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tv   Full Court Press  Current  May 28, 2012 3:00am-6:00am PDT

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♪ >> >> >> i wanted today talk to you about schools. we were talking about the update on the trayvon martin case. he was a junior in high school? >> right. >> so your teachers teachers around the country have been involved in this. >> right. the bigger issue is: we have an obligation to keep our kids safe. and when it's a kid is wearing a hoodie, that doesn't make a kid a criminal. we have to find ways of educating people to respect each other.
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>> that's what this tragedy cries out for. it's a tragedy for trayvon. it's a tragedy for his family. but it is a tragedy for the broader community that this is not the dominant conversation now about how do we as america in 2012, be hugely respectful of all people, regardless of color of skin, regardless of religion, regardless of any other thing that may potentially divide us. this is the melting pot, and if it needs to be the melting pot. >> it must put the fear of god in kids his age? right? >> well, you know, you hear -- sdlfrn parents with kids his age. >> what's been interesting about -- and i'm glad, you know, in the last few days nea, aft and fta, both national unions and our union down in florida
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put out a very strong statement yesterday about not only needing to get to the bottom line of the investigation, but, also the larger question of how in our society, we make sure there is a deep respect much all of our people. and, you know, so teachers have been talking about this. and, you know, you have these amazing conversations with people about what the effect of racial profiling is. and, you know, and that's what we have to really combat. so i hope that the department of justis does the invest gauging they must do but our role as schoolteachers is to keep our children safe and start teaching. we do it all the time. >> right. >> what should happen in schools is we should actually stop with the test fixation and start with a learning and a teaching and an
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understanding fixation. >> that's what our school should be about. and that's why we have common public schools. but it is -- it's been -- it's not just a strategy. it's the -- both the strategy as well as this reaction of not wanting to get to the bottom of this. and it's also the vig land lunch lan-- the vigalante laws. >> we could talk about that? >> sorry. >> i do want to ask you: what is the state of schools? the president gives a state of the union address. what would you say is the state of schools in america today, in our public schools? >> well -- >> good shape? >> you know, given the last recession and that the fact that schools are still attempting to do what they should do, you know, we have a lot more to do. but our schools are in far
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better shape than the naysayers give them credit for. our schools educate 90% of america's young people. and every time someone comes up with a new fangled way to do it whether it's vouchers or charters or k-12 technology education and you start looking at the evidence of how do these market-base strategies come tearpare to our schools? our schools always are better than the new market based strategies. charters a stud y said 17 to do better. 34% do worse basically everybody else is the same. so, you know, our schools have gone through this gripping financial crisis at the same exact time as we actually have a bigger role now about not only helping kids get prepared for life and for citizenship but,
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also, all kids not some kids be prepared for 21st sent re skills. >> right? >> because that's where the jobs are. >> the schools have been hammered here couldn't happen at a worse time money amount available available, they continue to name tain the schools across the board. >> the worst hammering. we have gone through fiscal crises before. i taught in new york city. we were in a fiscal crisis. i taught in new york city from 1991 to 1997. we scavenged for chalk. our books talked about, you know, john kennedy as president when billcally ton was president. the copier machines were our best friends because that's how we put stuff together. so, you know, those of us who have been around we have taught through thick and then, but this is the big differences this time. the demonization. the last few crisis teachers
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have been lionized. es, teachers have been lionized. it doesn't just affect our schools. it affects people at home. >> yeah. >> the country right now is within 200% of the povertiesy line. that shows up in your classroom and you have a responsibility to help embrace and help kids regardless of how they show up. so when -- so when you see this vilification rather than lionizing of teachers, when you see these politicians whether democrats or republicans say it's the teachers' fault or the unions' fault or this or that as opposed to how you work together to move this. siker, the head of the oecd education programs and the oecd has done a lot. they run the international tests and things like that.
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he put it in an amazing way. we had an obligation to teach kids 21st sent re skills. we have 20th sent re teachers meaning we haven't given them the tools and conditions to do this and we were 19th sent re schools. >> who. >> that is the transformative challenge we have to do. but we should not be vilified. the people who are closest to trying to do it. >> poems >> president obama has come up with his program, "race to the top" with arnie duncan, education secretary, to replace no child left behind. is it a better program? is it working? >> well, what happened is no child left behind needs to be revamped revamped. we need to go to -- initially, what this was, was the anti-profshth programoverty program said that
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kids who have the least should get the most. it was a title i poverty program. it was creating streams of money that way. in the '60s and the '70s we actually we actually did more to reduce the achievement gap than we did under no child left behind. so what's happened that the testing and in the '90s, when you look at the national tests we did more under clinton than we did under bush in terms of no child left behind. so what happens was this was a testing fixation. race to the top has tried to broad en and in some ways has narrowed it. it's a competitive grant as opposed to how do you raise all votes? and i will give one example. we know early childhood is key. race to the top until the last year didn't have anything ofabout early childhood. so we need to actually have systemic programs that actually help all kids.
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feds can't do it all. but they are a great lever. >> and we need to talk about the role of the parents, too. you know this is such an -- i don't think there is any more important topic. and i don't think there is any more important job in this country than teachers. and i, you know, i am a former teacher. i just have such respected for you and the work you are doing and we barely scratched the surface and we are out of time? >> i'm sorry. but they are wonderful people and i want them to be respected, not demonized so do i. i want you to come back and we can really good into this issue. >> factsastic. >> randi pweingarten, aft dorg.org. we will be right back.
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you've heard bill's views, now let's hear yours. politically direct means no b.s. just telling you what's going on in politics today. >>at the only on-line forum with a direct line to bill press. >>it's something i've been waiting for a long time. >>join the debate now. >> great to >> great to have you with us. governor eliot spitzer. >> great to be here. >> we are welcoming the boss.
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my god. >> better be on good behavior. >> co-founder, chairman of the board, long-time friend of mine, a great american, vice president al gore. mr. vice president, good morning. >> hey bill. welcome to current tv. i am so happy that your show is on and doing so great. and good morning, eliot. >> good morning. >> i can't tell you how proud and excited we are to be here, to be part of the term. so we will do our best to carry the flag from 6:00 top 9:00 every morning. >> it's a very exciting and informative show. i am really happy about it. >> you know, i have totel you mr. vice president, you and i have a mutual friend in suzy suzy beull. she sent me an article, global warning close to become can irreversible. what happened? why aren't people talking about it? first of all, i think most
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scientists would probably not reach that particular conclusion. some are irreversible because we are already raised the temperature of the earth by a degree and more is to come because the heat is stored up in the occasions. we have a good chance to avoid the worst of the impacts that the scientists have been warning us about. your question is really why have we failed to rally and do something about it? >> congress is not talking about it. >> first of all, i want to compliment president obama for the action that his epa administration, lease a jackson, took yesterdayisa jackso, took yesterday. all focus is on the supreme court because of the healthcare arguments but people forget back during the final year of the bush-cheney administration, the supreme court upheld a provision
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in the clean air act that that designated -- that allowed the designation of c 02 as an air pollute polluteant and it's not ancient history. it is because of that law and the ruling and the interpretation of the law that the epa was able to issue this historic rule yesterday that really puts limits on carbon emissions. so, you know, the action has been frustratingly slow it's a tough problem, garden variety denial. there has been a mess of information come pained by coal and oil companies sort of like -- well exactly like what the top acco companies did for 40 years to mislead people into not believing what the doctors have always said about smoking and lung cancer after the surgeon general's report. >> right. exactly. the obama administration has
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done some great things which they are not getting credit for and renewing us in the direction of renewable energy. finally, mr. vice president, i have to ask you, politically now, have you ever seen a republican primary or even a democratic primary as crazy as this one we have been through with the cast of shacks? it must be fun for youcharacters? it must be fun for you on the sidelines. >> it only hurts when you laugh. >> it's not fun, really for this reason, bill. i think it hurts the country. i think it's embarrassing to have, you know, people major candidates come out against public education come out against contraception, make some of these arguments that are just ones that you think they are in the last sent re i don't think it's good for the country. in a purely partisan sense, maybe it tilts the scales and
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helps democrats but for the country as a whole, i think anything i say about it is going to be heard as partisan but i will say this at that let me ask you this: i really wish the majority within the republican party who i believe are embarrassed by this would stand up and say, wait a minute. we need to offer better and the democratic party has made so many mistakes, also, you know it's not purely a partisan divide but we need good, high-quality debasis about what we need to do and this has been astonishment in the shallowness of it in my opinion. >> gept back to the issues that matter. t back to the issues that matter. mr. vice president, thank you for a chance to be part of your term. we are guide to be here. >> i am so happy you are. keep up great work, bill. talk to you soon, eliot.
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>> come down and see us. we will have a place for you in the studio any time you are in town. >> bye-bye. >> he is a great guy. >> he is spectacular. this environmentals stuff that lisa jackson did is hugely important. it prospect actively is going to make all future power plants cleaner, coal plants going forward, they will be so much more significant. >> the vice president was right. there is so much attention now to to the healthcare thing. that's what we are understanding. here is the epa? >> he should have been back 5 is the most powerful number in the united states. i think most of us think he actually should have been president, won the vote in florida. he never got that chance. it's the same supreme court that
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really is the fulcrum of so many of these decisions. >> absolutely, this is the bush v. gore court. >> exact right. it's emotional the same. >> maybe they have a chance to redeem themselves. he was elected president. there is no question about it. which mitt romney won. he has not been able to make the deal. how does he, in your opinion, he is weak. there are three different pieces of the republican party, the theological, rick santorum the libertarian, ron paul and the traditional corporate kind of moderate which is mit romney. he can't close the deal with the other two. they are fundamentally. i am not sure he wants that theological piece. here is the other reality. at that level, he is weak. different prospective on it.
