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tv   U.S. House of Representatives U.S. House of Representatives  CSPAN  December 12, 2018 11:59am-2:00pm EST

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congress. the white house, the supreme court, and public policy events in washington, d.c., and around the country. c-span is brought to you by your cable or satellite rovider. >> the u.s. house is gaveling in next, they'll take up the farm bill, which sets farm subsidies, crop insurance, nutrition assistance, and rural development programs for the next five years. first up, the rule for that farm bill. bloomberg writes that rule contains an unrelated provision that would block lawmakers from forcing the chamber to vote on certain yemen legislation until a new congress takes over in january. debate and vote on that rule coming up shortly in the u.s. house. live coverage now here on c-span.
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the speaker: the house will be in order. the prayer will be offered by our chaplain,ather conroy. chaplain conroy: let us pray. dear god, we give you thanks for ving us another day. the sun grows dim and the dayght is measud. in the darkness, phantoms loom. the eye cannot discern as the distance fades. be for us light, o lord. bless the members of this people's house with clear judgment that the work to be concluded might propel our nation into a prosperous future. and as always we pray that whatever is done this day be for your greater honor and glory,
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men. the speake the chair has examined the journal of the last day's oceedings and announces to the house his appro thereof. pursuant to clause 1 of rule 1, the journal snds arove. for what purpose does the gentleman seek seek recognition? >> i demd a vote on agreeing to the speaker's approval of the journal. the spker: the journal stands approved. >> mr. speaker. the speaker: for what purpose doethe gentleman seek recognition? >> i make a point of order that a quorum is not prent. the speaker: further proceedings on this question are postpone. the pledge of allegiance will be led by the gentleman from rhode isnd, mr. cicilline. mr. cicilline: please join me. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to threpublic for which it stands, one natn, under god,
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the speaker: the chair will entertain up to 1requests for one-minutepeeches on each side of the aisle. for what purpose does the gentleman fropennsylvania seek recognition? mr. thompson: request unanimous consent to address theouse or one minute. revise and extend my remarks the speaker pro tempe: without objection, the gentleman is recognized. mr. thompson: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, i rise today to recognize decber 15 as t ll of rights da the bill of rights which is the first 10 amendments to the constitution was first ratified i 1791. it protects the rights and liberties oall americans. the bill of rihts guarantees our freedoms of religion, eech, press, to peaceably assemble, andetion our government, a protect our right to bear arms, o private pperty rights, right to a fair trial, and right against unreasonable search and seizures. it establishes that we as nation promote the power of the individua libertieand limit the scopef the fer government. mr. speaker, bill of rights day
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came into existence in 1941 on the50th anniversary. congress passed a joint resolution authorizing president franklin d. roosevelt to make it a national whody. roosevelt referred to the document as quote, the great american chart of personal liberty and human dignity, enquotes. . speaker, it is important we use this day to educate younge generations oamerins on our bill of rights. and the values it embodies for all. thankou, mrspeaker. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker proempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from new jersey seek recognition? >ask unanous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. e speaker pro tempor without objection, the gentlan fronew jersey is recognized for one minute. >> mr. speaker, i rise today to honor aiden and kyle, aiden miller andyle latumi for receiving the prestigious fulight scholarips this year. hey are both recent graduates
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of seton hall university school of the f much diplomacy. aiden is a student of modern ional relations, langges, and eastern europe sties. mr. pne: ov the nexyear he'll be teaching english at the university of russian wle learning about rsian tradition answer culture. aiden plans to enter plic rvice when he turns home. kylie also engagored in international relations and modern modern languages. with a minor in economics. the fulbright scholarship has ven her the opportunity to teach elin malaysia. wh she returns from malaysia, she will finish her graduate degree in public affairs at colu university and enter the foreign service. mr. speaker, i ask my colleagues tjoin me in celebrating these bright young people w are committed to making ouworld better place. d with that, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman fromeorgiaeek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i ask unanimous
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consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extenmy remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman from georgia is recognized for one minute. >> mr. speakerit with great joyhat i rise today to recognize and celebrate the life of my 13thrandcld on his fit month birthday. on november 7,018, my family a i welcomed richard wayne r.w.llen e second, namesake, into ou family. of our 13 grandchildren, r.w. is our fourth granon. i ruly mbled my fourth grandson was named in my honor. robin ani are e proud parents of four wonderful childand i only -- ouonly son and his wife are now the parents of r.w. and his older ister.
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i can cannotell you how happy i am that they e here in d.c. as we celebrate ts addition. my prayer for r.w. is he will grow strong in his faith and personally experiee the mercy grace, peace, and love of ou savior jesushrist. and i yield back. the speaker o tempor what purpose does the gentlely from nevada seek recogniti? >> i ask unanimus consent to adesthe hoe for one ne. the spear pro tempore: witho objecti, the gentlelady from nevada is recogned for one minute. ms. titus: thank you. we mark the sixth anniversary the tragic shooting of sandy hook elemeary school which left 26 dead includi 20 childrs 6 and 7. the years since there have been 1,917 mass shootings, killing 2,175 n, women, an children, and rouing more than 6,00 e worst of these shootings occurred in thheart of my district athe route 91 music festival. when a gunman opened fire on
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the crowd killing 58 and injung more than 800. 7 the list f vms --he st of victims grows every day, and yet on this floor there is only silence. this past novemb voternt a strong message by rejecting those who stab in the -- stand inhe way of commonsense gun violence prevention. we can never bring back those who are st to gun vionce, but from universal background hecks to a ban on bump stocks come january, we can and ll ta action. yield back. >> mr. speaker, today we ll vote on the farm bill. i can't help but be reminded of the more than 1,14u7bd attendees at the farm bilasing sessions we held across the country. what an honor it was to take the comments, the feedback, and
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the suggestions they had and work and address those concerns. those 1,100 attendees represented the full spectrum of american agriculture. from citrus producers in florida to wheat farmers in kansas. we saw and heard amazing stories of the grit and determination of the people who wake up every morning, pulling their boots on, in order to feed, clothe, and fuel this world. as we vote today, i salute and honor each of them and their families. mr. speaker, kansans kent me to congress -- sent me to congress to get a farm bill done and i'm honored to be here to say we delivered for kansas. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from rhode island seek recognition? mr. cicilline: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman from rhode island is recognized for one minute. mr. cicilline: mr. speaker, in nine days we're going to face another government shutdown. the american people want a responsible federal government that works for them.
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but yesterday president trump said he will be proud to shut down the government. the president believes that his idea for an ineffective, $70 billion, 1,000-mile long border wall is more important than keeping the government open for business. our constituents are sick of this stuff. the president told them that mexico would pay for the wall. now he's threatening to close the government if he doesn't get what he wants. this is exactly why our constituents voted to put democrats in control of congress last month. they don't want their hard-earned money wasted on an expensive, ineffective border wall. we should listen to them. democrats and republicans need to come together and work together to meet their needs not president trump's. while the president throws another twitter tantrum, let's keep the government open and work on solution force the real challenges facing our constituents. good-paying jobs. lower health care costs. and ending the corruption in washington. that's what democrats are committed to doing. it's time for republicans to stand up to this president and work with democrats for the benefit of the american people.
