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tv   U.S. House of Representatives U.S. House of Representatives  CSPAN  May 23, 2018 1:59pm-4:00pm EDT

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the speaker pro tempore: on this ote the yeas are --
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the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the yeas are 229, the nays are 183. the resolution is adopted. without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. pursuant thousand resolution 905, and rule 18, the chair declares the house in the committee of the whole house on the state of the union for the further reconsideration of h.r.
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5515. will the gentleman from texas, r. poe, kindly take the chair. the chair: the house is in the committee of the whole house on the state of the union for the further consideration of the bill, h.r. 5515. which the clerk will report by title. the clerk: a bill to authorize appropriations for fiscal year 2019, for military activities of the department of defense, and for military construction, to prescribe military personnel strengths for such fiscal year and for other purposes. the chair: when the committee of the whole rose on tuesday, may 22, 2018, amendments en bloc
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printed in house report 115-698 offered by the gentleman from texas, mr. thornberry, had been disposed of. pursuant to clause 6 of rule 18, proceedings will now resume on those amendments printed in house report 115-698 on which further proceedings were postponed in the following order. amendment number 2 by mr. nolan from minnesota. amendment number 3 by ms. gabbard from hawaii, amendment number 4 by mr. aguilar of california. amendment number 5 by mr. garamendi of california. the chair will reduce to two minutes the time for he will thoke -- for any electronic vote on this series. the unfinished business is the request for a recorded vote on amendment number 2 printed in house report 115-68 by the gentleman from minnesota, mr. -- 115-698 by the gentleman from
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minnesota, mr. nolan. the clerk will redesignate the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 2 printed in house report 115-698 offered by mr. nolan of minnesota. the chair: a recorded vote has been requested. those in support of the request for a recorded vote will rise and be counted. a sufficient number having arisen, a recorded vote is ordered. this vote and all further amendment votes will be two-minute votes. members will now record their votes by electronic device. this is a two-minute vote. members are reminded to stay on the floor for further votes. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the
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united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the chair: on this vote the yeas are 62. the nays are 351. he amendment is not adopted. the unfinished business is the request for a recorded vote on amendment number 3 printed in house report 115-698 by the gentlewoman from hawaii, ms. gabbard. on which further proceedings were postponed and on which the noes prevailed by voice vote. the clerk will redesignate the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 3 printed in house report 115-698 offered by ms. gabbard of hawaii. the chair: a record vote has been requested.
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those in support of the request for a recorded vote will rise and be counted. a sufficient number having arisen, a recorded vote is ordered. members will record their votes by electronic device. this is a two-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the yeas are 60. the nays are 355. he amendment is not adopted. the unfinished business is the request for recorded vote on amendment number 4 printed in house report 115-698 by the gentleman from california, mr. aguilar, on which further proceedings were postponed and on which the noes prevailed by voice vote. the clerk will redesignate the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 4, printed in house report number 115-698, offered by mr. aguilar of california. the chair: a recorded vote's been requested. those in support of the request for recorded vote will rise and be counted. a sufficient number having arisen, a recorded vote is ordered. members will record their votes by electronic device. this is a two-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the
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national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the chair: on this vote the yeas are 198. the nays are 217. he amendment is not adopted.
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the unfinished business is the request for recorded vote on amendment number 5, printsed in house report number 115-698, by the gentleman from california, mr. garamendi, on which further proceedings were postponed and on which the noes prevailed by voice vote. the clerk will redesignate the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 5, printed in house report number 5-6698, offered by mr. garamendi of california. the chair: a recorded vote has been requested. those in support of the request for recorded vote will rise and be counted. a sufficient number having arisen, a recorded vote is ordered. members will record their votes by electronic device. this is a two-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the chair: on this vote the yeas are 188. the nays are 226. he amendment is not adopted. there being no further amendment, pursuant to house resolution 905, under the rule, the committee rises.
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the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to house resolution 908, and rule 18, the chair declares the house in the committee of the whole house on the state of the union for further consideration of h.r. 5515. will the gentleman from texas, mr. poe, kindly resume the chair.
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the chair: the committee of the whole house having had under consideration h.r. 5515 directs me to report it has come to no esolution thereon. the speaker pro tempore: on the state of the union reports that the committee has under consideration h.r. 5515, and has come to no resolution thereon. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition.
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>> parliamentary inquiry. the house is currently in the committee of the whole, correct? the speaker pro tempore: we're currently in the house. does the gentleman have a -- mr. thornberry: mr. speaker, i have confused by the mace coming and going here. mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and insert extraneous material on h.r. 5515. the speaker pro tempore: without objection.
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the speaker pro tempore: the chair declares the house in the committee of the whole house on the state of the union for further consideration of h.r. 5515. will the gentleman from texas, -- texas, mr. poe, kindly resume the chair. the chair: the house is in the committee of the whole house on the state of the union for further consideration of the bill, h.r. 5515, which the clerk will report by title. the clerk: a bill to authorize appropriations for fiscal year 2019, for military activities of the department of defense and
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for military construction, to prescribe military personnel strengths for such fiscal year and for other purposes. the chair: when the committee of the whole rose earlier today, pursuant to house resolution 905, amendment number 5, printed in house report 115-698, offered by the gentleman from california, mr. garamendi, had been disposed of. pursuant to house resolution 908, no further amendment to the bill as amended shall be in order except those printed in house report 115-702. and emmeds -- and amendments en bloc described in section 3 of house resolution 908. each further amendment printed in the report shall be considered only in the order printed in the report, may be offered only by a member designated in the report, shall be considered as read, shall be debatable for the time specified in the report, equally divided and controlled by the proponent and an opponent. shall not be subject to amendment and shall not be subject to a demand for division
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of the question. it shall be in order at any time for the chair of the committee on armed services or his designee to offer amendments en bloc consisting of amendments printed in the report not earlier disposed of. amendments en bloc shall be considered as read. shall be debatable for 20 minutes equally divided and controlled by the chair and ranking minority member of the committee on armed services or their respective designees. shall not be subject to amendment. shall not be subject to a demand or division of the question. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? >> mr. chairman, pursuant to h.res. 908, i offer amendments en bloc number 1. the chair: the clerk will designate the amendments en bloc. the clerk: en bloc number 1 consisting of amendments umbered 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 20, 2, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18,
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28, 29, 4, 25, 26, 27, 39, 3, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 48, 1, 42, 44, 45, 46, 47, 57, 1, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 58, 59 and 60. printed in house report 115-702 offered by mr. thornberry of texas. the chair: pursuant to houses remain -- to house resolution 905, the gentleman from texas, mr. thornberry, and the gentleman from california, mr. garamendi, each will control 10 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from texas, mr. thornberry. mr. thornberry: mr. chairman, i ask unanimous consent that amendment number 53, printed in house report 115-702, be