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those voters whoa whom he doesn't appeal toe have going to vote vote for the republican nominee. there is some merit as a tactical matter, is that he is stronger in the swing states because he is a slightly more moderate voice. in pennsylvania ohio, mish. now, i think president obama will win those states because of the economic trend right now. santorum can't. i can. he is going through some tougher battles now. he would say it means grateder streng
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we have a big, big hour and the i.q. will go way up. how are you ever going to solve the problem if you don't look at all of the pieces? >>tv and radio talk show host stephanie miller rounds out current's morning news block. >>you're welcome current tv audience for the visual candy. >>sharp tongue, quick whit and above all, politically direct. >>you just think there is no low they won't go to. oh, no. if al gore's watching today... >> if president bush had gotten bin laden, we would hear it morning, noon and night. there would be action figures. >> aircraft-carrier on the south lawn. >> they would go bananas with it. to claim it's out of bounds to polit size it, it's short
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memories during the 2008 campaign and before that, in the 2004 campaign, we saw 9-11 imagery and campaign commercials. it raised some eyebrows but the idea of polit sizing this is not a new one. here is the problem: pomresident obama tries to hold himself above and portrays himself appear different politician. he is just a politician trying to get re-elected everyone acts shocked and horrified. >> that's not a fair standard. >> i am always sitting in the back of the press room at the whitehouse, you know, i always get annoyed when the people say isn't this a political event. isn't this just political? duh, right? >> again, yes, no. >> if you want to talk to students about student loans i think going to a college campuses is sort of making senses. >> talk to the nation about afghanistan, going to afghan state and doing it makes sense.
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>> if you look at the tone, he talked about the half million men and women who send and made served. he talks about people who lost their lives. that wasn't a political speech. this is a moment the president was handed two words, he ended one. the other one is on it way to being done. >> everything he is doing isling. the problem is the white house keeps denying it's happening. that has the reporters screaming it. like admit what you are doing. this trip, i thought, was number 1, the imports thing to do, a
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historic thing to do. at the same time, it served a purpose of squashing all of of this republican whining. the president showed we have gone full circle. right? >> right. >> the attacks were planned in afghanistan. 10 years ago, we went into afghanistan to get them. a year ago, we got the number wu gyn. now, 10 years later, we are aannouncing sort of the end of the operation there. no new taxes. >>this bill clinton commercial marked a new milestone in the "flip-flop" tv ads. now a days with video tapes, you can go and find a piece of footage of them saying one thing and then find another piece of footage of them contradicting themselves. >>we're never ever going to be able to totally control immigration. i promise you we can end illegal
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immigration. >>and, sometimes the candidate does the work for the commercial producers. >>i actually did vote for the $87 billion before i voted against it. >>he bragged about voting for the $87 billion to support our troops before he voted against it. >>in this new media age a flip-flop ad is just a verbal gaff away. >>current tv's look at campaign ads that changed history is brought to you by pradaxa. i have the most common type of atrial fibrillation, or afib. it's not caused by a heart valve problem. i was taking warfarin, but my doctor put me on pradaxa instead to reduce my risk of stroke. in a clinical trial, pradaxa® (dabigatran etexilate mesylate) reduced stroke risk 35% better than warfarin. and unlike warfarin, with pradaxa, there's no need for regular blood tests. that's really important to me. pradaxa can cause serious, sometimes fatal, bleeding. don't take pradaxa if you have abnormal bleeding
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jennifer granholm is politically direct on current tv. >>the dominoes are starting to fall. (vo) granholm is live in the war room. >> what should women be doing? >> electing women to office. (vo) she's a political trailblazer. >>republicans of course didn't let facts get in the way of spin. >>do it, for america. ♪ skfrn join joining us in studio, nia malika henderson. >> hi. >> how is everything going? >> good. rick santorum is going to be pull out a pretty big victory
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there. >> 49 to 27. >> gingrich had about 16%. a really strong win there. he went in about 12 points ahead. no surprise he won. certainly surprised he won so gig. again, i don't know how much it changes. ballpark 20 tell gates were up for grabs in that one. he's got a 300 point deficit to mitt romney. he calls that romney math. his numbers are apparently a little different. it looks like this thing is over. >> sort of like a rodney dangerfield moment. can't get more respect. >> he can get more respect than he used to. >> that's for sure. i interviewed him in february of 2011 in a krispy kreme. he had just given a speech where michelle batch man wasta at this event. she got much more praise and cheers and standing ovations thank he did.
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he has been able to reverse those fortunes. >> he won 11 primaries. it's gotten to the point where math matly he is not going to be able to catch up. he is going to stay in this thing. they pretty much admit it's not matter of getting to 1144 themselves but denying mitt romney getting 1144. he is the face and voice of social conservatives, of the religious right. we will have to see. >> we will talk more about the louisiana primary with nia nia malika. not just louisiana but what's coming up is more important and how president obama's campaign is shaping up as well. >> this is the bell press show. >>(narrator) the sheriff of wall street. >>the leadership of high finance just doesn't get it. >>(narrator) the former governor of new york, eliot spitzer is on current tv. >>somebody somewhere can listen,
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record, track, gather this data. >>arrangements were made. >>(narrator) independent unflinching. >>there is a wild west quality to it that permits them to do whatever they wish. >>(narrator) and above all politically direct. >>facts are stubborn things.
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pweingarten, aft dorg.org. we will be right back. >> radio meets television the bill press show, now on current tv. >> good to have you with us
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today in studio with us nia mallickmal malika henderson, we have comments on this big day today. very pleased to hear from democratic leader nancy pelosi who e-mails in congratulations, bill press as one of your big fans, i am glad that even more americans can start the day energized, informed and kept current. very nice use of "current". >> thank you very much leader nancy pelosi. a great leader a great friend and former chair of the california democratic party as i was. today is her birthday. >> happy birthday. >> happy birthday, nancy. so there we go. good to have you in studio with us nia. i was looking ahead about the break. that you are talk being
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louisiana. >> that's behind us. coming up, they have a little time. april 3rd, we go into wisconsin maryland and washington, d.c. i am always curious about that. where do they have the republican caucuses. >> right. washington, d.c. >> in a phone booth if there were phone books. >> rick santorum is probably wondering the same thing. i think he imagined he wouldn't get this far. his daughter was in charge of actually researching how to get on ballots in all 50 states and in d.c. so he is going to give that one up. people are saying if he can't do well at least in wisconsin, it's probably time for him to bow out. but it doesn't look like he is going to. >> then we go to april 24th, which is connecticut, delaware new york, pennsylvania rhode island. so we are kind of getting away from santorum country office right? >> that's right. >> it seems his chances get
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diminished rather than grow. >> it's going to be hard for him to maintained moment um through april. it's going to be a cruel month for him. he's got a bright spot in pennsylvania. of course, his home state. so he should do well there. >> didn't the first time around? >> that's right 18 point os loss but he is hoping that will be a race he wins and he can go into may where there are more southern con tests and he can pick up momentum again, but you imagine there will be a isition in april where rom energy does well and santorum capabilities to fade. >> the bite we used earlier from santorum where he is talking about mitt romney as a possible nominee, he certainly has not let up at all on romney. here he is. >> he is the worst cran in the country put up against barack obama.
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why would wisconsin want to vote for someone like that? >> at some point, you think he is not going to be the nominee. >> yeah. how could he vote. against against. >> he called a possible romney win saying it would be a hollow victory. >> he said almost better off to have obama? >> basically the same. he has backed off of that and said he would obviously campaign for whoever the republican nominee is. again, you think that the democrats are going to miss this opportunity to use santorum against romney in the general you can almost imagine them using those ads against him. >> at some point, he will have though either cut reality as you put point out. his goal is to keep romney below 1144, to go into the convention and be the broker or where he thinks he could then rally
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people behind? >> yeah. his platform, social conservatives, religious right who have very much been in the political hinterlands. bush didn't pay them much attention. of course, he, you know, he startsort of cowtowed to them during elections but you can imagine rick santorum can go into tampa and have authority, some leverage to maybe flew the republican party platform. you do, i think at some point, romney will have to pick up the phone and say, hey, santorum. what do you want. >> nia malika henderson in studio with us here this morning. again, thank you for coming in here. so, let's look at the one big ent ent. the supreme court today taking up the affordable act obama
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care. >> short. >> give us your read on the court may uphold it or they may dump it. right? how does that affect play for president obama in this campaign? >> i have been thinking about this. the conventional wisdom is it could be a warn. >> either way? >> either way. it could damage romney. it could damage obama. it could make a a difference. like you said, the oral arguments are going to start today. three days, six hours, a long, long time. the longest time they have been deliberated. >> can you imagine clarence thomas staying awake for that long? >> it's going to be a challenge for a lot of people to stay through this. >> he better pop some -- i don't know what you would have to pop to stay awake. drink a lot of coffee. >> this obviously will affect the way the obama campaign has
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to kind of craft their argument around healthcare. >> if the court says -- which ryan grim from hustington post was on our first hour this morning, and ryan grim predicts the court will uphold the afford affordable care act because he thinks john roberts wants to restore the reputation of the court. but if the court were to do that, that's a huge win for obama? >> that's a huge win. i think that's right. i mean -- >> what it is itf it doesn't? is that necessarily. >> i don't know that it does because it's not like -- i mean, part of problem of the healthcare agent to begin with in terms of campaigning on it is that a lotit hasn't gone into effect. there aren't fines for people who don't get health insurance aren't the state pools where people can get health insurance disappoint. some have gone into effect. i think if it goes down it
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could have something of a bearing on the campaign but i think people who hate the healthcare law hate the healthcare law. they are not going to hate it anymore if it goes down. >> i could see how the obama campaign could use it to their loss in the court. >> to rally the base. >> and say this is why the sprrt is so important. >> that's whysupreme court is so important. >> that's why we need to keep obama there and it would be worse if you have a republican president. i think he comes out of it okay. >> that's about right. >> so then, the other question is: look at santorum and look at romney. can santorum run on the social issues in the general election were he to become the nominee? >> i don't think connection. you have seen romney very smartly stay away from the social issues and try to make this all about the economy. he hasn't been so successful.
