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tv   Making Money With Charles Payne  FOX Business  October 31, 2015 6:00pm-7:01pm EDT

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there, making money with charles payne starts now. . charles: we've got breaking news for you right now the rnc has pulled out of the gop debate on nbc news. that was scheduled for february 26th. they stated that -- well, it's because cnbc debate had been conducted in quote bad faith. the committee chairman sent a letter to nbc stating that cnbc network was one of your media properties and handling the debate was conducted in bad faith. we understand that nbc does not exercise full editorial control over cnbc, however, the network is an arm of your organization, and we need to
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ensure that this is not a repeat performance. nbc responded to the chairman saying the following. this is a disappointing development, however, along with our debate broadcast partners, we will work in good faith to resolve this matter with the republican party. >> this is not a cage match. and you look at the questions, donald trump, are you a comic book villain? ben carson, can you do math? john kasich, will you insult two people over here? marco rubio, why don't you resign? jeb bush, why have your numbers fallen? how about talking about the substantive issues people care about. >> let's be honest. is this a comic book version of a presidential campaign? >> no. it's not a comic book and not a very nicely asked question. >> we have isis and al-qaeda attacking us and we're talking about fantasy football? . charles: well, the candidates clearly not happy with the line of questioning so what does it mean going forward? joining me now michael barns,
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political policy advisor for bush 43, and daily beats reporter and fox news contributor and legal analyst. betsy, i'll go to you first. and we talked about this last night, and on i'll throw out my premise so that everyone can jump on, and i think they were in a hard place because there was a revolt for the actual candidates for him to lose his job and shake up the entire rnc. >> right. exactly. there's so much frustration within these campaigns with the way that the rnc has run the debates, with the way they've managed the debate schedule and the cnbc debate has made things incredibly challenging. so he's going after nbc to make nbc seem like the bad guy when a lot of the candidates are saying, no, it's not just about nbc but the way that the republican party is managing this entire process. so it's, you know, and understandably; right? he has some very valid and fair criticisms of nbc here but there's also that's an important under current that
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people should really be paying attention. charles: absolutely i think the candidates have felt, especially the nonestablishment candidates have felt disrespected and one of the initial questions was his campaign been clownish when knacked it's been amazingly successful you can see they're rubbed the wrong way. >> definitely. i think the rnc was to insist on promises that there will be greater responsibility on professionalism on the part of the host, to the type of questions that were asked, personal morality and things were inappropriate, it's great to get to the issues and megan kelly did a great job, for example, in their debate with pointed questions like marco rubio points on abortion, those kinds of questions we need to get answers to. an hard questions not the morality questions. charles: but what about the -- some are saying, hey, there's got to be something of journalististic freedom,
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freedom of speech and the idea that this is controlled by an outside party might diminish the future debates. >> yeah. there's a question about substance and that's a fair one. here's the thing, charles, you're exactly right. there's something to be said about delivery, now, some of the questions weren't bad, i think it's fine to ask marco rubio if you don't handle your personal finances, how do you handle he work's? but the way you frame it. charles: but from a legal point of view and an ethical point of view the moderator that might try to make a name for him or herself with these gotcha questions, i don't know if you can draw a line and say no gotcha questions. >> no. it's no gotcha questions because they're a part of the process but what we shouldn't see is three unknown people trying to be megan kelly overnight and that's what i saw. i really did. charles: so from here, initially cnbc had talked about this being a three-hour debate, donald trump got together with ben carson and
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said, no, we're drawing the line at two hours. is the second amendment, though, may be worried and i'm talking about the rnc and let's face it, you're part of the bush administration that the grassroots considered the old guard if you will the establishment at risk here of losing complete control and should it be a new time for guard. >> no. i think this is the appropriate step to deal with the debates and there are a lot of entities that are eager to do debates and many of them are willing to be responsible and professional in the way they handle them. so just expecting that sort of standard for whatever entity is going to make the debate and make tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands of dollars for 100 seconds on advertising, that's reasonable and move forward. charles: but some of the earlier debates you had some folks that complained about the journalistic integrity, can we set them up where they will have an asterisk next to them? >> i think that's possible and one of the issues is having more conservative media partners for this debate.