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with that, mr. speaker, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from oklahoma seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman from oklahoma is recognized for one minute. >> mr. speaker, in the last 10 years our country's national debt has gone from $10 trillion to nearly $ trillion. this trajectory is not sustainable. while there is no easy fix to this, the first step is clear, stop adding to it. president trump is leading by example, telling his cabinet to eliminate waste in their departments. he understands the fiscal cliff we're standing on and taking the right steps to get our spending under control. now it is the time for us to do our job. we cannot govern from crisis to crisis. we need a budget that balances and we need to get back to regular order by passing all 12 appropriations bills. short-term spending bills are not the solution, and we cannot rely on them anymore. with the national debt growing every day, we cannot continue
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to kick the can down the road. we need to face this crisis head-on. frankly, americans deserve better. it's time we put in the work to get it right and solve our pugget crisis. let's go to work. -- budget crisis. let's go to work. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from new york seek recognition? >> unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentleman from new york is recognized for one minute. mr. higgins: mr. speaker, this generous nation has a long tradition of welcoming those seeking refuge and a better life in america. america is, in fact, a nation of immigrants. for generations immigrants and refugees, my ancestors included, have contributed to a diverse and strong nation built on the foundation that through hard work anything is possible. the state department recently announced plans to cut the very programs to provide refugees with the tools toward economic independence, self-sufficiency, and success. it is a counterproductive move by the administration that
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cites the economy as a priority. refugees are helping revise older communities like the buffalo niagara region, increasing our population, contributing to a dedicated work force, and bringing new life quality and economic life back to neighborhoods like buffalo's west side. we're calling on secretary pompeo to immediately reverse any plans to cut resettlement agencies and affirm this nation's commitment to the american dream. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the chair lays before the house a communication. the clerk: the honorable the speaker, house of representatives. sir, pursuant to section 3-b of the public health safety -- public safety officer medal of honor act of 2001, 4 united states code 1520 , i am pleased to reappoint brian fingle of illinois to the medal of valor review board. thank you for your consideration of this recommendation.
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signed, sincerely, nancy pelosi, democratic leader. the speaker pro tempore: the chair lays before the house an enrolled bill. the clerk: senate 245. an act to amend the indian tribal energy development and self-determination act of 2005, and for other purposes. for eaker pro tempore:
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what purpose does the gentleman from washington seek recognition? mr. newhouse: mr. speaker, by direction of the committee on rules, i call up house resolution 1176, and ask for its immediate consideration. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the resolution. the clerk: house calendar number 196, house resolution 1176. resolved, that upon adoption of this resolution it shall be in order to consider the conference report to accompany the bill, h.r. 2, to provide for the reform and continuation of agricultural and other programs of the department of agriculture through fiscal year 2023, and for other purposes. all points of order against the conference report and against its consideration are waived. the conference report shall be considered as read. the previous question shall be considered as ordered on the conference report to its adoption without intervening motion except, one, one hour of
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debate; and, two, one motion to recommit if applicable. section 2. the provisions of section 7 of the war powers resolution, 50 u.s.c. 1546, shall not apply during the remainder of the 115th congress to a concurrent resolution introduced pursuant to section 5 of the war powers resolution, 50 u.s.c. 1544, with respect to the republic of yemen. . the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from washington is recognized for one hour. >> mr. speaker, during consideration of this resolution all time yielded is for the purpose of debate only and i yield the customary 30 minutes to the gentleman from massachusetts, my friend, mr. mcgovern, pending which i yield myself as much time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. newhouse: i ask unanimous consent that all members have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks.
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the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. newhouse: mr. speaker, on tuesday, the rules committee met and reported a rule, house resolution 1176, providing for further consideration of a very important piece of legislation for america's farmers and ranchers. the conference report to accompany h.r. 2 the agriculture and nutrition act, commonly referred to as the farm bill. this rule provides that the conference report shall be considered as read. mr. speaker, earlier this year, as the house considered its version of the farm bill, i spoke in this chamber about a farm bill listening tour that i had conducted in my own district, traveling to every county that i represent, to hear from and listen to input and the concerns from farmers, ranchers, and producers across the state of washington. in the days since then, the house passed that bill early
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this summer. there's been growing concern that the job would not get done. that the 2014 farm bill would expire. and that our nation's farm country would be left without the crucial tools that this legislation provides to strengthen the farm safety net and provide certainty and flexibility to america's farmers and ranchers. fortunately, with the legislation before us today we can report that this is not the case. after months of painstaking negotiations between the house and senate conferees, we have an agreement before us. this agreement will not including several provisions i would have liked to have seen sets us on a better path for our farmers and ranchers, for our rural communities, for small businesses and for consumers across the country at the grocery store and at kitchen tables. with this conference agreement to the farm bill, i can now go
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back to my district and confidently report to my constituents that we have provided a strong foundation to help our farmers survive a 50% drop in net farm income over the past five years. and tell my to constituents in pateras we have strengthened market access programs and provided strong resources to open new resources for exporting across the globe. i can tell farmers in grant county we have protected crop insurance and made several key improvements including for whole farm coverage for specialty crop producers. i can tell dairy producers in yakima county we have improved the dairy safety net for large, mid sized, and small dairies. i can report back to producers in bebton county who stress the importance of agricultural
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resource -- research that we have provided an increase in funding for research, for extension and education projects. with the bill before us, i can let key agricultural groups in our community know that we will keep american agriculture at the forefront of innovation and productivity. farmers will hear from me that this farm bill invests in critical cost share and incentive-based programs to help farm families improve our soil, water, and other natural resources. i can tell farmers of fellow and adams dams county, concerned with the regulatory burdens on their shoulders, that this legislation protect ours producers from costly additional unnecessary red tape. mr. speaker, i am proud to rise today as a third generation farmer to say that this farm bill takes strong steps to
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address challenges facing america's agriculture community. the rule before the house provides further consideration of the conference report to h.r. 2, the agriculture and nutrition act. legislation that is critically important to my district in central washington and to rural districts across this great country. this legislation maintains and strengthens important policies like price loss coverage, agriculture risk coverage, community -- commodity loans, dairy margin coverage, livestock disaster programs, and crop insurance. it enhances and permanently funds the foreign market development program and technical assistance for specialty crops. which are so vital for export driven agriculture economies like my state of washington has. it increases funding for land grant yuferes, research, extension, and education, as well as special research
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initiatives including for specialty crops and organic research. this legislation makes strides to expand quality broadband to all of rural america by including forward-looking standards to ensure we are meeting next generation rural broadband needs. it also improves the tools available to reduce forest fuel loads that increase the size and force and catastrophic wildfires. by renewing key cat gorical exclusions, expanding its purpose to allow for expedited reduction of hazardous fuels in our forest, we can continue to reduce the threat of these wild -- that these wildfires pose on rural communities. mr. speaker, with support from the 2014 farm bill, american farmers have been able to combat the -- depressed prices and severe drops in farm income but they would not have been able to
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do so without a robust safety net in place. the conference report before us will build upon this effort and ensure a steady food supply will be on the shelves and in our markets for years to come. as i mentioned, it doesn't include everything i would have liked to have seen in this bill. but in reality, no piece of legislation is perfect. particularly comprehensive bills that have been negotiated for months. but the fact of the matter is, this farm bill includes important and significant wins for american farmers and ranchers. it is now our responsibility to get the job done. mr. speaker, the people's house has more than 20 farmers, ranchers, and producers serving in this body. among us are a dairyman from central california, a bluebury farmer from main -- a blueberry farmer from maine, two rice
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farmers, one from california and another from minnesota a cattleman from kentucky, an almond father from california, and a proud hops farmer from the yakima valley of washington state. this is the first farm bill i've had the opportunity to engage in since coming to congress, mr. speaker. i've spent my whole life on the farm and my life in public service, including serves as washington state's director of department of agriculture, has been spent working on behalf of american farmers, ranchers, rural communities, and families. it is an honor today to bring this rule forward for the conference report to accompany the farm bill h.r. 2, the agriculture and nutrition act. i humbly urge my colleagues to support the rule, support the bill, and strengthen the future for america's farmers and all those who depend on them. thank you, mr. speaker, and i reserve the balance of my time.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman tees -- the gentleman's time is reserved. the gentleman from massachusetts. mr. mcgovern: i want to thank my friend, mr. newhouse, for the customary 30 minute, i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend my remarks and yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized. mr. mcgovern: i will be submitting a longer statement for the record so i'll keep my remarks today fairly brief. mr. speaker, i intend to support this farm bill. this farm bill is not perfect. it is not the bill i would have written. but this conference report, unlike the farm bill that the house produced is a good, bipartisan product. i want to thank chairman roberts and ranking member stabenow for their tireless efforts to protect snap benefits throughout the process. because of their work, hungry people across this country will have access to the modest benefits they need to feed their families. and thank you as well to chairman conaway, who recognized the importance of getting a farm bill over the finish line this year.