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>> we will get to that next. >> but it's hard to see how if you are santorum you roughen on contraception, for instance. you hear his wife even having to say on cnn, hey, my husband is okay. he is fine with contraception. he is not going to do anything. she knows full well that that wouldn't play so well in a general election and that women are going to be so important in the fall to this campaign. lard to believe that may birth control is the number 1 tissue americans want to be talking about and voting on november, but that's santorum's big issue. 8 since 6-55-press is our toll-free number. we are talking the current political scene- here on currentt with nia malika henderson. ken is calling from greenfield wisconsin. thank you for joining us. >> good morning congratulations on the show. >> how about it? thank you. >> it's awesome to talk to both you guys.
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i have seen you on msnbc here we are. it's great when the republicans are going to have their campaign in wisconsin because it brings more attention to the recall walker campaign and the other republicans we are recalling even though one has the gal to up and quit. >> yeah. >> like i am not going to give you the satisfaction of recalling it. >> that recall, of course, is so important. we have been talking about it non-stop it seems here on the show. what is it? the date again? june 5th? right? is that? ken. >> for the recall, i am not actually sure. >> i am pretty sure. nia malika henderson. >> on your radio on t.v. the bill press show, new on current tv.
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weeknights on current tv.
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>> heard around the country, seen on current tv this is the bill press show. >> 13 minutes before the top of the hour congressman emanuel cleaver said of the congressional black caucus will join us here in full court press when this monday march 26th, surveying the political scene on the republican side, democratic side with washington post national political reporter, nia malik henderson talkking your calls at 866-55 nia malika. i don't know anybody else with a hyphenated first name. how did that come about? >> my parents couldn't make up their minds. i actually hyphenated my own name. i had this short first name, n. ia and a long last name. i felt like my first name needed
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company. i hyphenated it. >> you are not married? >> people think i am married because i have a hyphenated first name. >> i was going to say, let's say you marry joe smith. you would be a nia malika henderson-smith. >> right. >> you would have two hyphenated names. >> a long by-line. >> the obama campaign doing nothing but raising money right now. >> that's right. >> and sharpening their message. >> sharpening their message. >> i have the impression they are ready to leave outed of the box. >> they are chomping at the bit. president obama a very competitive person, a very competitive politician. >> a great campaigner. >> he wants to get out there. over the last couple of days you have seen campaign send out messages about healthcare, trying to rally the base around healthcare. they have the new shirts about healthcare, calling it a bfdt so
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they have these shirts. david axleelrod sent out an e-mail message saying hell yeah, i love obama care. a little casual there. they think this is an issue they can raise money around. >> your calls welcome "86 s 55 press." josh calling from chicago. hey, josh the. >> hi, bill, hi, malika. >> hey there. >> i wanted to comment on why the national media hasn't picked up on the karens thomas keyrecusing himself because of his wife and the money that she has obviously made off of this. >> that's a good question. i had forgotten that. when she was head of the liberty, she was being paid, she was like leading the lobby against the affordable care act and for repeal. >> she is a big player in those
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conservatives. >> took money from koch brothers and others to fight that issue. here is her husband who gets to vote? >> yeah. it does seem like an issue. i am not sure if it will come up in some of the reporting on this case but no. >> there were stories on it when she was still there. >> now joining this with tucker carlson at the daily caller. i haven't seen any message of that for quite awhile. shame on the national media for not reporting that. he should have recharacterized himself in this case. michael in magnolia, new jersey. hi, michael. >> good morning. >> good morning. yeah. >> congratulations on the show. i like both of you guys so. >> thank you. glad you are there. my question is i am rallied confused with people that are so against the healthcare law. i am wondering if you have
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any -- it's obviously just an opinion, but what's the mate of people being so against people getting healthcare when they are not well or when they can't actually afford insurance? i mean i work two jobs. i still can't afford it. i work with people who their insurance levels have doubled since they have gotten insurance and they meet have to drop it. i was would notering why people are against it. >> you know, it's a next question. nia malika i will let you go first. going to some of these rallies and hearing santorum talk about it and talking to people in the audience, their big beef is the calendar federal government actually forcing people to buy something. they leap to the an an i didn't of what if the government forced me to buy blockroccoli, should i have to do that? >> yes. >> yes. it's delicious. the issue of the government
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compelling you to do something that maybe you don't want to do. so that's the issue. but again what do you think, bill? >> i think the big deal is simply that this is something that, after all republicans and democrats have fought for and talked about for 100 years. >> yeah. >> finally, it gets to obama who can maybe get it done where nix on couldn't get it done and some others didn't try. and suddenly they turned against it, and, you know, the lemmings follow the leaders and say it has to be bad. these are people, the obama care. right? don't want to give up medicare. >> there is that contrad addition. they don't want give up their healthcare. they need t let's say hello to pat from the wisconsin. hello, pat. >> bill, i will tell you one
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thing. i was a republican until i became a pre-existing condition 24 years ago. i got a million dollar leg because i had cancer in my leg and then i had colon cancer 11 years ago. hey, this racing the debt limits are the maximum you can use is pretty important to me. >> there are a lot of people out there. i think people who are out there now rallying against healthcare when they have a condition like pat. >> they might very well change their mind. >> you are great. >> welcome welcome, welcome. come back any time. >> i love being with you. >> you will be here. we will see you often. i will be back bringing upyou up, up to date on the president's busy schedule in the republic of korea on the full court press, monday march 26th.
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>> the supreme court opens in just about an hour for the second day of arguments on obama obamacare and get right into the meat of the issue over the individual mandate. aren't country back down in florida, of course big huge rally last night, justice be done in that case and president obama wrapping up his visit to the nuclear submit in south korea flying home today after being caught on the open mike following those stories here with team press. peter okay burn dan henning. >> good morning. >> sip ran boulding the man behind the camera videographer
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here, joining us in studio faz shakir is the head of think progress.org. >> nice to see you. >> thanks for coming over. >> looks like you professionalized the operation. i see your producers are wearing pants to the office now. we had to dress up a little bit: we might mention the flowers are a gift from jennifer gran home. the host of the war room current tv. isn't that nice? she and her team. >> she is tall event he had on t.v. i have been on a couple of times with her. she is a natural. >> a welcome to the current tv term. speak about welcome to the term. tim teabow was welcomed to the team yesterday, to the jets. they had a little news conference with him.
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one might say if you listen to this montation put the together by espn one might conclude that he is excited to be there. >>. >> i am so excited about being a jet, so excited about being with my teammates. i was excited about that. all right. i am as excited. exciting for me. i am excited to be a jet. i am excited to be here. that will be exciting for me. i think it's exciting. excited about working with me. i am excited about working with him. 44times. 30 minutes. >> the presses conference. >> the use of the word excited. >> 44 times. >> i think it might have to do with limited vocabulary. >> i think it's because he is a virgin. >> sure filled with excitement.
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>> he doesn't have to deal with excitement. all right. good to have you with us. a little bit late erpt, melany sloan from cru soo. >> simon cowl's home was broken into in great brittain. a 29-year-old woman was arrested and charged with aggravated bug larry after baking through a window. he was in bed when he heard her in the bathroom and found her with a brick in her hand. his security staff held her until the police arrived. >> how did she get that far? where was the security. >> you are ready, dan. that's going to happen to you now that you are on t.v. >> right. right. whitney houston's ex-husband bobby brown arrested in van nice california on suspicion of driving drunk.
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cops believe he was intoxicated. he has a previous dui conviction. >> he may be trouble. >> a new study says chocolate lovers are thinner than those who stay away from the street. researchers. >> best news i have heard all day. >> san diego scientists say people who ate moderate amounts of chocolate 5 times a week and exercised had lower moss mass -- >> and exercised. >> this is compared to people who ate no chocolate and also exercised. >> they had lower body mass indexes. >> no more than one ounce of chocolate per day is recommended. >> doctors recommend a gas of red wine and a box of chocolates. dan, thank you. faz, i want to just make sure all of our listeners and our viewers know as far as i am concerned as a tox talk show
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host the importance of the work you did it. it's no exaggeration and i know i am speaking for the whole gang. right? for stephanie miller, tom hartman, randy rhodes, rachel mad on you ed schultz. we couldn't do our work without the work that you do. you put it out there on think prague. >> and you give it the greater platform it deserves. i have a staff of 25 people who all deserve partial credit here we work together as a great team covering all kind of issues so i am glad that other people find the site useful. >> it's great. it's a great source. i want to encourage our listeners and viewers to check out every day like we do think progress think progress.org and i hope it's safe to say -- i certainly hope you can make this happen you are going to be a regular on our new current tv show? >> i have nothing better to do. win of the jobs that you and i are in the business of is trying to make people believe not only
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do people want to hear about justice and stories that are right but that there is a consumer base for this. i think if we tell the stories that matter whether it's tray van moretin or a hor i have been beating and the truth about it that these are the kind of stories people really want to hear and will gravitate to over time as long as we provide it to them. >> people are looking for facts, you know. >> that's one of the things that we have been trying to do is present the facts of the case but not only so people are informed but they also can see through the lies and propaganda from the other side and it didn't exist before center forre for american progress. >> thank you. >> seriously, i mean that. you have been out in front on the trayvon martin case. in outed lining the facts of the case. and now in on the lining the smear campaign that's started
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when we first started telling the story, we wrote what you need to know about tray von martin, the facts. it started a cable blitz around this issue, right around the time the 9-11 tables were released and we got to learn more details about how ridiculous the story was. last night, judd posted a round-up which the team helped him with, which is documenting the smear campaign against trayvon. if you saw his mother mrs. martin yesterday talk about this, she was really distraught about the it and said they killed my son. and now they are trying to damage his reputation. i think it under scores how tragic the whole story has become. >> do you think this smear campaign is coordinated, organized? and if so, who is behind it. >> i don't know it's coordinated person to person. i think that everyone has gotten the message on the right that they feel zimmerman has been assaulted and attacked and that
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now it's time to open up whatever vault you have on trayvon and this came in wake of the rivera comment it sent a signal saying if i am saying this, everybody else say what you want. you sawed doctored photographs of trayvon circulating and conspiracy these are saying he may have beat up a bus driver. >> nudge of which is true. >> as far as we know, none is true. it's made up out of whole cloth. al sharpton had it right when he said this is the kind of thing you always see to an african-american who is a victim. characterize it around racial stereo times. this guy is a thuggy druggy trying to fit you into what you saw on television about an republican american who may have got caught in the wrong business. >> what is the come pulse?