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modified in the form i have placed at the desk. the chair: the clerk will report the modification. the clerk: modification to amendment number 53. mr. thornberry: mr. chairman, i ask unanimous consent the amendment -- the modification be considered as read. the chair: without objection, the reading is dispensed with. is there objection to the original request? without objection, the modification is agreed to. and the gentleman from texas, mr. thornberry, is recognized. mr. thornberry: thank you, mr. chairman. mr. chairman, at this point i'm pleased to yield three minutes to the distinguished chair of the committee on homeland security, the gentleman from texas, mr. mccaul. the chair: the gentleman from texas, mr. mccaul, is recognized for three minutes. mr. mccaul: thank you, mr. speaker. i thank the chairman, mac thornberry. protecting u.s. government communication networks from foreign adversaries such as china is vital to our national security. i share the concerns of f.b.i. director ray who testified before the senate. he was deeply concerned about the risk of allowing any company
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or entity that is beholden to foreign governments, that don't share our values, to gain positions of power inside our telecommunications networks. i'm pleased to see section 880 of the ndaa, of f.y. 2019, addresses this concern by prohibiting federal departments and agencies from procuring equipment and services from foreign firms such as z.t.e. specifically, z.t.e. violated u.s. sanctions and then got caught lying about it after agreeing to discipline their employees -- about it. after agreeing to discipline their employees, they lied again and then gave their employees a bonus. now it seems we're offering them the same kind of deal. they clearly do not have a record of trust with the united states government. this poses significant risks to our nation's security. however, this prohibition does not apply it to -- to state and local governments who often rely on federal grant dollars and play a major role in the
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protection of our nation's security. that's why he i offer this amendment. my amendment -- that's why i offer this amendment. my amendment proi had by thes purchasing z.t. -- pro hit -- trohib itses -- prohibits purchasing z.t.e. and other companies. i urge my colleagues to protect our nation's communications networks from foreign adversaries and support this amendment and with that, mr. speaker, i yield back. the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from texas reserves. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. garamendi: mr. chairman, i'd like to yield two minutes to the gentlelady from new mexico, ms. grisham. the chair: the gentlelady from new mexico is recognized for two minutes. ms. lujan grisham: thank you. new mexico is home to the air force research laboratory that develops groundbreaking technologies that support our men and women in the armed forces. these technologies often have a range of commercial applications that can re-energize domestic
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manufacturing, create high-paying jobs, and increase economic development in our state, which has the second highest unemployment rate in the nation. high-speed internet servers, g.p.s., electric vehicles, and even microwave ovens are just a few of the examples of transformational technologies that were originally developed by the federal government. my amendments would help facilitate the commercialization of innovative d.o.d. developed technologies by investing in the scientists, engineers and mathematicians serving in our military laboratories. by providing laboratory personnel with business education, entrepreneurial sabbaticals and new opportunities to partner with universities and businesses, we can make cutting-edge technologies more widely available to american businesses and consumers, grow our economy, and ensure that the united states leads the world in innovation. i urge my colleagues to support my amendment and with that i
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yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentlelady yields back the balance of her time. the gentleman from california reserves. the gentleman from texas. mr. thornberry: mr. chairman, i'm pleased to yield one minute to the distinguished gentleman from maine, mr. poliquin. the chair: the gentleman from maine is recognized for one minute. mr. poliquin: yes, sir. thank you very much, mr. speaker. thank you very much, mr. chairman. i greatly appreciate everybody recognizing the importance of the hardworking folks at the defense finance accounting services. lots of our fellow americans, mr. speaker, might not realize that it has an incredibly important function to cut the payroll checks for our men and women in uniform and also they pay the vendors, suppliers and contractors that keep our military operating. year. nsactions last the pentagon has consolidated 0 offices and the civilian work force has been reduced from 27,000 to 13,000. i am so pleased and grateful that the armed services committee and the rules committee are advancing my
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amendment to clarify that there is no intention by the house of representatives to further consolidate any location or jobs. i am so proud of the 600 hardworking mainers who cut checks for our brave military personnel at the facility in limestone, maine, way up north. these 600 maine jobs are so important to our families and also to our military personnel. thank you, mr. chairman. thank you, mr. speaker. i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from texas reserves. the gentleman from california. mr. garamendi: mr. chairman, i'd like to yield one minute to the gentleman from new york, mr. souza. the chair: the gentleman is recognized from new york for one minute. mr. souzzi: thank you, mr. speaker. i want to thank my friend, mr. garamendi, for yielding this time to me. i'm pleased that my amendment, my bipartisan amendment, has been included in the en bloc package. there's a major problem in our country that americans want to us address, it's a bipartisan issue related to contamination
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related from defense-related activities. and i want to thank the chairman of the committee for his assistance in working on this, as well as my colleagues, congressman cook and congresswoman hanabusa, for their work in helping to get this done. military bases and munition storage depots and armament manufacturing facilities have left behind a multibillion-dollar legacy of required environmental cleanup. under my amendment, the assistant secretary of defense for energy installations and the environment will be required to brief the committees on armed services on initiatives being pursued to accelerate environmental restoration efforts. in my district alone, there's a site that was contaminated by grum on the and the united states navy and it was discovered over 40 years ago. it's contaminated the ground water, which is the sole source of drinking -- drinking water on long island. there are people that are trying cleaned up things but there's so much cleaned up but there's so much bureaucracy, so much red tape, so much finger
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pointing that we need to send a clear message from congress that we need the executive branch to work together with us to accelerate this cleanup. this amendment will help get that done. thank you so much. the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from california reserves. the gentleman from texas. mr. thornberry: mr. chairman, i'm pleased to yield one minute to the distinguished chair of our subcommittee on oversight and investigations, mrs. hartzler. the chair: the gentlelady is recognized for one minute. mrs. hartzler: thank you. i rise in support of this en bloc package. this package includes a bipartisan amendment to ensure that video surveillance equipment is included in the scope of the ndaa's prohibition on using certain chinese technology in government agencies. china is actively expanding the role of its companies in the u.s. domestic communications and public safety sectors. video surveillance and security equipment sold by chinese companies exposes the u.s. government to significant vulnerabilities due to built-in back doors baked right into their products. these back doors can be used to covertly funnel data, including live video and audio surveillance of america's sensitive military installations and embassies, back to chinese
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operatives. given what we know about china's intentions and the security risks posed by these firms, we have absolutely no business helping china extend its networks further and further into our agencies. i want to thank chairman thornberry and ranking member smith for including this amendment in the package and i yield back. the chair: the gentlelady yields back the balance of her time. the gentleman from texas reserves. the gentleman from washington -- does the gentleman from washington wish to control the time for the minority? mr. smith: i'm sorry, yes. i'm claiming the time for the minority. the chair: the gentleman is recognized. mr. smith: thank you, mr. chairman. i yield one minute to the gentleman from illinois, mr. snyder. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. schneider: thank you, mr. chairman. i want to thank the ranking member for the time. i rise today in support of my amendment to increase flexibility within the small innovative research and technology transfer programs. i want to thank chairman thornberry and running backing member spigget for including it in -- ranking member smith for including it in this en bloc package. this ensures we stay at the
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global forefront of innovation and advancement. but this investment is only the first step of the process and we must shirne -- ensure that innovators and entrepreneurs have the tools necessary to bring their ideas to market. currently sbir and sttr recipients are restricted in how much funding they can use toward commercialization. my amendment would increase the amount of funding recipients in phase one and phase two can use to pay for assistance protecting intellectual property, conducting market research, mapping out manufacturing plans, and other steps that would help them successfully commercialize their ideas. my amendment would help empower successful innovators with more resources to turn federally funded research into viable commercial products, creating quality jobs and securing our nation's creative leadership. i yield back. the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from washington reserves. the gentleman from texas. mr. thornberry: mr. chairman, i ask unanimous consent that amendment number 55 be removed rom the en bloc package. the chair: without objection.