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i especially want to recognize the effort os ranking member peterson. he's truly an amaze gige who presides over a committee that is very diverse, with rural, suburban, and urban members of congress. it has conservatives, moderates, and liberals like me. yet he's managed to bring us together and not let the perfect be the enemy of the good. farmers, consumers, and hungry people across the country owe him a debt of gratitude. and i also want to thank the staff of the minority and majority who put in endless hours trying to negotiate a compromise and i want to thank kaitlyn hodgkins on my staff, my point person on these ag issues, for all of her work. mr. speaker, the issue of hunger and food insecurity has been my primary cause in congress. i've been proud to work on these issues as a member of the agriculture committee and to oversee the snap program as ranking member of the subcommittee on nutrition.
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as members of the house well know, i have been very critical of the legislation that the republican majority in this house initially produced. it included more than $20 billion in snap cuts that would have disproportionately harmed the most vulnerable among us. kids, the disabled, the elderly, the very people who are often left to wonder where they'll get their next meal. many would have been cut off from assistance all together if the house version actually prevailed. the senate, however, took a much different course. their ag committee chairman, senator roberts, consulted with ranking member stabenow, there were no disastrous work rirpte no, partisan policies cooked up in some extreme conservative think tank somewhere. it largely continued proven policies that both sides have a traditionally agreed on. thankfully, the conference committee took the same course. this final bill does not include any snap benefit cuts. no one is getting kicked off the
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rolls. there are no changes to cat gorical eligible or evering of the link between snap and liheap and there are no burdensome additional work requirements. in fact, this conference report makes a number of administrative improvements and efficiencies saving $1 billion. these savings are reinvested into nutrition programs and as a result more americans will have access to healthy food and snap employment and and training programs will be strengthened. mr. speaker, i hope the secretary of agriculture and the president are tuning in to this debate. right now we hear rumors they're trying to work behind the scenes to circumvent the woifl the congress by institute manager onerous work requirements administrative ily. such a move, i believe, would lead to legal action. next congress when democrats are in the majority we'll use every legislative tool available to block such a move at every turn. we will not tolerate more of their disrespect an more of
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their ka louseness toward the most vulnerable in this country. no more beating up on poor people, period. we will be watching them very closely and if they do anything, and i mean anything, to increase hunger in america, we will fight them and that's a promise. when a congress is polarized as the 115th congress can negotiate and aprivate at a bipartisan agreement like this one, we should be celebrating it. it's mind boggling to think there are some on the other end of pennsylvania avenue working to overturn it even before it is signed into law. lastly, mr. speaker i want to be -- i wanted to be able to vote for this rule today since i said i was going to support the underlying legislation. but my republican friends screwed it up again. because tucked inside this rule is language that turns off fast track procedures for all yemen resolutions through the end of this congress. that's right. the republican leadership has declared that the worst humanitarian conflict in the world where the u.n. has just
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announced famine is taking place due to the war is not worth the time and attention of the people's house. it is an offensive abdication of our responsibility. we should not be sitting idly by waiting for the start of the next congress as this conflict rages on. we should be doing something today. it is because of this yemen lang what g -- language they strongly urge my colleagues to vote no on this rule and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time is reserved. the gentleman from washington. mr. newhouse: it's my pleasure to yield two minutes to the gentleman from michigan, mr. mitchell. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for two minutes. mr. mitchell: thank you, mr. speaker, and thank you for yielding time. i rise in support of the conference report to h.r. 2, the farm bill. our ag community has faced far too much uncertainty and challenges this past year and i'm glad to see we're finally able to reach a consensus to put the country forward on a better path for communities like mine.
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the bill addresses urgent needs of rural communities and ag communities including those in michigan's 10th congressional district. first the bill authorizes a huge investment in rural broadband, $350 million a year. as hard as it may be for people to believe, access to stable, high speed internet is not common place in rural america. it hinders economic development, hinders the economic opportunity, it hinders them in many ways. this bill also raised the minimum standards for rural broadband and targets grants and financial sport, securities most in need of assistance. the farm bill also assists dairy producers, especially the small dairy producers like in my community that have faced real challenges with dairy prices by expanding affordable coverage for all producers of all sizes. and maintains the sugar program urgently needed in my district to protect american farmers from anti-competitive foreign programs that dump sugar at artificially low prices.
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lastly the conference report makes important changes to protect the integrity of -- the financial -- the financial integrity of the snap program and make it more effective for recipients. we need to be concerned, we cannot keep snap forever that can work. we have to help people return to the labor market and support themselves despite what my colleague may believe. i'm pleased we are able to come to consensus finally with the senate and i encourage my colleagues to vote in favor of the rule and the underlying bill. thank you and i yield back, mr. speaker. . the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from massachusetts. mr. mcgovern: i want to say for the record in response to my colleague that the average snap recipient is on the been fit for less than a year and the majority who can work do work. at this time i yield three minutes to the gentleman from wisconsin, mr. kind. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from wisconsin is recognized for three minutes. mr. kind: i thank my friend from massachusetts for yielding me the time. i rise first in opposition to the rule. i think the gentleman from
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massachusetts is correct. here we're in the waning days of this session of congress, and we can't even produce a rule that specifically focuses on the farm bill. they had to include in the late hours of last night language that affects our policy as relates to yemen. i commend my colleague from massachusetts for his efforts to try to strip section two out of the title of this rule so we could have a rule that specifically addresses the farm bill. it wasn't done. we should go back and make sure it is. and allow that policy to develop and debate we need in the house floor. mr. speaker, i am representative of one of the largest agriculture producering districts in the nation. my rural western wisconsin district. i own a farm myself. we rotate corn and beans. we have beef cattle in from time to time. no one appreciates the hard work or family farmers are going through to stay in business today more than i. this past year i had countless meetings with family farmers throughout my state. i have never seen the fear in their eyes or heard in their voices than we have this last year after dealing with
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multiple years of low commodity prices. our family farmers are being driven out of the business in droves right now. i appreciate having been involved in farm policy in the past. mind you we only have a chance to correct farm policy every five or six years in this place. how difficult it is to put together a coalition to get a farm bill done. there are many things in this bill that are commendable. as co-chair of the organic caucus we have the strongest organic title of any farm bill produced. we have good agriculture research programs in this program. a plus up in funding for rural broadband expansion. a new beginning farmer program. the nutrition title was protected after what was initially reported out of the house earlier this year. but i am reluctantly stand today in opposition to the overall bill because it's not addressing the two evils that are driving our family farmers out of business today. overproduction and the trade war that president trump has created.