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right? that they can't accept the facts the way they are but they have to make this kid look like the attacker and ziperman look like the victim? >> rich lowry, as conserve tough as you can get with the national review actually wrote a piece saying, al sharpton finally got something right, you know. i thought i really valued that. just being honest, basically the way he was saying let's not try to make this anything other than it is. >> right. this age of hyper politization. i think one of the reasons is the impact of the stand your ground law in florida there is a whole host of important people who are trying to defend that law leading that charge. it's the nra alec who has written about by paul krugman in the new york"new york times" yesterday. these are the groups who have a lot of money resources, a vested interest in trying to i think, show the facts of this case are a certain way.
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am friend who is savvy on television, you are wondering where he came from and he is throwing out the most outlandish comments. >> he looks like he is a t.v. host, veteran. >> he is. he was an orlando t.v. reporter actually and an award winning t.v. reporter a friend of the family and has been tasked with going out and making the most overzealous accusations. >> the most outrageous of which i have heard is that what about this racial epithet which i haven't said on the air until today but if he is saying it, it sounds like in his call to the 911 did be in his call to the police, george zimmerman is say,ing, these f'ing soons
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always get away. joe oliver is saying that's a term of endearment down here in the south we call each other soon ass. >> people proudly say that. >> do you think for a moment george zimmerman if he said that, that's what he said about trayvon martin? saying i like this kid. he is a friend of mine. >> you see joe oliver say this with a completely straight face as if he is trying to be totally honest where he was trying to be nice to the guy. >> faz shakir, editor-in-chief at think progress.org. the other big story, as big as that is, here in washington, d.c., supreme court in what has been called the case of the sent re or the biggest case the supreme court has had since bush v gore. >> right. >> a lot riding on it. it's a lot of activity, a lot of excitement. for me as an activist, i am sure you feel the same way, it's nice
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to see people getting excited about policy. they are in the supreme court getting people engaged in the pros. >> rick santorum showed up in front of the court. >> god bless him. >> to take a stand. >> you know, i think ultimately, in terms of the argument here in the court case, i think a lot of people have forgotten we have had a number of conservative courts uphold the law. lawrence silverman, given the metal of freedom by bush. harvey wilkinson, you know, people who have upheld the law. >> said this particular law. >> and argued vor civ rusly that the congress has to have it and that there is no context within the constitution, as silverman said for this argument to exist. your calls welcome about
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anything he is working on, about the affordable care act or the obama care case before the supreme court. the toll-free number 866-557-7377. the conversation continues on a chat room and here on the air and we will get right back to it. ♪
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>>the guys in the middle class the guys in the lower end got screwed again. >>i think you know which one we're talking about.
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the overwhelming majority of the country says"tax the rich, don't go to war." >>just wanted to clarify that. >> reverend berry linn is in the studio with us on a related issue. as we speak, catholics united is in new york to deliver some pigs today to cardinal timothy doe less than asking what are you doing about this ryan budget cuts food stamps head started everything to do with the poor. the bishops are very out spoken
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when it comes to contraception. what about some other reasons? with me and berry linn. hi, james. >> good morning, bill. >> tell us what you are up to in new york. what's the message for the cardnal? >> were you there when they crucified the poor. he is very comfortable giving interviews to fox news complaining about increased access to contraceptive services for women but silent when it comes to the single largest redistribution from wealth from the poor to the rich in my lifetime. we are saying people of faith, we want him to be an office for the faith. >> what have they said about paul ryan budget. >> nothing. pi they put out a general statement saying the budget reflects moral priorities two weeks later, the ryan budget drops and not a word. we have seen cardinal doelenz
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give these on a pr campaign. >> that's not weft mother american contact licks are >> barry, i had a question. it seems to me as i recall -- i am not a catholic but i do remember in 1931, there was a papal split, a letter from the pope opposing artificial birth control. it seems there were several centuries before then when the catholic church was talking a lot about helping the poor. is. >> is there a very short attention span on the part of mr. dolen these days? >> the church has a profound teaching when it comes to social justice and the common good. >> that's what inspired me to devote my life to working against the war on poverty. and unfortunately, the cultural re, of the politics right now are driving record numbers of
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catholics away from the faith. but the cardinal barnadines of the world saying the it gave voice to people like me that said yes, this has truth behind it. i want to spend my life working for it. . >> i wrote my column about the byrnesooned the fact they are so out spoken about contraception and i got a lot of material from catholics united. i can't tell you how many e-mails i received from priests around the country who read the column and said thank you for speaking out about our bishops because as priests we know embarrassed and disappointed by your leadership because they have moved away from what should be the true focus of religious leaders and are on to this other
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stuff, sadly i think this reflects the agenda of benedict xvi. >> thank you. >> another great organization. so you just participated a couple of days ago in a with the the feminist majority about the war on women. >> a couple of points at that address that were pet well received. you can find it going to www.au.org. the speech is up there so people can watch it. if you want to tall talk about the core principle did of the church church in general, it's about something called jesus, not about iuds norplant. it's not even about abortion. this idea that this is the central focus of the entire faith being repudiated by president obama is total -- i
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wouldn't want to use this word. >> be careful. you are on the rye. >> i heard it from rick santorum. it's a word i never used. it's kind of in that category. >> initial b. >> the pope on holy thursday in rome rebuked priests who advocate or daning women. the pope said it's time to stop talking about their own preferences and ideas. anti-women. >> yes. >> they should turn toward a radical issue of obedience. >> a radicalism of obedience. that's what they want catholic women to be except on the contra session matter 94% of american catholic women use contra exception. i guess they didn't get the message >>. >> one more minute barry linn nationwide concerts. >> last weekend in september if you go to
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voicesunitedconcerts.com, you will find out the beginnings of this roll-out, all over the country, singer song writers giving us their time in order to make a point that we are trying to elect in november not a they arelogian in chief, not a pastor in chief the next commander in chief and we need to keep church and state separate. >> that's so important. the last weekend in september, friday, saturday, sunday can concerts. >> a very, very important cause. berry, reverend berry lin, americans united for separation of church and state au.org is the website. >> nice to be here, bill. >> thanks, berry. keep up the good fight. >> i shall.
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only on current tv. >> if you are a republican candidate these days, it seems that you can't start your campaign without making a pilgrimage to 6th avenue and what is it? 58th street. >> why do they need to go there?
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>> there happens to be a little building there will called newscorp and fox news. >> i have heard of them. >> roger ails? right right? >> my colleague wrote a whole book about them. the fox effect. what was so interesting, i think you are talking about that article that came out documenting how republican litership in congress and any republican really running for. like we have to go and kiss the right? right? roger ailes, head of the foch news network. if you are going to run to office and the republican party you better make a stop by. it's more important than any big donor which makes sense if you understand how political fox news actually is. what we are talking about here is that fox news isn't a news organization. it's a political operation. >> absolutely what you have in rogers ailes,acy political consultant, not the head of a
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news organization. >> but that's what he is >> that's exactly right. >> that's hisbi background. usually people who head news organizations have, you know they are news men. that is the background. ails has decades of experience going back to the next on white house as a political aid and it's very interesting, this reminded me. i was talking too my staff yesterday. this is the least surprises news to come out. this was how it was set up from the beginning. his handwriting was all over it. al plan for putting the g.o.p. t.v. news. it's not to create a news disi am nation organization to avoid the prejudices of network newsdessimination organization to avoid the prejudices of network news news. here we have fox news. the candidates have to go kiss
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the right. he set it up from the giving to operate as it is. we have fox news, not just, you know, a little bit liens to the right right. the amount of money this free air time is worth for these candidates. softball question, clean up any messes they need to take care much. >> that's where you go. lieutenant governor of california, and former mayor of san francisco is on current tv. >>every night on cable news networks everyone's focusing on what's wrong. i want this show to move past that. i love creative people, and with all the vexing problems we have we need creative thinking. >>(narrator) with interviews with notables from silicon valley, hollywood, and beyond. >>at the end of the day this show's simple. it's about ideas. ideas are the best politics. ideas can bring us together. >>(narrator) the gavin newsom pacific. only on current tv.
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♪ ♪ spearmint that tingles as you chew. 5 gum. stimulate your senses. i have the most common type of atrial fibrillation, or afib. it's not caused by a heart valve problem. i was taking warfarin, but my doctor put me on pradaxa instead to reduce my risk of stroke. in a clinical trial, pradaxa® (dabigatran etexilate mesylate) reduced stroke risk 35% better than warfarin. and unlike warfarin, with pradaxa, there's no need for regular blood tests. that's really important to me. pradaxa can cause serious, sometimes fatal, bleeding. don't take pradaxa if you have abnormal bleeding and seek immediate medical care for unexpected signs of bleeding, like unusual bruising. pradaxa may increase your bleeding risk if you're 75 or older, have a bleeding condition like stomach ulcers, or take aspirin, nsaids, or blood thinners,
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or if you have kidney problems especially if you take certain medicines. tell your doctor about all medicines you take any planned medical or dental procedures and don't stop taking pradaxa without your doctor's approval as stopping may increase your stroke risk. other side effects include indigestion, stomach pain, upset, or burning. pradaxa is progress. having afib not caused by a heart valve problem increases your risk of stroke. ask your doctor if you can reduce your risk with pradaxa. her unique mix of comedy and politics to current tv. >> it's like a reality show, they're just turning cameras on and we just do our thing. >>politically direct to me means no b.s., the real thing, cutting through the clutter. i'm energized to start my show everyday because it's fun, because i care about what's going on in this country, rather than some sort of tired banter it is actual water cooler talk it's the way people really talk about these issues.