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the february debate that nbc is involved in that the rnc with drew their hosting privileges, the media partner for that debate is national review. now, disclosure i used to work for national review but they're completely smart people there, going to make questions that are actually things that republican primary voters confuse rather than these bizarre off the beat path questions that cnbc took up. so i think having voices might mitigate that asterisk. charles: i hope telemundo tase in for a lot of various reasons. i want to talk about something else because this thing is hard and bloated and i'm talking about that new budget. 144 pages long. hey, the senate passed the thing at 3:00 a.m. in the morning, that tells you something. they got around a whole filibuster and effort escaped a lot of scrutiny because when it comes to the light of day, this thing is ugly. the deal? the latest example of conservative -- at least some people think conservatives are at least republican scathing
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to president obama and the irresistible goodies that come with unbridal spending of washington d.c. it removes those spending caps in the 2011 sequester agreement and puts an extra 80 billion spending, and most of the culprits involved in cobbling the scene together, they will be gone a long time, including president obama who actually called the deal responsible for breaking the cycle of manufactured shutdowns. of course senator rand paul, he had other thoughts. >> this deal gives the president the power to borrow unlimited amounts of money. this deal represents the worst of washington culture. charles: by the way, the debt ceiling now? it won't be lifted until march of 2017. ebony, i guess -- yeah, again, the establishment got what they wanted and i guess they figured a couple of years from now, you guys have at it, have all the fun we want but we've provided enough cover. but it gets to the heart of
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what's happening in america. people are upset, this deal is a prototypical deal that has offended americans. >> yeah. and i don't think it's accurate, charles, to paint that these gop members are going to obama, this is a spend heavy that things along across the board, you're right, pay for it all later, my kids, your kids, grandkids to come and that's the problem. everybody wants to compromise on what to spend on about had nobody seems to have good ideas on what to cut on and that's the problem. charles: michael. >> this deal is the good conservative things in it, national security has advanced, that's conservative with what the federal government should be doing. charles: you're talking the defense spending aspect of it? well, let's put up, some of the win experts losers so that the audience understands who benefited from this and who didn't. now, on the winner side, i would say that the establishment certainly big business and defense contractors are talking an extra $40 billion. now, the losers of this deal,
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there's a whole lot of losers but certainly i would say the house freedom caucus, hedge funds are going to lose big time and even farmers. so, michael, you think, though, overall it's a good deal. >> yeah. we're not going to get everything we wanted as conservatives in a administration with president obama; right? we have to reflect the political reality and that is that we get whatever we can in terms of conservative principles being advanced in deals like this and there are some good things in addition there's cutting out the waste abuse and entitlement spending; right? fairer taxation so they're taxed like the rest of us. these sort of things are consistent that we move forward on and stop shutting down the government. >> i agree with you. there doesn't seem to be a problem with both sides coming together on how to spend more but not how to cut. that's my concern. >> that's not going to happen . charles: why do we have a debt ceiling and does anyone care about the 18 trillion-meter that never stops running? at some point it can't, about all the goodies that everyone gets to share.
