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tv   FOX and Friends  FOX News  July 2, 2013 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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baseball, a great american past time. >> america is great because it is full of people like the arizona fire fighters. >> absolutely. we will tell your stories and show your photos the rest of this week. have a great day. >> "fox & friends" starts right now. >> good morning. it is tuesday, july 2, 2013. i'm gretchen carlson. thanks for sharing part of your day with us today. overnight an unbelievable scene as a russian rocket launches and explodes moments after takeoff. more details later. >> egyptian president mohammed morsi refusing to step down. who is he going to call? president obama. details of that conversation coming up. >>brian: this just in. leaker edward snow dan -- snowden denying russia's offer for asylum. can he go anywhere else? we've got developing
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details as the show progresses. according to my rundown, "fox & friends" first hour starts now. ♪ ♪ >>eric: you know it's going to be one of those exciting days when you put on the tv in the morning just to make sure the earth is still here and you see millions of people out in egypt saying we're not going anywhere until there is a regime change. >>gretchen: very interesting because they had a chance to vote about a year ago and they chose president morsi and now they don't like him. we will bring you those details. great to be back. good to have eric here today. a bit of a warning: i had no television for ten days. you guys carry the water today. >>eric: yesterday brian and i got into it a little bit. we had a mud wrestling match. my followers liked his
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p.o.v. his followers liked mine. >>gretchen: it was about edward snowden. if you have been watching the show before i left, you know i'm on that side of the camp. >>brian: there is nothing in my mind that happened in the interim while you are away without television or electricity to really put you into eric's camp. >>gretchen: funny you would say g.p.s. the exact letters of where i was. see if you can figure that out. g.p.s. very close to where edward snowden wanted to be. >>brian: i do know but i don't know if you want me to reveal. >>gretchen: you can at the 7:00 hour. we've got to do headlines. stunning video released overnight. an unmanned russian rocket explodes and crashes to earth seconds after it was launched in kazakhstan. the rocket was carrying 600 tons of toxic chemicals. there are no reports of
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injuries at this hour. >> hundreds of people gathered in phoenix last night to remember 19 elite fire fighters killed in that massive wildfire. >> anthony rose, 23. christopher mckenzie, 30. >> bagpipers played amazing grace after the victims' names were read. this morning we're learning more about them. kevin wyecheck, christopher mckenzie and wade parker, their fathers were fire fighters. edward parker left behind a wife and four young children. >> the best person i ever met. he gave all for his job [inaudible] compared to what he gave to his family. >>gretchen: deadly wildfires still zero percent contained. we thought we were going
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down, those words coming from passengers on a spirit airlines flight that came close to colliding with a sky-driving plane. the plane was headed to dallas on sunday when it was forced to take a sharp dive over michigan to avoid hitting the other plane. passengers bumped their heads but no one was seriously hurt. the f.a.a. says the two planes were less than two miles away from one another. unprecedented chance encounter for president obama and president bush all the way in tanzania. they came together to lay a wreath for the embassy bombings. they met with survivors of that attack. the meeting was not planned initially. president obama was wrapping up a tour of africa and the bush family hosting a summit on african women. those are your headlines this morning. >>brian: let's talk about egypt. it turns out when president morsi was elected in elections we believe were on the up and up, there was
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going to be an injection of muslim brotherhood leadership into the arab world. people were predicting this was the beginning of the long talked about caliphate in the region. things have changed. the people of egypt want this thing called quality of life. they didn't like islamic laws being implemented. they didn't like the fact the economy was in the toilet, education was nonexistent and tourism insreubl. now they are calling for the president to leave and the military weighed in and they put the president on a deadline to meet with their opposition, especially emphasizing the youth who they say brought on this continuous state of revolution. >>gretchen: he's not going to do that. he's saying i was democratically elected to run this country, and so he's rejecting what the military is asking of him. i think it's fascinating because remember when this happened, guys, we talked on this couch about is this
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what the people of egypt want? do they want somebody like president morsi to lead their nation? would it be so much better than who they had who was president mubarak. now maybe they're finding out maybe not so. >>brian: he had four ministers resign. the head of the military said i call it quits. >>eric: what i find fascinating is president obama backed the people. he said i'm with the people if this is what they want. i'm backing them, even though hosni mubarak was an ally. he worked with the united states. now the people are saying we made a mistake. we didn't realize the muslim brotherhood was going to have such an influence in our government. they didn't understand that. now president obama is saying not so fast, people of egypt. you don't have so much of a say. >>gretchen: did they understand it and could it be they would elect somebody else and they wouldn't be happy with that either because change takes time. remember when russia went through their entire revolution and everything changed. it didn't happen overnight where they were a
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successful nation and suddenly democratic in nature and capitalism was on the rise. you always have this down swing. i'm not sure exactly if the people, is this what they wanted and now they don't like it, would they go back and change their mind? did they want morsi at the time. >>brian: it's great to be a terrorist and outliar and say how bad hosni mubarak is but then to be in government and have no vision, i think the people begin to see that. as you guys know, the people that caused this revolution had nothing to do with the people who took power. they were sidelined by the muslim brotherhood poised waiting for this moment, unprepared to utilize this moment. i thought charles krauthammer nailed it when he talked about the president of the united states immediately call for mubarak to leave but sitting opbd sidelines now. -- sitting on the sidelines now. >> obama the bystander.
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here are the egyptians in the millions on the street trying to bring down a government increasingly dictatorial, increasingly intolerant, arresting judges, trying to islamac i ze their military. what does the president do? says he's not supporting either side. yet he took the side of the people, demanded mubarak had to go. morsi represents a movement which is essentially deeply anti-american and deeply antidemocratic and yet he's neutral on this. this is a shocking position for a president to take. >>eric: the important point here is that whichever way president obama decides to go, that will likely be who wins in this battle going on in egypt. if he sides with the people, you will likely see a regime change. morsi will probably have to leave. if he in fact sides with
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morsi, they will uprise but probably the -- very importantly the military will probably stay with them. >>gretchen: who do the people want? have they named somebody they want? >>brian: i think what is going to happen in the interim is the military is going to take over. that to us is great news for america because we have trained most of those officers. we have great relationships with the egyptian military. and they have proven to be the most powerful entity in the government. they took over before the elections and i think they're about to take over again. and the police sided with the military as well. they gave him 48 hours. they say you have 48 hours to meet with other factions. you can sit in your building but you're there without the cops, without your military, without your ministers. he better have a backdoor. >>gretchen: let's look at how the u.s. has supported egypt over the last couple of years. just a big blur because it is pretty much the same
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number year after year, $1.6 billion from 2009, slightly less in 2013. thus far pledged $1.3 billion. >>eric: i think we also gave them some f-16's? didn't we hand over some? >>brian: we did. rush limbaugh is going to be live with us at 8:30 to talk about this and so much more. rush limbaugh live this morning from his studios. >>gretchen: in the meantime, edward snowden still trying to figure out a place where he can call home now. he's making new asylum bids. i think there is a list of about 15 countries that he supposedly requested, including germany and france -- >>brian: france, italy, ireland, nicarauga, russia, poland, switzerland, spain, venezuela. he could leave with the venezualan president. >>gretchen: russia has apparently now essentially turned him down. they told him we don't want you to give up any more
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u.s. secrets. we will not extradite you to the united states but you can't stay here if you continue to give up united states secrets. >>eric: they also gave him a free pass saying we'll let you go to any of the countries you want to go. we're not going to hold you up and we're not going to extradite you back to the united states. >>brian: how unbelievable is it that vladmir putin says if you stop leaking secrets, if you want asylum, stop leaking secrets, harming our american partners, as strange as that may sound coming from my lips. stop leaking secrets. there's many theories about this. a lot of russian experts weighed in. they thought, number one, at the beginning they thought they had a piece of gold, a great propaganda tool, they put out documentaries how this guy represented all these great truth seekers in the past. now they are realizing we can't get him off our tarmac. no other nation will take
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him. china dumped him on us and could this actually boomerang? could there be a russian spy willing to tell secrets? could this be bad precedent in the future? >>gretchen: could there be another reason why russia allowed him to stay for a little bit. let's listen to ralph peters on the o'reilly factor last night. >> the russians are draining all the -- they are down loading all the intelligence he's got, questioning him. snowden is trying to make them happy because he wants asylum. for putin, once the russians have the intelligence, snowden is a liability. the chinese downloaded his computers, told him to hit the road. putin is going to hang on a little longer, question him but eventually he'll move along because snowden is a liability. >> no offense to colonel peters, how does he know what the chinese have? does he know they downloaded his files? could we bifurcate this issue.
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whether or not you agree with what ed snowden did or not, did he it. the other is you have to say what the n.s.a. did was, in my opinion, unconstitutional. they did things the wrong way. they did things they weren't allowed to do. those are two separate issues. we have glenn greenwald in the next hour saying he's got more information on what the n.s.a., their tactics. >>brian: let's hope every 29-year-old decides he's better fitted to be the guy who does our national foreign policy. let him decide to reveal our secrets to jeopardize our relationship with our allies in france, germany and throughout the european union, 27 countries strong. he caused an uproar that hurt this nation. >>eric: did you think we weren't spying on anyone? does anyone in the world -- >>brian: does it work to anyone's interest to have it revealed. >>gretchen: i don't think that is a revelation. we have a lot to debate. this cop was arrested four
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times in seven years and still has a job. even worse, he's not alone. how does it happen? charles payne has an idea. next. >>brian: did you see jimmy kimmel last night? we'll guarantee you'll never see anything like this. we'll show you what happened. (ann) to help me plan my next move, i take scottrade's free, in-branch seminars... plus, their live webinars. i use daily market commentary to improve my strategy. and my local scottrade office guides my learning every step of the way. because they know i don't trade like everybody. i trade like me. i'm with scottrade. (announcer) scottrade... ranked "highest in customer loyalty for brokerage and investment companies." using night-vision goggles to keep an eye
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>> a chicago cop arrested four times in the past seven years on charges including child endangerment and aggravated assault with a gun, won't
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pay so much as a fine. in fact, officer richard rizdo will collect an $80,000 a year salary and keep his pension because he didn't break the law while on duty. here with reaction, charles payne. >> four different times he's been arrested for bad stuff, but because he didn't do it while he was on the clock he gets to keep his salary and his pension? >> absolutely. prosecutors filed charges each time and ultimately dropped the charges each time including the child endangerment charge where he left his son eight years old alone for like three hours. when they brought him in for questioning, he didn't ask once about the welfare of his son. he just wanted to know how it would impact his job with the chicago police department. unfortunately this is not an isolated incident. listen, we love our policemen and we understand they risk their lives for us every day. so when we see a person like this abuse that trust,
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it's a serious story but there's also an economic story beneath it, eric. that's this sort of unholy alliance between a lot of these public-sector unions and large cities and large states predominantly run by democrats where one hand washes the other. we see situations like this over and over again. how many teachers get charged with thing like sexual assault and end up working in a so-called rubber room. >>eric: let's be fair. charges were dropped on all four occasions but he was never convicted of any one of these crimes. had he been convicted, would he still be able to keep his salary? >> in chicago you can be convicted of a misdemeanor, not a felony. >>eric: do we know why the prosecutors dropped the case four times? >> we don't know why
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specifically. i think rizzo would still be on the job if it were not for the chicago sun times writing about the story after the fact. this got out to a reporter and he wrote it up. if it wasn't for that, he would still be on the job. >>eric: you'll be handling duties over -- it's "payne and company." what's on the show quickly? >> what's going on in egypt and the stock market. we started off the second half of the year pretty good. can we keep it going? gold might be rebounding. >>eric: don't hold your breath on that one. thanks for joining us. thinking about going parasailing? this video might have you thinking twice. what happened after this parasail broke free from a boat. the f.b.i.'s dirty secret. they let this guy walk away from 26 murders? with the spark miles card from capital one,
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>>gretchen: 23 minutes after the top of the hour. if you're just waking up, thanks for sharing your time with us today. the accused fort hood shooter nidal hasan expected to enter a not guilty plea today. under military law the case requires a plea of not guilty. jury selection begins next week. >> a judge threw out three lawsuits against kevin clash, the voice of the muppets for 28 years. the judge ruled the men waited too long to sue over sex abuse claims. >>brian: he was one of the most -- one of the mafia's most notorious murderers killing so many
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people he stopped counting after 50. new released memos reveal a mafia informant committed over half the killings while be paid by the f.b.i. revealed in a book called "deal with the devil:. the f.b.i.'s secret relationship with a mafia killer." you're more of a terror tracker? >> i was working on the story after the original trade center bombing. in 1996 after yousef was captured and rendered back at the federal jail in lower manhattan in an only in new york story, in between yousef and marad, another terrorist, was gregory scarpa jr., the son of the killing machine. they are passing notes to each other. photographing notes for the bureau. the bureau has access to all this intelligence
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including what leads them to where khalid sheikh was hanging out. they miss him only to have him knock the towers out. >>brian: he convinced the terrorists that the mafia hates america as much as you do. that lead you to senior. senior and the f.b.i. go from j. edgar hoover to louis freeh. >> everyone thought joe vallaci when he sang in 1963 was the first mafia turncoat. no. these files uncovered in the freedom of information action by angela flamenta that i used in part of the book, the files show in 1962 scarpa is giving hoover the entire mafia play book, the entire hierarchy, even the secret induction ceremony punishable by death. the deal with the devil was over the years he gave
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reams of misinformation, rose to the top of the family, killed with impunity. he was the largest phony credit card dealer in new york, had an $30,000 week drug operation. he used to steal negotiable bonds. >>brian: do you think the f.b.i. knew he was killing and stealing while giving them information? >> the man killed -- i document in this book, killed 26 people from 19 # # -- 1980 to 1992. you tell me. >>brian: many people think this is what the godfather was based on. peter, congratulations on your book "deal with the devil: the f.b.i.'s secret relationship with the mafia." straight ahead, brand-new
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animal abuse allegations against michael vick. details on the show. anna kooiman is taking a swing at another installment of made in america. >> good morning to everybody at home. we're touring the louisville slugger factory. i'm going to be testing out my swing with these bats. my swing with these bats. don't go anywhere. [ female announcer ] it's simple physics... a body at rest tends to stay at rest... while a body in motion tends to stay in motion. staying active can actually ease arthritis symptoms. but if you have arthritis, staying active can be difficult. prescription celebrex can help relieve arthritis pain so your body can stay in motion. because just one 200mg celebrex a day can provide 24 hour relief for many with arthritis pain and inflammation. plus, in clinical studies, celebrex is proven to improve daily physical function so moving is easier. celebrex can be taken with or without food. and it's not a narcotic.