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we've always considered ourselves a comedy show. let me just say i am not ready for my close up. i think it's important to laugh. i think it will be exciting, because you can't script three hours of radio. what is going on? i can't tell you how many times right wingers call the show and say, "i don't agree with anything you say, but your show is funny as hell." the only thing that can save america now, current tv. can i say that? >> pleased to welcome to the from the congressional district rosa del arrow. >> good morning. it's wonderful to see you did. it's great to be herearo.
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>> good morning. it's wonderful to see you did. it's great to be here. peter ogburn. >> hi, there. >> dan henning. >> good morning. >> current tv term. and our individualvideographer cyprian boulding there. the man behind the camera we never see. so this is what neck to the last day before break. >> it is. we will wrap up sometime around 4:00 o'clock this afternoon. >> this afternoon. >> and then, you know, head out. >> was there any -- i want to ask you about this later. was there any action? when i went from our bedroom here on capitalol hill, we see the capitol dome. it's lights on. >> we will know you are there h when i we want to bed? >> the light was still on. >> the light was still on. was there any action on the highway bill last night? >> no. we are anticipating the transportation bill sometime today. it would appear that we are looking at a 90-day extension and we will see.
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we will see what happens. last night, they did two or three pieces of the budget. >> okay. we will talk more about that in just a moment. this is also congress woman, a big day today because this weekend at any rate, megamillions now the megamillions is expected to reach up to $500 million. i never buy lottery tickets until it gets real high. now, this intrees me. all you need peter, here is a little clip that says here is all you need only a dollar. you take your chance here you might be luck. >> a dollar and a dream. >> that's all you need. i love it. a dollar and a dream. >> you know where i get my tickets right here at the eastern market. >> wonderful. i don't do this. >> from the greek mrs. calamari? >> fab louses. a wonderful lady. >> if i win, she will get a big
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prize. >> if you hit half a billion dollars, do you tip here? what's 10% of half$10% of half a billion dollars? >> i forget what the vendors, the one who sells the ticket. they get something. >> i think it's $50,000 is what the vendor gets. >> i think it's a set price. >> they should double it for something that's half a billion dollars. >> can i tell you vaa very quick annekdoteecdote anecdote. >> you won the ivy issue sweepstakes? >> one satisfactory morning on a bicycle up to my folks home, 53880 channel street what is it? so early, the tell grant people. western unions. the my dad says to my mom, lou, it's the irish sweepstakes but butted opened the tellgraham was--
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the telegram. >> he opened it. it was from me saying send money. >> what parents think college is about. >> send money. >> senate chris coons from delaware will join us. next hour, david corn the washington bureau chief for mother jones. we have a lot to talk to the congress woman about. >> this is the full court press. >> the news you need to know on this thursday, president obama, an avid basketball player wants to shoot hoops with jeremy lin. arnie duncan who plays with the president told the hill newspaper yesterday linn should expect a phone call. duncan was captain of the harv vard basketball team lin's alma mater. >> that's how the pet got to learn ballpark jeremy lin early on.
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>> another day, another celebritity on capitol hill, sandra lee spushing for support for federal nutrition programs. the hill reporting the food network host daviding new york quo mo. >> first girlfriend. >> got it. eary-eyed on talk being it on tuesday. >> a good message? >> an unbelievable initiative and effort. it's worth getting teary-eyed about be. >> prince william and duchess indicate will have a new roomnatemate. >> she is pregnant? >> no. >> we don't know that. will's brother, prince harry is moving in with them. it won't be a crowded small apartment. >> i don't want you sleeping on the sofa. >> the brothers are close and they wanted to be closer together. so he is moving in and indicate and harry get along very well.
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>> i don't know. i think there could be trouble. when your inlaws start moving in. >> that's right. >> not so. >> congress woman, lease start with healthcare. they finished yesterday the arguments in the supreme court. what do you think is going to happen? >> i don't know what's going to happen. yol have a crystal ball but i would say, bill, i think it would be an amazing over reach by this conservative court if they were to declare any part of this legislation unconstitutional. >> do you think it is constitutional? >> i do. >> you voted for it? >> it is. it's not unlike other efforts of engaging whether it's civil rights or if it's, you know we do pay costs for medicare across state lines. it falls within the jurisdiction of the commerce clause. >> the individual mandate, we were back be in 2008 in the
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campaign hillary clinton was saying wineed the individual man dates. barack obama was saying no no, that goes too far. she ended up winning that argument. is it core? >> i believe it is core. to the handwriting, to be able to maintain it. if you want to drive the cost of handwriting down, you are going to have to make sure that everyone or as many people are as possible are not covered. if not, they are going to be picked up by those insured. it is a very simple presentlies. it's in bulk which drives costs down. any shopper knows about that. anyone goes to big places to. >> if everything in the pool
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pays. >> it's on people's hospital bills for uncompensated care. >> yeah. >> this is all about. james carville whom we all know bill clinton's campaign manager in 1992. to stir things tup says he thinks the best think that could happen to barage obama would be for the supreme court to overturn the healthcare bill because costs would go up, insurance and they would have to reassure the president's re-election. >> i have a lot of respect for james. he is a very good friend as is mary honestly but my view is i just think we need to get on with healthcare. this bill is really transformative and that's what i
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believe. i will tell you it's probably my proudest moment was being able to cast a vote for the healthcare bill. it changes people's lives. we have been trying to do that for a long time. >> for a very, very long time. it talks about prevention. it talks about trying to bring down the cost of healthcare. it increases the coverage for people, for women, you and i have talked about this. it is testimonyative in making sure that women's healthy becomes on a par with healthcare in this country. while there may be political advantage down the road. i think we need to move forward as we have already with what has already in place. >> yeah. >> i think that has to be a driver that folks understand what they have already as a result of affordable care act. >> to build on that rather than
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start from scratch. >> i don't think people want to relitigate this they really don't. >> or relegislate it. >> we certainly don't need that processes under way again. >> congresswoman rosa delauro on this thursday edition of full-court press. i asked you briefly about the highway bill. yesterday we had secretary ray lahood on the show. >> wonderful. >> wonderful guy? >> i asked him what was going on. i would like to play a clip from the cemetery's interview yesterday and see if you agree with his take on the hold-up in the house. >> unfortunately, they have this 40 to 50 very, very conservative do-nothing republicans who came to washington to do nothing and that's what they have done who are holding up the bill. and so again speaker boehner can't, with his leadership get his troops together. he doesn't want to pass a bill
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with democrats because that would be embarrassing to him and he can't pass it as long as he's got these 40 to 50 intract dent conservatives who don't want to do anything. >> the peeker said he has to step up if you know anything about ray lahood i served with him on the agriculture and appropriations committee, he is a straight shooter. it doesn't make a difference. he tells it as it is. here we are, transportation. we want to talk about a key to economic growth. >> and jobs. >> that's all the peace of it if you can't move there because of the intransigence of 30 or 40 people and not being able to corral those phones and lead them to pass a bill, it's
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extraordinarily ol a transportation bill in the past has enjoyed bi-partisan support because we know what the economics are from it. >> you have to move the goods. it's not just getting to granted ma's house. you have to move the countries around by rail and before these bills are always six years, usually, five or six years out. this bill that passed the senate was a two-year bill. it passed by the way do you remember james inhoff and barbara boxers were the leading responsesors of that bill. if you get those two together on anything. >> my god, you know. now in the house, you are saying you can't get a two-year bill? >> no. you made the point, you know, we are pulling back on high speed rail in this country. we know that this is as i said economic growth for the future. it's about our infrastructure. % it is in my view the driving engineerren engine in terms of jobs, technology, the future
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growth of the nation if we do not make the proper investments now in this area, we are not going to get out of this reception. >> congress woman rosa delauro with us. stay with us. >>the dominoes are starting to fall. (vo) granholm is live in the war room. >> what should women be doing? >> electing women to office. (vo) she's a political trailblazer. >>republicans of course didn't let facts get in the way of spin. >>do it, for america.
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pweingarten, aft dorg.org. we will be right back.