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>> at some point there has to be serious questions raised not about how much we're spending but how much bang are we getting for our buck? and just because we're spending more money on defense, just because defense contractors are winning, doesn't mean we're safer. we learned earlier this month that we spent half a billion dollars on a program training syrian rebels that left four syrian rebels fighting isis, we have to look at the government spending numbers. the fact that this deal goes after hedge funds, the private sector but doesn't seem to increase scrutiny of pentagon spending doesn't seem curious about waste fraud and abuse within the industry. charles: the more money shloshing around, the more likely that it could be miss spent. now, the budget, by the way, i think this budget is it. i think this will actually mark the changing in the guard within the republican party. so possibly for the establishment insider, think about this. six of the ten republicans in the senate voted for this
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budget, and it includes the establishment like mitch mcconnell, john mccain. the 18 "yes" votes have an average age of 65 for the rest of the country that's usually the mandatory retirement age. on the other hand the top ten polling republicans for the white house have an allergic age of 53 -- by the way, the youngest two are 44 years old, and they may start moving up in the polls. so maybe this changing of a guard is something that's needed. i don't know that you necessarily believe it, michael, but i did find it interesting that at least all dudes who like to do business as usual still seem to have a tenure when it comes to the public. >> well, they reflect the reality. charles: i think they reflect the political reality when they came in, the chamber of washington d.c., but i don't know if they reflect the new political reality that has a bernie sanders drawing 20,000 people, and a donald trump drawing 25,000 people. do they see that? >> yes. they see it and they're trying to make the government work.
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they're trying to compromise so that we can get something going instead of the extremist approaches that are stalling us and having the same debates that we've had for four years. reality is president obama's in office for another year and a half, and they have to respect that. then what they really need to focus on is being able to improve the image of the government and their party and electing someone who is going to retain a majority in the u.s. senate, someone who would actually be able to beat initially general. if they can do those things - charles: it sounds like what michael is saying let's put lipstick on this pig for a couple of years and hopefully it won't die. >> you know i love you but it doesn't look like the changing of the guard to me, paul ryan, the new face; right? this is going to be the new fresh of breath air, he voted for it too. so it's really tough for me, and i get the political reality. i don't disagree with you. that's what i'm saying. it's really encouraging to come in with this sense of it's going to be different, i've got my convictions around it, but it's tough to governor around that same principle.
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>> he's policy too. charles: he's a policy too and he bought himself a couple of years once he gets his act together. let's face it. he wasn't one of the favorites in the house freedom caucus but having said that, you've got all of these guys who probably most of them won't even be in office when this thing expires and there could be a different dynamic down there. betsy? >> without a doubt. i think the fact is that the dynamic could change radically by january 2017 and a important component here there are a ton of vulnerable republican senators, there's a good, decent chance that democrats will actually take the chamber back regardless of who's president in january 2017. so the fact the conservatives got basically nothing out of this budget it telling. this was a chance for conservatives and for republicans to try to move the needle, over the window if you will a little bit to the we'll be right back that didn't happen, even the entitlement reform, quote, unquote, that they got didn't really bother democrats enough for every single democrat to vote for this -- >> what they got is the ability to focus on compressive tax reform with a
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clean slate. charles: okay. >> we'll see. we'll see how that goes. charles: all right. let's see. but we will see how it goes. and i've got to say i'm biting my fingernails. but if you want to know where the economy is going and what these candidates really think and what their plans are, you don't want to miss fox business' very own republican debate because it will be a business debate. make sure you tune in. the gop hopefuls take center stage in wisconsin, tuesday, november 10th, we begin at 6:00 and then the big stage at 9:00 p.m. eastern time right here on the fox business network. you know, 30 days ago the fairs were popping champagne and running for the hills. one of the best octobers ever turned the tables. now the question is can it continue? at mfs investment management, we believe active management can protect capital long term. active management can tap global insights. active management can seek to outperform. that's the power of active management. if legalzoom has your back.s, over the last 10 years we've helped one million
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this but october was huge for the stock market. the s&p posted its best monthly gains in four years. one of the major reasons was consumers. not american. chinese, that's right for all of the talk that china's got a weak economy, the american names that did great over there propelled our stock market over here. but it wasn't all fun and games. the losers in this market have had pure cartilage to the share prices. but the big question right now as we head into the rest of the year, can we keep this up? are we talking about going back to the all-time highs. hilary kramer and peter mauricey, peter, i'll start with you because you're one of the most optimistic economists out there and you've been optimistic about the economy and the stock market, but i wonder if even you've been surprised. >> well, i've not been surprised at the stock market, but i will surprised it rebounded so quickly. and i think the fourth quarter is very, very promising.