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♪ ♪ >>gretchen: i like this video. the red bull cliff diving world series happened on the rocky cliffs of port gallons. this is british diver gary hunt. he took first place. if you want to get in on the action, it's going to be in italy next. look at that. >>brian: here's my question. are the lines on the high dive too long? why do you have to dive off a cliff? can't we get a diving board that high? why risk the jagged edge? >>gretchen: i remember seeing that in alcupolca as a kid.
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>>eric: if they don't dive they lose their speedo? >>gretchen: how do you know that? steve told us before he has a rainbow-colored speedo he wears when he swims. >>brian: i know that's not true. >>gretchen: it's totally true. >>brian: you swim with steve? have you swam with steve? yes or no. that's a yes. >>gretchen: ask him when he comes back. >>brian: my son is taking a life guard class. one of his friend is a swimmer. he says if you want to shave some time off your -- some time off your race, wear a speedo. he said i'd rather fail. i give him credit for that. >>gretchen: does he wax his body? that is another way to save
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time. >>brian: he's still growing so he's got the kilmeade irish side. he's not a hairy kid. unlike italians seem to be a little hairier. i got both side. he is choosing to wear a baggy outfit and not shave. you happy? >>gretchen: story n 3,872. okay. >>brian: good thing in the summer he sleeps till 10. >>gretchen: i don't know how you follow that up other than my kids still get up at 6. efforts to contain that deadly wildfire in arizona. still zero percent contained? >> that's right. we have a time lapse video of that fire to show you how quickly it spread. that is likely one of the reasons why those 19 fire fighters were killed; just a heartbreaking story out of this part of the country, yarnell, in arizona. conditions out here are expected to continue to be keeping that elevated fire
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danger in place out here because we have a slight chance for a thunderstorm. this particular fire, it is believed it was started by lightning. look at the forecast over the next couple of days. more lightning possible with isolated thunderstorms. overall it will be dry, very hot, temperatures well into the 90's. blazing sunshine expected. surrounding areas are going to be getting hotter than that. triple-digit temperatures very widespread, as far as north as montana. 100 degrees your anticipated high temperature in the city of my suh la. 1 -- in missoula. in nevada, likely over 120 degrees. over the east, temperatures closer to where they should be at this time of the year. we're looking at another issue. while we need the moisture out west, in the east we don't need moisture. we've had showers and storms over the last couple of days. that storm threat is in place as far as upstate new
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york and even new hampshire. advisories and warnings out here. yesterday we had a rough round of storms across sections of the northeast. a reported tornado in the state of new jersey. even westchester saw damaging wind. today again more showers, more storms. they are already fired up along the east coast with a slow-moving storm system. >>gretchen: maria, thank you for that update. now we have other stories to tell you about making headlines. pierce brosnan mourning the tragic death of his daughter charlotte, died of ovarian cancer, the same disease that killed her mother and grandmother. she leaves behind a husband, their 14-year-old daughter and 8-year-old son. charlotte brosnan was 41 years old. >>brian: an adventure for two girls turns into a nightmare when their parasail breaks free from a boat. i was wondering if that
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ever happens. strong wind sent them crashing into a condo balcony then into power lines before landing on several cars in a parking lot. both girls in the hospital in serious condition. >>eric: move over mayor bloomberg. a new nanny in new york city. christine quinn says p she becomes mayor next year the first thing she'll do is add calorie limits to kids' menus, no more than 650 calories, 7 grams of saturated fat. that could mean the death of mcdonald's cheeseburger happy meal. ironically, get this, quinn opposes bloomberg soda ban. >>gretchen: did you see jimmy kimmel last night? then you miss this had romance between johnny depp and jimmy. >> you have this very handsome and let's be honest and say beautiful face.
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[cheering] >>gretchen: sorry i missed that. after getting complimented on his good looks, johnny depp planted a kiss on kimmel. it didn't end this. that second kiss, that was the one on the lips before rebecca romaine came out and also gave kimmel a kiss. >>eric: do we have video of that? >>gretchen: you've got a serious story about michael vick. >>brian: one thing i'm sure, none of these six guys will try to do that -- let me tell you what's happening in the world of sports. michael vick facing new animal abuse allegations. a woman says she was his mistress and claims he also neglected his pet birds letting one starve to death. the woman is trying to shop a book about her relationship with vick.
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no comment yet. vick spent 21 months in prison for a dogfighting ring. >> it could be bad news for a-rod. alex rodriguez and ryan brawn. major league baseball officials will meet with porter fisher, the whistle-blower from the biogenecist clinic. fisher is reportedly being paid as a so-called consultant to cooperate. he was a key guy in that organization. meanwhile, tennis. the game actually played. a stunning upset for serena williams in wimbledon. the loss sends serena's career high 34 winning stream comes to an end. coming up on kilmeade and friends, jennifer griffin will be tell us what's
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happening in egypt. you can listen to us on the fox news radio app kilmeade and friends.com and hopefully your local station. >>gretchen: it's america's favorite past time. no surprise baseball's favorite bat is made here in the u.s.a. >>eric: anna kooiman takes us behind the scenes of the louisville slugger factory. >> good morning. louisville slugger takes care of everybody from major league baseball to fast-pitch softball to slow-pitch softball. we're testing out the bats. >> trying to hit a home run. it's sure going to be the day. >> from legends like babe ruth put stars in the making. louisville slug tkpwer has been around since 1984 and still going strong. >> my great-grandfather
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turned the first bat in louisville. the fact that we've been able to be a mainstay and keep jobs in kentucky and the united states has been very important. >> louisville slugger makes more than a million wooden bats every year. it used to take 20 minutes to go from this to this. now it takes 45 seconds. >> you get the shape you want. then you measure it back and forth. >> how many major leaguers have you made bats for? >> at least 90%. >> how does that make you feel? >> it is a sense of accomplishment. it doesn't have to be a home run. i think bats have won the world series. >> it is not just baseball stars that swing that slugger. the famous bat has popped up everywhere from commercials to country music.
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louisville slugger employs over 200 people and all their american-wood bats are made here in kentucky. >> burn, baby, burn. >> making it official, in 245 degree heat. >> we strive to make the best bat ever. with the innovation we have, we guarantee we have the best bat on the market. babe ruth, mickey mantle, jackie robinson, david wright, it's a wonderful deal. we've had over 8,000 players over the last 129 years. >> this is mickey mantle's bat. you think i'm ready? >> minus the dress and heels, you're ready to go. >> i'm changed. are you happy now? >> let's see what you got, fox news. >> all right. [music] >> made in america, i even have my own signature. i'm an all-star now.
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used to play varsity high school but haven't played in years. why don't you at home rate my swing. there is a signature on both these bats. i have my pink bat and my wooden bat. in the 8:00 hour, brian kilmeade, i'm challenging you to dizzy bat. you know what dizzy bat is? where you go like this. >>eric: you spin around and try to run in a straight line. there is a race to the finish line. you go all over the place. it's embarrassing. >>brian: possibly dangerous. i thought you had my best interest in mind. >>eric: anna, that's a great swing. >> thank you so much. >>brian: great job, anna. >>gretchen: that company is so great. they give us bats every year. we have our names. i've got about five of them. coming up on the show, dramatic testimony in the george zimmerman trial.
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for the first time we heard what happened when he was interrogated by police. we're live outside the courthouse. coming up next. >>eric: should we give lois lerner immunity in the i.r.s. targeting scandal? is that the only way we'll get to the truth? coming up next.
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>> brian: about of about offer a a
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>>brian: george zimmerman taking the stand. could he be taking the stand in his own trial? live in sanford, florida, where the trial resumes in about two hours. valley, what is the likelihood of that happening? >> we keep asking his attorney if george zimmerman will take the stand? he says he's not making any promises whether he will or whether he will not take the stand. we know chris sar i no will be back up there today. yesterday a voice expert took the stand. the expert said he couldn't determine the age of the person yelling for help. another officer named doris singleton said she had no
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idea that george zimmerman did not know that trayvon martin had dyed the night of the shooting. it was very interesting. also if you are having trouble hearing those voice recordings, you're not the only one. even the jury said they had trouble with that and the judge told them they would be able to listen to those recordings once again when they get behind closed doors. >> [inaudible] for the purposes of this next question. do you think he was telling the truth? >> yes. >>gretchen: thanks for that update. in the meantime, another big story. >>eric: she is the i.r.s. official getting paid to do nothing but lawmakers have a plan that could end lois lerner's silent treatment once and for all. >> i would hope that lois lerner would feel motivated at some point to come share the information she has with congress, whether that's in the form of a proffer or a limited
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immunity agreement. unless your name is jack bauer, you cannot make people talk. you can bring her back but can't make her talk. what you can do is incent them to talk. >>gretchen: can congress force them to talk? judge andrew napolitano said they can. what is it called? immunity? >> they can give her immunity. the committee that seeks her testimony by a two-thirds vote can make an application to a judge in washington, d.c. the judge after hearing arguments from the attorney general, who is probably against this, would give her immunity. there's different degrees of immunity. the basics are immunity is involuntary. they can give her immunity even if she doesn't want it. once they do give her immunity, she would have to speak. if she didn't speak she would go to jail until she spoke. the theory is they can't use the information you give against you but they can use it against others. this doesn't always work. we have a wonderful, wonderful colleague by the name of colonel oliver
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north who was once given immunity and he testified, and they used the information he gave against him and he was convicted. a higher court overturned the conviction, saying you have to follow the immunity. so there's a lot of case law there, a lot of judicial interpretation of it. the bottom line is if they give you immunity by a majority vote of the house or two-thirds vote of that committee and tkpwhraeplt by -- and agreement by the federal judge, you have to talk or go to jail. >>brian: i don't think she is the type of person to take a deal. she's happy with what she's got. >> it is not a deal. it is involuntary. they would give her immunity even against her will and she would end up in jail. >>brian: would congress put her in jail? >> a court would. congress would go before a judge and say order her to speak. the judge orders her to speak. she remains silent. ms. lerner, if you don't speak, we're going to put you in jail until you do speak. that length of time in jail is about 18 months.
