we have a program exodus program, where formerly homeless milies live in an onsite apartment complex and receive comprehensive services, including substance abuse counseling, child development and family reunification services. years, more seven than 80% of enrolled families program and the 95% have been able to keep their families together. even though we know that parent-child substance abuse exodus have shown promising results, current law does not financially to utilize states these programs where they are available. the supporting families in treatment act would address this problem by ensuring that if parents and placed in these
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programs and stay together, the state can receive the full match for the child's living cost. states would retain full to decide which placement is best, but that consideration will now be based what's best for the child, ot what is most affordable for the state. states should be given the option to use family-based reatment options without risking the loss of federal foster care reimbursement. to ge my colleagues consider our nation's families d how this legislation may impact those when heads of are struggling with addiction. we can heal them without creating new trauma and pain children. i urge my colleagues to support h.r. 2857, and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentlelady from south dakota is recognized. s. noem: having no other speakers, i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady reserves. the gentleman from illinois, recognized. mr. davis: thank you, mr.
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speaker. i'd yield three minutes to the entlelady from california, representative bass. ms. bass: mr. speaker, i rise 2857, support of h.r. to support foster care for nance payments children with parents in a licensed residential facility. last month when the national institute sponsored shadow day, several town hall h in a meeting that we had described their parents' challenges with substance abuse. one young lady said that both of her parents were addicted to she was taken into a court and in front of said to her parents, if you don't clean up, we're going to take your away.en court, after she left she was taken away. she was removed from her ultimately her parents continued to use and died.both of them
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this young woman grew up feeling guilty and feeling that why her he reasons parents passed away was because used as leverage, and that if her parents had been ept together in drug treatment along with her maybe, one, she wouldn't be an orphan today and r parents would have lived and she wouldn't have to grow up in foster care. will allow programs like shields for families that parental substance abuse and keeps families gether to have the resources to expand their programs. today we heard five bills that challenges in the child welfare system. we know there is a lot more done, but today we passed bills addressing substance abuse, relative aregivers. we identified and addressed barriers to placement and i'm step we t one next could take would be to extend e kinship navigator programs so that organizations like
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community coalition can provide support to latives and expand their kinship and action program. at some point we need to address the structural program of how the system is financed. right now we have to remove a child, break up a family, in order to have the resources to help ep the child. we know much more now. we know what leads a parent to neglect a child. substance abuse, mental health issues, poverty. we need to continue to reform the system and provide the resources to prevent a crisis then problems are identified. why should we wait for the the tpwhrect to occur? once again i want to thank chairman brady, ranking member neal and all the sponsors of the legislation today and urge my colleagues to support h.r. 2857.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the gentlewoman from north dakota is recognized. mrs. noem: having no other speakers, i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from illinois is recognized. mr. davis: i have no further requests for time, so i want to commend representative noem and all the co-sponsors of this important bill. these are programs that have been proven to work. they're what are called evidence-based. where the research demonstrates that with them, individuals have been able to improve the quality of not only their lives but certainly the lives of their children, and the lives of everyone with whom they come into contact. so i agree that today has been a tremendous day for the ways and means committee. but it has been a tremendous day for the people of the united
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states of america. where we have come together with five bills that will be passed the end of the day, dealing with the needs, hopes and aspirations of our vulnerable population of children. we really can't have a better day than that. so again, i commend chairman brady, ranking member neal, and all the members for their participation, engagement, and involvement. i urge passage and yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields. the gentlewoman from south dakota is recognized. mrs. noem: i yield myself such time as i may consume. today i want to thank my colleagues for working with me on this legislation and collaborating on this important -- on the supporting families in
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substance abuse treatment act. this is a critical step to addressing the needs we have in our communities with the urgent opioid and methamphetamine crisis in our country while protecting the foundation of our society, the family. i urge support of the legislation before us today and with that, i yield back the remainder of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the question is will the houms suspend the rules and pass the bill h.r. 2857 as amended. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 being in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed, and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid n the table.
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for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? >> i move that the house suspend he rules and pats h.r. 28 -- h.r. 24 4. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 24 4, a bill to ensure the united states promotes the meaningful participation of women in mediation processes, seeking to mitigate violent conflict. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from kale, mr. royce and the gentleman from texas, mr. castro will each control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from california. mr. royce: i ask unanimous members -- that all have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks. i also ask unanimous consent to place in the record an exchange of let wers the committee on armed services.
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the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. royce: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. royce: mr. speaker, i rise in support of the woman, peace and security act, h.r. 2484. i want to recognize kristi atives noem, noem and jan schakowsky. i want to recognize the two of them for their bipartisan effort in putting together this legislation, important piece of legislation. and i think it is going to have a great impact. i also want to thank mr. engel for his important leadership. but our consideration of this measure is really the culmination of many years of bipartisan work. by members of the house, including jan schakowsky and representative kristi noem.