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the u.s. economy will start to rebound, i expect growth in the range of 3% and that should be enough to start drive up corporate profits but more optimism about 2016. charles: do you think, hillary? >> holiday buying season is coming and that should really give the lift to some of the companies who have been struggling like macy's, kohl's,. charles: let me ask you on that. why are you convinced that consumers all of a sudden -- by the way, we had a consumer spending out today, another dud, why all of a sudden are consumers going to step up to the plate? >> because when it comes to actual employment even though we all agree, some of those numbers are manipulated manipulated, if not most of them, the consumer still has some money and spends what the consumer makes goes out the door when it comes to holiday season, i think we're going to see it. as long as there's no overhang, politically or concerns, the consumer will go court and spend. it's going to be another -- another season of apple and amazon that we may see these classic companies come back. charles: peter, to that point,
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this is one of those markets where on any given day you have more losers than winners, and the down volume is twice the up volume, it's been amazing for the winners and hell to pay if you have the slightest miss step. >> absolutely. the market is not very forgiving. but remember a lot of companies are trading places. ibm, amazon, web systems good example. it drives amazon up because that thing is a cash cow. the reality is a lot of old line companies are in trouble and a lot of young companies that came up during the tech boom and the last decade are really now maherring and are becoming very, very promising growth companies. so i'm not surprised at all by this. it runs in parallel with what's going on in china, there are people who are buying luxury goods, turning nike into a lurk line, there are places in the market and that's fine. charles: but that just echoes your point. this is still a very select market. we can go back to the all-time
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highs and half the stocks in the market can be losers. >> that's right. you can look at roughly rl, it was 1 $90 stock, it's $10 today, you go in, you're going to make money, but there are investors sitting on losses of 30%. charles: what do we do with that? because i've got some big losses in names that i think are over sold. would you sell them? bite the bullet because this is possible leg up that could be big, in other words, go straight up from here, ride the wave, and is that the strategy for someone like you? >> probably, yes, that would be the way. go and find the ones that are winners. charles: first you have to take the loss. >> you have to -- charles: that's the hardest thing to do. >> exactly because some of those sectors could come back and it's making that determination. charles: and peter made the point long term generally does well. thank you both really appreciate it. you know, a big chunk of obama's prisoner release, 6,000 of them, a big
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chunk are illegals and my next guest says they're not going to leave the country. the get out of jail free path and put back on the life of crime immediately. we'll be right back good. very good. you see something moving off the shelves and your first thought is to investigate the company. you are type e*. yes, investment opportunities can be anywhere...
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charles: starting today over 6,000 federal inmates and drug offenders will be free from prisons under a new department of justice guideline. now, this is the largest one-time release of federal prisoners in united states history, in fact, all 50 states will receive inmates. will they return to a life of crime? and will we be able to get the illegals out of the country? joining me now cheryl, and sheriff. sheriff, we're told by the administration, yeah, large chunk of these guys are here illegally, they committed crimes, but as soon as we let them go, they're going to go home. >> yeah. well, will they return to our communities? yes. do they have any chance to
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returning to their country of origin? not a chance. and this is where the rule of law has been further under mind by barack obama in this mass break. this number of 6,000 is a part of a larger number of 46,000 that are slated to be released. a third of them are criminal illegals. and this adds to the number of 67,000 that the president already released over the past two years. this is unacceptable, and it makes the job of us in law enforcement that much more difficult. charles: logically, it stands the reason if you're here illegally, you've committed a crime, maybe more than one crime, and you're released. you go to one of these sanctuary cities, you camp out there and the only thing you can do is return to a life of crime. i don't understand by what you're saying doesn't resonate with the white house. >> well, because he's not following his oath to faithfully carry out, execute the laws of the land. all of these criminals on
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average have been in federal prison for nine years. and i don't know a listener of yours that is watching this believes that a felony coming out of federal prison after nine years is somehow going to be a contributor to our society. they're not. who's going to hire them? nobody. they're not for our country so how can they lawfully work? so what do you think? going to happen? you don't have to be the sheriff to figure this out. they're going to commit additional crimes. and so this is where -- who's going to be the victim? it's you and i. hard working americans who are contributing to our country and these noncitizens that the president continues to release falsely promises that they're going to be deported. they're not going to be deported. they're all given deferred action. so that's the truth of the matter. and the president continues to lie about this. charles: so, sheriff, what do you make of this movement i guess you can say in this country where there's so much