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in fact, they are doubling down on encouraging policy that will lead to more production which will flood the market and drive commodity prices down more by expanding the title 1 subsidy programs. these are taxpayer subsidies that primarily go to a few but very large agribusinesses. 80% of the title 1 subs dris are going to the 20% largest farm operations in the country. the average person back home would be astounded to see how many subsidy checks are being mailed to addresses in washington, d.c. and new york city and chicago and san francisco. under this bill, they are even expanding those subsidy opportunities by what's called a multiple entity rule, again included in the final conference report. that means no longer husband and wives will qualify for subsidies operating on the farm. but sons and daughters and uncles and aunts and nieces and nephews and cousins will be able to qualify now for these subsidy programs. not only will that encourage these large operations to ramp
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up productions, but it's not fiscally responsible. we're in an era of huge budget deficits and yet finding additional $1 billion under title 1 subsidy programs by primarily taking -- an additional one minute? mr. mcgovern: 30 seconds. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for an additional 30 seconds. mr. kind: they are taking that $1 billion primarily out of the conservation fund by reducing funding under the conservation stewardship program from $1.8 to $1 billion. that will jeopardize quality water programs throughout our nation. unfortunately this bill is not going to solve the problem, the crisis that our farmers are acing today. which is driving them out which is driving them out of business in record numbers. the overproduction in agriculture in our country and this trade war. i think we should take a little bit more time, get the policy right because we won't have another opportunity for another five and six years. that's going to be too late for too many of our family farmers. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from washington.
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mr. newhouse: i'm proud to yield two minutes to the gentleman from pennsylvania who will expound on the importance of this bill and how it does respond to the plights farmers find themselves in and does give certainty to family farmers around the country. mr. g.t. thompson for two minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from pennsylvania is recognized for two minutes. mr. thompson: thank you, mr. speaker. i thank the gentleman for his leadership, managing this rule debate and yielding. mr. speaker, as vice chair of the agriculture committee and conferee, i rise in strong support of this rule and the underlying bill, the farm bill, 2018. over o the past three years, the house and senate agriculture committees competitively reviewed the 2014 -- comprehensively reviewed the 2014 farm bill. get feedback from farmers, ranchers, lands owners, and stakeholders. this is the final product of this process and months of bipartisan, bicameral compromise. while there are many important provisions within the bill to highlight, at its core the farm
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bill is about supporting american agriculture and access to food. it is about supporting our domestic food spry and ability to feed, clothe, and provide energy and fiber for all americans. one portion of this bill i'm particularly pleased with is the dairy reforms contained in title 1. these reforms build on the positive changes made to the dairy margin insurance program in this year's bipartisan budget agreement. our dairy farmers have continued to face difficult times over the past decade and i am hopeful that the 2018 farm bill will help to provide some stability in this sector. also of note is a strong conservation title and support for act iive land management. this includes re-authorization of the conservation reserve program, environmental quality and center program, and the regional conservation partnership program. finally i'd like to mention a positive reforms that we have made to snap included in this conference report. these changes will help with
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program integrity. it will encourage work for able-bodied adults without dependents, and better ensure that snap funding and resources are going to our most vulnerable and those truly in need. i'd like to o thank chairman conaway and ranking member peterson, all the committee staff, and all the committee staff for their hard work on this conference report and dedication to agriculture. i strongly support this rule and the underlying farm bill. and ask my colleagues to vote yes on both. thank you, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from massachusetts. mr. mcgovern: as i said some of us who support this farm bill wanted to support the rule as well, but again the republicans thought it was important to basically tuck inside this rule language that turns our fast track for procedures for all yemen resolutions to the end of this congress. this is one of the worst humanitarian crisis in the world right now and we don't have time to talk about it. the republican leadership takes the extraordinary step of doing everything they can to block
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debate. it is unconscionable. i'd like to yield two minutes to the gentleman from california, who has been a leader on this issue, mr. khanna. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california is recognized for two minutes. mr. cana: thank you, mr. speaker. -- mr. khanna: thank you, mr. speaker. americans around this country are wondering what does a farm bill have to do with the war in yemen? and the answer is absolutely nothing. you wonder why people are frustrated with congress. why they think congress lax common sense. it's because no one understands why you would have a vote on a farm bill and would you tie it to a vote on war and peace in yemen. the only reason the leadership is doing this is because they know that there are dozens of republicans who will stand with democrats to stop the killing in yemen. how do they know this? because senate republicans are voting to stop the killing in yemen. i came to congress because of
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my grandfather, who inspired me, spent four years in jail in gandy's independence movement, and i came to congress to say that america should always stand for human rights. i urge my republican colleagues look at the pictures in the "new york times" and huffington post. 5-year-old kids, 7-year-old kids starving to death. a yemenese child dying every 10 minutes. they tell us to wait until january. that would mean thousands more yemenese kids dead. i don't think this is a partisan issue. this is an american issue. let's stop the killing in yemen. let's end the famine. let's have a vote in this house so we can stop those civil war in yemen and save lives. i yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from washington. mr. newhouse: mr. speaker, we all look forward to the classified briefing that will be a part of tomorrow with the department of defense and others to talk about the situation in yemen.
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it seems premature to make decisions regarding that issue at this present time. but tomorrow will give us much enlightenment on the issue. at this time getting back to the issue at hand, the farm bill, i'm very proud to yield two minutes to the gentleman from oregon, mr. walden. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from oregon is recognized for two minutes. mr. walden: thank you. i want to talk about the farm bill and the rule that allows us to bring this to the floor. and the lives i want to save in the west and across america. because this bill takes important steps to help improve the management of our federal forests by expending expedited management tools for insect and disease projects in eastern oregon and expand hasoredous fuels reduction to reduce fire and smoke. these are real life and safety issues in our communities. the tragedies we have seen in california this last summer, paradise, this last fall, i guess, they are repeating themselves year after year. climate change and drought and
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higher temperatures and the overgrowth in our forests come together to create catastrophic wildfires as pictured here. these are monsters when they fire up. they kill. it's unfortunate that the provisions that the house passed as part of the farm bill were rejected by the democrats in the senate. it's unfortunate because after these catastrophic fires we should get in and be able to remove the fuel load so that the next fire doesn't burn even more intensely, which is what happens. and is a bigger threat to the firefighters because the snags that remain are destined to fall. this year we lost a firefighter to a snag that fell. but they rejected that. we're expanding authorities, categorically exclusion authorities in some forest, the house provision said we should expand it to all forests so we can begin to catch up and
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remove the excess fuel load from our forests. when we do get fire, which is a natural part of the environment, it does not become so destructive it burns up entire towns. unfortunately, again, senate democrats rejected that. we're left with a bill that's pretty good. and the farm bill provisions are terrific as the leader has said. but when we're losing towns and people and firefighters and our communities are choked with smoke -- mr. newhouse: an additional 30 seconds. mr. walden: when our communities are choked with smoke, we can do better. let me close with this. last night in medford, oregon, the commission held a public meeting to talk about this fire situation we face. and a dad from jackson county recounted how his daughter with cystic fibrosis had to move away. he told the audience it's been devastating for us as a family. we wish our daughter could live with us.