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andy prior administration officials as well that have worked on this. and many advocates. many advocates who want to see better, more sustainable solutions to ending wars, to combating terrorism, to improving human rights around the world, and what we are saying today is that women's participation is really essential to confronting these fundamental challenges. last year, the foreign affairs committee held a hearing where we heard powerful testimony about the importance of including women in peace negotiations. and in the security negotiations and security institutions that have been set up around the globe. and women, of course, have the fundamental human right to have their voices heard in discussions affecting their lives and their families' lives and that is a case in and of itself that we must continue to make. but women's participation is
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also critical. to realizing better outcomes with respect to these negotiations. simply put, when women are at the negotiating table, and it affects their community, peace is more likely. compelling research shows that peace agreements are much more likely to be reached and certainly more likely to last when women's groups are genuinely involved. women peacemakers often press warring parties to move beyond mere power sharing agreements, which of course benefit only a small percentage of fighters. to more comprehensive and longer term accords which benefit the civilian population as a whole. e have seen this play out from
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colombia to rwanda, to sri lanka, where women's groups have pushed for practical solutions to de-escalate and resolve the conflict and certainly in northern ireland where indisputably the bravery, the perseverance in the face -- in the face of reprisal and pressure led women on both sides of that conflict to stay engaged until there was a lasting peace. at least until today there is a lasting peace in northern ireland and that is because of their involvement. efforts to keep the peace through policing and peacemaking missions also -- this is an additional point, benefit the women's -- benefit from women's participation because it leads to better crime reporting and -- reporting and higher levels of trust within the communities
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they serve. and women are essential to confronting one of the greatest national security threats of our time. and that is the spread of violent extremism. because if we think about it, women, of course are truly on the front lines of the fight. they posets unique insights into the community, into their families. and are capable of gathering information often that men cannot or do not see. yet their input is frequently overlooked. i would just give one example of frau, t activist wasma in afghanistan. recalls when women from a small afghan village tried desperately to warn a government official that young men in their community were being recruited by islamist militants. being recruited at the local weddings. the minister laughed them off.
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he said, the military -- the militants that we are fighting are much too sophisticated to go and recruit at the weddings here in the community. well, of course a month later, unfortunately, some of those same young men attacked a bus, killing 32 civilians. they had been recruited. my committee has heard similar stories from women around the world who want to reclaim their communities from the spread of radical ideologies. we must acknowledge women as partners in this fight and that is why the legislation before us today recognizes that it is in our national interest to promote women's participation in resolving violence and conflict. and this concept has been building support for some time. the bush administration was right to press hard for women's participation in peace negotiations and political
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processes in iraq and afghanistan and elsewhere and the obama administration expanded on these programs to require a government-wide approach to women's inflution in conflict resolution overseas. and so today this bipartisan legislation before us builds on these efforts. it will continue to require a government-wide strategy to promote women's participation, along with specific goals and benchmarks and regular reporter to congress in order to gauge progress. and it also requires that appropriate state and usaid and defense department personnel receive training in how to facilitate women's participation in conflict resolution. and in security initiatives and efforts to protect civilians from violence and to protect them from exploitation. i urge all members to support
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this measure's passage. i reserve the balance of my time. and i, again, i thank kristi noem and jan schakowsky for their good work on this bill. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from texas, mr. castro. mr. castro: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise in support of this measure and i yield myself as much time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. castro: i want to thank the bill's author, representative schakowsky and representative noem for their years' worth of work on this measure. i also want to thank chairman royce and ranking member engel for helping move it forward. wherever there are conflict around the world, women and girls face particular vulnerabilities, but they also possess unique abilities to bring peace and prosperity to their communities. research has shown that getting women involved in conflict resolution and peace building leads to better outcomes. that's why the obama administration launched its
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executive order on women, peace, and security in 2011, to make sure women had a seat at the table when it came to conflict prevention and resolution. thanks to the obama administration's effort the united states has worked to include women in conflict prevention, negotiation, and resolution. we have promoted efforts to enhance the physical and economic security of women around the world. and we've sought to break through the barriers that have stopped women from being pull participants in peace processes. the bill we're considering would make these policies permanent. it would build on what the obama administration has accomplished by making sure agency personnel across our government are fully trained on the ewe neebling strengths women bring to conflict prevention and resolution. it would also require annual reporting so congress can stay apprised of the efforts. making this strategy permanent is absolutely imperative. it's important that we fully

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