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mounting sympathy for people in prisons, for felons, and we want them to vote, and we want to get them back into society and the president visited one of these prisons. i've got to believe from a law enforcement point of view, this is scary stuff. i'm scared as a sven be but i know your job is going to get a whole lot harder. why so much sympathy for them? >> yes. it's both -- it angers me, and it's also heartbreaking. the men and women in law enforcement since we were little boys and girls dreamt of the day that some day we could be a protector. a defender in our communities and this president has led the fight to cheer on all those people who believe the worst in our protectors and in our law enforcement officers, and i'll never forgive the president for doing these things. and so here that our job is that much more difficult and when you're releasing these rims out into our community, what do you think's going to happen? and the president instead of touring these prisons, he
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should be talking to victims. i sat down just the other day with two moms, their sons were killed by criminal illegals just like these being released. he's never met with one of them. he's never talked to them by telephone. charles: good point why doesn't he do that instead of ls?ring these prisons and . charles: assign to your point you can see and i didn't heartbreak throughout this country. thank you. >> thank you. charles: we've got breaking news. president obama has authorized the special ops in syria. we're talking boots on the (vo) rush hour around here starts at 6:30 a.m. - on the nose. but for me, it starts with the opening bell. and the rush i get, lasts way more than an hour. (announcer) at scottrade, we share your passion for trading. that's why we've built powerful technology to alert you to your next opportunity. because at scottrade, our passion is to power yours.
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charles: breaking news. president obama has authorized the deployment of special forces in syria, these will be the first u.s. troops working openly on the ground in that country. but can 30 or so special force members turn a tide against isis and do they actually become targets for russian fighters? joining me now fox news contributor general jack keane. general, thank you so much for joining us. major news in that i guess it's the president has to swallow hard to give the okay. but 30 or so special ops, is that enough to turn a tied there? >> well, as significant as you mentioned because on the ground in syria for the first time ever, but certainly those kind of numbers, they're small and not going to be consequently in defeating
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isis, it's likely going to be the coalition that we've been given supplies to for the last two or three weeks. it will make a difference for those forces. but those forces are in and themselves cannot defeat isis. so we have a long way to go before we put together an effective ground force in iraq, charles, and an effective iraq force in syria, both of which are necessary to defeat isis. we don't have an end state to syria or for iraq. and that's pretty sad. charles: well, then will we consider to going to the completely other side of the pendulum. i remember when the iraq war began initially and collin powell talked about an overwhelming force, win quickly, secure the peace and then get out of there. if we're going to peace mill this thing, doesn't it make it and learning more difficult? >> certainly. i did not dispute the fact that the best option for us to
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start with is support the local forces. but we knew the local forces were set with problems. so as opposed to being really all in and strengthen their hands to give them the apache helicopters on hand, to give them the advisors to help call in air strikes early on, to train up significant amounts of forces, this would be thousands, not hundreds. we didn't do that. we've taken this incremental minimalsist approach over the course of the last 14 months, and we're very much about that as a strategy yet. we still don't have the kind of reenforcement we need. charles: general, president obama ran on want to go wars, and he's been very proud of his responsible exit. but a lot of people say that by announcing his exits, by routinely saying he can't, this will be one of his achievements getting out of there. how can we ever really instill any confidence from any of
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the, folks, down from there from any of the rebels and stay on their side long enough for this to be successful? >> well, certainly that is a concern that is so previn in the region. any speaker you speak to in the middle east will give you exactly what you put your finger on and that is u.s. resolve and u.s. reliability. look what putin is saying. he's coming in, assad was in much more position than was talked about, and that's abandoning egypt to us walking out of iraq to retreating from yemen and retreating from libya. that is the message that is seen out in the middle east. united states pulling away, disengaging and not backing up its allies and punt sending a totally different message that i'm going to be here for you. charles: general jack keane, you're definitely one of the best, and i appreciate your time this afternoon. >> good talking to you, charles. charles: we'll see you again
