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tv   CBS This Morning  Me-TV  December 4, 2015 7:00am-9:00am CST

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we ask the sister of syed farook. does marco rubio have a plan to prevent more senseless deaths? >> we begin this morning with a look at today's eye opener, your world in 90 seconds. investigators search for a motive in the san bernardino massacre. >> it was unspeakable, the karn carnage that we were seeing. >> i can't wrap my head around the fact that a 27-year-old mother is firing off as many
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>> i think the entire event doesn't make a whole lot of sense, to be honest with you. >> i am convinced that was a terrorist attack. >> the san bernardino shooting and terrorism is dominating the talk on the presidential campaign trail. >> it's becoming clearer that we are dealing with an act of terrorism. >> senate republicans rejected new gun control legislation, including the ability to bar guns. >> they'll be able to serve as army rangers, green berets and everything else that was previously open only to men. >> scott weiland is dead. >> he was found on his tour bus in minnesota. >> a virgin america flight was delayed after the loader used to load baggage caught fire. >> it's cold play. >> it's going to be wonderful.
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vintage moment in him? >> it is caught for the win! >> all that matters. >> the national christmas tree shine bright. the president remembered the victims of the mass shooting in san bernardino. >> their loss is our loss too. we're all one american family. >> on "cbs this morning." >> it's not going to be long before we get on this ride again. the scariest part about this whole thing is that it doesn't surprise us anymore. we're actually getting used to this. >> this morning's eye opener is presented by toyota. let's go places. welcome back to "cbs this morning." new evidence is leading investigators to suspect the san bernardino shooters may have been terrorists. the married couple killed 14 people wednesday and wounded many more. we are seeing the faces of their victims and hearing from their
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one police officer calls the unspeakable. >> police say syed rizwan farook and his wife tashfeen malik carried out the attacks. they are looking into malik radicalized her husband. >> oh, my gosh! >> this cell phone video captured the violent gun battle with police that killed the couple. carter evans is in san bernardin with the new evidence the authorities have. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. law enforcement still won't speculate on why the couple opened fire, but they have not ruled out terrorism. and cbs news has learned that syed rizwan farook had been in communication with people with suspected ties to terrorism here in the u.s. he had also been communicating online with suspected extremists overseas. investigators continue their search for clues thursday near
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rizwan faroooo and tashfeen malik were killed. for the first time the authorities showed the weapons they used in the brutal attack. >> as i said from day one with the evidence will lead us to the facts. >> reporter: police confirm there were 75 to 80 people in the conference room where farook started shooting employsees. he shot first at department managers before spraying the room with as many as 75 rifle rounds. >> so many lives lost over nothing. >> reporter: lieutenant mike madden was one of the first officers on the scene. >> it was unspeakable the carnage that we were seeing. that was evident in the moans we were hearing in the room. >> reporter: the fresh spray of gun powder led authorities to believe the shooters were still at large. >> we went further into the building and that was a difficult choice to have to make
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were injured and in needing of assistance but our goal had to be at that time locating the shooters. >> reporter: but the shooters were already gone. they left behind this bomb rigged to a remote control toy car that acted as a wireless trigger. it did not explode. >> it just seems so senseless that here people with going into their holiday festivities and >> reporter: farook and malik were killed in a shoot-out with police about four hours later. newly released information shows the ver osity of that battle. the couple fired 76 roupeds at police and 23 police officers returned 383 rounds. on thursday, an fbi evidence response team combed through the home where the couple lived. inside they found more than 4,500 bullets and 12 pipe bombs and enough material and tools to build several more. chief, do you believe they were planning another attack?
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clearly, they were equipped and they could of continued to do another attack. we intercepted them before that happened. >> reporter: now the fbi has flown in a special team from washington to study the crime scene and we understand that agents have already sent some evidence back to d.c. for analysis. they are also going to be taking a look at the couple's electronic devices to try and get a better understanding of what could make them commit such a heinous crime. >> thank you, carter. that is the question everyone is asking today. thanks a lot. thousands gathered in san bernardino last night at a candlelight and prayer vigil to honor the victims. relatives and friends are sharing stories to tell us about
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. >> reporter: family and friends are monohonoring their loved ones. 37-year-old michael wetzel was a father of six. his wife renee said i didn't know a better person. without him his family will never be the same. >> he was so kind to everybody. >> reporter: jennifer that will says her husband worked for the county.