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18 months is a long time to be sitting there not for a crime but because she won't talk. most judges say it's obvious she's not going to talk. let her go. >>gretchen: will she be testifying in front of congress or in privacy? >> it would be a public interrogation much like the one where she claims she took the fifth amendment but then asserted her innocence nevertheless, which probably waives her fifth amendment right which is the first step towards immunity. >>gretchen: thanks so much. >> my pleasure. this is a saga that will go on all summer, i think. >>gretchen: coming up, parents ticked off because their kids are doing yoga in school. they say it's too religious. >>brian: more parents are giving medical -- are giving malatonin to their kids to get them to sleep. kids to get them to sleep. is that safe?aiaiaiaiain and swelling
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>> eric: so it's called a magic sleeping pill for kids. parents increasingly turning to it. is melatonin safe for your kids? let's ask dr. david samati. good morning to you. >> good morning. >> gretchen: so i've never heard of parents giving mel knownen. i know adults take it from time to time. is it a good idea? >> this has become popular because somebody a few years ago mentioned it. so everyone has gone there. the sales of it has gone from $90 million to now $260 million. a lot of parents are giving this melatonin. what exact pee lee it is, the
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natural hormone that the body makes. i think this is a huge mistake. it's been around a long time of the there are some side effects, but not so bad for adults. if you take it once in a while for jet lag, if you travel a lot, there is no problem with that once in a while, instead of other medications. it's over the counter, it's available and it's no big deal. if you're going to use this for your children on a regular basis, there is a huge problem. number one, it gives the wrong message and it's a behavior addiction. after a week where mom, dad r is my melatonin. number one. number two, there are some hormonal changes that happen. it can affect your sexual function, infertility. it really changes the whole cycle of hormones in kids like this. i'm complete will he against it. i don't think it's a good idea. teaching the children to have a regular sleep pattern, going to bed at the same time, turn off the facebook, ipads, all that stuff before you go to bed and
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creating a bedroom that's calm will help them a lot more. >> gretchen: i can imagine this is an increasing problem because of electronics. a lot of kids take their phones to bed with them, even hiding them from their parents and they're on if you go into the bedroom to check on them. >> 100%. and then i see these kids are on these kind of electronics for hours and hours, especially watching tv and other things. you want to make sure that at least an hour before you go to bed you turn off all of that and you're calm. the other thing that to tell you is even this sunday, we talk about some of the trauma or concussion and some of these kids that play sports may have some sort of like a sleep problems, insomnia and behavior problems. you have to investigate whether there is any underlying issues going on. is there bullying in the school? are there other issues, anything else that affects them and they can't sleep? so melatonin, the knee jerk reaction, hey, take had and you'll be fine. it's a wrong message. >> gretchen: the national institute of health says this, melatonin should not be used in most children. it is possibly unsafe because of its effects on other hormones.
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it might interfere with development. exactly what you have just said this morning. >> that's accurate. >> gretchen: all right. you're probably helping a lot of parents out there who maybe did reach for that knee-jerk reaction. >> thank you. >> gretchen: coming up, a big interview here. the man who broke the story of ed snowden, glenn greenwald is here with us live. a lot of women say david beckham is the perfect man. but the survey says it's brian and eric? look, they don't even flinch over there. they don't even flinch. i just called you guys the perfect men, you don't even flinch. i'm going to add dr. samati to the mix. >> brian: we're used to hearing it. >> eric: stop rolling my video. >> gretchen: so if it's not dr. samati, brian or eric, who is it? right back so then the little tiny chipmunks go all the way up...
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>> gretchen: good morning, everybody. today is tuesday, july 2. i'm gretchen carlson. thanks for sharing part of your day with us today. fox news alert, crash and burn overnight, unbelievable scene as a rocket comes crashing down-to-earth moments after takeoff. >> eric: this just in, leaker edward snowden denying russia's offer for asylum. but can he go anywhere else? the man who broke this story wide open, glenn greenwald joins us live this hour.
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>> brian: then she was 16 months old and knows how to swim. the girl's parents stirring up controversy for leaving her unattended in the pool. they will join us and defend that child who can swim better than me. "fox & friends" starts right now. ♪ accomplish splash i was taking a bath ♪ ♪ all about a saturday night >> gretchen: wow. do they look happy or do they look bummed out that they're about to be doused with water and get all clean? they're going to get a bath on the plaza. brian will tell but that. >> eric: to my dog, that would be absolute torture, to chain him to a bucket and pour water on him. >> brian: my dog would be searching for freedom if he was doing that. i don't think i would be able to get him in there. i don't know if you saw two weeks ago. >> gretchen: that was the day that i left.
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did you bring in your hound? >> brian: i brought in duke. >> gretchen: oh, my gosh. >> eric: look at this guy. he's looking forward to it. >> gretchen: how did duke behave? >> brian: i thought duke was extraordinary. am i right? [ laughter ] >> gretchen: he says he's definitely brian's dog. >> brian: joel is notorious for saying, brian u left your notesly. the craziest question i ever asked him. he didn't know it was bring your dog to workday. i said, did you see my dog? he said, that's a first. am i look for your dog? i said yeah, it's bring your dog to workday and he's 140 pounds and he was on the loose. am i right, joel? >> gretchen: the bigger question is, why was your dog on the loose? >> brian: well, he wanted to be. >> gretchen: so now we know who rules the roost in your house. by the way, all those dogs getting bathed are benefitting our wounded warriors. eric is in for steve today. welcome. let's get to your headlines.
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stunning video leased overnight. unmanned russian rocket explodes and crashes to earth. it was carrying 600-tons of toxic chemicals. investigators believe engine failure is to blame. no reports of injuries at this hour. hundreds of people gathered in phoenix last night to remember 19 elite firefighters killed in that massive wildfire. >> anthony rose, 23. (ding) christopher mckenzie, 30. (ding) >> gretchen: bagpipers played "amazing grace" after the names were read. this morning we're learn morgue about them. three of them had fathers that were firefighters. andrew ashcraft left behind a wife and four young children. >> he was the best person i ever
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met and he gave all for his job compared to what he gave to his family. >> gretchen: the deadly wildfire still 0% contained. we thought we were going down, those words coming from passengers on a spirit airline flight that came close to colliding with a sky diving plane of the it was headed to dallas on sunday when it was forced to take a sharp dive over michigan to avoid hitting the other plane. >> everybody was screaming, crying, yelling. the other compartments were opening. >> gretchen: luckily passengers only bumped their heads. no one seriously hurt. the faa says the two planes were less than two miles apart from one another. a judge just went to the mat for school yoga classes. some parents in one california school district were outraged. they said it promoted religion and shouldn't be allowed.
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the judge admitted yoga had hindu roots, but said it promoted good posture and breathing and that it's not religious. >> we're very happy that he came down on our side. they believe is an excellent program for kids and we are moving forward with our plans to have it in place next year. >> the judge acknowledged from the bench. he said yoga is religious. so if yoga is religious and it's being taught, why is there not a constitutional problem with that? >> gretchen: the plaintiffs say they're going to appeal. the program was paid for by a $500,000 grant. those are your headlines today. >> brian: in case you missed it, egypt has millions of people in the streets, really for the third consecutive day and they've been building for a long time. it's been a year since morsi took power. he's a member of the muslim brotherhood and the leader there. he has done nothing to turn around the country. unemployment is through the roof. their economy is in the toilet. education is nonexistent.
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there is no tourism to speak of and the people are fed up with the islamic laws he's putting in and the intolerance in which he breeds. with very little violence, what they're saying to morsi, get out while you can. >> gretchen: it's interesting, these are live pictures coming out of egypt for you this morning. they elected him, guys. they elected morsi. they had a choice. they had other people who were also on the ballot and they chose the candidate from the muslim brotherhood. so my concern is, would they just be doing this over and over again? things don't turn around quickly when you change leadership for a country that had mubarak for decades. >> brian: they're leading toward stricter and stricter islamic law. they don't like the mood and feel of the country or what he's trying to do. they don't like the intolerance towards the christians. they don't like his foreign policy. >> gretchen: where were they a year ago when they should not have voted him in?
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that's what happens. >> brian: you can gather in the square and tell him to get out. the military left, the cops have are gone. the military resigned. his military leader left. >> gretchen: if we don't like who the president is and we protest, that doesn't mean -- >> brian: they can impeach him. >> eric: how is this work out? >> brian: this is the best sign of the arab spring yet. the people have rioted. they don't like the islamic extremism here and they're rioting again. >> gretchen: how do we know that's why they're rioting? >> brian: because we've talked to the people, heard what they said. again, it's the students that are rising up. >> eric: shouldn't we have known a year ago, shouldn't president obama have known a year ago that mohammed morsi, who is part of the muslim brotherhood, was going to do exactly what he's done over the past year? was it wise to get mubarak out because at that point, he was an ally to the united states. we pushed him out. we supported the rebels and
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morsi comes in and he's an islamic extremist dictator. no surprises here. obama really needs to take his time and figure out which side he wants to be on. >> brian: there is only side one more extreme. they are nowhere near getting power. so i think this is a good sign. i think you're right n retrospect a huge blunder not supporting mubarak because you look at the message it sent to israel who said this is a guy we can work with, saudi arabia, this is a guy we can count on. and now he is pretty much 85 years old and on his death bed. >> gretchen: there was an uprising in iran before egypt and a lot of people criticized president obama for not being involved in the iranian uprising. so then egypt came along and then he does get involved. >> brian: which makes no sense. >> gretchen: right. that's my point is that the foreign policy has been zigzagging pretty much all overt place. the president did call morsi, but charles krauthammer had some thoughts on what the president needs to do next.