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is there objection? without objection, the clerk will report. the modification. the clerk: modification to en bloc number 1 offered by mr. thornberry of texas. strike amendment number 55. the chair: without objection, the amendment is modified. . mr. thornberry: i reserve. the chair: the gentleman from washington is recognized. mr. smith: thank you. i yield one minute to the gentleman from california, mr. akano. the chair: the gentleman from california is recognized for one minute. mr. at that kango: -- mr. at that kango: thank you, mr. speaker. -- mr. takano: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise in support of the demonstration program in the air force for 15 to 20 deaf and hard of hearing individuals to serve their country. this amendment is inspired by a young deaf man i met a few years ago named keith nolan. he excelled at the first two levels of army rotc and prepared to take the next step when he
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was told he could not continue because he is deaf. including this amendment is an incredible tribute the to the advocacy and i urge my colleagues in the senate to main thin this provision. i thank the chairman and ranking member for including this amendment and i'm excited we're taking this step forward to give the deaf community a chance to defend the country that they love and that we love. thank you, and i yield back. the chair: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from washington is recognized. yield one minute to the gentleman from illinois, mr. lipinski. the chair: the gentleman from illinois is recognized. one minute. mr. lipinski: thank you. the world's foremost state sponsor of terrorism. in spite the world's foremost state sponsor of terrorism. in spite of their weak economy and u.s. imposed sanctions in response to iran's support for terrorism, abuse of human rights, and acquisition of prohibited weapons, they continue to support violent groups abroad. as our diplomatic and military
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leaders determine how best to respond to iran, they and the world, including iranians, should have a detailed accounting of the amount spent by iran to support specific terrorist groups. this is especially important in light of the escalating conflict between israel and iran-backed forces in syria. my amendment requires an annual report from the secretary of state and director of national intelligence describing iranian expenditures on military and terrorist activities outside this country. this will send a clear message to iran and our ally that is we do not tolerate support of terrorism. i thank the chair and ranking member for including my amendment in this block. i urge my colleagues to support it. and i yield back. the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from texas. mr. thornberry: mr. chairman, i have no further speakers on this amendment. and reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman from washington is recognized. mr. smith: we have no further speakers, either. i urge adoption of the amendment
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and yield back. the chair: the gentleman from texas. mr. thornberry: i yield the balance of the time as well. the chair: the question is on the amendments en bloc as modified. offered by the gentleman from texas. so many as are in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it. the en bloc amendments as odified are agreed to. it's now in order to consider amendment number 3 printed in house report 115-702. for what purpose does the gentleman from kentucky seek recognition. > mr. speaker, i rise in support of my support of my amendment. the chair: the clerk will designate the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 3, pripted in house report number 115-702, offered by mr. guthrie of kentucky. the chair: pursuant to house resolution 908, the gentleman from kentucky, mr. guthrie, and a member opposed, each will control five minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from kentucky. mr. guthrie: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the chair: the gentleman is
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recognized for as much time as he wishes to use. mr. guthrie: thank you, mr. speaker. i appreciate the chairman and chairman of the natural resources committee for working with me on this amendment. i rise in support of the amendment to clarify congress' intent with energy security and conservation programs at fort knox. in january, 2009, a major storm hit my district. a major ice storm crippling local infrastructure for days. this outage across the region also affected fort knox due to the post reliance on the local energy grid. this weather event highlighted a vulnerability that local leaders at fort knox took seriously and had been working for years to mitigate. with the full support of the pentagon, the leaders on post and in the community around fort knox have made great strides to make fort knox the armies' first energy secure installation. this really is a great story and one that we in congress should support. my amendment is about how natural gas fits into the complex, highly sophisticated energy security program of fort
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knox. kentucky being blessed with natural gas. the award winning combination of features in the fort knox energy program ranges from new power generation facilities to a geothermal pond, infrared heating system, extensive energy efficiency upgrades, and even a solar array. the dashboard in the control room is incredible to see as energy officials can remotely observe and analyze current energy consumption and efficiency isolated to the level of individual rooms in the building -- buildings on post. while the energy conservation program started in the 1970's, the natural gas story came into focus a little over 10 years ago the army established service contracts with local companies to drill and pump methane gas on post. this is everything weigh won't for our the army established service contracts with local na. energy independence and security that saves federal money, off the grid capability during moments of national or crisis utilizing energy resources efficiency as close to the source as possible.
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natural gas has been produced and used on post since 2009, and makes up about 28% of annual needs. the amount of gas produced is enough for an entire summer load. however, the catch s. why we're here with this amendment s. that the interior department has raised concerns because the army did not go through the typical bureau of land management lease process. the bureau of land management lease process will not work for operation because it is operation because it is not in our national security interests to give mineral rights for d.o.d. property to a third party. the army should be able to access the resources on post for consumption and use on post without having to go through a third party or remit royalties. this amendment simply allows fort knox to continue the great energy security success story and gives them the ability to remain the number one energy secure army installation. i reserve my time. the chair: for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition.
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>> thank you, mr. chair. i rise in opposition to the amendment. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. mr. lowenthal: thank you, mr. chairman. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for as much time as he wishes to use. mr. lowenthal: mr. chairman, i am a little surprised that meone from kentucky is sponsoring this amendment. because if this amendment were to become law, who would be the biggest sponsoring loser? it would be the commonwealth of kentucky. when the army started developing natural gas under fort knox, it did so without notifying the department of interior, which is the agency that's responsible for these resources. now, the defense department has admitted that it was a mistake and says that it has taken steps from preventing this from ever happening again. but we still know that they are producing gas. and i'm glad that they have
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taken steps to prevent this in the future. but to my knowledge that is not the critical issue. the critical issue is we have a real problem here. that is the natural gas that's under fort knox belongs to the american people not the military. and royalties are owed to the american people when that gas is sold. as we know, half of those royalties as we know, half of t royalties would have gone to kentucky, or would go to kentucky. example, in army estimated that it effectively cheated kentucky out of $250,000. now there are four more years of cheating kentucky and the american people out of their royalties. that number is probably much larger now than 2014 the the 25 year. we have no indication that the army has paid any of these
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royalties. nd until we deal with that issue that they are not paying royalties for the gas that the american people and the people of kentucky own, we should not be letting them off the hook. i would ask the sponsor of the amendment to look closely at this issue and what his home state stands to loose because of it and then to -- lose because of it and then to reconsider again whether or not he want this is amendment to be adopted. i reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from kentucky is recognized. mr. guthrie: i have no further speakers and prepared to close. the chair: prepared to close. the gentleman from kentucky prepared -- and the gentleman from california is recognized of his time.nder mr. lowenthal: i yield back. the chair: the gentleman from kentucky. mr. guthrie: i want to close that -- it is owned by the mill. mr. lowenthal: i yield back. -- american people and the military is owned by the american people. there are things we can work through and move forward. fort knox an economic driver in
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that community. it contributes with the federal hardworking tax dollars that comes to fort knox to support our men and women contributes greatly to that community. being energy secure is a vital component when we look at the overall needs of the army and the importance of every army post. fort knox certainly make a great claim being off the grid. being able to operate in times of national emergency. i do think this has been thought through. instead of going through the other process, we need to move forward and let the department of defense do what the pentagon had set fort knox to do. i appreciate my comments from cra. this is the right policy to move forward and i yield back my time. the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the question son the amendment offered by the gentleman from contract -- the question is on the amendment offered by gentleman from kentucky. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the it. s. it--the aye vs. the amendment is agreed to.