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then went on to say when you can't breathe, nothing else matters. you want to talk about life, safety, health issues in america, we should have done better with the senate, but we're doing ok with this bill. i intend to support it. thank you for bringing it to us. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from massachusetts. mr. mcgovern: mr. speaker, i'd like to yield two minutes to the gentlewoman from wisconsin, ms. moore, who has been one of the leaders of this congress fighting on behalf of the most vulnerable in our country. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from wisconsin is recognized for two minutes. ms. moore: mr. speaker, i'd like to thank the gentleman from massachusetts for yielding. i'd like to commend my colleagues of the farm bill conference committee in both the house and senate, for strengthening the supplemental nutrition assistance program and rejecting harmful cuts and onerous hurdles that would have made efforts of struggling families working to escape poverty more difficult. this conference, very
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specifically, agreement protects snap's categorical eligible. what a victory we have won by not throwing 235,000 children, including 23,000 in my home state of wisconsin, off school lunch. it rejected a lifetime ban on snap benefit, it rejected harsh work requirements, extremely limited time restrictions proposed in the house bill. which would have left millions of americans hungry and vulnerable. and as a true compromise, mr. speaker, nobody got everything they wanted. for example, we still must work to strengthen access for seniors, people with disabilities, who face difficulties participating in strap. that's the fight that we're going to continue to fight in the next congress.
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but for the meantime, let's not have the perfect be the enemy of the good and let's celebrate that we won't be taking food off the table for millions this holiday season. with that, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from washington. mr. newhouse: i'd like to yield two minutes to the good doctor from kansas, roger marshall. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for two minutes. mr. marshall: thank you for giving me an opportunity to speak today. rise today to highlight the work of the house and senate agriculture committees. this afternoon we'll be considering the conference report of the 2018 farm bill. i'm proud to have had the chance to work alongside two of my great mentors, senator pat roberts and my house colleague chairman mike conaway on this bill. while the national media may not spend much time reporting on this one, i want to take a moment to recognize the importance of this bill and the work done by farmers and the ranches it protects.
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mr. speaker, kansas sent us to kuok to get a farm bill done and i'm hon knobbed -- honored to be here today to say we delivered for kansans. i can't hold a a town hall or listening session in my district without hearing about the importance of this bill. our farmers need certainty and a responsibility -- responsible safety net to protect them from the whims of nation and markets that are far out of control. crop prices dropped 50% sthins last farm bill and that impact is showing up in the bottom line to producers across the country. in kansas, farm bankruptcies are up six times in just three years. i'm not here to fear monger but to share the serious thovepbs state of the agriculture economy. mr. speaker, as i vote here today, i'll be thinking of and honoring my paraphernalias and grandparents, knowing this legislation well preserved the rural way of life from which i was raised and the work ethic that was taught to me on those family farms. thank you, mr. speaker, and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the
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gentleman from massachusetts. mr. mcgovern: thank you, mr. speaker. again, for those of us who support the farm bill, we want to be able to support the rule for consideration of the farm bill but unfortunately, the republican leadership decided to mess things up by inserting language that would prevent this congress from debating the war in yemen. when the -- one of the worst humanitarian crisis in the world. the gentleman from washington said we'll have a briefing tomorrow, it's not timely. the bottom line, in this rule it not only prohibits us from debating the war in yemen with regard to the war powers resolution, it prohibits us debating it for the rest of the congress. what if we learn something tomorrow that prompts action on the other side of the aisle? you basically have said no. no. this is ridiculous. mr. speaker, i yield two minutes to the gentleman from texas, the distinguished ranking member of the ways and means subcommittee, mr. doggett. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for two minutes.
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mr. doggett: what cruel irony that this rule dealing in part with too much food in america ill deny food to millions in yemen. that remote corner of the world of which most americans know very little, 85,000 children have already died and another 12 million people are on starvation's brink. this very day, more children will die of starvation and disease. in an eloquent plea this week, nick christof reports on one, an 8-year-old boy who is starving, his limbs are like stick he gazes stolidly ahead, tuning out everything as hi body focuses every calorie simply on keeping his organs functioning. weighing just over 30 pounds. united nations officials have warned that this could become
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the worst famine in the world, in a generation. mr. christof rightly concludes very succinctly, the bottom line our tax dollars are going to starve children. suffering is rising, american bombs are still falling. when the saudi coalition attacked the school bus killing 40 little children, scrawled on the remains of the bomb were words that meant made in america. with today's rule, enablers here in this house tell them to keep it up, keep supporting the murderous saudi regime for whom they can see no evil and hear no a party if there's a record ofif there's a the murder and dismemberment of an american citizen to listen to.
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the republican leaders know so many members of their own party along with democrats can no longer stomach these atrocities. may i have another minute? mr. mcgovern: i yield the gentleman an additional minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for an additional one minute. mr. doggett: atrocities that are supported with american tax dollars. they fear a bipartisan majority of this house would reject what has become a wretched stain on our nation. last month, these same -- this same group of trump enablers buried consideration of our resolution to end this atrocity in a bill about gray wolves and today they bury yemenis again with a bill about american agriculture abundance. as americans celebrate this special, joyous season of christmas, the trump administration, if we do not act today, will continue to write the epitaph on the mass graves in yemen. let's reject this rule today and
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put a stop to this egregious wrong dink -- wrongdoing. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from washington is recognized. r. newhouse: let me say, the atrocities taking place in yemen a serious matter? absolutely they are. do they deserve to be debated an discussed to find solutions on what we can provide? absolutely. after tomorrow morning's briefing 23 there's something we feel we need to to, we can respond with quickness, with nimbleness, we can provide those solutions if we think there a necessary solution to be had. at this point, i would like to yield two minutes to the good gentleman from montana, mr. gianforte. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for two minutes. mr. gianforte: this farm bill is a win for montana's farmers and ranchers who work the land, feed our country, and the world. as thoy note too well weather
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and markets bring uncertainty. this farm bill give ours farmers and ranchers a strong, -- a strong safety net that protects against the inimpact of natural disasters and unpredictable, unfair trade practices of other countries. mr. speaker, this farm bill has montana's fingerprints on it and it addresses many of our key priorities. it protects montana's sugar beet growers and processors and supports agricultural research service which includes several experiment stations in montana. it helps montanans throughout the state by providing a grant for rural emergency services, training and equipment, particularly in our rural areas. it improves how we manage our forests by empowering county governments to improve management of neighboring national forest lands. it also improves rural broadband that's so important to our small
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communities. mr. speaker, this farm bill works for montana. i urge my colleagues to give america's farmers and ranchers the certainty they need and vote for the farm bill conference report and with that, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from massachusetts with 13 1/2 minutes remaining. mr. mcgovern: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield two minutes to the distinguished gentleman from vermont, mr. welch. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for two minutes. mr. welch: i thank the gentleman and rise today in support of the farm bill conference report. it's absolutely no secret that rural america, our farming communities, from franklin county and addison county in vermont to the plains of kansas and iowa, to the central valley in california, are facing a crisis. this conference report contains a number of positive changes that will help in vermont. first, nutrition. thankfully we are acceding to the senate position.