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>> obama, the bystander again, here are the egyptians in the millions out on the street trying to bring down an islamist government, increasingly dictatorial, increasingly intolerant, arresting a journalist and judges trying to islamize the military and the people say no. what does the president of the united states do? takes a position to study the neutrality. he says he's not supporting either side. yet as you pointed out in the mubarak revolution, he took the side of the people. he demanded that mubarak had to go. he was not neutral. morsi represent has movement, which is deeply anti-american and deeply anti-democratic. yet, he's neutral on this is a shocking position for a president to take. >> brian: one thing that stands out about the iranian revolution where the president stood on the side, cher they were chanting president obama's name and they
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did nothing. >> eric: we also give them billions of money there. tourism has absolutely vanished from the country. they're going to need a lot more help. they better figure this out and quickly. >> gretchen: let's move on to the ed snowden -- >> brian: we're going to talk to rush to that at 8:30. >> gretchen: hide and go leak is the headline for ed snowden today because he's now asking about 15 countries for asylum. many of them turning him down. during our show right now because they are six, seven, eight hours ahead of time, including i believe india was the most recent to turn him down. he didn't like russian terms because keep in mind, that putin said look, you can't leak any more secrets about the united states if you want to stay here. we're not going to extradite you, but if you continue to leak and even went so far as to say, i know this sounds crazy coming from me, putin, but if you continue to leak secrets about the united states, you can't stay here. >> brian: which shows you that putin seems to have overplayed his sign. as the former deputy director of the c.i.a. said, the russians have come to the conclusion that it's not in their interest to be
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snowden's best pal right now. it's extraordinary statement for putin to say you must stop his work aimed at harming our american partners, as strange as that may sound coming from my lips, which is strange to be reading it as it came from his lips, which makes me think that it is really boomeranged on him and he does say that he might have a home there, gretchen, if he stops talking. >> eric: so we're over a barrel. so many people are saying, snowden is a traitor. he should be tried for treason and hung. but in inn he has so much -- if he has that much information, why is it that big a deal. president obama says i'm not scrambling jets for a 29-year-old hacker. he either has secrets that are dangerous, pick a side. >> brian: they're work with the russians to solve this situation. the president tactically evidently is saying that i'm going to low ball this publicly, where behind the scenes this has
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been devastatingly damaging. >> eric: one of the big issues is what the nsa has done. that's for me, that's -- does it violate the constitution? >> gretchen: that's two separate issues. >> eric: absolutely. we have glenn greenwald coming up in a few minutes and he'll talk about what the nsa did. he says he has a lot more information. he's a guy from "the guardian" who broke the leak stories. >> brian: he says if the u.s. continues to stop him from seek asylum or obtaining him, he will leak more. >> gretchen: bill hemmer figured it out where i was. what makes the perfect man? earlier in the show, i tried to give props to these two guys. i said, the perfect man, like brian and like eric, and they didn't flinch. >> brian: you know why? we looked at the study. over 1100 people studied and it turns out when women were asked
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what they wanted, come out with definite qualities that are above and better than anything else. >> gretchen: they want a good education. they want a hard worker. >> eric: that's not us. >> gretchen: and a gentleman. that's not asking for much. >> brian: keep going. >> gretchen: the worst qualities, being a drunk. and a bad temper. but i love this. pick up lines never die, according to this study. do you have a map? is that a good pick up line? >> brian: it's a great one. >> gretchen: come o i thought it was about puppies or something like that. i just got lost in your eyes was deemed to be the most effective. i don't know if i can read the lamest one. eric, you read it. >> eric: do i have to? pick up line for a dude? you must be jamaican because i
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can't micahan me crazy. >> brian: if you want a woman -- >> gretchen: dr. mcdreamy from "gray's anatomy" got the most votes. 35%. i think. >> brian: right. >> gretchen: said that he would be the guy they'd want. >> brian: we want to know if this study is correct by your book. what is your criteria for the perfect guy and we could change, eric, couldn't we? we could change. >> gretchen: you can always go to medical school. >> brian: right. we're thinking about it. >> eric: obamacare is going to ruin the whole doctor thing. >> brian: don't start talking down the study. straight ahead. >> gretchen: why couldn't americans understand one of the most important witnesses in the george zimmerman trial? this colombia professor had an idea. >> she was very articulate. i think people did understand her. she's speak black english. a lot of people think black english is bad gramar but that's like saying a cocker spaniel is a bad kind of saint bernard. they're different kinds of
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english. >> gretchen: is it right or offensive? we'll debate it. >> brian: then a reporter gets revenge against the punks who tried to sabotage his live shot. good job. and i have a massive ht attack right in my driveway. the doctor put me on a bayer aspirin regimen. [ male announcer ] be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. go talk to your doctor. you're not indestructible anymore. backflips and cartwheels.mile? love, warmth. here, try this. backflips and camm, ok!s.mile? ching! i like the fact that there's lots of different tastes going on. mmmm! breakfast i'm very impressed. this is a great cereal! honey bunches of oats. i hear you crunching. .
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>> gretchen: welcome back. one of the key witnesses in the george zimmerman murder trial under fire for the way she speaks. listen to this. >> i see trayvon and then he say
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why are you following me for? and i heard a man say what you doing right here? >> gretchen: according to a columbia university english professor, that's because the witness doesn't speak traditional english. >> she was very articulate. i think people did understand her. she's speaking black english. a lot of people think black english is just bad grammar. that's like saying a cocker spaniel is a bad kind of saint bernard. there are different kinds of english. >> gretchen: so is that right or is it possibly offensive? joining us for a fair and balanced debate, democratic strategist jehmu green and brian benjamin. good morning to both of you. >> good morning. >> gretchen: we invited john mcwhorter he declined to come on the show. thank you both for helping us analyze this. let me start with you, brian. what do you make of -- there is so much to discuss. what do you make of all the talk about the fact that the way she spoke was sort of its own news story and then john mcwhorter saying there is such a thing as
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black english. is that true? >> i don't think there is such a thing as black english burks i think she's speaking the language she's used to. she grew up where she grew up and communicates the way she feels comfortable. the most important thing is she's honest and telling the truth, which i think everyone can agree that she's done that. to make the point that somehow because of the way she communicates she's somehow lesser than or is not a credible witness, i think is unfair. >> gretchen: jehmu? >> i agree with brian that she was credible. she was honest. she was sincere. but i think this issue has gotten a little bit bigger, especially with john mcwhorter's statements because yes, he's a linguist, anthropologists will say black english is a language, and it won't get to you graduate from high school, to find a job, or to keep a job. and we have to stop making excuses in a sense, for this type of conversation that is happening in our communities. i think all too often we have
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leaders, like john mcwhorter, talking about the history and talking about where it comes from, but like the slave trade, where this language is based from, it should be a thing of the past. and i think it should be okay for people who have a platform, especially african-americans in the media who have a platform, to say this is unacceptable. this is not how our children should be learning. this is not the best way to move them forward. >> gretchen: i assume that you'll take hits for saying that. >> absolutely. he called it something like garbage dialect. >> i don't agree with that point. i do think, what i disagree is calling black english, 'cause that's too general. but the fact that -- there are caribbeans who they have their own kind of dialect that they speak. various people speak and communicate the way they communicate. the question is, can they communicate appropriately in the job force. as long as she can do that, i think it's perfectly fine for her to communicate in a way that's comfortable for her.
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>> gretchen: what about it coming a side show? it's taking the attention away from what's happening at the trial. now we're talk being the way she speaks. >> yeah. a lot of people have been accused of being racist for addressing the way she speaks. i think john mcwhorter has gone o he didn't want to come here, but he's on cnn and msnbc. what eforgets is most of the people who went after her, many of those commentators were african-americans. so this whole conversation is also another way of just throwing the r word out there. he's a racist, she's a racist, you're a racist. that shuts down conversation and they're not going to proceed in dealing with racial anxiety, dealing with implicit bias if we keep throwing that r word out there. this was something that a language that, yeah, lots of people hear this 'cause lots of people listen to rap of the it's not just black people buy it. but again, is this the best way to move this child forward with a profession?
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no. >> gretchen: interesting discussion. thanks so much for your thoughts. >> thank you. >> gretchen: coming up, a big interview here on "fox & friends." the man who broke the story of ed snowden, glenn greenwald next live
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>> brian: i'm back just in time for news by the numbers. $543 million. that's how much money medicare overpaid in 2010 and will likely never get any of it back. that's because medicare lost information about providers. i guess it happens. next, $500,000. that's how much in jewels was stolen from a store at atlantic city's casino. police hoping these surveillance pictures will lead them to three suspects. i don't think so. finally, $3,600. that's how much cash was found inside a taco bell takeout bag. the customer who found it
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returned the money, but didn't get his tacos. >> eric: nsa leaker edward snowden speaking out for the first time since getting stuck in the moscow airport saying he remains free and able to release information that serves the public interest. according to the journals who broke his first story, there is a lot more to come. that journalist, glenn greenwald of "the guardian" knopf is my guest this morning. turning to. so you say you have another big nsa scoop. do you care to break it right here, right now? >> unfortunately, you're going to have to wait along with everybody else until our stories are published. i will say that there are vast programs of both domestic and international spying that the world will be shocked to learn about that the nsa is engaged in with no democratic accountability. >> eric: yesterday ed snowden released a letter to i guess the world about the obama administration. i'm going to paraphrase here.
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he's saying that the obama administration, they're not afraid of me, ed snowden. they're afraid of a constitutionally informed public. question: do you think the obama administration wants snowden to come back to the u.s. or is that going to look bad for them to have him in a u.s. court? >> i think what the obama administration wants and has been trying to establish for the last almost five years now with the unprecedented war on whistle blowers, that it is wagering, is to make it so that everybody is petrified of coming forward with information about what our political officials are doing in the dark that is deceitful, illegal or corrupt. they don't care about edward snowden at this point. he can no longer do anything that he hasn't already done. what they care about is making an extremely negative example out of him to intimidate future whistle blowers from coming forward because they'll think they're going to ends up like him. that's their objective. >> eric: so some of the new news that's breaking as we speak is that edward snowden has said that he's going to turn down russia's offer, putin's offer to stay in russia.
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that would have required him to stop leaking information. he said no, i don't want to do that. but he's asked fora asylum up -- asylum up to 20 countries. some have said no. what's the ed game for him? >> from the first time i spoke with him, he said he completely understood that once he came forward against the u.s. government and the obama administration, he would become the most wanted man on earth and hunt down by the world's most powerful state and he felt it was worthwhile to do that because he could not in good conscience to allow this to be constructed in the dark and said obviously he wants to stay out of the clutches of the u.s. government, given the way they persecuted whistle blowers. he's obviously trying to find a place to do that. his real goal is continue to be part of the conversation about why he did what he did, what it is that he saw in the nsa, how these powers were being abused and to continue to make people around the world and his fellow citizens in the united states aware of what their government
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is doing. >> eric: glenn, you've been criticized specifically david gregory, i'm going to play this. i'd like you to react to it. play the clip on david gregory. >> why shouldn't you be charged with a crime? >> i think it's pretty extraordinary that anybody who would call themselves a journalist would publicly muse about whether or not other journalists should be charged with felony. the scandal that arose in washington before our story began was about the fact that the obama administration is trying to criminalize investigative journalism by going through the e-mails and phone records of a.p. reporters, accusing a fox news journalist of the theory that you just embraced, being a co-conspirator with felonyies for working with sources. >> eric: has david gregory contacted you and apologized? >> no, he hasn't. there was a "new york times" reporter who went on television the next day and said i ought to be arrested. he publicly apologized. but david gregory has not. look, thomas jefferson 200 years
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something said those who most fear investigations are those who attack free press first. that's why a free press is guaranteed so that i can as a journalist tell my fellow citizens that the government is collecting all of their phone records and e-mail records and tapping into their facebook conversations and google chats and skype telephone calls. this is what journalism is about, shining a light on what the most powerful people in the country are doing to them in the dark. so we're going to continue to do that no matter what david gregory and his friends say. >> eric: yes or no, have you been in contact with ed snowden recently? >> not since -- no. >> eric: last question. there was a report that a laptop yours was stolen from your apartment. i think you may have said that. is that true? do you have any idea who has that laptop? >> no. i talked to my partner about sending him encrypted files. two days later, his laptop was stolen. we have no idea if it's connected, we just know it was stolen and nothing else was. >> eric: last chance to do a scoop? >> just wait a little bit and you'll have it.