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it is now in order to consider amendment number 8 printed in house report 115-702. for what purpose does the nevada seek recognition. >> i have an amendment at the desk, mr. chairman. the chair: the clerk will designate that amendment. the clerk: amendment number 8, printed in house report number offered by mr. amodei of nevada. the chair: pursuant to house resolution 908, the gentleman amodei, and the -- a member amodei, and the -- a member opposed each will control five minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from nevada. mr. amodei: thank you, mr. offe of nevada. chairman. i yield myself one minute. my amendment would streamline the permitting process for production of minerals deemed critical and strategic for national security and other infrastructure needs. what does the word streamline mean? if you read the amendment, it
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means 30 months. now, i'm a little embarrassed to tell you that streamline is 30 months, but unless the parties agree to something longer, it's 30 months. when you say deemed critical, if you read the amendment, you'll see multiple pages basically paying respect to the nepa process and also setting forth due process and asking for a federal representative of the lead agency to coordinate federal permitting actions so that we proceed as expeditiously as possible when there is, in fact, a need that affects the armed services of our country for supply chain and things like that that are critical. i reserve the balance of my time. for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition. i rise in l: opposition to the amendment. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. mr. lowenthal: thank you, mr. chair. i yield myself such time as i may consume. i rise in
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opposition to the amendment. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for five mr. chairman, this amendment is simply an attempt to wave -- waive portions of our environmental laws, for all, i use the word all new mines by pretending that these mines are essential for national security. under this amendment, even sand and gravel, yes, sand and gravel, would become a critical and strategic mineral. the proponents of this amendment have argued in the past that sand and gravel are extremely important when you need to build roads. i will agree to that. but this is a deliberate distortion of the meeting -- of the meaning of what is a critical mineral. when it comes to minerals, just because something is important does not mean that it is critical. when someone is in critical condition in the hospital, that doesn't simply mean that their
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condition is important. it has a specific meaning. the same is true for critical minerals. all reputable definitions of critical minerals make it clear that there must be a risk of losing access to the mineral for it truly to be called critical. even the definition from an executive order signed by president trump just five months ago says that a critical mineral has to have a supply chain that is vulnerable to disruption. in the final list of critical minerals identified by the secretary of the interior published just last week, the department states that it recognizes the economic significance and indispensable nature of minerals such as sand and gravel. but it also states, and i quote, these minerals do not currently meet the definition of critical, unquote.
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because we're not reliant on imports and we have access here in the united states to adequate domestic sources. simply put, we're not at risk of losing access to our supplies of sand and gravel, and no foreign government is threatening to close down our quarries. . but i point out it only took four months for the interior department of this administration to publish their final list of critical minerals. four months. and that is starting from scratch.
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clearly the existing process is already very quick and very flexible. there is no need to define everything as critical and weaken environmental protections for all mines, just so a mining company doesn't have to wait four months. also, if this amendment looks family -- familiar to many of my colleagues, that is because it's language that's come out of the natural resources committee on a party line vote in each of the past four congresses. in the past three congresses, it passed the house, again on a party line vote, only to go nowhere in the senate. the reason why it goes nowhere in the senate is because that body understands what is the definition of a critical and strategic mineral. this amendment will have similar
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luck in the senate and it has no business being added to a defense authorization bill. i urge my colleagues to oppose the amendment and i reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from nevada seek recognition? >> i seek recognition for the purpose of providing to my colleague from arizona one minute of the time on this amendment. the chair: the gentleman from arizona is recognized. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i rise today in support of my good friend and colleague, representative amodei's, amendment. the amendment aims to streamline a bureaucratic process that is hampering the production of defense critical metals and minerals. these are important to national security and help provide our troops with the equipment and weapons they need to keep our us safe. a nonclassified defense study recently found that failure to have a reliable supply chain for at least 16 of the 35 critical minerals has already caused significant weapons system production delays for the department of defense.
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a recent report published by the department of interior and the u.s. geological survey found that the u.s. is 100% net import-reliant, let's get that again, is 100% net import-reliant on foreign countries, including china, for 20 different critical minerals. mr. gosar: such reliance threats -- threatens our national security, as well as our ability to make equipment and weapons that our troops need to be successful in their missions. i applaud representative amodei for his strong leadership and tireless efforts to the support of our men and women in uniform, urge the adoption of this amendment, and with that i yield back. the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. mr. amodei: i reserve, mr. chairman. the chair: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from california seeks recognition? >> i reserve, mr. chair. the chair: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. mr. amodei: thank you, mr. chairman. you know, it's good to hear that my colleagues from the golden state think that the administration is doing a good job in this area in some respects. and it's good to hear about concerns about the state of
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kentucky. but let's talk about what's actually in the amendment. and so let's talk about what's not in the amendment first. first of all, there's nothing in the amendment that says you must approve a request to be considered a strategic critical mineral. so when we talk in the context of, oh, gee, this could be sand and gravel, some federal land manager in the executive department, under the provisions in this amendment, has to find that. and by the way, there's multiple pages saying how they go about that. so it's 30 months. and guess what, after that 30 months, you don't get a yes. so when we talk about the -- how the sky is going to fall, let's keep in mind that if you can't satisfy them, whatever it is that's critical, that, guess what, you may get a no. as should be done if it doesn't satisfy that. so to indicate in context that this is something that's going to make everything critical, omits the whole appliance process and omits the consideration process that goes over 30 months. now, i just want to point out a
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couple of other things. because, quite frankly, although maybe the other side thinks that the crystal ball that the administration has is an excellent one, i beg to differ. and since we're talking about things that happened in specific states, let's talk about the earthquake that happened in northern california a while back that quite frankly shut down freeways, major arteries in the bay area. now, i don't know if sand and gravel would have been appropriate and critical for that, but guess what, to those people in the bay area who wanted that transportation infrastructure open, they wanted it open as soon as possible. so if we have to wait for 30 months to haul loads of sand and gravel and make concrete, to get there0 open, then perhaps was an argument for that. i don't know. unless something like that happens again. but for those minerals that are critical to our health care industry, our defense industry, and all of those sorts of things, they ought to have the opportunity to apply and see if they get told yes or not in 30
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months. with that, i yield back and thank you, mr. chairman. the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from california is recognized. >> i yield back. the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. all time is expired. the question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman from nevada. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes appear to have it. >> ard recorded vote -- a recorded vote. the chair: the gentleman requests a recorded vote. pursuant to clause 6 of rule 18, further proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from nevada will be postponed. it's now in order to consider amendment number 10 printed in ouse report 115-702. for what purpose does the gentleman from massachusetts seek recognition? mr. mcgovern: i claim -- i have an amendment at the desk, mr. chairman. the chair: the clerk will designate the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 10 printed in house report 115-702
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offered by mr. mcgovern of massachusetts. the chair: pursuant to house resolution 908, the gentleman from massachusetts, mr. mcgovern, and a member opposed each will control five minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from massachusetts. mr. mcgovern: thank you, mr. chairman. this is an amendment that i'm offering along with my colleague from minnesota, mr. emmer. i want to thank him for his leadership on this issue. our amendment would very simply create a service medal to be awarded to veterans or their surviving family members in honor of their service and sacrifice to our nation. between 1945 and 1962, about 225,000 members of our armed forces participated in hundreds of nuclear weapons tests. now known as atomic veterans, these g.i.'s were placed in extremely dangerous areas and were constantly exposed to potentially dangerous levels of radiation in performance of their duties. they were sworn to secrecy. unable to even talk to their doctors about their past exposure to radiation.