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soon. by the way, guys, you don't want to miss a did business debate, fox business very own republican debate. tune in, you're going to see the gop hopefuls take center stage in wisconsin on tuesday, november 10th, begins at 6:00 p.m. and then again 9:00 p.m. eastern time. you're looking at our all-star panel right here on fox business. we've got breaking news, just fantasy sports we know it has rubbed a lot of people the wrong way since that insider scandal, now the nfl player is tackling the industry.
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charles: breaking news just out of washington redskins receiver has filed a class-action lawsuit against class-action lawsuit against fanduel. ♪ ♪ (singing) you wouldn't haul a load without checking your clearance. so why would you invest without checking brokercheck? check your broker with brokercheck.
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why is philips sonicare the most loved electric toothbrush brand by americans and their dentists? because it leaves your mouth with a level of clean like you've never felt before. get healthier gums in 2 weeks innovation and you. philips sonicare charles: breaking news. washington redskins receiver has filed a class-action
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lawsuit against fanduel. now, claims that the players names have been miss appropriated and fanduel knowingly and improperly exploits the popularity of players at offensive skilled positions without their permission. competitor draft kings allegedly was not sued because it was an advertising partner with the nfl players association letting them to use the players and images names. back with me ebony williams and kiersten and sports fan jillian. let me ask you from the legal point of view. i mean this is pretty fascinating thing. we know a lot of things are going to happen from lawsuits to maybe state and national regulations and maybe a revisit to the supreme court with this. but i didn't think of the actual individual players getting involved. >> yeah. you know what it is, charles? they're going to say that they're receiving financial harm because of all the enormous profits and they want to take part if they can show
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that their image, their likelihood is being added to that millions of dollars being made and that's harm. the problem is he's going to have a tough time because he was tweeting about these various issues and they're saying, hey, you had no awareness and you don't approve it yet you were tweeting. he's going to have to make a case around that. charles: i have to assume that they're involved, particularly the offensive players but by the samic to en, it reminds me of the video game stuff and some of them went to the players and i lost track because they win, they lose, then they go back to court. >> yeah. i mean what's going on here really is that he smells blood and doing what football players do, which is pile on, we've already seen the football industry. we're seeing the fantasy football industry already under increased pressure for regulation. concerns about gambling, concerns about insider trading, i think he sees this
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as a opportunity to get a quick buck. charles: will it be an opportunity for other players? oh, you missed it. >> sorry. i fumbled that. i fumbled. sorry. no, i think you're exactly right. that there's a lot of attention obviously it came up in the republican debate with jeb bush talking about this and then christy piling on again there we go. and saying that, you know, why are we talking about this? but it is really interesting. especially because it is an opportunity for more government tax and regulation. so we're going to see this come up more but it is an issue too for those who struggle with gambling and there are people losing tens of thousands of dollars on this site, which fanduel is $1 billion company. i mean -- charles: right. and to that point, ebony, a lot of folks are saying that the supreme court decision that made this possible didn't cover an entire year. in other words, the part that made it skilled that they've extrapolated that from the ruling and is there a possibility that this will end
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up back in supreme court? >> absolutely. it's what i will consider an incomplete ruling and they'll have to revisit it in a broader way and full scope. i think you're giving the players a hard time, why shouldn't they benefit? everyone else given a huge chunk of the earnings. why shouldn't they get a piece of the pie? . charles: you're saying that there's an addition aspect that severn exploiting. >> yeah. and that's why the government steps in and regulates. and that's why a lot of the republicans, let the states regulate, which is what they're doing and there should be because there's a lot of people who have major problems and that's why you see it with the lottery ads, if you ever walk into a casino, if you have a gambling problem, you need help. so that's so that needs to be emphasized because there's a lot of vulnerable people. charles: how were the but none of this negative publicity hurt these guys; right? >> no. i think they had their best weekend ever but who this is going to benefit is draft king the competitor because they do have that licensing agreement. charles: all right. guys, thank you very much. sports experts. i've got a ton of questions coming from you guys, particularly late in the day.