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>> right now, we are in studio with molly ball from the atlantic talking about paul ryan and president obama, mitt romney and president obama both speaking about the paul righteousness budget plan. the point i was making about paul ryan before the break here here is from and i quote these in "the obama hate machine," my latest book, plug plug time magazine described ryan, he has jet black hair and a touch of eagle scout to him. the "new york times" wrote that he's described him as the congress man from wisconsin quote with the piercing blue eyes. love for heavy metal on his ipod and a reputation among democrats including president obama as a republican who has put forward budget ideas that are thoughtful
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and serious. give me a break. >> i take it you don't like the guy. the piercing blue eyes have had no affect on you -- effect on you. >> the jet black hair. >> stlaping upper body physique. >> this document is bogus. liz calling from fort washington washington, maryland. hello, liz. >> hey, bill. how are you? con congratulations on the show. >> how about it? >> you are. >> you are welcome. i used to listen to you on the way to work on serious and i am so happy that i don't have to suffer through morning joe any more, that i can turn you on and get some real news. >> now you have more billing there you go. >> i got full-court press. >> all right. thank you. >> i love it. >> type of ryan is a fraud. i totally agree with you. a budget is about numbers and it's supposed to add up, supposed to al bangs. he has filled it up with republican ideals and is lying about it to sell it to
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low-information volters. i don't know what the politics are but i think she may be living in a bulb. the one that bill march talks about i don't know wham molly's politics are. >> i don't either. >> she a good reporter. are you living in a bubble when it comes to paul ryan. >> i don't think i am living in a paul ryan bubble. i try to talk to both sides. i find myself in the position of arguing with bill from the other side to play devil's advocate and represent the point of view of the other side because i do believe both sides have a case to make. >> liz, appreciate overhearing from you. you would agree if they are putting forth a budget, it's got to do the job? right? if they are putting forth a budget they say will balance the budget, they have to show how
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they are going to do it? right. >> absolutely. >> at some point, he has to do that. this is going to be the battle ground. apparently, it is. >> for 2012. >> going back to what i was saying before, i think democrats love this fight and republicans, a lot of them hate it. there are a lot of republicans i talk to in the house orb just in politics who would regard not deal with this who wish paul ryan could be stopped. >> molly ball, thanks for coming in. >> thanks for having me. >> the bill press show. ♪
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>>(narrator) eliot spitzer is on current tv. >>you just have to conclude that the leadership of high finance just doesn't get it. >>(narrator) independent unflinching, and above all politically direct. ♪ >> in seed yes with us bob kusak for the hill newspaper. bop, a lot to talk about the war on women you know. pribus, the chair of the republican committee was asked about this on an interview he taped with al hunt on bloomberg t.v. and his answer basically is: what war on women? >> well, for one thing, you know, if the democrats said we had a war on caterpillars and
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every mainstream media outlet talked about the fact that republicans had a war on caterpillars action we would have problem with the caterpillars. it's a fix and this started as a war against the vatican that this president pursued. he still hasn't answered barn bill obvious doll en issues issues with obama world and obama care. >> so a war on caterpillars. it's a pure fiction, he says, when you look at rick santorum on the contra. roy blunt voted on them in the sfait to allow employers to decide what kim with get in their healthcare plan and what they can't, when you look at rush 4ri78 bar, not just a fiction. >> it's amazing how this issue has turned around. at first, republicans were playing offense on this. the administration altered its position and then there was just -- >> on the rules
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>> of the healthcare reform law and now, republicans are just plumb objectioned on this. >> with women and hispanics they have to make major improvements in the coming months. they have lost the message war on this. at least to this point. >> yeah, i know, you know, the bottom line is they end up blaming the media. even the trayvon martin killing in florida. some are saying why they feel to need to defend george zimmerman. it's the media i can make toe /* /* -- madeking too much of this. >> obviously i am biased because a member of the media. it looks like you are whining and you have to improve your message and there have been
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times when democrats have been on the defensive on 13 but then they tinkered how they handled it. now, it's republicans who have really taken a nose dive in the polls. >> it's unfair but we have 30 seconds. my final question is: why did the president sign this jobs act yesterday by eric -- sponsored by eric cantor? >> it was a beep bill. some senate. it's not great but it's not as icy as it was in 2011. >> contactsor was -- cantor there was. as one of the callers said if they pass a bill, that's called the jobs act, you kind of have to sign it. right? >> that's right. senate read and schum mer were calling it an ipo bill. >> bob kusack. great to see you thehill.com. check it out. >> this is the bill press show.
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>> how about it? friday morning 4:20. magic day. you pot heads know what i am talking about. we have the executive director of no, ma'amal the national organization for the reform of marijuana laws. alan, good to see you. >> the head head. >> sglrnlthsz. >> exactly. before we get into the significance of 4-20, we always do a little bit of spin here at this time and take a look at some of the spin from the day before. and poke a little fun at it. yesterday's spin and we have been talking about mitt romney his latest demonstration of how out of touch he is when he saw these cookies in pittsburgh, pennsylvania and said they come from the local seven-11 and the lom baker who had prepared these
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was crushed. so president obama said about mitt romney, he wasn't born with a silver spoon in my mouth. mitt romney was asked about that on fox and friends. here is his response. >> i am not going to apologize for my dadses success. the president looks for scapegoats, for those who have been successful. >> misses point nobody warrants you to apologize. we don't want you to keep rubbing it in our face which he does every time he has a chance? >> alan saint pierre 4-20 is a big day why? >> the suginares, foreman wrote to high times magazine and said we are taking the equivalent of a british tea time and by the early 1990s, the time and then the date april 20th had become now a symbol for marijuana use
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all around the country and world for that matter. >> is fob-20 the police code >> no. >> get out of here. >> lots of lor, lots of myth. 4:20, these gentlemen between intra-muiral sports and institutional food were looking to prime their appear tis. they wanted the munchies. >> in marine county? >> marine county california. >> do you know who lives there? >> your home turf. >> native of so how are we doing? are we making any progress? i have been supporting normal for a couple of decades. are we making any progress toward reform of marijuana laws and making marijuana legal? >> sure. here are some numbers that help frame this pretty readily. when normal was framed. 14 states have decriminalized
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marijuana. with you 30 million people in places like california, ohio new york to name some bellweather erb states. de decriminalized means usually if you are caught with one ounce or below, $100 fine, the cops take the ped -- weed and so that's not legalizeation. 16 states and the district of columbia have medical marijuana laws. those range from flu blasts places like colorado you can purchase it if you have am regulation. you can possession a small amount or grow a small amount. you can't go and buy it. >> but still in california federal agencies sweeped into some dependary. law enforcement doesn't catch up
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with their own what's happened? >> i can quickly say there are five pillars of pot prohibition the 5 entities who wants marijuana to go another 75 years is the cops, from the dea all the way down to the local sheriff, alcohol to be acco, pharmaceutical companies because don't want a drug-free america. three would be companies that make money from prohibitions t private prisons and people that are in the business of competing directly with marijuana a most notable, pharmaceutical companies. >> how about politicians? >> politicians, when we look at congress is only about 100 to 120 politicians on record of favoring any type of reform. the huge disconnect in america is here in washington. no surprise. >> no. no surprise at all. starting with the white house. right? >> most regretably, the white
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house while taking a positive turn coming into office saying they were going to do something different have spent month political capital and are going into this election that run to the middle. >>. >> 866-55-press. i must say, you are the earliest guest we have ever had in stud engineer yeah. ? >> the irony that it's the pot guy. >> it is. >> bursting everybody's bubble. >> we knew the pot guy would not have gone to bed. not at 4:20. >> already a busy day for me starting at 4:20 a.m. >> 866-55-377. join the conversation, take a seat at the table here. very long al hit. what do you say to the people
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who still argue, right, that marijuana is a threshold drug? >> pretty simply the data -- clever. >> never that way for me. i have smoked lots of pot. >> you and i could be end of experimenting nothing beyond major and wine and beer is as far as i have gone in my advancesment of drug use. the government has been taking good data on how many people use marijuana. for every 102 people who use marijuana, one geoto use heroin or cocaine. there is no stepping stone, otherwise, it would be more of a health problem than it is. >> is it growing, the uses of marijuana in this country in terms of just as a relaxation drug? >> the data indicates there is a trend upwards toward use. top acco use is going down. they are going to enter second soon.
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>> do you have problems with lung cancer from smoking pot? >> no. they are not quite apples and oranges but donald -- kin professor in california spent his career looking at tobac e and canibis smoke. if you use major about 30 to 40 years and there are four people whom get 300 pre-rolled cigarettes a month. a part of a closed program. >> 400 people. >> four people. >> four people out of all over the united states who get 300 prooernld marijuana cigarettes. they have been using it for 30 to 40 years, moaking 10 houningsz per month. almost all of them are in their 60s and appreciatesentence. they developed pre-bronchial wheeze. >> how did i miss getting this. >> won loppedary. >> talk about it. >> 10 joiningss of wee. does? talk about a government program.
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right? right? >> yeah. >> 4 people in the entire united states. >> change you can believe in. >> that would be opening it up. so i want to discussions, also about the cash crop aspect of this. i am from california. right? right? >> yeah. >> i allegation thought grapes, wine, was the number 1 cash crop in california. it's not. is it? >> you would think so driving through the beautiful valleys. >> places like florida and in cavh k it's not the sit russ. it's the canabis. the number 1 cash crop, the number 4 in the united states and number 1 in 15 states. it's a cash crop but an underground cash crop? >> it is people are fetching 2 to $500 an ounce for vegetable matter. >> wow. if we canbly callsers in, a lot
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of our listeners up early this morning. god knows what they are doing. joe is out in seattle? >> it's me the insom know man yake yake. >> we have our own frequent flyers club. you can't tell me there is much in seattle. >> we are the originators of hempfest, the largest out door party in the world. are you kidding me? i am 60. and i am not well. i have been spokemoking pot since i was 15. routinelied when i got to pay taxes, i did a dance. i alone could have supported ohio in taxes since 1964. i want to volume you know tear for that 300-joint program.
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is there one site where i can put my name on the list? >> there is a website for normal? right? normal norml.org. i didn't realize this. so now you go to the medical marijuana dependary? right? joe? is that what you are talking about? >> yeah. >> you pay taxes. >> we are proud. i made a big deal of it. i got up on the bar and did a little dance and everybody was like a like a plauding. >> for paying taxes. >> thank you so. >> in king county where seattle, the local laws there allow for these sdpningsaries. if you travel to the eastern part of the state, they don't allow it. often i say marijuana laws are the very square foot that you are standing on determines what the outcome is going to be. so she is in king county, she can buy it. >> this is the way it ought to be? you should be able to buy it and pay taxes on it.