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thankfully presidents bill clinton and george h.w. bush recognized their service and acted to provide specialized care and compensation for their duty. in 2007, our allies, great britain, new zealand and australia, enacted their versions of this amendment by authorizing a medal to honor their atomic veterans, who served with the united states. regrettably, the pentagon remained silent on honoring our atomic veterans, arguing that to do so would diminish their service -- diminish the service of other military personnel who have tasked with dangerous missions -- who were as iting ed with dangerous -- who were tasked with dangerous missions. tragically, more than 75% of atomic veterans have already passed away. never having received this recognition. they served honorably and kept a code of silence that most certainly led to many of these veterans passing away prematurely. past administrations and congresses have dealt with
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thornier issues of legality and compensation. what remains is recognizing these veterans' duty, honor and faithful service to our nation. i want to thank my colleagues in the house for unanimously voting in favor of this amendment last year, by a vote of 424-0. i was shocked when the service medal was not included in the conference report. so i'm urging my colleagues to join me in voting for this amendment again. let us send a message to the senate that this is important. that we are not going to give up. together we can show them that we are serious about honoring our -- honoring this brave, distinguished group of patriotic americans. we owe it to our atomic veterans to recognize them for their selfless service to our nation. i reserve my time. the chair: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. does anybody seek time in upport or in opposition? mr. mcgovern: mr. chairman, let me just close by saying, you know, our veterans, who are now
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known as atomic veterans, served this country with great distinction. and when they left the service, they raised their families, they worked in factories, they contributed to our communities. they are getting older. let us not wait until there are no surviving atomic veterans before we do the right thing. i ask my colleagues to join me in honoring our atomic veterans. this is the right thing to do. and it's shameful that we have not been able to do this sooner. but i'm confident that maybe this is the moment where we'll do the right thing. with that, i yield back my time. the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman from massachusetts. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes appear to have it. mr. mcgovern: i ask for a recorded vote. the chair: the gentleman asks for a record vote. pursuant to clause 6 of rule 18, further proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from massachusetts will be postponed. it is now in order to consider
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amendment number 13 printed in house report 115-702. for what purpose does the gentleman from west virginia seek recognition? mr. mckinley: mr. speaker, i have an amendment at the desk. the clerk: amendment number 13 printed in house report 115-702 offered by mr. mckinley of west virginia. the chair: pursuant to house resolution 908, the gentleman from west virginia, mr. mckinley, and a member opposed each will control five minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from west virginia. mr. mckinley: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, i rise in support of my amendment to h.r. 5515. but let's put this in historical context. in 1941, congress passed the barry amendment. which requires the department of defense to purchase certain items only from american companies. that list includes american-made roducts which already includes textiles, clothing, shoes, food
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and certain tools. our amendment would simply add dinnerware. america has some of the best, most talented producers of nontoxic, lead-free dinnerware on the globe. companies like coors in tucson, arizona, emerson creek in bedford, virginia. homer lockland in west virginia. it makes common sense that when we purchase equipment for our military, whether it's weapons, food or supplies, it's incumbent on us to consider american jobs as well. this amendment solidifies that belief and shows our strong support for american manufacturing, and already has basketball supported an endorsed by the alliance for american manufacturing. but importantly, it would ensure access to safe dinnerware for our military.
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free from lead or other cars genic materials. according to the national institutes of health and the food and drug administration, there have been numerous violations involving lead and other contaminates in dinnerware coming from china and mexico and other suppliers around the world . leading to concerns for their se by american troops. mr. speaker, i urge my colleagues to stand with american manufacturers, safety and health concerns, and the jobs that are created in our communities by supporting this amendment. i reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. does anyone on the minority side seek recognition? the chairman of the committee. mr. thornberry: mr. chairman, i claim the time in opposition. the chair: the gentleman claims the time in opposition. the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. mr. thornberry: mr. chairman, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the chair: without objection. mr. thornberry: mr. chairman, i
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appreciate and understand all members' desire to not only support jobs in their district, but to support american manufacturing. i share, of course, that goal. at the same time i must oppose this amendment because there is simply no national security justification to mandate where d.o.d. buys its plates and mugs. now, there was a view in the past that textiles and food and certain tools were essential for the health and well-being of our military, and related to their combat effectiveness. and it is absolutely true that we have had troops die from exposure, from tainted food, not having the appropriate tools has had an effect on the quality of our weaponry. but i have never heard that
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argument aplide when it -- apply when it comes to plates and bowls and knives or forks and spoons that we're about to discuss with the next amendment. and, mr. chairman, adding this mandate hurts our troops. because if that -- if these suppliers of plates are the best price, then that's what d.o.d. buys. but if it costs more to have these plates, that money has got to come from somewhere, and that money will come from bullets, or fuel or other things that are essential for our troops to have. i cannot tell you how many fewer bullets the pentagon will be able to buy because they have to pay more for bowls and plates and mugs. i also can't tell you how much more, exactly, the pentagon will spend in ensuring compliance
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with this mandate. to do the studies, to check the quality. to have a report if they should fall in one of the exceptions which are all there within the law. but i know it'll be some. and some money, some added bureaucracy, is too much. as a matter of fact, the underlying bill is trying to go the other way and get more resources into the hands of our war fighters, to increase what and reduce he tooth the tail. and i would just say one other point at this point, mr. chairman. where does this stop? where does this end? so last year we had knives and forks and spoons this year we've got plates and mugs. does it next go to the trays they carry their food on? what about the plastic cups they may drink from?
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do we keep rolling with this and go to the hand soap and toilet paper in the bathroom? i don't know where it stops. if there's not a national security justification to put this added cost and added mandate, we should not do it to our troops. therefore, i must oppose this gentleman's amendment an other amendments that are not related to national security. i reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from west virginia. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i appreciate your remarks, mr. chairman. as far as it relates to national security, our schools and our spitals all across america consider it a serious enough situation on their china ware because of the lead content and other carcinogenic materials that they've made this mandated for the health of our children across america that they must have lead-free chinaware.
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mr. mckinley: unfortunately, what's happening for our military is we are allowing -- we don't have that requirement. by putting lead-free in american products we'd be able to have control, so you say our troops can get sick from tainted food, they can get sick as well from the plates that they eat from if it migrates out of the material into their food when you put hot contents on it or you cook it in a microwave. those things can happen with that. now if the schools and the hospitals think it has enough of a concern that they may maybe -- that they make this mandate, quite frankly, i think we ought to consider the same thing for our troops. so that they're not made sick. as far as the price and quality, there's nothing -- we're simply adding. if that amendment or that language in the amendment deals with satisfactory quality and fair prices as standard, all
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we're doing is adding that to it. i don't see that issue being valid on this because you're going to be -- if it's not good quality, even if it's american-made, you're going to be able to, you're going to be able to acquire from someone else at the same time. mr. speaker, again, i urge my colleagues to stand with us on this issue, american meafed products, safe for our troops nd i call for a recorded vote. the chair: the gentleman calls for a recorded vote. does the gentleman from texas wish the final word? mr. thornberry: i yield myself the balance of my time simply to say, before we add this additional burden on our troops and what we provide to them, there ought to be a scintilla of evidence that this is a problem with the military. saying, well, somebody might get sick someday is not enough to say we're going to take more money away from your needs and put it into plates and mugs.
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we have got to have a sense of priorities where the real -- a sense of evidence of where the real problems are. therefore i oppose the gentleman's amendment and yield back. the chair: the gentleman yields back. the question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman from west virginia. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair the noes have it. mr. mckinley: i ask for a recorded vote. the chair: the gentleman from west virginia asks for a recorded vote. pursuant to clause 6 of rule 18, further proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from west virginia will be postponed. it is now in order to consider amendment number 19 printed in house report 115-702. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from new york seek recognition?