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group. >> reporter: the mother of three fled to america at the age of 18 to escape islamic extremism. >> she came in to have a better life, better education and everything else. unfortunately it was taken away from her. >> reporter: on facebook one of sierra clayborn's photos is covered in blue white and red, a tribute to the paris massacre. >> he had this grin that made it something. >> reporter: the los angeles times reported that daniel kaufman worked at a coffee shop. >> daniel would pull some stunt and make you laugh. >> reporter: in addition to the 14 people who died, nearly two dozen were injured. one of the survives, 22-year-old jennifer stephens was shot in the side.
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i said there's something wrong, i've got to take this call. she said, mommy, i've been shot. it was terrible. it was very upsetting especially when you start hearing the people. >> reporter: other relatives of the injured say they're lucky. >> unfortunately the other 14 families don't have the story to share. it really breaks our heart that this is happening to all of us. >> reporter: of course, some of the injured are luckier than others. at least three have now been released from area hospitals. here at the loma linda university medical center, at least two remain in critical condition. norah? >> john, thank you so much. officials tell cbs news this morning that a woman named tashfeen malik attended pharmacy school in paecket and the home country of farook's wife. authorities are going through
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home in redlands. david begnaud spoke with farook's sister farook's family appeared here in the apartment behind me with the couple's 6-month-old baby girl and the closest we have been able to get. for the first time we were
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>> of course it makes me angry. >> very upset and angry at how you can leave a six month old daughter. >> and he put us in this predicament. >> he met tashfeen malik and they became engaged in 2013 after he traveled to saudi arabia during the annual pilgrimage. she passed a homeland security counter terrorism screening as part of the u.s. vetting process. she was not on any u.s. terror watch list. >> so many lives lost other nothing. >> he was shocked when he learned the man accused of gunning down more than a dozen people turned out to be the coworker he sat just feet from for five years. >> do you believe he was radicalized?
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i think he married a terrorist. >> a law enforcement source tells cbs news bombs found in the couple's home are near carbon copies of explosives shown in al qaeda's online magazine which shows instructions on how to make a bomb in the kitchen of your mom. >> we can't imagine the loss. our thoughts and prayers are going out to them. >> reporter: she revealed to us during that interview that the couple's six month old baby girl was actually taken into state custody on the night of the shooting. she and her husband now plan to adopt that baby girl. a new quinnipiac poll shows
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jihadists are the greatest threat to the united states. radicalized foreign visitors and terrorists hiding among syrian refuges. michael morale is a former cia deputy director. what questions should we be asking at this moment? >> i think the most urgent question were they working with anybody else? are there any other coconspirators out there? an awful lot of weapons for just two people. that is the most important questions for the fbi to run down now. the other questions what did he do in saudi arabia, who did he meet with? more importantly, what did he do in pakistan and did he get training to do something like this. what motivated them to do this particular event rather than something else. >> what else might they be plannng to do? >> exactly. >> what is your expertise tell us what happened here? they did the shooting at the center and went home and yesterday police found quite an arsenal at their place. >> i'm speculating right now.
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were radicalized, they were radicalized by either isis or al qaeda, not necessarily just isis. they were planning something big or down, as we have reported, that he was in contact with a person we believe has ties to terrorism here in the u.s.? >> i want to know what those conversations were, what was actually being said, who that person was. i also want to know the same thing about his reported communications with people overseas. >> and if we have this person that has suspected ties to terrorism under surveillance, why didn't our intelligence or law enforcement know about mr. farook and his wife and what they were doing? >> there is a lot of people,
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are communicating with isis, reading isis propaganda, even communicating with them on facebook and twitter. too many people for the fbi to survey and follow up on. a lot of americans out there -- >> how many are we talking about? >> thousands. >> in 50 states we have open investigations into isis sympathizers. >> why is there a reluctance to call this terrorism? what do we need to know to call it officially terrorism? >> as odd as it sounds they were terrorists but this event was not terrorism. what it depends on is what was their motivation for doing this? right? was the motivation to do this to be part of al qaeda and isis and sympathize with them, or was this because you were mad at your coworkers? >> you would think if that was the issue, they would have just killed one or two rather than as many as they could. >> they shot their managers first. >> right. >> michael morrell, thank you very much. >> you're welcome.