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>> eric: i tried. thank you very much for joining us this morning. >> thanks. >> eric: have you seen this video? a baby girl who knows a thing or two about swimming. is it real? her dad and swim teacher are here live. and they're helping our veterans one dirty dog at time. how a simple bath for your dog can help you give back to our military, a good cause. stick around she's still the one for you - you know it even after all these years. but your erectile dysfunction - you know,that could be a question of blood flow. cialis tadalafil for daily use helps you be ready anytime the moment's right. you can be more confident in your ability to be ready. and the same cialis is the only daily ed tablet approved to treat ed and symptoms of bph, like needingo go frequently or urgently. tell your doctor about all your medical conditions and medications,
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starting at $49 installed. hurry. offer ends july 8th. adt. always there. ♪ >> gretchen: wow. check this out. time for your shot of the morning. fourth of july cupcakes, courtesy of crumbs. i have a feeling those are going to be gone in about three seconds. >> brian: i understand, according to reports, a cupcake was just stolen. we have the fireworks one, which i assume revolves around sprinkles. and we have the proud to be an american face pack, which i believe is from the middle. all right. so fourth of july celebrated with sweets, red, white and blue. >> eric: that's just the beginning. >> gretchen: just wait 'til the fireworks come, right? that will be on thursday night
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and some places friday night. thanks very much to crumbs for dropping that by. let's get to some headlines. a jealous ex-girlfriend sentenced to to 20 years in prison for murder in 2006. she sent her ex-boyfriend and his new girlfriend the bottle of booze laced with insecticide. he died immediate will he and the girlfriend had a stroke. >> brian: oh, her. adventure for two girls turns into a nightmare when her parasail breaks free of the boat. you think that's part of the vacation? and these guys are just on the side. witnesses watched in horror as strong winds sent them crashing into condo balcony, then power lines. landing on several cars in the parking lot. both girls in the hospital in serious condition. >> eric: a medical breakthrough that sounds like something out of the movie "frankenstein."
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doctors can transplant human heads. italian scientist says the technology to do that exists. up until now, there wasn't a way to properly connect the spinal cord to the head. it could offer par plegic has chance at a new body, but it doesn't come cheap. the cost is at least $1.3 million. >> gretchen: we've all seen video like this. people trying to get on television by sneaking up behind reporters in the middle of their live reports or interrupting people -- >> brian: come on. >> gretchen: when they're reading. one reporter at wgn in chicago decided to turn the tables on these folks. take a look. >> home boy, you want to get on? >> i'm cody. >> cody has been using the cream for two months and you said you're rash free now? >> excuse me? >> we're talking about jock itch. >> no, no.
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>> gretchen: oh, my gosh! that is so fantastic. i love it. that's one way to shut them up. >> brian: how much time does he have on that live shot? he's talking about creams and rashes. >> gretchen: look, there is john. john really wants to be on tv. >> brian: talk about a guy a rash. >> hey! >> brian: fantastic. let me tell you what's happening in the world of sports on a different note and a much more serious note. he's been charged with murder, but the aaron hernandez -- some of his number 81 jerseys have been going for more than $1,000 on ebay. ebay says the listings don't violate policies, but will reexamine it if convicted. michael vick facing new animal abuse allegations. one woman he dated said he was neglecting pet birds. she's trying to shop a book about their relationship. vick spent 21 months in prison for running a dog ring.
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he was not commenting on these new bird allegations. it could be bad news for a major league baseball superstar alex rodriguez and ryan brawn. officials will meet with porter fisher, he's a form employee of the biogen says clinic who claims many players were using drugs. he's getting a consultant fee. a-rod will be coming back, his rehab and stint, he could be in the major leagues within two weeks. >> gretchen: thanks very much. now to the latest on the deadly wildfire in arizona. this is time lapsed video showing just how fast it moved. but it's still 0% contained. whoa are crews facing now? let's go to maria molina who is looking at the weather picture out there and so much more. good morning. >> good morning. unbelievable that this fire is still 0% contained. hot temperatures worsening the
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wildfire fighting efforts across sections of arizona. we want to mention that actually the elite hot shots firefighters that were unfortunately perished that were killed by the fire did use a last resort, which is something called a fire shelter during this wildfire. basically what they coo is try to lay down, this is an animation illustrating what this is. then they place the tarp over themselves. that's supposed to protect them from the wildfire. what this does is reflects radiant heat, reduces convective heat and supposed to trap breathable air so they can continue to breathe. again, like i mentioned, hot temperatures expected to continue out here well into the 90s across parts of yarnell in arizona. a slight chance for a thunderstorm. more lightning is possible and gusty winds. now let's head to brian, which is with a very cute set of pooches out here. brian, you didn't bring your dog? >> brian: no. i should not bring my dog. get over here. we have to talk about a great topic here.
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it is now time to look at how you can wash your dog and help our troops at the same time. one dirty dog at a time, joining us now is amy nichols, ceo of dog topia. what's special about this month? >> we wash dogs quite a bit. we are a dog daycare and boarding facility. but once year, all of our locations participate in a charity dog wash. this year all the proceeds are going to support veterans and training dogs, training service dogs to work with them. >> dogs in the past have been used for equipment, to provide equipment for dogs in desert conditions, local police canaan and search and rescue canine units, right? >> yes. when we first started in 2005, our main focus was to send care packages overseas, primarily to military work dogs. but now that we're seeing so many veterans coming home, we wanted to switch our focus to supporting dogs that are supporting our veterans. the service dogs that work with them. >> brian: that's great. this is good therapy. let's take a quick tour of the tubs. what kind of dog is this?
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>> a cabapiano. >> brian: you look very happy. >> this is hank, he's a tank. a golden retriever. >> brian: very impresssive. >> i want to know, would brian's dog fit on here? >> that might be over the max. >> brian: look at this, i hope you're charging for two. >> this is buy one, get one free here. they're getting a tub. >> brian: fantastic. they're in the shampoo stage. do you repeat or is that too controversial? >> depends on the dog. this is thatcher. a beautiful young guy. he's a beautiful example of with his light coat that you would want to use sun block on him in the summer. >> brian: really? >> yes. >> brian: i never thought that. but it's a great thing you're doing. >> thank you. >> brian: everyone find a dog topia and know you're helping out the cause. >> i want to ask, the sun block, do they have special for dogs? >> brian: human grade sun block
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is fine. you want to focus on the nose and any place you can see the skin. you can donate to us and we're doing text to donate. >> brian: thanks so much and special thanks to the great shampooers and the great dogs that have come by to get -- i'm very jealous of the spa treatment they're getting. >> we're happy to put you in. >> brian: fantastic. i don't know if you have a tub that big. tell us what's coming up next. >> gretchen: thanks, brian. who knew sun block? remember these commercials? >> you can drink a lot of it! it tastes cool! it can be a real pick me up! look! it does the body good! >> gretchen: it turns out now milk may not do a body good. the story coming up next. >> eric: then have you seen this video? a baby girl who knows how to swim at just 16 months old. is it real? her dad and swim coach here live ♪
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that's why more customers recommend verizon, america's largest 4g lte network. i got my mom wrapped around my little finger. do you? yeah, i do. huh. i said i want honey nut cheerios uh huh. and she just totally caved. it's all about psychology buzz. psychology? as long as i don't tell him the cereal is healthy -- he can't get enough. sad, really. i kind of feel bad that i tricked him. but...it was easy. surprise... uh, ha ha ha. ♪
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>> eric: quick headlines. kyra sedgwick is on the mend after slicing off her finger. her husband tweeted this picture, writing, kill isn't healthy if you chop your finger
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off. remember this commercial? >> you can drink a lot of this and it tastes cool. it can be a real pick me up! >> eric: turns out milk might not do a body good. a harvard pediatrician the current recommendations of three servings of dare a day might do a body more harm. the fat is often replaced with sweeteners which add sugar and calories. gretch? >> gretchen: thanks so much. she has barely learned to walk. look at this video here. at 16 months old, elizabeth christianson, instead of walking is proving herself to be a better swimmer than most adults. as you can see, the fearless toddler swimming like crazy without any help. the video from last year has just gone viral on the internet and has some parents saying too much, too soon possibly. joining me, elizabeth christianson, her father, adam, and swim instructor. good morning to all three of
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you. >> good morning. >> gretchen: adam, let me start with you. how did you decide to throw the little one before she could walk ostensibly into the water? >> well, when we moved to texas, we noticed there was a lot of pools and elizabeth has always been very curious and likes to explore and one of the places she loves is the water. i know that it only takes a minute for a little toddler to slip away from you. and how tragic would it be to find her in the worst case scenario? so we researched different programs and found that the isr program was the best and absolutely the most unique program out there. so we investigated. we found an instructor. we found ilese. she did a fabulous job teaching her how to swim. if she falls into the water, she can save herself. we don't have to worry about it. we still have to watch her, but
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don't have to worry. >> gretchen: we're watching the amazing video of her under water now. i assume this is part of the instruction you're doing. is this the same kind of program that i've heard about where you basically throw the baby in to the water and many people are shocked by that and then the baby just has to fend for themselves or do you have a different methodology? >> no. we absolutely never throw a child in the water. and it's an expensive training -- extensive training troves. i never let them go until i'm sure they can float on their own of the it's a gradual process learning this technique. >> gretchen: what is it about a baby that is only 16 months old that gives her the capability of knowing how to swim? should we be doing this with every child? >> i think every child should learn to save themselves should they fall into the water. but it's important that they go through the resource program because your local rec center is not going to be able to teach this. >> gretchen: how do you teach them how to hold their breath
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and do these movements when they understand in some cases limited language even? >> well, it's all learned through muscle memory and like i said, it's a gradual process. and so they slowly learn to do these movements through the water. >> gretchen: so adam, i understand that you said earlier you still are to be watching her 24/7. but what sort of sense of comfort do you have as a parent now because every summer, we hear about kids who drown. >> yeah. roughly there is about 4,000 a year that die through drowning and we think that we're smarter than our kids and that we can put up fences and put up gates and keep them out of the pool. but they can climb fences. they can pick locks. kids are smart. and if they're smart enough to be able to do that, then they should be smart enough to be able to swim. so most cases where children will -- all cases where children drown, it's not something that was planned.
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it was an accident. that's why it's an accident. and we wanted it to be a situation that if she did get over a fence or she did get through an open gate that was left open on accident and fell into the pool that, she'd be able to pull her sufficient out or at the very least, float there until somebody sees her. the difference of life and death can be six inches of water sometimes and the ability to flip over. >> gretchen: wow. amazing video and i'm sure you've inspired a lot of parents to make a phone call possibly today to get these lessons. infantswim.com. ilese, adam and baby elizabeth, thanks for your time today. >> thank you. >> gretchen: have a great summer. are you looking for a job? so many people are. cheryl casone here with the five all american companies hiring right now. first on this day in history in 1988, "dirty diana" by michael jackson. that was the number one song. ♪
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>> brian: the fourth of july just two days away, if my calendar is correct. if you're look for work, why not a company based here in the good old united states of america? cheryl casone also from america and from the "fox business" network located in america, is here with five all-american companies that are hiring. >> yes. five all american companies. the companies we picked are certainly, they've gotten a lot of accolades and awards and accreditation based on the fact that they are strong business partners in the united states. cvs, caremark, you know this one. they fill 21% of the prescriptions around us. 250 million prescriptions they fill every year. they're opening up a lot of those new minute clinics.