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>> i have an amendment at the desk. the chair: the clerk will report the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 19 printed in house report 115-6 2 , offered by ms. ten nee of new york. the chair: the gentlewoman is recognized. ms. tenney: i standen the floor of this great body to support american manufacture -- urge my colleagues to support american manufacturing and american workers. the first shovel struck the ground to build the erie canal which started the industrial revolution in american on july 4, 1817. paul revere started his company there remington arms was founded just down the road. we supplied our military with firearms. these two iconic companies we main -- remain but many more have left. throughout our nation and the region that i represent, factories that once boomed with
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activity and production are now shuttered and empty. meanwhile the entire segment of the population has been pushed out of the work force. president trump described the america we now know in central new york in his first inaugural speech. our manufacturing plants are now rusted out factories scattered like tombstones across the landscape. in the 22nd district, the rust belt of new york and many regions across this nation, economic activity has been a consistent downturn. well-paying manufacturing jobs have been increasingly hard to come by, leaving former industrial communities like ours empty as families and businesses flee in droves. in my home state of new york we've lost one million residents in since 2010 alone. here in washington, in state capitals -- capitols across the country, special interests have been placed before the american worker. it's time to put our citizens and our work force first. mr. chairman, the amendment that i have introduced will level the playing field for american companies and it will show our american work force that they
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have not been forgotten and importantly it will reduce our military's dependence on foreign goods. it's time to put our -- for 30 years the barry amendment included a domestic sourcing requirement for stainless steel flat ware. however in 2006, the provision was remove when onigh ta limited which once was in our region, the sole compliant manufacturer in the u.s., closed its u.s. factories and moved to china where almost all flat ware is now manufactured. in a true american comeback story worthy of a hollywood cinderella story, two former oneida limited employees opened a new company, sheryl manufacturing. greg owens and matt roberts purchased oneida's closed factory and elled equipment. they refurbished the old equipment and opened shefrl manufacturing, hired many former oneida limited mes and have a work force of nearly 8024e678 product line they create --
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create is known as liberty table top this former factory tombstone on our landscape is now a symbol of american ingenuity, craftsmanship, hard work and freedom. the story of rebirth has given hope to my district. sheryl manufacturing has a strong and proven record of selling high quality products at market prices. since 2008 they've been among the top providers of flat paire to the department of defense, fulfilling more than $6.8 million in federal contracts over the subsequent years. while i understand there may be concerns that this domestic sourcing provision will increase costs, g.s.a. has already found the flat ware to be offereded a a fair and reasonable price which is a major reason why this factory, why the agency already purchases flat ware from sheryl. most importantly, my amendment retains all existing waivers under the barry amendment, unlike some other barry amendments. in the case of negative changes to price or quality, the department of defense can use
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other sources of flat ware including in other countries. it doesn't cost the department of defense anything to use sheryl under this amendment. mr. chairman, at this time it is true that the only current barry compliant manufacturer is located in my district. it is sheryl. however that does not mean that others who support domestic manufacturing cannot begin production and comply with this amendment. opening a door for american manufacturers can encourage entrepreneurs across the crunt toy start an operation of their own. my amendment encourages the american free market principles of competition and ingenuity. again this amendment does not cost the department of defense. passing this amendment will prove to american entrepreneurs and visionaries that congress stated support for american jobs and american manufacturing is not merely lip service. it shows that congress is committed to putting our nation back on the path of prosperity. i'd like to thank my colleagues who co-sponsored this bipartisan amendment , my fellow new yorker, representative katko who
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has 15 businesses in the neighboring new york district he represents that are part of the sheryl manufacturing supply chain. representatives poliquin and lipinski, both great supporters of buy america, representative walter jones, a dedicated member of the house armed services committee, and representative tim ryan, an outspoken advocate for american manufacturing my amendment supports american manufacturing. helps the domestic supply chain that spans 40 congressional districts from new york to california. the chair: the gentlelady's time has expired. does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? >> i claim time in opposition. i yield 30 seconds to the gentlelady from new york to finish her statement. the chair: the gentlelady is recognized for 30 seconds. ms. tenney: thank you. again i want to emphasize that this amendment supports manufacturing and the domestic
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supply chain spans 40 congressional districts from new york to california and it decreases the department of defense's dependence on foreign producers and goods, removing the variability and uncertainty that comes with foreign sourcing of necessary materials for our military. it's the smart thing to do considering our goods are now made in china of this type. today we have the opportunity to give american manufacturing the boost it deserves while adding a measure of certainty to d.o.d. procurement. i urge my colleagues to support this amendment. the chair: the gentleman is recognized. pll thornberry: i yield myself the balance of the time. i want to express my admiration for the gentlelady for new york and her advocacy for the workers and businesses in her district. but i must oppose the amendment and the fundamental question before the house is are we going to inflict higher costs on the department of defense with a
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mandate that requires where the department buys its forks and spoons and knives and plates and mugs. that's the question. if any of these suppliers provide the best price, that's where d.o.d. is going to go buy them. these amendments, both the last one and this one, only become relevant if the costs are higher and we are making d.o.d. buy the higher priced items anyway. now as i mentioned, there may be some justification for that when there's a vital national security concern. but when it comes to forks and plates, i don't think that exists. and so, the only way these amendments matter is if it forces d.o.d. to pay more and when it forces d.o.d. to pay more for plates and bowls and forks and knives then you're taking money away from bullets
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and fuel and guns and ships and the things that help keep america safe. mr. speaker, creating domestic jobs is not the primary mission of the department of defense. our focus, the department's focus and our focus in this bill and when it comes to this congress, is to protect the nation and to support the men and women who risk their lives for us. we've got to give them everything they need to do their job. we should not do anything that would divert from that. so i again with all admiration for the gentlelady and from the gentleman from west virginia, i just say if we're going to tell d.o.d. where they have to buy their forks and knives and plates, where does it end? i have a manufacturer, i'm sure, in my district that would love too supply the department of defense with something or another. we cannot go down this road.
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we must let the department buy the best value. that's what i think all members should support. i oppose the amendment and yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman yields back. the question is on the amendment offered by the gentlelady from new york. those in favor say aye. hose opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the noes have it. the gentlelady requests a recorded voted. -- recorded vote. pursuant to clause 6 of rule 18, further proceedings offered by the gentlelady from new york will be postponed. the chair wishes to announce that amendment number 22 will not be offered. the chair wishes to announce it's now in order to consider amendment number 31 printed in house report 115-702 and amendment number 32 printed in house report 115-702. those two amendments are going
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to be rolled into an en bloc amendment later. so they'll not be considered at this time. and finally, it is now in order .o consider amendment number 43 for what purpose does the gentleman from new york seek recognition? mr. engel: mr. chairman, i have an amendment the desk. the chair: the clerk will designate the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 43 printed in house report 115-702 offered by mr. engel of new york. the chair: pursuant to house resolution 908, the gentleman from new york, mr. engel, and a member opposed will each control five minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from new york. mr. engel: thank you very much, mr. chairman. let me say that since august of 2017, the burmese military has inflicted horrific violence gainst the rohingya and is today using the same tactics against others.
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the result, 700,000 refugees. i didn't get that wrong. it's 700,000 refugees. pushed into bangladesh, 80% are women and children. many of whom are now victims of horrific gender-based violence. it's the sort of treatment ethnic minorities have endured there for decades. this is a man-made crisis. ethnic cleansing, perhaps genocide. and to date there's been no accountability. this measure would change that. it would limit u.s. military to military assistance with the burmese military until we see progress and human rights and accountability. it would authorize tough financial sanctions and visa bans against military and security forces involved in human rights abuses. promote transparency and push reform in the burmese sector, a target of corrupt military influence, and it requires the
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secretary of state to determine what in addition to ethnic cleansing might have occurred. this body has long stood on the side of freedom, democracy and human rights in burma. i urge all members to join me today in doing the same thing by supporting this measure. and i reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. for what purpose does any other member seek recognition? seeing none, does the gentleman from new york wish to close? mr. engel: i'm sorry. i urge ail all members to support this and -- i urge all members to support this and i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the question is now on the amendment offered by the gentleman from new york. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. the ayes appear to have it. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes do have it. the amendment is agreed to. mr. engel: mr. chairman, on that i ask fored a vode -- i ask for a recorded vote.