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gun control push in the wake of the shootings. they failed to pass a series of measures including more background checks. republicans say they are focusing on fixing the mental health system and renewing the terror fight. >> the san bernardino suspects were holding an arsenal in a state with some of the america's toughest gun laws. the husband and wife team carried two assault rifles and two semiautomatic handguns during the rampage. but in their home, investigators found a dozen p and more than 4,500 bullets. jeff pegues has more in washington. >> reporter: good morning. the two shooters were armed to the teeth. officials want to know how the weapons were purchased and paid for. syed farook was a county employee earning about $70,000 a year. an expert told cbs news the cache would have cost between
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police say syed farook and his wife tashfeen malik fired 65 to 75 rifle rounds inside the inland million regional center on wednesday and then fired 76 more rounds at officers during their life ending shoot-out. >> they had over 1,400, 22 3 caliber rounds and nine millimeter rounds on their person as well. >> reporter: at their home, 2,000 9 millimeter handgun rounds and more. this is a former l.a. prosecutor. >> when there is guns on the street and whenith there is ammo and large magazine clips, this is bound to happen. >> reporter: are according to the atf the handguns were legally obtained and purchased by farook and they confirm the ar-15 guns in the shooting were bought legally and illegally modified to make them more powerful.
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style rifles. a law banned magazines and clips which can hold ten or more but they are readily available online and in other states. chris cox from the national rifle association noted in today an opinion piece that california gun laws didn't stop the attack. quote, the fact remains that california has already adopted president obama's gun control wish list. according to investigators, a lot of the ammunition the shooters used was strong enough to pierce the bullet-proof vest worn by police. >> that's scary. jeff, thank you so much. we have much more to come from san bernardino in our next half. farook's sister talks about what if she could have stopped the bloodshed. that is ahead here on "cbs this morning." many rock music fans are shocked this morning by the sudden death of singer scott weiland.
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when i feel times are gold he had other hits for the stone temple pilots starting in the 1990s. the band sold more than 13 million albums in the u.s. weiland won two grammys including one with the velvet revolver the group he led after the stone temple pilots broke up. he reportedly died on a tour bus last night in minnesota. the cause is not determined but he had battled drug and addiction for many years. ahead, "60 minutes" investigates the use of young good morning. it's a frosty start to this friday with temps below freezing. widespread sunshine will quickly warm temps to near 51 this afternoon. saturday looks warm again with highs near 50 with clouds increasing by the afternoon. a few sprinkles are possible saturday night and early sunday with quiet and mild days returning to last into mid-week. have a great day.
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ahead hear how the president respond in norah's white house interview.
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good morning. it's a frosty start to this friday with temps below freezing. widespread sunshine will quickly warm temps to near 51 this afternoon. saturday looks warm again with highs near 50 with clouds increasing by the afternoon. a few sprinkles are possible saturday night and early sunday with quiet and mild days returning to last into mid-week.
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>> we are averaging more than one mass shooting a day.
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whenever one of these happens, i feel like we have to go through the same emotional roller coaster and it's the most vile roller coaster in history, except for maybe the legendary 1933 world's roller corvette of breakaway railroad. this shooting yesterday was like a couple was radicalized and not sure of that yet and another crazy guy shot up a theater for god knows what reason. the only thing we know for sure as we get off this ride we are a little queasy and legs wobbly and in the pit of our stomach, we know it's not going to be again. >> that is the scariest party. when is the next one is what everybody says these days. welcome to "cbs this morning." coming up in this half hour, more from our interview with the sister and the brother-in-law of the suspect in the san bernardino massacre. they talk about the man they knew, their grief for the
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ever forgive him for the massacre. plus our white house interview with president obama, why he considers climate change a bigger threat than isis and his answers to critics like donald trump is ahead. time to show you this morning's headlines. "the washington post" reports on a historic decision to open all jobs in combat units to women. for the first time, females will be eligible to join all infantry universities and special operations. the jobs will open beginning next year. defense secretary ash carter says there will be no exception. "usa today" says the army has grounded all aircraft in active duty units across the country between now and monday, after three helicopter crashes in ten days killed eight people. between now and monday, army leaders will review the flight mission, the briefing process, aircraft coordination training, unit preaccident plans, and maintains training responsibilities.
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they want one to repent for voting against the confederate flag. on the back it says may you take takes a few puffs while adults off camera encourage him to do so. we have unique insight about one of the san bernardino shooters and comes from his sister. the police searched the home of syed farook and his wife on california. the two had apparently been planning something for a long time. they had a giant stockpile of ammunition and homemade bombs. david begnaud in redlands shows us how the gunman's family is responding and coping.
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we are speaking to the sister and i have to tell you she says she is numb and, quite frankly, at a loss for words. for the first time since the shooting on "cbs this morning," the sister representing the immediate family is talking. it is their first interview ever since police told them their brother committed mass murder. >> i want to say i'm sorry, deeply saddened, and, i mean, it's a sad day for all of us. >> reporter: saira khan insists she has most idea what motivated her brother and his wife to go on a shoot rampage. she and her husband farhand are left to wonder could they have stopped it? >> i asked sk myself if i had called him that morning and asked how he was doing and what he was up to. if i had any inclination, could i have stopped it? >> reporter: they had thousands garage.