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we have an economy where profits are up, record incomes for many people, and increased poverty and nutrition tradges for children. this makes certain that our kids are going to get the nutrition they need. second, dairy. this farm bill revamps the existing dairy insurance program known as margin protection for a more effective and affordable insurance tool that's going to help our family farmers hang on. i still believe we need supply management, it's the only sustainable way to go, but this will help and no one in vermont needs more help and is deserving of more help than our dairy farmers who have done so much for our state. third, maple. maple syrup is really an important component including for our dairy farmers. this bill halts a misguided f.d.a. effort to require an added sugar label to pure maple syrup. this was a student f.d.a.
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regulation. it's now dead -- a pretty stupid f.d.a. regulation. it's now dead forever and is helpful to the maple industry. fourth, organics. this farm bill doubles funding for federal research into organic production methods, improved oversight of the global organic trade and funds the organic certification cost share program. more organics, better nutrition, more local agriculture that is a very good thing. fifth, hemp. this legislation legalizes industrial hemp production. mr. mcgovern: i yield the gentleman an additional minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for an additional minute. mr. mel. -- mr. welch: this legalizes industrial hemp production, something vermonters have been advocates for for decades, this will be a boost for local agriculture in vermont and other parts of the country. beyond these, there are a numb of additional positive changes in the bill. while no one got everything they wanted and many of the urgent
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reforms that are needed on the commodities side are not part of this, this will be a positive contribution to the well being of vermont agriculture. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from washington with 11 1/2 minutes remaining. mr. newhouse: i'd like to yield two minutes to the gentleman from texas, mr. arrington. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for two minutes. mr. arrington: thank you, mr. speaker. pardon me. thank you, mr. speaker, and thank you to the gentleman from washington state for his leadership in the floor debate. i rise today, mr. speaker, in support of the 2018 farm bill. i want to thank chairman conaway and ranking member tom peterson and all the members of the house ag committee staff for all their hard work. there's no single piece of legislation more important to my district or rural communities throughout this nation than the farm bill and given the depressed state of the farm
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economy, there's never been a more pressing time to get one passed. the 2018 farm bill significantly strengthens the agriculture safety net which will give our producers the certainty they need to keep providing a safe and affordable supply food to our families. it also makes important investments in rural infrastructure, to help sustain these small towns that are so critical to our vibrant agriculture economy. additionally 18 of the 21 house 46 passed reform programs to the food stamp program are reflected in the final report which strengthened the program's integrity, provide needed oversight and reduce waste, fraud, and abuse. finally this steered the american taxpayer moneys in a fiscally responsible way by having a farm bill that's budget-neutral. mr. speaker,ing a culture -- agriculture and traditional american values go hand hand in hand. they represent more than food and fiber they symbolize a
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culture of faith, hard work, and infence which has always been at the herd of -- at the heart of america's greatness. this will not only support producers and those in rural america, it will provide security and peace of mind to all americans by maintaining our ability to feed and clothe our own people. or agriculture independence. i urge my colleagues to support our farmers and ranchers, to support rural america, to support agriculture independence in these united states, and i urge them to vote yes for the 2018 farm bill. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from massachusetts. mr. mcgovern: thank you, mr. speaker. i'm here to support the farm bill. unfortunately, my republican friends made the rule controversial. another reason to support the farm bill, in addition to the strong nutrition title for those who are vulnerable here in the united states, the conference report also has tissue provides strong support for international food assistance programs. like food for peace.
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food for progress. and mcgovern-dole. a program i helped write several years ago which provides food to some of the most vulnerable and poor children in the world in school settings. and so this farm bill in addition to helping our farmers, in addition to provide food security for people in the united states, i think also contributes to our national security around the world and i point that out so my colleagues understand that this farm bill covers a whole wide range of areas. mr. speaker, at this time i'd like to yield three minutes to the gentleman from oregon, mr. blumenauer. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for three minutes. . mr. blumenauer: thank you, mr. speaker. i acknowledge that ranking member collin peterson, the committee has done a good job balancing many special interests that are profoundly affected by the farm bill, solving a delicate series of
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political problems and holding firm vital nutrition programs and things i care about that i have been working on for years like hemp, but, unfortunately, the bill is not addressing the crisis in american agriculture. i published a book earlier this year, "the fight for food," had an alternative farm bill. some of the provisions have found their way into it, but this bill does not affect the crisis that we are he' facing in american agriculture. having small and medium-sized producers being squeezed out. the battle in terms of the chemical warfare in parts of america with monsanto products, that are threatening agriculture production and we're actually seeing violence break out in terms of being unable to deal with this. we have a profound problem in terms of the environmental
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context that farmers face. only one in four farmers are going to get access to the environmental programs they need. now, there are improvements in there, things i have been working on for years, but by flatlining it, not meeting the needs, in fact, it will have a reduction in absolute terms. it does nothing to address the crisis that agriculture is facing because of climate change and carbon pollution. we have a crop insurance program that doesn't work for most farmers and ranchers. and it's grotesquely expensive and we have had efforts in congress, committees, outside experts that point to ways we can rein in these unjustified subsidies, save money and have a program that works for most farmers and ranchers. but sadly, that will have to wait for another day.
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we're not investing in the future. we're not investing in farmers and ranchers who need the help the most. accelerating research, accelerating environmental programs, accelerating and investing more in beginning farmers. mr. speaker, it's not good enough to be able to solve the political problem, to solve the bill and prevent the worst proposing. we're we need a farm bill for americans who eat, who pay taxes, and for farmers and ranchers that want to be on a smaller scale, not massive agricultural industrial production. this bill is a missed opportunity. even though it's got some good things in it, i am going to vote against it because it's not nearly good enough.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from massachusetts reserves. the gentleman from washington. mr. newhouse: mr. speaker, just like to say my farmers and ranchers in the state of washington as well as we heard earlier from the state of oregon do support the strengthening of the provisions in this bill to make sure that the farm economy can continue on in as strong a manner as possible. there is widespread support in agriculture country for this farm bill. with that i'd like to yield two minutes to the gentleman from the great state of arkansas, mr. westerman. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from arkansas is recognized for two minutes. mr. westerman: i thank the gentleman for yielding. mr. speaker, i was blessed to be a walk-on football player for the university of arkansas and participate on two winning conference championship teams. the coach averaged over 300 yards per game. but it came in small chunks. it resulted in first downs that
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resulted in touchdowns and eventually led to victories. mr. speaker, farm incomes are down across the board. the west is consumed by wildfires, china and other nations are taking advantage of unfair trade laws. what rural america needs is a first down. our farmers and ranchers need to see congress move the ball forward and provide their families the protection and relief they need during these hard times. this conference report is not a hail marry. it does not -- hail mary. it does not contain everything i want to see in a farm bill but it does move the ball forward. it's progress our farmers need right now. i am disappointed that senate democrats blocked many needed forest management provisions as we continue to sift through the ashes of catastrophic wildfires. however, this conference report strengthens the farm safety net and provides certainty to our farmers. it does address some forest management issues. it provides millions of dollars in new funding to combat a
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range of issues facing rural america, from funding to erat indicate federal hogs, to address the oipt crisis and expand rural broadband. this conference report moves farm policy in the right direction. i urge the adoption of the rule for this farm bill and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from washington reserves. the gentleman from massachusetts. mr. mcgovern: mr. speaker, i yield two minutes to the gentleman from new york, mr. tonko. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new york is recognized for two minutes. mr. tonko: thank you, mr. speaker. i thank the gentleman for yielding. i rise today in support of this legislation, and as a farm bill conferee, i would like to pass along my sincere thanks to the members and staff who worked diligently to put together a good final product for the american people. this farm bill strikes the right balance by providing certainty to our hardworking farmers while protecting our most vulnerable by rejecting the harsh snap cuts that were contained in the original house republican bill, a very
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meaningful restoral. as i volunteered at the capital area food bank, they serve 500,000 individuals who are food insecure, annually in the maryland, d.c., and virginia area. i am particularly pleased with provisions that will benefit new york's dairy farmers and producers of specialty crops, which together form the backbone of the agricultural economy in my 20th congressional district and across upstate new york. this farm bill also recognizes the importance of expanding broadband access to the american people and particularly to those who don't have access to a high-speed connection. i am disappointed, however, that we were unable to agree on stronger language to ensure federal money is spent wisely. investments in broadband, internet infrastructure have the greatest impact on american lives and should be dealt with in a very resourceful way. specifically, i argued for more interagency coordination. the federal communications commission, the department of agriculture, and the national
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telecommunications and information administration need to coordinate with each other, not merely consult, when funding critical broadband internet infrastructure. when it comes to broadband internet spending, this bill provides limited investments, and because of that, we have a duty to stretch every dollar as far as possible. it is unfortunate that this concept was not included in the farm bill, but i plan to continue advocating for legislation that would require greater coordination amongst federal agencies as we build out broadband. i was proud to work on a bipartisan basis to provide coordination language in the access broadband act, which has already passed the house and -- mr. mcgovern: i yield the gentleman an additional 30 seconds. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for 30 seconds. mr. tonko: thank you. which has already passed the house and now being considered in the senate. i will continue working with my colleagues to improve coordination of federal broadband programs so we can increase sufficiency and eliminate duplicative or wasteful efforts.