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that brings it into a regular economy and we can make money on it tens of billions per year. >> alan saint me year is the executive director of normal on this big day 4-20, pot heads unite. >> on your radio, on t.v., the bill press show. new on current tv. >>we have such a big show today it may, uh, actually explode. >>(narrator) tv and radio talk show host stephanie miller rounds out current's morning news block. >>we're hogging all the sexy on hello! fun... indulgence... one square inch of bliss. hershey's bliss.
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pweingarten, aft dorg.org. we will be right back. ireriction >> look who is here with us. carl davenport, good to see you again. >> great to see you, too. >> thanks for coming all the way in. so let's talk energy. let's talk environment. john boehner yesterday, over the weekend, gave the response to president obama's radio address.
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he like other republicans tries to hang gas prices around president obama's neck. here is speaker boehner. >> pain at the pump is an urgent issue. it deserves the same urgency from leaders here in washington. the house is doing its part. we can do more if president obama steps up and heeds the will of the american people. >> if only the president would act, he can drive gas prices down. >> john boehner knows that's not true. the price of gasoline is out of the control of anything that the president can do, anything that can congress can do, but everyone involved in this game knows that historically, the president's approval rating is very closely tied, inversely tied, higher prices go the lower the president's approval goes. the president is in full crisis control mode trying to deal with this. on the other side, republicans are trying to harness this
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trying to, you know help them keep control of the house and gain control room of the senate and hopefully control of the white house. it's kind of like lucy and the football. every spring, gas prices go up. every spring whoever is in the white house gets blamed for it t every spring pressure to do the same ol' things like release oil from the strategic reserve. particularly that. and gas prices go down. >> next break. we go through the same nonsense. >> one reason as you said is typically -- first of all, is it hurts people. >> it hurts people, the economy, tax prices are taking a bigger bite out of the american
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household budgets than they ever had but in terms of how this plays in politically, you are right, it's sad the prices go up every spring. usually they tends to go down by fall so by the time that voters go to the polls in november >> this that not been an issue right in fronts of them for at least a few months. the volatility much oil and gas surprise going to keep getting worse in the comers years. the energy policy real long-term. you can't pass a bill and make prices go down. they are good for political sound besides but the hard work of doing energy policy is on a tile frame far beyond the political campaign season. >> an afrth president obama has made on several occasions, also a tough sell. so one of the things the
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president proposed last week came to a vote last week is once again thing we can do is to get the money to make those investments let's take away subsidies the big oil companies have been enjoying for almost 100 years. the republicans, to be fair some democrats from oil and gas producing states like maryland marylander, all of the republicans are against it because they said, if we take away these subsidies, then the oil companies will raise gas prices. so they come back to use gas prices as an excuse for continuing subsidies. why do they still make sense today or do they? >> to be clear on one front, when the president proposed that, that rolling back of the oil subsidies, everyone involved in that game knew that that vote was not going to pass. that was a straight-up political
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k affects buki. >> why shouldn't it pass? why shouldn't we continue welfare for exxon? >> the debate here is the oil an gas industry enjoys about $4,000,000,000 a year in tax breaks. some of those tax breaks have been in place nearly 100 years. >> right. >> they were put in place when the oil industry was very new. and they were put in place to give this new -- the government kind of wants to help out this new industry go forth. >> right s. >> get tax breaks in order to make these risky investments. it not really a risky investment to gout and explore for oil. the prices are high. profits are clear. on the other hand, some of the tax breaks are tax breaks that are enjoyed across industry. so the oil industry says it's not fair for the government to take away those tax breaks just from the oil industry when manufacturing and other industries get the them as well.
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it's definitely a complicated issue? >> i don't think it's complicated at all. i mean you can focus on just the oil companies because they are making the biggest profits they have ever made in $137,000,000,000, the big 5 last year, and most of that they say they need this money to do the development and exploration. i am not telling you anything you don't know. very little of that money. most of the exploration is not being done boy the big 5. it's by the independent wild caters and very little they spend more money lobbying in washington, d.c. than drilling for sites or exploring new sites. >> oil industry spends a prodigous amount of lobbying. one of the big things they lobe 4, one of their priorities is to keep tax breaks in place. >> exactly. >> right. although i would say right now the political environment for doing anything broad locker energy is glyc, you know. i think we are going to see a
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lot of posturing between now and november between energy. probably nothing consequential will happen. the thing to look for, next year, 20s 13, when congress is likely to take up corporate tax reform and we will see a look at putting all of kind of tax loopholes and tax breaks on the table and some of the oil companies, shell oil is one of them, has said, okay. we are willing to play on this, you know, if all the of these other corporations are willing to put tax breaks on the tacky, we might be able to negotiate on this. >> that's the time when we will see something happen, i think, potentially in fax brates. between now and november we will hear about it a lot in campaigns. i don't think we will see anything happen. >> isn't the bottom line civic big i am owns congress and they always have? >> the amount of money that the oil industry gives to you elected officials and spends on lobbying and on campaign
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donations and now on super p.a.c. funding is again is prod i know us and i should say it goes mostly to the republicans but the amount they give to democrats actually, i looked it up, bill oil hundreds its bets so they give more money to democrats than environmental groups do. >> unfortunately some democrats are for rent or for sale the same as most republicans are. the number i saw last week when i was doing research on this for every $1 that the oil companies spend in washington, they get $5 in subsidies from us us. us taxpayers. carl davenport. follow her at national journal.com. [ orbit girl ] don't let food hang around. yeah! [ orbit trumpet ] clean it up with orbit! [ orbit glint ] fabulous! for a good clean feeling. ♪ eat, drink, chew orbit! ♪
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the bundler. let's say you need home and auto insurance. you give us your information once, online... [ whirring and beeping ] [ ding! ] and we give you a discount on both. sort of like two in one. how did you guys think of that? it just came to us. what? bundling and saving made easy. now, that's progressive. call or click today. pweingarten, aft dorg.org. we will be right back.
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♪♪ >> even if you give him the benefit of the doubt he was out there trying to do good things, trying to be his brother's keeper, well, you know, when you saw his brother, somehow, he saw the other and decided that he could disobey the police and go and do this. you know part of the thing i think your listeners had you had be aware of and i want to talk about in my book and the reason i wrote this book is that i think that, you know, the majority of us who are progressive, independent democrats were kind of post-hope at this stage. we understand we are up against much, much more than we thought to try to get the changes that we want for instance that whole kill-at-will law, stand your
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ground, i call it kill-at-will. those dents couldn't out of nowhere that's an nrl. alec has been writing this and funded by big corporate money from corporations likewater wal-mart. >> and and i might at, the koch brothers. >> and the koch brothers, of course. it turns out that in 2008, we over estimated our achievement in 2009 and since we have underestimated our independents. so i decided to write this book. as you know, i spent six months in the white house, best six months of my life followed by the worst two weeks. >> i know. >> coming up against against these guys. i took some time off. i taught at princeton last year really reflected, i said i am one of the few people, probably the only person in american-right now who was both a grassroots outsider then a
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white house insider and then a grassroots outsider again. i have a 360 degree view of kind of what is going wrong, how question keep malfunctioning. i have a responsibility to put this 0 paper, take no riftvisit for the left, right. progressives myself, put on paper and get it out there. so the book is called "rebuild the drill." i go through the mistakes and i look at the tea party and what they are doing right and wrong. still the potential for 99%. i put it on you there. you know, a lot of people in dc are not happy about it. it's more important to me we not only reelect the president. we have to do that but reenerggize this moment electing the president is not, as we saw
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in 2008, enough. how are you ever going to solve the problem if you don't look at all of the pieces? >>tv and radio talk show host stephanie miller rounds out current's morning news block. >>you're welcome current tv audience for the visual candy. >>sharp tongue, quick whit and above all, politically direct. >>you just think there is no low they won't go to. oh, no. if al gore's watching today... all have in common? sam adams! last year we brewed more than one new beer every week. some we'd been experimenting with for years others...we just found a cool ingredient. many we brewed just once to see how they would taste. why? -- because at sam adams we love beer. ♪ ♪
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increases your risk of stroke. ask your doctor if you can reduce your risk with pradaxa. you're about to watch an ad message created by a current tv viewer for allstate save 11 campaign. >>i was going to pick up my little brother from school today. >>i was actually going to clean my room today. >>my dad was finally going to make it to one of my basketball games. >>i was going to apply to college. >>i was going to go to work, on time. >>my mom was going to buy me a car. >>i was going to try out that new chinese restaurant. >>i was going to audition for the school play. >>today i was going to tell my girlfriend that i loved her. >>i was going to play cards with the guys. >>i was supposed to turn 18 today.
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>>join the movement to help prevent teen driving deaths at facebook.com/save11 ♪ ♪ >> heard around the country and seen on current tv, this is the bill press show. >> politically direct, that's what we say here on the morning show. we saw it all day long on current tv.
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this is the new morning show on current tv, if you will court press in studio with us. senator chris coons from the good state, the first state, the state of delaware. senator, before we move on some other things holly callingfo from sackament 0 about the transportation bill. thank you for joining u.s. >> i would like to see the fight over infrastructure funding to include clarity over the high coast of not having a modern infrastructure. the economy is hobble by it. if that was part of the fight, i think we would have an easier time. >> it's the deferred maintenance question. the more you put it off, the more it will cost? >> there have been studies that have been discussed in hearings and talked about by members of congress by national association of civil engineers, the point the caller is making deferred
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maintenance costs money both in safety, in dramatic failures we have had of bridges that have collapsed, roads that have collapsed but you can't travel as fast, as e firnltlya, we were talking off of the air about a bridge that connects the north earn and southern parts of delaware over the canal and it's the closeure of the bridge for long-delayed, badly needed maintenance that will inconvenience folks in delaware city this summer. >> i want to throw you a curveball here we haven't exhausted any topic, let alone healthcare. about right in front of you front page of "the washington post" shows pope benedict meeting and talking with fidel cast row. >> wearing a track suit. >> interesting juxtaposition. >> wouldn't it be great to lead
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in panel a.m.ics? >> president obama in a track suit. >> the maybe too easy question is how come the 30e7 can talk to if i had he will cast row and the united states won't after all of these years? >> it's a great question? >> i actually recently went on a visit to cuba with senator patrick leahy of vermont and a number of other members of congress, both houses. it was a great opportunity for me. i had never been to cuba to get stomeet with cuban leaders. we met with dissidents. i got to visit with alan gross in jail. >> usid worker arrested for bringing internet communicatety to the jewish community. it's an island that struggles under the u.s. economic em baro. it has had an effect on the cuban people and it is a society that is as close to stalinist as anything i have ever seen.