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i call them doc in a box. 150 new stores in 2013. they're going to be opening up clinics. they need nurse practitioners. 2,000 overall positions. they have i.t. jobs open, finance jobs open as well. again, this is a big expansion for this company, especially in arizona, illinois, pennsylvania, rhode island, texas. >> brian: you say some of those jobs require masters degree and a lot of people want no know how they're exercising it. now let's move to cracker barrel. >> okay. down home cook. what is this? this is about meat loaf, chicken and dumplings and biscuits. let's be honest. they won a lot of awards for having the good american home grown food. again, they are hiring and they're expanding. based in lebanon, tennessee. they've got 150 manager positions open right now. i'm not talking food service jobs. this is management positions. this pays between 40 to $50,000. depending where you're located, that can be a solid salary and offer benefits. they're opening up new stores,
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allen, texas, fayetteville, north carolina. >> brian: if you want to open up your own restaurant, it's a great place to start to learn the fundamentals. >> i think this all the time for new college grads, managing a restaurant, you can get in as assistant manager. it's a great way to build your management skills. >> brian: american company, u-haul. >> phoenix, arizona-based company. again, expanding. 3669 new jobs by the end of 2013. customer service, they also need managers, mechanics. they also have admin jobs available. salary, hourly will be 8.25 to $14 per hour. that depends on the location and the job that you do. >> brian: i lost the keys and i had to empty it and had another one delivered. >> they're called movers. you can hire them. >> brian: i know. but i wanted to do it myself. you're yelling at me now. caterpillar is also hiring. >> no, you need help.
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all right. they've got manufacturing jobs open right now. this is about 300 jobs open. they've got management positions that are opening. they're based in -- construction equipment, based in georgia. they've got mostly again management positions, construction jobs available. things like that. when we talk on the break, i'm going to call you out on our off camera conversation. it's hard to fill construction jobs. caterpillar is busy because they sell the equipment. but there is a lot of open jobs building homes right now that can't be filled. >> brian: right. buy low and win-dixie market. >> self explanatory. i.t., finance, merchandising, alabama, florida. this is the ninth largest supermarket chain that's out there, especially in the southeast. they're expanding now. who doesn't know about winn-dixie, if you live in the south? >> brian: where do we get more information? >> casonee change.com. it has all the details. >> brian: we'll watch you all
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over. >> wherever i go. that's fine. >> brian: coming up, using kids to sell obamacare. it's actually happening. is that really a good idea? you report i'm going to think about it my name is paul ridley. to benefit cancer research i rode across the atlantic.
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>> gretchen: good morning, everybody. today is tuesday, july 2. i'm gretchen carlson. thanks for sharing your time with us. fox news alert. crash and burn overnight. unbelievable scene. moments after takeoff, a rocket explodes into flames and comes crashing right back
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down-to-earth. we'll tell you about that. >> eric: this just in, the nsa leaker ready to leave russia and has a lot more secrets to release. we just spoke to the man who broke this story and you'll hear from him straight ahead. >> brian: all right. more breaking news. president morsi refusing to step down and rejecting the military's deadline. they gave him 48 hours. so who is he going to call? president obama. >> they're protesting morsi. morsi is obama's guy. obama loves morsi. morsi is a front for the militant. he's a front for the muslim brotherhood, which is taking over the middle east, by the way. >> brian: people are rejecting it. more from rush when he joins us live in 30 minutes. the final hour for this tuesday starts now.
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>> brian: that's one thing "the five" doesn't have. >> eric: a rooster? >> brian: we don't have a rooster. 'cause we think you should be up by 5. i give the time too much when i'm on there. i have a problem giving the time. >> eric: it's like 47 minutes after the top of the hour. >> gretchen: that's because he does that here. >> eric: you got to hurry up and get home? >> brian: it's a habit. the other thing is you don't have five singers. we have the "fox & friends" singers. we have a live chorus. >> gretchen: we do? >> eric: do you sing? >> brian: no, we don't sing. >> eric: you sing that jingle? >> gretchen: we could do it, though. we could if we wanted to. we could have clarinet in the background with a little violin, a little piano. >> brian: although you haven't played in a while. >> eric: you play clarinet? >> brian: in eighth grade. i was asked to stop. >> eric: i thought you were a tambourine guy. >> gretchen: he rose to third chair out of three chairs. >> brian: i'm the all junior high clarinet.
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believe me. >> gretchen: all junior high. >> brian: when you tell a girl you're an all junior high clarinet player, they just flock. >> gretchen: okay. how is your -- figure it out while i read headlines. here are some of your headlines. stunning video released overnight. take a look. unmanned russian rocket explodes and crashes to earth seconds after it was launched. the rocket was carrying 600-tons of toxic chemicals. that could be dangerous. investigators believe engine failure is to blame. but no reports of injuries. it was carrying three satellites worth $200 million. today investigators will go back to the scene of that wildfire that killed 19 elite firefighters in arizona. officials say the hot shot crew was following safety procedures at the time. the fast-moving fire overwhelmed them. this morning we're learning more about the victims.
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william -- three were expectant fathers. three others had fire fighting in their blood. their fathers were firefighters. and andrew ashcraft left behind a wife and four young children. >> the best person i ever met and he gave all for his job that his family.are to what he gave >> gretchen: the deadly wildfire, unfortunately, still 0% contained. we thought we were going down. those words coming from peenges spirit airline flight that came close to colliding with a sky diving plane. the plane was headed to dallas on sunday when it was forced to take a sharp nose dive over michigan to avoid hitting that other plane. >> everybody was screaming, crying, yelling. the compartments were opening. some items were falling out.
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>> gretchen: passengers bumped their heads, but fortunately, no one was seriously hurt. the faa says the two planes were less than two miles apart from one another. what makes the perfect man? >> eric: brian. >> i want to marry you. i want to have kids with you. i want to build us a house. i want to settle down and grow old with you. >> gretchen: according to a new poll, women claim the perfect man is just like that guy, dr. mcdreamy, in his 40s, successful, a doctor, and looks like patrick dempsey. 35% say education is the most important quality. followed by being a hard worker and then a gentleman. the worst qualities? apparently having a bad temper and being a drunk. earlier we asked you what you think makes the perfect man. this is eddie in florida, e mailed, no such thing as a perfect man, but eric comes pretty close.
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oh, my goodness. his head is not going to fit out the door. he's intelligent, good looking and cares about the plight of animals. >> eric: this is eddie. >> brian: i do care about -- >> i love animals. i love my dogs. >> brian: really? >> gretchen: should we hear what jody has to say? god fearing, country loving and patriotic with a perfect mix of steamy and dreamy. and jim writes, i know the secret. women want men to know what women want without having to tell us. men, no thanks needed. >> brian: you want kreskin. there you go. george zimmerman taking the stand on his own trial. >> eric: that's it? we're moving on? >> brian: okay. let me go find more. [ laughter ] >> gretchen: i do feel bad that we did not have an e-mail to say brian was the perfect guy. >> brian: and we searched, believe me. we had our whole brain room going through them. we had nothing. >> eric: you're the perfect
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co-host. >> brian: right. i was hoping it would come from a woman, but thanks, eric. >> gretchen: i say it every day. >> brian: you calima perfect co-host every day? >> gretchen: i do. >> brian: it's usually in the prompter. >> gretchen: never. never. we got to go down to florida 'cause there is a lot of stuff going on. >> brian: the trial that's got america entransed. >> gretchen: the george zimmerman trial, where the trial resumes in an hour. what can we expect today, valerie? >> good morning. by the way, i think you're all perfect. this morning on day 7 of testimony in the george zimmerman trial, lead investigator is expected to take the stand once again. we're also waiting to see if the medical examiner will testify. we've been waiting on him. yesterday two police officers and a voice recognition expert from the f.b.i. took the stand. the voice expert said he couldn't determine the age of the person yelling for help. and the lead investigator said he believed george zimmerman as to what happened the night of the shooting. take a listen to this.
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>> take pathological liar off the table fort purposes of this next question, do you think he was telling the truth? >> yes. >> and some of the jurors said they had problems listening to those recordings. the judge told them they would be able to listen to them again behind closed doors. valerie boea, fox news. >> gretchen: thanks very much. just about 30 minutes ago, we debated part of this story, the george zimmerman trial because there was a witness who was on i believe last week. her name was rachel jeantel and in the analysis of the way in which she testified, there was a lot made about the way in which she spoke. and there was a professor at columbia university who said that she was speaking black english and it really became a debate in our society about whether there is such a thing and whether or not it's a good idea. >> brian: yeah. and we had that little debate here about whether that's over the line and even saying that
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and what exactly it means. you had a debate that you moderated. >> gretchen: so i think we're going to hear from that professor who gave the original comment that it was black english and then from fox news contributor jehmu green with her thoughts. >> she was very articulate. i think people did understand her. she's speaking black english and a lot of people think black english is just bad grammar. but that's like saying that a cocker spaniel is a bad kind of saint bernard. there are different kinds of english. >> what he's forgetting is that most of the people who went after her, many of those commentators on twitter were actually african-american. so this whole conversation is also another way of just throwing the r word out there. he's a racist. she's. you're a racist. that shuts down conversation. and we're not going to proceed in dealing with racial anxiety dealing with our implicit bias if we keep throwing that r word out there. >> brian: as bernie goldberg said last night, we would not be covering this trial, there would not be as much international interest in this trial if it
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wasn't a race factor in it. people are intrigued by the entire process. how is it going to play out? dating really back to o. j. simpson. >> eric: and what bernie also pointed out is, by the way, fantastic interview with bernie last night. he pointed out if you question what rachel jeantel is saying, are you racist for questioning her motives and sop of the facts that she was saying and he said a lot of that is what's bubbling up right now. there were some comments that she made that were deemed pretty racial in themselves, you know. white cracker. she said it a bunch of times. that's what we say in my neighborhood. >> gretchen: what struck me as so interesting this morning was listening to jehmu green, african-american herself, who also said she doesn't agree with giving excuses for speaking in not a traditional english way, especially for the african-american community because she believes that it's
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important to trying to find a job in our country, to be able to speak english in the way in which you might get the best job possible for yourself. so she knows she's going to take a lot of hits for saying that as an afran woman. so she took a risk today in saying that. >> brian: here is you have to say about this entire situation. a tweet from java davis says white people in this country have many different dialects. i agree she's speaking in her native dialect. >> gretchen: carol from michigan says if we don't hold our children to the same standards for education and being able to speak proper english, then we are not getting away from racism if children are given a pass due to their skin color, then that is racism. >> brian: right. bottom line, overall with this child, the defense is looking as though they might not have to put -- the defense is going so well during this phase. >> eric: more to come.
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>> brian: yeah. we'll see what happens later. >> eric: how about this? snowden, the nsa leaker, who is now holed up somewhere in russia, we believe in an airport terminal area, made some requests for asylum, some 20 countries were asked for asylum. as we speak, some are coming in. some are saying no. some are saying you have to get here first. >> brian: austria is saying get here first. >> eric: russia is saying you can stay here, but you have to stop leaking. i spoke to glenn greenwald a couple of minutes ago. he's the guy who broke the story from ed snowden originally with "the guardian" newspaper. here is what he had to say. >> he said that he completely understood that once he came forward against the u.s. government and the obama administration, that he would become the most wanted man on earth and would be hunted down by the world's most powerful state. and obviously he wants to stay out of the clutches of the u.s. government given the way that they persecuted whistle blowers. he's obviously trying to find the place where he can do that. but his real goal is to continue to be part of the conversation
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about why he did what he did, what it is that he saw in the nsa, how these spying powers were being abused and to continue to make people around the world and his fellow citizens of the united states aware of what their government is doing. >> brian: he himself has a mentor. >> eric: greenwald points out that there is a lot more nsa stuff. you may not like what ed snowden did and you might not like how did he it, but the other issue is did the nsa violate our fourth amendment? >> brian: the danger, too, is that he knows so little about the program overall that people like michael hayden and people that run the nsa have said, general alexander said, what he's letting out is portions of the program, just enough to hamper it. he doesn't know it enough to actually explain it. not only that, do you want everybody who signs allegiance to say i have top secret clearance, therefore you can trust me, to not be trusted? >> gretchen: and by the way, people can finally see clearly
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inside to our studio and see the back of your head because they're cleaning our windows right here. >> brian: really? fantastic. >> eric: didn't do you a story about that a couple minutes ago? >> brian: the thing about bill o'reilly's studio used to be ours. they used to clean the windows every monday, wednesday and friday in the middle of the show. >> eric: right. >> brian: and they would not adjust. so we moved the studio. they found us. >> gretchen: coming up next, using kids to sell obamacare. is it a good idea? >> eric: we told you about the duck unable to walk because of a bum foot. look at the duck now. it's walking thanks to a new foot made out of a 3d principaller. printer. the details coming up here to take your lettuce from drab to fab with lean cuisine salad additions. just byol. first, thaw your dressing.