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the chair: the gentleman from new york asks for a recorded vote. pursuant to clause 6 of rule 18, further proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from new york will be postponed. it's now in order -- oh, he is here. ok. it is now in order to consider amendment number 50 presented in house report 115-702. for what purpose does the gentleman from colorado seek recognition? mr. polis: i have an amendment at the desk. the chair: the clerk will designate the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 50 printed in house report 115-702 offered by mr. polis of colorado. the chair: pursuant to house resolution 908, the gentleman from colorado, mr. polis, and a member opposed each will control five minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from colorado. mr. polis: my amendment, which i'm proud to sponsor with representative blumenauer, makes a small, sensible reduction to unnecessary nuclear weapons
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spending. the national defense authorization that we have before us this week authorizes hundreds of millions of dollars for our nuclear weapons program, en $65 million to produce an additional low-yield warhead. while the threats we face around the world are different than what they were a few years ago, we cannot afford to sacrifice our fiscal security of our nation in the name of national security. spending more than we have and more than we need to on the military makes us less secure. rather than more secure. by mortgaging our future and the future of future generations to those foreign nations that hold our debt. my amendment would simply make a small start by reducing the funding for the national security administration's weapons account, by $198 million. the exact amount that the agency itself says that it doesn't need.
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let me be clear. this amendment will maintain all of our nuclear capabilities and research. but for a body that should be making the hard choices to get our budget under control, why should we be giving the national security administration more money than they want, need or are asking for? we need to start getting our budget under control. this is a small step. i offered other amendments that were blocked. this one is allowed. i hope that my republican and democratic colleagues can come together to show that we're serious about cutting unnecessary spending. and reducing our deficit. and i reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from alabama seek recognition? >> i rise to claim time in opposition to this amendment. the chair: the gentleman is recognized. >> i yield myself such time as i may consume. i strongly oppose this amendment. this amendment is not about
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stewardship of taxpayer dollars, good government or setting priorities. instead this amendment's part of a broader anti-nuclear agenda that we see year in and year out. let's be clear about what this amendment does. it cuts $145 million in desperately needed funding for recapitalizing nuclear weapons production buildings dating back to the 1940's and 1950's. mr. rogers: here's a kyo from -- quote from president obama's administrator before my subcommittee a few years ago. quote, our infrastructure is extensive, complex and in many critical areas several decades old. more than half of the approximately 6,000 real property assets are over 40 years old and nearly 30% date back to the manhattan project era. many of these enterprises -- critical utility, safety and support systems are failing at an increasing and unpredictable rate, which poses both programmatic and safety risks, closed quote.
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that was in 2016. folks, let me assure you, this problem hasn't gotten better since then. i know that it's only gotten worse because i visited all sites and seen these deplorable conditions firsthand. we're asking the nation's highly skilled scientists, engineers and technicians to design, build our nuclear weapons in buildings that are literally falling down around them. we've had large chunks of concrete fall from creelnoogs operating workspaces -- ceilings in operating workspaces. i personally have seen tarps hung over sensitive diagnosic equipment to prevent leaking roofs from destroying equipment worth tens of millions of dollars. it has a $3.7 billion backlog in deferred maintenance and repair needs. the funding that is in this amendment would strip away sorely needed help to dig out of this hole. it's unfortunate the gentleman doesn't at least recognize that this amendment would do harm to the safety of our workers.
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i urge my colleagues to recognize this amendment for what it is and be a part of the broader agenda to undercut -- and reject this broader agenda to undercut the u.s. nuclear deterrent and i urge a no vote and reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from colorado. mr. polis: i yield myself such time as i may consume. the chair: the gentleman is recognized. mr. polis: our nuclear arsenal is capable of ending human life on the planet five to seven times. i don't understand the need for redundancy when it comes to the extinction of humanity. once should be more than enough. to kill every man, woman and child on the face of the planet. my amendment doesn't address all of that. but it does make a cut of $198 million in unnecessary spending for nuclear weapons. i urge my colleagues to vote yes on my amendment and i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from alabama. mr. rogers: i yield two minutes to my friend and colleague from tennessee and maybe of the
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strategic forces subcommittee. the chair: the gentleman is . cognized mr. desjarlais: the nnsa's mission is arguably one of the most critical national security roles from across the government and as my colleague from alabama pointed out, after years of insufficient funding, our nuclear security enterprise is now facing a myriad of infrastructure problems and potential failures. to quote los alamos lab director, charlie mcmillan, one of the things that keeps me up at night is the realization that essential capabilities are held at risk by the possibility of such failures. the amendment offered by the gentleman from colorado would only exacerbate these problems. most of the cuts made by this amendment would come from high-priority deferred maintenance and infrastructure repairs, with a $3.7 billion infrastructure maintenance backlog, these cuts are unacceptable and pose a serious threat. not only to the nnsa mission, but to the occupational well-being of its employees as well. under the leadership of chairman
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thornberry and chairman rogers, the committee has worked hard over the past two years to mitigate these infrastructure issues and prevent the occurrence of a single point failure within the nuclear security interprice. it is critical that we continue to push forward with these efforts and resolve these outstanding issues. as such, i strongly urge my colleagues to oppose this amendment. i yield back. the chair: the gentleman from alabama. mr. rogers: i'd like to yield 30 seconds to mac thornberry for any comments he may have. mr. thornberry: i thank the gentleman for yielding. mr. chairman, the men and women of nnsa are like the military. they're going to get the job done. under whatever conditions are required. theiris amendment effects work environment, both their health and safety and whether we can attract and retain top-quality people. it's the people who would suffer under this, it's not the mission. i understand people are anti-nuclear. but it's the people who would suffer. as both gentlemen have said, we
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have a tremendous backlog. this just helps us catch up a little bit. the chair: the gentleman from colorado. the question is on -- oh, the gentleman from alabama. mr. rogers: i urge a no vote and yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman from colorado. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the noes have it. mr. polis: on that i request a recorded vote. the chair: the gentleman requests a recorded vote. pursuant to clause 6 of rule 18, further proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from colorado will be postponed. it's now in order to consider amendment number 55 printed in house report 115-702. for what purpose does the gentleman from wisconsin seek recognition? mr. gallagher: mr. chairman, i have an amendment at the desk. the chair: the clerk will designate the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 55 printed in house report 115-702
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offered by mr. gallagher of wisconsin. the chair: pursuant to house resolution 908, the gentleman from wisconsin, mr. gallagher, and a member opposed each will control five minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from wisconsin. mr. gallagher: mr. chairman, i yield myself such is time as i may consume. the chair: without objection. mr. gallagher: mr. chairman, as a free and open society, the united states has always drawn in from those around the world seeking to study here, to live here. individuals seeking to observe and participate in our way of life. indeed we benefit from these visitors when they take on our values and go home with them. however, when an individual comes to study and work in the united states, we must take care of both that they are here for their stated purpose, and that they are allowed to fulfill their legitimate goal without disruption. as one f.b.i. study has found, foreign intelligence services have been taking advantage of higher education institutions and personnel for many years. this problem is particularly acute with china. and that's why administrations on both sides of the aisle have considered measures to protect academic research from foreign exploitation. in recent years we've seen a number of cases damaging the