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we have full and open trade with china, with vietnam. i am not clear why that wouldn't be the best pathway forward but the real question is: what's the best path to creating a free and by brant and open community. there are 400,000 cuban americans a year traveling to cuba. you can see the impact. i hadn't been to cuba before but senator leahy said it was noticeable how many shops and businesses there were. >> yeah. >> how much improvement there was in vehicles. frankly how many european tourists there were. the rest of the world is engaging with cuba. i think it's time for us to in a campaign to make sure cuba becomes free and open. >> we have about a minute and a half left. you have a big hearing on africa this afternoon. alta of talk about sudan. why aren't we doing more? >> more than 120 million people mostly americans, have viewed a
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30-minute video. my own kids two weeks ago were pressing me on the weekend? why aren't you doing more about the resistance army. i am a co-sponsor that will show bi-partisan strong support for our effort working with regional armies in south sudan uganda, democratic congo to find joseph koni end the lord's resistance army. he was first person indicted by the criminal court back in 2005. i am excited to have this many americans interested in issues in africa and willing to use our influence and our resources for humanitarian reasons. >> are we involved at all. >> back in october, the president deployed 100 special forces troops not directly engaged. they are providing coordination, communal cakeses intelligence, logistic support to african troops. this is an african problem and
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nomads logistic support. we can provide coordination. >> you come from as a county executive, you come to the united states senate. you have been there three years? >> about a year and a half. >> year and a half. feels like 3 years. 2010 election. >> do you find it a place where you can get things done? >> it is very difficult to get things son. i am working hard to build individual relationships. i have picked a few discreet issues i am working hard on, but the broader -- any broader issue we find like we are talking a vote on ending oil and gas subsidies that have enriched some of the biggest most profitable oil companies. we know we will fail before we take the vote because virtually everything is filibustered and we have difficulty getting cloture on anything that is partisan in nature. >> senator we will try to get you some more democratic dregs. maybe that would maybe make a difference. >> that would be a huge difference. >> thank you for coming in this morning. >> thanks, bill.
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>> senator chris coons here on the bill press show. >> hear until it grabs you and won't let go. we push, we prod until the truth reveals itself. we are fearless, independent trendsetters, problem solvers, and above all, we are politically direct. the young turks with cenk uygur at 7, viewpoint with eliot spitzer at 8, the war room with jennifer granholm at 9, the gavin newsom show fridays at 11. and there's only one place you'll find us: weeknights on current tv.
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we have a big, big hour and the i.q. will go way up. >>tv and radio talk show host stephanie miller rounds out current's morning news block.
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♪ >> this is the bill press show, live on your radio and current tv. >> tuesdays with faz we call it around the full court press. faz shakir is director of think progress.org, part of the scepter for american progress. faz, good morning. >> good morning, mr. press. >> good to see you. women start where we always start, around the full court press with baseball. and the big news. >> my favorite. >> big news out of the white sox, white sox versus mariners. >> here we go. >> the 3-2-1, ball away, he has pitched a perfect game.
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arthur has pitched a perfect gay. >> pitching a perfect guy. you know this guy faz. >> i faced him as a senior in college. he was a senior in college at the time as william for rice university: he struck me out as he struck out many white sox mariners. he was good then. he is better now. it was an honor and i congrat late him for accomplishing a feet that only 21 pitchers in major league history have ever acomaccomplished. >> is that right. >> you played second base? >> i was second basement for the harvard crimson. rice had three starters, all of whom in those three games are in the major leagues. they were quite good. >> did you ever think of playing major league ball. >> after i graduated, there was an opportunity to go and basically sign a free agent contract because they fill out their rookie league teams. that was an offer out there but i knew being 5'-nothing, 100 and
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nothing, i wasn't going anywhere. i got in my car and drove up to washington d.c. >> the nationals could have used you this season. >> they have a fant affidavitic one. be i have been out there a anywhere of games. it's exciting to see a team in our hometown first place doing well. >> yeah. they had a great home game run. >> this month, their schedule stacks up well where they should win quite a few games. >> i want you to know >> phillip hum we can speaks well of you. >> the batters' check swing, i think it looked like he didn't actually go. it should have been a walk. the gods have bass ball smiled down on him. >> faz is holding a grudge? >> not at all. i am happy for him. >> we have so much to talk
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about. your top story on think progress 8 the top 10, 8 of the twell super p.a.c. donors are republicans. no no doubt about who is purposing money. we talked about sherrod brown about the money in his campaign? >> what often gets lost in the stories is why would republican donors throw millions and millions of dollars at the leading republican candidate? i think it often gets boiled down to they share an ideology. the substance of their vision for the future is critically important here which is: which is. . i got mine. i don't care about you. i have my life raft. i am doing well. instead of throwing you a life raft and seeing if you will survive, i am doing okay. i don't care about you. >> that's the plan mitt romney holds. it's the vision that these guys, these major super p.a.c. donors are happy to endorse a tax benefit plan that has no state
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tax. shelf the move -- money pass it around. these would have devastating impact for working families. >> the two i saw here that are not republican individuals, the national education association. >> yeah. >> i guess the other is this cooperative of american physicians? >> that's right. i don't know a ton about them. obviously we know where the national association stands the number one, sheldon adelson, putting $25 million. >> but this and foster freese a little over 2 million, this is all -- this is only what we know about. right? they could have given more money to the side of the packs. >> non-disclose, somebody like crossroads gps for instance, who doesn't reveal their donors but has clearly hundreds
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programs up to 100 million, $15 million to run ads during this next cycle. t people like josh mandel running against sherrod brown in ohio. >> documented to join the conversation? 866-55-press. you have mentioned their agenda which is i've got mine. screw you. >> yeah. >> that's not the way you put it. >> that's the way i would put it. is reflected in whatever their economic agenda is. >> correct. >> i mean which doesn't -- yeah. >> we don't really know. >> what mid romney's economic agenda is other than there have been some hints of kind of the same ol' stuff. right? >> there was a fantastic quote that the rnc spokesperson gave us yesterday to describe mitt romney's economic plan which is that it's the bush program just updated. and i think that that tells you basically everything you need to know. for george bush, it was something like 12 1/2% of the
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entire tax benefits that he gave out, went to the top 10 of 1%. mitt romney does even more than that. he goes further than that in the amount of money he is giving to the top 1%, top 10 of 1%. the 57% of the entire tax benefits of mitt romney's plan goes to the top 1%. >> who. >> people making over 400 would,$000 getting over 57% of the total tax benefits that mitt romney is doling out. that gives awe vision of who he is fighting for. who does he feel like are the people are his champions, people he wants to get into office and fight for every single day? it is the sheldon adelsons of the world. >> so what they are saying is if you like bish economic policies you are going to love them. >> it's on steroids. right? george bush plan on steroids. >> the same plan but updated.
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>> even more going up to the top 1%. >> that's right. >> who said that. >> this is an r and c spokeswoman. she deals with their specialty media. she was on a radio show talking about mitt romney's efforts to reach out to immigrant populations and gave this very ringing endorsement of mitt romney. >> it certainly shows who they are and again, as you say, who they stand with and what they stand for. faz shakir our guest director of think progress. now, you also report this morning that alec american legislative exchange counsel, has lost another big corporate sponsor. procter & gamble, the largest maker of consumer packaged goods in the united states and also the biggest advertiser in the united states. they are a huge -- >> they are. >> you go to the shopping store and see all procter & gamble
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goods. they are a heavy-weight joining coca-cola and pepsi and, you know, the kfc, taco bell owners as people who dropped out of alec putting more pressure on that group to drop its right-wing agenda. they have been toiling at the edges here trying to reframe the things they do by suggesting that, we are not going to do these stand your ground laws any more. we are going to focus on economic issues, and i think that even despite that announcement by alec, these companies are still dropping them, which i think is a good sign, a credit to color of change and a variety of other progressive groups who have led the fight and raised awareness of how devastating an agenda alec has and how effective it has been in moving it. >> it also shows to me i am really impressed by the power of the social media. >> uh-huh. >> you don't need an act of congress any more. you don't need like a million
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people march to bring about change. i mean i think these are still effective ways of getting things done. this is just going online getting people to sign petitions online getting people to send e-mails to these companies and a little bad publicity and boom. >> you know, you hit it on the head. they are seeing their consumer based on facebook and twitter responding to them in negative ways. it's having an impact. >> we saw this during the rush limbaugh issue where corporate advertisers were dropping rush limbaugh show, reacting to online movement against him because of his smears against sandra fluke. >> with alec is alec going to continue to -- will they survive? >> in some form of course, but i think the challenge is they are a spoveningsorship, these people who remain, who are their biggest supporters, tobacco companies, perhaps some guns --
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a guns company who -- what are they going to push alec to do? because as others drops out these guys will have more power and they will dictate and it could become more right-wing or boil it down into kind of a softer version of the heritage foundation's economic policies. >> alec and the -- which most people have not heard of until the trayvon martin case in florida. alec and the super p.a.c.s and the republican mitt romney economic agenda just like george bush except on steroids. your calls welcome. faz shack areir on the full-court press 866-55-presses. >> on your radio, and on current current t.v. this is the bill press show.
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