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>> gretchen: could there be more trouble with schools in california where apparently and allegedly the los angeles unified school district is going to collect government grant money to train students on ways to promote obamacare. the hope that kids can convince their parents that the government health care is a good thing. the president of the governing board of the school district is my guest. good morning to you, angela. >> good morning. >> gretchen: so you're out in california. we're hearing reports way on the other coast here that this could be going on in your state.
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what have you heard? >> well, i read on-line newspaper article about it last week and was actually quite surprised by it all and so i was shocked and really was wondering what in the world is going on with this? >> gretchen: how would the teen-agers ostensibly be trying to promote obamacare to their parents? >> you know what? i haven't even heard from our school district that this was going on. like i said, i just read it on-line and i can't even fathom how in the world that we could find the time and the money to do this and why we would even be doing something like this as far as federally mandated program through the school system. >> gretchen: if it's actually going on, it would be a $1 million state grant to train the teen-agers. i think what many people might
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be thinking is where does california get a million dollars because we all know the state is in a budget crunch of sorts. >> that's what i want to know, because i know with our district, our budget gets deferred to us year by year and trying to find the money to pay our bills has been very difficult. so i want to know where that money is coming from. >> gretchen: as far as you know, angela, this is not going on in the travis unified school district at this point in time? >> no, i have not gotten any word about that for our district in particular. >> gretchen: all right. keep us posted if that happens. angela, the president of the governing board of that school district. thanks for your time this morning. have a great week. >> thank you. >> gretchen: there is a whole lot of news developing this morning. coming up, rush limbaugh will join us live here on "fox & friends" to weigh in on the top stories. then his story was the basis of the movie "blackhawk down" now
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>> eric: quick headlines. accused fort hood shooter nidal malik hasan is expected to enter a not guilty plea today under military law, a death penalty case requires a plea of not guilty. jury selection begins next week. and an unprecedented chance encounter for president obama and president bush in tanzania. they came together to lay a wreath for the victims of the 1998 embassy bombings in tanzania and kenya. the al-qaeda attacks left 224 people dead, including 12
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americans. mr. brian? >> brian: service to our country was the subject of the blockbuster movie "blackhawk down." remember? >> you all right? >> i'm good! >> he's coming around these corners! you watch our backs! >> where is the rescue squad? >> we're it. >> brian: wow. michael durant is former blackhawk pilot who went from a prisoner of war to the ceo of a multi-million-dollar company. he's being honored for it. he was crowned 2013 vet entrepreneur of the year. with us right now, u.s. army veteran and decorated soldier, ceo of pinnacle solutions, michael durant. he joins us right now from huntsville, alabama. michael, congratulations on the flawless transition to civilian life. how does it feel to get this award? >> thanks, brian. i appreciate it. it's a humbling experience.
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to know how many veterans are out there having started their own business, there is literally millions. and being recognized by the national veteran owned business association, singled out among those great americans is a great honor. >> brian: you were singled out for 2008. you formed pinnacle, you co-founded pinnacle, pinnacle group. what do they focus on? >> we started out with aviation training primarily. that's everything from computer-based training applications up to flight simulators. we've expanded. we actually have instructor pilots flying aircraft. we produce manuals to support the maintenance and operation of aircraft. and couple of commercial ventures. lately doing on-line learning and some sophisticated gaming technology to allow students anywhere around the world to access some of the courses available at various universities. >> brian: pretty impresssive.
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$10 million company. you're roaring in 2013. you get this award. what are your thoughts back when you look back at that video of you being held hostage for those 11 days in somalia? is that something that's still with you on a daily basis? >> not on a daily basis. i guess the biggest piece of encouragement i got was a few years ago when the anniversary rolled around, october 3. and i didn't even think about it until late in the day that it was the anniversary. so i guess i could say as much as i can, i've moved on. but it's something that will never leave my life. it's a big part of my identity and to try to learn from it and move on and leverage those experiences and the great people that i worked with to continue on in life. >> brian: i know you are quoted as saying all the discipline and the hard work that developed this company, you learned a lot of that in the military. what message do you have for veterans right now having trouble getting motivated and to get to go civilian life after
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serving our country in two wars over the last ten-plus years? >> well, it's been a heavy toll. we've asked a lot out of our troops. they've risen to the challenge. i think the main thing, the most important thing for all of them is to understand that there is help. they may not know where to go, but there is help everywhere. there is government organizations, there is civilian organization that are all out there and with great intentions trying to help facilitate transitions for these warriors and their families. and for my perspective, the main thing is don't quit. life is not easy. starting a business wasn't easy for me either. i did get a lot of help, but you just got to persevere, drive on, make it happen. the same things that made these people successful in the military will make them successful in the transition. >> brian: i know at pinnacle solution, you hired a lot of veterans as well. congratulations, michael.
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thanks for your service to our country. >> thanks, brian. appreciate it. >> brian: coming up straight ahead in the final half hour of our show, they're brand-new animal abuse allegations against michael vick this morning. the details ahead. or is this just an ex girlfriend trying to get back at him? first, rush limbaugh will join us live right here on "fox & friends" to weigh in on today's top stories and why the gop might be sold down the road if they go along with immigration what makes your family smile? backflips and cartwheels. love, warmth. here, try this. backflips and camm, ok!s. ching! i like the fact that there's lots of different tastes going on. mmmm! breakfast i'm very impressed. this is a great cereal! honey bunches of oats. i hear you crunching.
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if you have persistent diarrhea, contact your doctor right away. other serious stomach conditions may exist. don't take nexium if you take clopidogrel. relief is at hand for just $18 a month. talk to your doctor about nexium. >> reporter al eisner learns the extreme importance of the words get set. >> i got a lot of other people who love this weather, members of the armada swim team. go ahead. let's you guys take off. on your mark, go! [ laughter ] >> gretchen: they jumped the gun there. >> brian: right. i think there is a way to start a race and not to start a race. >> gretchen: let's do some headlines for you if you're just joining us. an adventure for two girls turns into a nightmare when their parasail breaks free from their boat. watch this.
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>> oh! >> gretchen: witnesses watched in horror as strong winds sent them crashing into a condo balcony, then into power lines before they landed on several cars in a parking lot. both girls are in the hospital in serious condition. >> brian: actor pierce brosnan mourning the tragic death of his daughter. she died of ovarian cancer, the same disease that killed her mother and grandmother. she leaves behind a husband, their 14-year-old daughter, eight-year-old son. charlotte brosnan was just 41 years old. >> eric: remember buttercup the duck? he was born with a deformed foot and he has never walked normally. now thanks to a 3d printing technology, a prosthetic foot was made and look what he can do. taking his first steps after being fitted with his prosthetic foot. his owner says he's walking normally and it doesn't seem to
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be bothering him at all. >> brian: they don't walk at all anyway. they waddle. michael vick faces new abuse allegations this morning. a woman says she was his mistress, claimed he also neglected pet birds. letting one starve to death. she won't reveal her identity, trying to shop a book about her relationship with michael vick. spent 21 months in prison for running a dog fighting republican. he has not commented on the new allegations and wants to be the starting quarterback on the eagles. >> eric: it could be bad news for major league baseball star alex rodriguez and ryan brawn, former mvp. it's reported major league baseball officials will meet this week with whistle blower porter fisher. he's a former employee of the clinic who claims more than 100 players purchased performance enhancing drugs. fisher is reportedly being paid a consultant fee to cooperate. question is, why isn't he going to rehab? he's playing single a ball starting tonight. coming up on radio, jennifer
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griffin, ambassador dennis ross will be joining us. you can listen on the fox news radio app. some of our local stations. >> gretchen: speak of radio, someone who is the king of radio, rush limbaugh joins us now. >> brian: no one would argue. >> gretchen: good morning to you. >> hey. it's been a long time since i've been with you give guys. how are you? >> gretchen: thank you for joining us. >> my pleasure. >> gretchen: thank you. let's talk about egypt because we've been watching these live pictures come into "fox & friends" this morning of these protests going on and i'm interested in knowing what your thoughts are. the egyptian military apparently giving president morsi 24 to 48 hours to basically not be president anymore in that country. >> i don't know. i'm totally confused by egypt. i thought this is what we wanted. when this all happened, when the arab spring was taking place a couple years ago, everybody was making it appear as though it was happening as a result of being inspired by obama's own election. so hope and change was spreading to the middle east.
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and we had all kinds of learned people, including some conservative media pundits talk about what a wonderful day it was in the middle east and this is exactly what obama's presidency means, the world is going to love us, and basically what we have is a bunch of people in egypt defrauded by an illegitimate lying campaign. reminds me of some others that i know and am familiar with. >> brian: it's amazing, too, the muslim brotherhood had a chance to rule. the people saw the oppressive way and the way they treated women and robbed them of their right to succeed. >> what did anybody think was going to happen? who are these people? i mean, they're not exactly the founding fathers of this country. what do people think they are? these are militant islamists. under the cover of a so-called moderate group called the muslim brotherhood. i don't understand why anybody is surprised by any of this. >> gretchen: i don't either. that's been sort of my point this morning. they voted this person in. they had other candidates who
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were on the ballot. >> well, but they were defrauded. they were lied to. the people of egypt were lied to. they were lied to about mubarak. they were lied to about what they were getting with morsi, who is just a front for a bunch of more militant people -- the fact that obama can't bring himself to condemn this ought to be eye opening to anybody that's paying attention. >> eric: don't you think it would have been wiser before we start continuing to send billions and billions of dollars of aid to egypt and f-16s and any other sort of military help they want, anything they ask for, we say, sure. we should have found out whether this muslim brotherhood influence was going to be as muslim brotherhoody as we suspected or they thought? >> i don't mean to be a cynic, but i don't think what's happening here is surprising to anybody in the regime, the obama regime. i don't think they're surprised by any of it. they're going to keep sending the jets and keep sending the money. they're going to keep providing the foreign -- nothing is going to change because of this. this is -- i don't even understand why people get so upset about this.
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this is so predictable. everything that's happening here, there are those who said this is exactly what's going to happen and not just in egypt. go up to turkey and go over to the palestinian-israeli conflict. this is a harbinger of what's coming and we supported this! we helped install this. >> gretchen: what should happen? >> brian: the secretary of state is focusing on israel and the palestinians, which is hamas. why is he there? even the "new york times" said -- >> it's john kerry. he is doesn't know what he's doing. everything about this administration is image, side show, perception, photo op, optics. the israeli-palestinian has been going on since the bible. the only way it will be solved is like any other conflict is solved. that's when there is an acknowledged loser who surrenders. until that happens, all of this is just -- it's meaningless.