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i'm going to answer as many as possible, we had a great month but we had some clunkers too. tweet me all of your questions i'm at cvpayne we'll be right bk ♪ i built my business with passion. but i keep it growing by making every dollar count. that's why i have the spark cash card from capital one. i earn unlimited 2% cash back on everything i buy for my studio. ♪ and that unlimited 2% cash back from spark means thousands of dollars each year going back into my business... that's huge for my bottom line. what's in your wallet? awe believe active management can protect capital long term. active management can tap global insights. active management can seek to outperform. that's the power of active management. i am totally blind. and sometimes i struggle to sleep at night, and stay awake during the day.
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charles: well, wie got some monster halloween news for you. the national retail federation is reporting that up to 157 million americans plan to spend almost $7 billion to celebrate the holiday. now, that's down about a billion from 2014 where americans spent over $7.4 billion. although it does amount to a little bit more than $3 decrease in spending, we're talking $77.50 to $74.34.
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the bottom line is that these reductions, they make this probably more of a trick than a treat, but everybody is going to have a lot of fun this weekend. now let's have fun with your questions. and robert asked charles, can you tell me more about how the plunge protection team operates, it seems pretty kevitt. here's the thing, it does exist. let me take you back to 1987, stock market crashes on october 19th, down 24%, the biggest crash in history. 33 economist go to the white house and says a great depression is unavoidable, put together what they call the waking group and the economy is revised and the stock market goes from 2,200 to 12,000. a lot of people saying that's the team in work now. maybe, maybe not. susan asks i have a 4 # 01k in the bank, should i go to an investment company? an investor would probably be better, but 401(k) are so limited on the options, the difference what you earn could be difference in the fees, so
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pay close attention to the fees. and another susan wants to talk about mgm on the rise, i guess you want to brag, mgm is also ran, user kohler wanted to know, hey, what's going on with buffalo wild wings, you're absolutely right. i will say this, though, it's the fourth miss in a row. i love the ceo of the company, she is a sweet heart, a nice person, upbeat, but when any ceo misses the streak four quarters in a row, it might be a time to go. i'm stuck in the stock down about 25 points, i'm going to hold it because it's an amazing franchise, i think a new ceo will take that almost instant to a all-time high. and wen beck, the stock that went from 20 cents to $10.58,
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congratulations anyone who bought it, if you haven't taken anything off the table, you're nuts, i don't know enough for me to pull the trigger yet. hey, by the way, we have an election alert for you. it seems hillary clinton has her own staff on lock down. at least she did a little while earlier today. the director jennifer and a few of the other staffers from the democratic presidential hopeful got locked in the ladies' room. now, paul mary had some fun with thization, she actually tweeted out pictures and updates, but it took 25 minutes before they were actually freed. believe me. social media had a lot of fun with this thing. it's turning into the largest humanitarian crisis in the area but we're going to talk about this migrant nosh europe. it's big. we'll be right back technology empowers us to achieve more. it pushes us to go further. special olympics has almost five million athletes in 170 countries. the microsoft cloud allows us to immediately
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since world war ii, there's a growing political and economic pressure on the richest nations there. take a look at this photo. really look at it. the closer you look at this, you can see one of the big sources of resentment. large masses of young able-bodied men are making the trek, leading many to say this is not a refugee crisis. it's a migrant money grab. asylum applications in eastern europe are expected to reach 1.3 million this year, 72% are men, 13% women and 15% are women. jillian melchior is with us. also joining me former nypd detective bo dietl. bo, this is something you have spoken about and people are picking up on the theme, when you look at the crowds and really look at them, these are the guys that should be back home fighting for their countries. >> you call them migrants or refugees, it's all basically the same, and then you have