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finally, while i'm grateful for the overall outcome of the legislation, as a conferee representing the views of the energy and commerce committee, i was disappointed on many issues in this legislation involving committee jurisdiction, the committee was not properly consulted. it's my hope that in the future all conferees will be allowed greater involvement and their voices will be heard, especially on issues that cross committee lines. again, i would urge my colleagues to support this bill and with that i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from massachusetts reserves. the gentleman from washington. mr. newhouse: mr. speaker, at this time i'd like to yield 90 seconds to the good gentleman from the state of illinois, mr. davis. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from illinois is recognized for a minute and a half. mr. davis: thank you, mr. speaker. i want to thank chairman conway and my fellow conferees to reach an agreement. these programs are critical to central illinois farmers, improves protection for organic products. first and foremost, this bill ensures crop insurance remains a vital risk management tool for farmers.
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it also ensures farmers have a choice between two different commodity protection programs, something i fought for in the 2014 farm bill and i'm glad we were successful again in this farm bill. consumer demand for organic products continues to increase and this bill makes positive changes to support organic products by placing higher scrutiny on imports, helping farmers who seek organic certification and increasing funding for organic research. the bill also strengthens agricultural research by including my bill to ensure usda's research focuses on agricultural's most needed priorities and helps universities like the university of illinois, illinois state university, and southern illinois university in edwardsville in my district continue important research. additionally, ensuring rural communities have access to broadband is an important part of this bill. not only do we invest in expanding broadband, we ensure rural communities have access to broadband that will now meet
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minimum standards and requirements for today's technological age. we've written a strong bill for our farmers, but, mr. speaker, 80% of this farm bill is related to snap and that cannot be ignored. we missed a golden opportunity to fill in the cracks of our existing workforce development programs to get millions of families the opportunity to get educational benefits, to get them out of poverty with the jobs we know are available in this community. i'm disappointed we weren't successful but i look forward to supporting this bill, and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from washington reserves. the gentleman from massachusetts. mr. mcgovern: mr. speaker, i yield one minute to the distinguished gentleman from new york, the ranking member of the house foreign affairs committee, mr. engel. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new york is recognized for one minute. mr. engel: i thank the gentleman for yielding, mr. speaker, and i rise in strong opposition to the rule because once again, the majority is stifling debate on a critical national security issue. the gentleman from california, mr. khanna, has tried again and again to bring debate forward
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in this body about where and how the united states military is engaged around the world. this is congress' responsibility and not only has the majority abdicated that responsibility, they won't even let us talk about. resolutions dealing with war powers, special privileges in congress, because these are such grave issues, that's how congress wrote the law. the other body is grappling with this body but the majority wants to pretend these issues don't exist and they strip those privileges away with this rule. that's wrong. it's a betrayal of the men and women who serve this country in uniform. we won't ignore these issues in the next congress. we should defeat this rule and have a real debate. i yield back to the gentleman from massachusetts. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from massachusetts reserves. the gentleman from washington. mr. newhouse: mr. speaker, our military is not involved in hostilities surrounding the yemeni civil war. as i said, tomorrow we're having a briefing.
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if we learn things we can respond with urgency and nimbleness to speak on this issue further. i'd like to yield two minutes to the good gentleman from texas, chairman of the rules committee, mr. peet sessions. -- mr. pete sessions. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas is recognized for two minutes. mr. sessions: mr. speaker, thank you very much. i appreciate the distinguished gentleman, mr. newhouse, for giving me the time. mr. speaker, it is true that from time to time the rules committee does need to take the authority and the responsibility that they have and the distinguished gentleman from massachusetts will soon learn this next year as he assumed, as i assume he will assume that role as the new chairman of the rules committee. in fact, the arguments that are being made today relate to the substance of the bill. the bill that is at hand is very important, and that is the farm bill. the farm bill that we know has a 10-year window that's net neutral, protects the balances
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that we have talked about, but it updates, not only the opportunities for people who are in rural areas, to update that policy, but it reinvigorates our establishment by this house, and the united states senate, that's already handled this bill, and the president to reassert that which they believe is important and that is the men and women who live in the rural areas, men and women who get up at 4:00 in the morning, men and women who are there protecting the grassroots, the soil, the topsoil of this country. we need them to serve not only this nation but the world. it is true that hemp was added. hemp, mr. comer, who is a member of congress from kentucky, last year began engaging me on this issue. we agreed we would put it in. it is an important agriculture product and will aid and help very much so, not only a
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marketplace, but farmers in kentucky and other places. as it relates to the authorization for the use of military force, aumf, i'd like to tell my colleagues that in fact i did make that decision that we would include by not allowing those not debate but a vote that would take place on this floor because we're, mr. speaker -- the speaker pro tempore: the entleman's time has expired. mr. newhouse: an extra 10 seconds, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. sessions: we'll have a classified briefing tomorrow that will further debate, allow debate based on the facts of the case and mr. speaker i assure you we'll be here all next week and if the facts of the case warrant we'll address the issue then. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from washington reserves.