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national security. in 2018 a tennessee professor was convicted of exporting defense articling without a license after using chinese students to conduct air force research that they exported to china. in 2009 a researcher at duke university sent data back to china which led to the creation of a multibillion-dollar chinese company. and in 2015 chinese professors were amongst six defendants charged by the department of justice with theft of trade secrets on behalf of chinese companies and academic institutions. as the united states addresses china's increasingly -- increasingly aggressive rise, it's critical we address these issues. that's why my amendment requires that a whole of government strategy on china mandated by the ndaa incorporate two key elements. exploitation of visa programs to enter the united states by the chinese communist party, and the party's intimidation and coercion of chinese nationals in the united states. this is not a blanket ban or requirement of any sort to limit the number of chinese students studying in the u.s., rather it
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is merely adding an important element to the existing strategy required under the ndaa to address a whole of government challenge comprehensively and i urge my colleagues to support this amendment and i reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman seek recognition? >> i rise to claim time in opposition. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. mr. thornberry: i rise to claim time in opposition. i commend my friend from wisconsin for correctly identifying one of the strategic challenges china poses. i'm concerned that this effort will make flawed language even worse. the bill currently requires the -- a report to congress to respond to competitive and malicious actions. my friend outlined several times when we have been successful in
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ferreting out these actions without his amendment being logged. let me be clear on the strategy. mr. larsen: the strategy should not always be only responding to china. the u.s. needs to develop a proactive, assertive agenda to compete with china. rather than setting up actions that could restrict student visa programs or suggesting that chinese visitors are in the u.s. to do the bidding of the chinese party, we should be taking an approach consistent with our national security interest and our values. i don't want to dwell too much on the confucius institute but in part our response to something like the confucius institute ought to be u.s. programs to support chinese language and culture programs for students in this country instead of outsourcing. as an example, we can goen of offense rather than responding or enacting actions by china. schools should not have to rely
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on china for funding as an example. i'm deeply concerned the language in the underlying bill takes a reflective and narrow-minded mueview of the real challenge posed by china. closing off our country is the wrong approach. closing off our nation of foreign investment and students is thinking like a defensive coordinator, not a particularly creative one. we need to think like a head coach, developing new offensive and defensive strategies a new playbook, revamping the old one. let me clarify, going on offense is not just a reaction to china, it represents a strategy to keep the u.s. engaged in the global community. we should focus on multiple aspects of public policy. education, foreign trade, investment, immigration, military capabilities, innovation, and of course our bilateral relationship with china. the smarter strategic plan would demonstrate to the world and the chinese people the superior of thoif u.s. model. democracy, free and open elections, diversity, open markets and a free press. we should be exposing chinese students to these values, making
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sure they understand that they have a different choice. this is what congress should be working on. not adding new provisions to an already flawed report. i urge my colleagues to oppose the fwalger amendment and i eserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman reserve, the gentleman from wisconsin. mr. gal fwerger: i yield three minutes to the gentlelady. chip the gentlelady is recognized. >> we need to if face the reality that china is pursuing a whole of nation approach to gain global influence. this includes targeting u.s. universities to influence our student visa programs to steal sensitive, proprietary and classified information. mrs. hartzler: according to d.o.d., almost a quarter of foreign efforts to steal sensitive information happen through academic institutions. what's more alarming is under chinese law, citizens are required to provide data,
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information, and technological support or assistance to the chinese government upon request. this means that china can intimidate and coerce citizens to provide information. the amendment offered today will ensure this form of espionage is thoroughly considered as we develop our whole of government china strategy. i support what the gentleman said that we need to go on the offensive as well but that couldn't mean we give up the defense and we need to be smart in that strategy as. we i urge my colleagues to vote yes and i yield back. the chair: the gentlelady yields back. he gentleman from wisconsin. >> i reserve. he chair: the gentleman. mr. larsen: i would like to yield the final two minutes to the gentlelady from california. the chair: the gentlelady is recognized for two minutes. ms. chu: mr. speaker, i rise in strong opposition to mr. gallagher's amendment to the national defense authorization act. this harmful amendment would add
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language to the ndaa that specifically targets chinese foreign nationals who receive u.s. pliment or student visas for extra scrutiny by our federal government. if this amendment twor confine itself to the serious issue of safeguarding american interests against foreign political influence, industrial acquisitions and regional global capability, it might be supportable. but this amendment specifically targets an ethnic population in this clint by singling out the chinese who participate in student visa programs and who are receiving employment visas. while there's no doubt that we must take national security threats from foreign countries seriously, including russia, this amendment assumes there's widespread abuse of our visa program from china alone and attempts to paint all chinese students, scholars and employees en s and potential spy -- massee as posen -- potential spies for china.
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this doesn't create a precedent of singling out individuals because of their country of origin. e have seen how our nation's attitude toward foreign u.s. als can impact citizens. two chinese americans were accused of espionage of china only to have the charges dropped with no explanation. just this week one was exonerated by a judge saying the case was a gross miscarriage of justice. it's wrong to characterize a group of people as a threat to our country. i reject the notion that all chinese students should be viewed with more suspicion in this country than others.
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>> i would like to yield 90 seconds to the gentleman from south carolina, chairman wilson. >> thank you for your military service and -- mr. wilson: i'm grate to feel speak in support of congressman gallagher's amendment that would require the executive branch to create a strategy to deal with -- of vita programs to organizations like the confucius institutes are deleerexoomples why congressman gallagher makes perfect sense and is critical to our national security. confucius institutes are active on 103 college campuses, despite a member of the chinese communist party's politburo calling the institutes, quote, an important part of chinese -- china's overseas propaganda setup. additionally the confucius institutes has been described as exploiting the open research and
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development environment we have which we all revere but they're taking advantage of it. unfortunately, my amendment co-sponsored by congressman gallagher and congresswoman hartzler dealing with organizations was not ruled in order. it is critical that the whole of government china strategy include vulnerabilities within our academic community and for this reason i urge everyone to support congressman gallagher's amendment. i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman yields back. mr. larsen: i would say, to extend the football metaphor perhaps to the point of absurdity, our defense doesn't get on the field, therefore allowing intleck -- mr. fwalger: i would say, to extend the football metaphor perhaps to the point of absurdity, our defense doesn't even get on the field. the chair: the question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman -- those in favor say aye. pose pez.
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the ayes appear to have it. in the opinion of the chair the ayes have it. the amendment is agreed. -- is agreed to. pursuant to clause 6 of rule 18, proceedings will now resume on those amendments printed in the house report 115-702 on which further proceedings were postponed in the following order. amendment number 8, by mr. am day. of neve. amendment number 10 by mr. mcgovern of massachusetts. amendment number 13 by mr. mckinley of west virginia. amendment number 19 by ms. tenney of new york. amendment number 43 by mr. engel of new york. amendment number 50 by mr. polis. of colorado. the chair will reduce to two minutes the time for any
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electronic vote after the first vote in this series. the unfinished business is the request for recorded vote on amendment number 8 printed in house report 115-702 by the gentleman from nevada, mr. amodei, on which further proceed wrgs postponed and on which the ayes prevailed by voice vote. the clerk will redesignate the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 8 printed in house report 115-702 offered by mr. amodei of nevada. the chair: a vorded -- a recorded vote has been requested. those in support of the request for a recorded vote will rise and be counted. a sufficient number having risen, a recorded vote is ordered. members will record their votes by electronic device. this is a 15-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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