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it really is. i've been doing my radio show for 25 years and topics now starting to repeat, you guys. and nothing changes. this is all just -- it's all part and parcel of the pattern of events. look at all the work clinton and arafat did. why? didn't matter a wit, did it? look at all the work jimmy carter did. didn't matter a wit, did it? arafat was given everything he asked for at one point. he pulled out 'cause he didn't want the conflict to end. just like certain leftists in this country don't want the conflicts they're involved in to end because if you solve the problem, there is no reason for them to exist anymore. so all of this is, to me, just sadly, really sadly predictable. i'm not trying to be cynical about it, but i am. >> gretchen: at least with mubarak, although he was a dictator, he was helpful to the united states in trying to at least try and find a peace process there. let me ask you this, if you were advising the president, what
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would you do about these growing crowds in cairo today? >> i would do what obama always does and i would try to shift this and make it look like they're protesting because they're inspired by him. if i were obama, i would try to get myself into this story that it's all about me because that's what he does with everything else. >> eric: here is something we haven't talked about and probably hasn't repeated it self because it's brand-new. obamacare. turns out they're having problems selling obamacare. in fact, they're having so much problem selling it, they're turning to school kids? they're turning to librarians and the nfl, the nba, et cetera. what about it, rush? can this thing survive? >> eric, it's going to survive. it's the law of the land. i don't think -- it will survive, but i think it's going to implode on itself. it's just unworkable. it is 2200 pages of a brand-new bureaucracy that transfers one sixth of the economy to the government, which doesn't know how to run anything properly, particularly this one.
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why are they selling it? why are -- it's the law of the land. i'll tell you why they're selling it. because 2014 midterms. only 35% of the people approve or want obamacare. 2010, democrats lost big. i mean, all the way down the ballot, the dog catcher at the local level, they lost big because of obamacare. they are salivating at winning 2014 and that is why they're out there running campaigns for a bill that is already the law of the land. nobody can do anything about. they're trying to sell it. counter the negatives about it for the 2014 mid terms. >> brian: so rush, what you're saying essentially is that it's unimplementable and if republicans possibly were smart, and are against it, the republicans that are, i believe every republican is serving right now, they should back up and let someone try to work it because it's nobody's program. it's conga glom race of ideas -- a conglomeration of ideas. >> you're right. it's golden opportunity for the republicans to get back in
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people's good graces and stand for something the american people actually stand for. and that is their dislike for this. look what's happening to these exchanges, guys. you've been talking about it on your program this morning. california health exchange. most people think that's where you're going to go to buy your health insurance if your employer doesn't provide it. turns out it will be run by the seiu, the afl-cio, cover california, democrat voter registration group! running the california health exchange. you show up to get your health insurance, they're going to register you as a democrat, get you to the polls to vote on election day as a democrat. they're using obamacare and these exchanges to grow the democrat party. republicans are sitting around televisionling their thumbs worried about immigration and whether the hispanics like them or not and being skunked on issue after issue after issue. like this is classic. the 2014 mid terms are really, really important. democrats win the house, then there is no such thing as a lame duck last two years for obama.
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he's going to have clear sailing. >> brian: you think that's a possibility? >> that the democrats win the house in 2014? yeah. because the republicans are in the process of engaging in policies guaranteed to lose them elections. absolutely it's possible. >> gretchen: you mean immigration? >> eric: can i just point something out. the reason why they're selling this to young people is because young people don't sign up for obamacare, the thing will implode upon itself. they're the only thing that are going to be -- >> if they don't sign up, they're going to be faced, the irs will find them and they'll be fined. the interesting number, the young people, people under 24, i saw the other day that the average annual expense for health care is like 800 bucks. the minimum premium will be $5,500. i tell you, that's going to be another golden opportunity for the republicans here. >> eric: yep. >> they get out in front of it. but the fines will be cheaper for a couple of years, but they will be found by the irs and they will have that fine deducted on their taxes, if they have a job, which is another thing that fewer and fewer
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people have in this country. >> brian: you have a big decision to make. you're a huge baseball fan. the all-star game will be in new york. you know your way around this city. will you come up to new york city and possibly sit on our couch enroute to going out for the all-star game? [ laughter ] no. >> gretchen: oh! >> because well, i don't go to new york during the workweek because i get audited by the new york state -- i've been audited every year since i left new york in 1997. if i show up on a workday, then i get audited and they want -- it's -- no. i'm sadly -- >> eric: i believe you spend eight days in new york, you have to pay new york city taxes. >> you don't want to know. if they move the all-star game to saturday, i'd be there. >> brian: we'll work on it. >> gretchen: thank you for joining us on the phone, though. maybe we'll talk to you during that week as well. thanks, have a great week. >> thank you very much. >> gretchen: he's a reporter who broke the nsa leaker story wide open. critics say glenn greenwald is
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going from reporter to advocate for ed snowden. are they right? if so, why does that matter in peter johnson, jr. here on that topic next. >> eric: did you know louisville sluggers made in america? anna kooiman up next with that awesome story [ female announcer ] it's simple physics... a body at rest tends to stay at rest... while a body in motion tends to stay in motion. staying active can actually ease arthritis symptoms. but if you have arthritis, staying active can be difficult. prescription celebrex can help relieve arthritis pain so your body can stay in motion. because just one 200mg celebrex a day can provide 24 hour relief for many with arthritis pain and inflammation. plus, in clinical studies, celebrex is proven to improve daily physical function so moving is easier. celebrex can be taken with or without food. and it's not a narcotic. you and your doctor should balance the benefits
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>> eric: it's america's favorite pastime, so it's no wonder baseball's favorite bat is made right here in america. anna kooiman joins us now with a behind the scenes of the louisville slugger factory. >> am i going to bunt or bat? louisville slugger takes care of everybody, from major league baseball to softball. we decided to tour the factory and see what it's all about. take a look. >> fan favorites, like derek jeter, stars in the making on little league teams. louisville slugger has been around since 1884 and still going strong. >> we've had a long tradition here. my great grandfather turned the first bat here in louisville. and just the fact that we've been able to be a mainstay here and keep the jobs here in the state of kentucky and definitely the united states has been very, very important. >> they make more than a million wooden bats every year and it
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usually takes between 20 and 30 minutes to go from this to this. now it just takes 45 seconds. >> you get the shape you want and then you take that and measure back and forth. >> how many major leaguers do you think used these? >> at least 90% over the years. >> how does that make you feel? >> it's a sense of accomplishment. especially when i see somebody -- doesn't necessarily have to be a homerun. have a good hit or drive in a run. i have bats that won world series. >> it's not just baseball stars that swing that. the famous bat has popped up, from commercials to country music. ♪ >> louisville slugger employs over 200 people and all american wooden bats are made right here in kentucky. >> burn, baby, burn.
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>> making it official. 225-degree heat. >> we strived over the years to make the best bat ever. with the innovation and tradition that we have, we guarantee that we have the best bat on the market. babe ruth, ty cobb, today derek jeter, it's a wonderful deal. we've got over 8,000 players over the last 129 years. >> this is mickey mantle's bat. you think i'm ready? >> i think minus the dress and heels, you're ready to go. >> oh, man. all right. i'm changed. are you happy now? >> i am happy. let's see what you got, fox news. >> all right. made in america. i even have my own signature. i'm an all star now. here they are, very nice. the pink one. brandon, how old are you? >> 13. >> where are you from? georgia. >> he's going to challenge me to dizzy bat.
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can we get music. maria molina will be the judge. she's got the patriotic cupcake. you got to spin around five times. you ready? >> yes. >> let's do this. one, two, three, four, five. go! go! >> anna, he got you. >> you win the patriotic cupcake. unfortunately, i got a little hungry and i had one. >> you have all five. there you go. >> that kid is good, anna. >> eric: he's no stranger to dizzy bat. i'll tell that you right now. >> good work. >> eric: he took it. >> gretchen: thanks a lot, anna and the young gentleman. coming up, the man who broke the
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story with ed snowden. some say he's an advocate for him. are they right? peter johnson, jr. here next. >> brian: let's find out what is coming up in ten minutes. >> good morning. he questioned george zimmerman the night that he killed trayvon martin. this morning he's going to be back on the stand. rivetting testimony. greta van susteren is in the courtroom this morning. she will join us here in "america's newsroom." is edward snowden's options start to dwindle, he threatens to divulge more classified information. what can be done? bill and i will see you at the top of the hour ♪
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>> gretchen: welcome back. nsa leaker edward snowden speak out this morning. he says he remains, quote, free
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and able to publish information that serves the public interest. could he be in the middle of the obama administration's battle against whistle blowers? earlier on "fox & friends," we spoke to glenn greenwald. >> eric: the reporter at "the guardian" who broke the story wide open. listen. >> they don't care about edward snowden at this point. he can no longer do anything that he hasn't already done. what they care about is making an extremely negative example out of him to intimidate future whistle blowers from coming forward 'cause they'll think they're going to end up like him. >> eric: joining us right now, peter johnson, jr. you watched the interview. your thoughts? >> it was an excellent interview. i think mr. greenwald has a little bit mixed up. yeah, i do think the obama administration, the government is trying to make an example out of mr. snowden because i believe that he broke the law. i believe that he engaged in violation of the espionage act. so it's appropriate to make an example out of him. the issue becomes, is mr. greenwald an advocacy journalist? it appears that he is. if he's an advocacy journalist,
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then we have to examine everything he's done with regard to this case. if he's merely a reporter and taking documents and say this is what i think the world should see, that's one thing. but when he becomes an advocate and almost a flak, the alter ego for the media for mr. snowden who is in communication in a russian hotel in the airport, then transparency should become the issue. what do we know about mr. greenwald's role in terms of being in hong kong? >> eric: but what if he's bringing out things that may be violating the constitution or, what if he has information that would lead to what went on in benghazi? should he not leak that if that was considered sensitive? >> has nothing to do with benghazi and you and i are both against violations of the constitution and we can wave it all we want. but that is not a defense or rationale for breaking the law. we also have to understand that mr. greenwald has been involved
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with the wikileaks. we have to understand that there is testimony now that al-qaeda was relying on the wikileaks leaks. in fact, there was testimony that osama bin laden said get me the wikileaks material for my own use. >> gretchen: which is what so many people were concerned about when this story broke, which is how will this affect our national security? i need to ask you this, other news outlets decided not to publish this information. so does that make glenn greenwald even more of an advocate, in your mind? >> i think he's an advocate for his particular position. he articulates it time and time again, that we're all getting viewed over by the government and i think he went beyond the line in some of the things what he was saying. it's not absolutely accurate. there is an obligation for the american press and he calls himself a part of the american advocacy press, do we put american interest above putting out a story? i think that is a concern and a
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balance that all journalists, whether advocacy journalists or not, have to meet and understand. if the constitution comes first, and the government and our country comes first, and the people come first, are we doing harm? >> gretchen: we got to go. thanks. >> eric: more "fox & friends" three minutesn away who's gonna take your wheat thins? i don't know. an intruder, the dog, bigfoot. could you get the light? [ loud crash ] what is going on?! honey, i was close! it's a yeti! [ male announcer ] must! have! wheat thins! the day building a play set begins with a surprise twinge of back pain... and a choice. take up to 4 advil in a day or 2 aleve for all day relief. [ male announcer ] that's handy. ♪
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>> brian: tomorrow big show. >> gretchen: dr. keith ablow and behind the scenes of kilmeade and friends? >> brian: never before has anyone seen what we're about to reveal. >> eric: really? >> brian: of the whole radio world on television. >> gretchen: have a great day, everyone. >> brian: be on the after the show show. it will be great. bill: knock *. another critical day in the george zimmerman murder trial. i'll take you to florida where the defense will continue their cross-examination of the lead detective in the case. martha: the jurors hearing george zimmerman's account of what happened that night through the police interviews he gave. here is a piece of the audio reporting that were played in court. listen to there is. >> i was walking back through to where my car was, and he jumped out from the bushes. and he said, what [bleep] you

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