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asylum, if they have -- if they're going to die in their country or something like that. when you look at the massive amount was able body men you say to yourself why are they leaving this country? why are they not fighting for their own country. germany is going to have 800,000 a year for the next few years. i'd like to know who the people are, there's certainly a lot of them, go into a lot of european countries, and i'm a little nervous, you can't identify them. they could be criminals. charles: we been the issues in the middle east that are driving some of this. but victor orban, the prime minister of hungary, he has really been coming out saying there are other elements in here. most recently the invasion is driven by the activists who support everything that weakens the state. he's saying as the george soros's of the world he'll spend billions of dollars in
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influence to create the one world atmosphere and the open door, no borders and killing the continent of europe. >> that's certainly a concern, and there is a mobilized volunteer response to the refugee crisis. if i were victor orban i would put the blame much more on vladimir putin, doing things in syria deliberately to destabilize. charles: this happened long before putin was in place. long before the russians showed up. >> it did. charles: the welfare benefits when you get to germany, you got it made, bo. >> there's a push and pull factor here. the conflict is illustrative of the fact if you have bad foreign policy there's much more potential. >> the lures when you have to give them housing, you have to feed them, do this all. that country that accepts them in there of this refugee thing, they have to now take care of them. and could this be a big burden as it is in europe to having problems financially.
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now it's just adding. charles: jillian was just over there, and you spent a lot of time there. you took amazing pictures, your brother, and you probably have a relationship or a certain feeling, when it's all said and done, did you also sense that maybe if the folks got their act together, they can fix their own homeland? >> i think many of them are trying to, to be honest. if you look at the crisis in syria in particular, we can say we want them to fight. charles: you go to syria, you go to turkey, the fact of the matter is you're not getting freebies in turkey so you make the trek to germany. >> i had a man tell me we sat around and wait for something to happen. in syria we had the opportunity to play for a hopeful role. that's not happening. i think it's not necessarily that these are fighting age muslims coming to take over in a deliberate invasion, they are make a determination it is more dangerous to use smugglers than get legal asylum.
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charles: the point is why are they leaving in the first place? >> the majority are men. where saudi arabia, qatar, the wealthy countries, the majority of the men are muslim. charles: did you see the photograph of the tent city in saudi arabia with air conditioners and not one single migrant. bothers me. guys, you are both fantastic. before we go, you know it's friday, saluting the american success, this time it's snapology, a company that officer classes for elementar and middle-aged schoolkids, they use legos as part of the curriculum to teach robotics, math, science, engineering, they have 22 locations. founded by sisters lisa and laura. for more on many of the success stories, go to our website, foxbusiness.com/charles payne. that's it for tonight, don't forget we've got the gop debate right around the corner.
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enjoy the weekend. we appreciate you watching every night at 6:00 p.m. if you can't watch it, dvr the show. you don't want to miss bo dietl! and, of course, you don't want to miss jillian melchior. keep it right here on fox business good evening i'm luodobbs. the military loses control of a massive billion dollar blimp. fighter jets are scrambled. we'll have the latest for you. reaction to the arrival of the u.s. navy in the south china sea. china doesn't like it. china says it's not afraid of a war with the united states, thank you very much. and among our guests tonight, house freedom caucus

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