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the gentleman from massachusetts. mr. mcgovern: can i inquire how much time is remaining on my side. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman has 3 1/2 minutes. mr. mcgon: i will reserve our time right now. i think i'm the final speaker here. i'll let the republicans go ahead. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from washington is recognized. mr. newhouse: i appreciate that. i'd like to yield a minute and a half to the congressman from the great agricultural state ofi -- iowa, mr. king. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for a minute and a half. mr. king: i'm happy to speak out behalf of the fourth congressional district of iowa which i claim is the number one agricultural producing congressional district in all of america and to support this underlying bill which does a number of good things. i've heard it provides certainty and when you deal with agriculture i have apprehension about that, mr. speaker, because certainty in agriculture seems an obblingsy moron to me but it does provide predictability and
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we owe that to our producers in particular. it does a number of good things. it sets up the payments so they'll be identified to the physical location of the farm that corrects an inequity. it's got $255 million a year in there for market access, foreign market development, technical assistance and emerging marks program. it addresses f.m.d. beyond form market development in another way and that establishes a vaccine bank for foot and mouth disease which we anticipate could well be something that could befell the united states and we need to be ready. i want to encourage also that we develop a g.m.o. vaccine for f.m.d. so we can produce it in this suntry in sufficient quantities and this bill allows for that to be developed. it also increases loan guarantees along the line for especially our young producers to $1.75 million and direct farm ownership loans to
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$600,000. those are all goods things. i'm really happy about the piece that gos in for iowa state. mr. speaker, i appreciate the opportunity to address this and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from washington reserves. this gentleman from massachusetts. mr. mcgovern: if i could inquire of the gentleman from washington if he has additional speakers? mr. newhouse: i have a couple of speakers. mr. mcgon: i'll reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from washington is recognized, the gentleman has a inute and three quarters left. mr. newhouse: thank you, mr. speaker. we have a lot of interest on this issue, i'd like to yield one minute to the gentleman from arkansas, mr. rawford. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman recognized for one minute. mr. raw crawford: my staff wrote me a speech but i've only got 30
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seconds to get this done. let me tell you what farmers across my district say. they say if you can get the federal government to relieve the regulatory burden and open up markets, we can farm in this country. we can succeed. mother nature is a treacherous business partner. so the federal government needs to do all it can to make sure we're mitigating those uncertainties inflicted by mother nature we've seen across the country this year, certainly in my district and other parts of the country. i'm proud to lend my support to this effort, i thank chairman conaway for his exemplary leadership and all those who supported this on the house and senate side. i urge passage of the underlying bill and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from massachusetts. mr. mcgovern: i know the gentleman has additional speakers would it be appropriate to ask unanimous consent to give the gentleman an additional two minutes. i have 3 1/2, i'm going to use that, but can we give them an
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adegreesal two minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from massachusetts may yield two minutes to the majority. mr. mcgon: i don't want to yield two minutes, i want to have an additional two minutes. is that -- if there's no objection. the speaker pro tempore: the chair cannot entertain that unanimous consent request. mr. mcgovern: i yield one minute to the gentleman. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from washington is recognized for one minute. mr. newhouse: can't tell you how much gratitude i feel to the gentleman from massachusetts for leading in a bipartisan manner. i appreciate that. yield one minute to
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my good colleague from the state of washington, ms. mcmorris rog evers. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized. mrs. mcmorris rodgers: thank you, mr. speaker. the american farmer is the greatest anti-poverty program the world has ever seen and in my district agriculture is a way of life. it's our number one industry and getting this farm bill done this year is a top priority. for eastern washington, i'm proud that this legislation includes important priorities around crop insurance, expanding the market access program, and ensuring agriculture research for cutting edge products that is done at washington state university and many others. as i talk with farmers all around eastern washington they often stress the importance of these priorities. i was grate to feel have the secretary of agriculture, sonny perdue, visit and talk to farmers in eastern washington as well as the chairman of the committee, michael conaway. this also includes important provisions for forestry, better forest management on forests like the national forest in my district. expanding the good neighbor authority, fixing borrowing. this is all so important to healthy forests. i urge my colleagues to support the farm bill conference report and i yield back.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. the gentleman from massachusetts controls the time. mr. newhouse: thank you so much for your fwrashese, with your time but we have no more speakers. mr. mcgovern: i have 2 1/2 remaining? the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman has 2 1/2 minutes and is recognized. mr. mcgon: thank you, mr. speaker. if we defeat the previous question i will offer an amendment to the rule to bring up h.r. 7264, a continuing resolution to fund the remainder of the government and extend the national flood insurance program, the violence against women act and the temporary assistance for needy families act until september 30678 i ask unanimous consent to insert the tekts of my amendment in the record along with extraneous material immediately prior to the vote. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. mcgovern: i hope people vote no on the previous question so we can debate this and vote on keeping our government open. but i will just close by again saying to my colleagues that this farm bill is not a great bill but it's a good bill.
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it is the result of bipartisan negotiations in the conference committee that produced something that i think both democrats and republicans can come together and support. i am supporting this bill because it is good on the nutrition title. as you know, i have spent a lot of time in this chamber talking about the issues of hunger and food insecurity in this country. there are 40 million americans who don't have enough to eat who are hungry. this is in the richest and most powerful country in the world. i'm ashamed of that fact every member of this house should be ashamed of that fact. hunger is a political condition, we could fix it if we had the political will. this farm bill is not as robust as i would like it to be on the nutrition title but it does no harm. it doesn't increase hunger, count throw people off snap, doesn't make hunger worse in this country. the serving of bipartisan support. so i hope all my democratic colleagues will vote in favor of the farm bill. i want to thank all those who came together to construct this
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compromise. it's a much, much better product than what came out of this house. and this is a vote that we can be proud of and i hope that everybody will support it. finally, i regretfully have to say i urge my colleagues to vote against the rule because the republicans couldn't help themselves and had to insert this yemen issue into this rule. this issue has been going on for years. this is not a new phenomena, what's happening in yemen. it's a tragedy that has gone on for years. we know what's happening, we ow it's long time past since we should act. we should defeat the rule, have another rule, that's just on the farm bill and we ought to be debating this issue of yemen. so mr. speaker, with that, i vote no on the previous question, vote no on the rule and vote yes on the farm bill and i yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back his time. the gentleman from washington is recognized for the remainder of his time which is one minute. mr. newhouse: thank you, mr. speaker, and i'd like to thank the gentleman from massachusetts
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for yielding extra time to us to allow many of our member os speak on this important issue. i look forward to reciprocating at some point in the future. mr. speaker, as you heard there's a lot of wins in this bill for rural america. especially in these extremely difficult economic times and farm country around the united states. the 2018 farm bill will help prvide certainty for the american farmer and for the rural communities that they support. families who work every day to put food on our tables deserve our support. before i yield back, mr. speaker, i'd like to submit for the record a letter that was led by the american farm bureau that has no fewer than 489 organizations around the country, every state in the union, supporting h.r. 2. i'd like to submit that for the record. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. newhouse: with that, i urge all my colleagues to support the rule and the conference report
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to accompany h.r. 2, the agriculture and nutrition act. mr. speaker, i yield back the balance of my time and move the previous question on the resolution. the speaker pro tempore: both sides have yielded back their time. the question is on ordering the previous question on the resolution. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it. mr. mcgovern: mr. speaker, i ask for the yeas and nays. the speaker pro tempore: the yeas and nays are requested. those favoring a vote by the yeas and nays will rise. a sufficient number having risen, the yeas and nays are ordered. members will record their votes by electronic device. pursuant to clause 8 and clause 9 of rule 20 this 15-minute vote on ordering the previous question will be followed by five-minute votes on adoption of the resolution if ordered and agreing to the speaker's approval of the journal if ordered. this is a 15-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the
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united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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