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much weapons. >> reporter: he didn't talk a lot? >> no. he was always shy and quiet. >> reporter: did you like his life? >> yes. she was also shy and quiet and kept to herself. >> reporter: saira says she hasn't had the time to process what is going on. >> we are also mourning the loss of someone we knew or thought we knew. so we would really want, like, everybody to give us, you know, some time to mourn or, you know, get some time, i guess. just like everybody else out there that need time to mourn. >> reporter: far dshan, said he felt an obligation to address the people on the night of the shooting. >> i wanted to go there and talk to the victims. people were hurt. i felt responsible. tell us to the people.
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brother deserves to be forgiven? >> that's a hard question. i don't even know if i will forgive him. just because of what he did. >> reporter: farhan, could you forgive your brother-in-law? >> not right now. what he did do to his own family, to his daughter, to other families, to the people there, no, i won't forgive him. >> reporter: we spoke with the two attorneys who are representing the shooters' family. they told us yesterday they met with the fbi and based on questions from the fbi being asked of the family, the attorneys believe federal investigators are pursuing a theory that this very well could have been a terrorist attack. norah? >> david, thank you. again, scary that no one even their closest family members could not know they were building this arsenal at home. >> looking at interview you
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david announced they are going to adopt the little do you mean that it's a greater threat than terrorism? >> what i mean by that is that we're going to get isil. they will be defeated. there will be ongoing efforts to disrupt the world order from terrorists, from rogue states, from cyber attacks. there's always some bad people
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things. and we have to be vigilant in going after them. but if you start seeing the oceans rise by five, six, seven feet f feet, if you see major shifts in weather patterns so that what had previously been bread baskets to the world unable to grow food, then you're seeing the kind of crisis that we can't deal with through the deployment of the marines. we can't deal with it through throwing money at it. what we know is that as human beings are placed under strain, then bad things happen. and if you look at world history, whenever people are desperate, when people start lacking food, when people are not able to make a living or take care of their families, that's when ideologies arise that are dangerous. >> donald trump, who is the
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side, said your remarks are one of the dumbest statements i've ever heard in politics. >> well, you know, mr. trump should run back a tape recorder on some of the stuff he's said. look, here's what we know, 99.5% of scientists in the world say this is a really urgent problem. the only people who are still disputing it are either some republicans in congress or folks on the campaign trail. >> this is part of the debate. the republican party is debating a different view. >> i think that was an interesting analogy that he made, because so many people don't believe this is a crisis that all the experts say it is. >> our polling suggests that almost two-thirds do believe that climate change deserves
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we're going to talk about his fight to make a deal with the world to limit global warming. no training and suddenly no backup from police. how a young woman's fear after a drug bust led to a deadly choice. it's friday. set your dvr so you can watch "cbs this morning" any time you feel like it. star mandy patinkin who is coming to studio 57 today. one touch, and unlike life, no mess. your favorites. your way. keurig hot. just press clean and let roomba from irobot help with your everyday messes. roomba navigates your entire home cleaning up pet hair and debris for up to 2 hours. which means your floors are always clean. you and roomba from irobot better together .
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sunday on "60 minutes," lesley stahl investigates the death of a 23-year-old woman and how police unknowingly set her up to be killed. in this preview she looks at the battle to shed light on some of the reality of some undercover drug stings. >> reporter: lance block is an attorney in tallahassee, florida. >> these kids are being recruited to do the most
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they are going undercover with no background, training, or experience. they haven't been to the police academy. >> reporter: so they are basically doing the same work as a trained undercover cop? >> absolutely. >> reporter: lock says he was unaware police were using young people as confidential informants until he was hired seven years ago by the family of rachel hoffman, a recent college graduate who was caught with a large stash of marijuana and a few valium and ecstasy pills and her second marijuana arrest. >> she was caught by the tallahassee police department and told if she didn't become a confidential informant she was looking at four years in prison. >> reporter: she signed up and a few weeks later, was sent out to make her first undercover drug buy. it was to be one of the biggest in tallahassee's recent history, 1,500 ecstasy pills, an ounce and a half of cocaine, and a gun.
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those things? >> no. >> reporter: a gun? had she ever fired a gun? >> no. rachel was a pothead and rachel sold marijuana to her friends out of her home, but rachel wasn't dealing in ecstasy or cocaine, much less, of course, not weapons. >> reporter: rachel drove her car alone to meet the dealers in this park with 13,000 dollars cash from the police and a wire in her purse. she was to be monitored by some 20 officers. but then the dealers changed the location of the deal so rachel drove away from the police staging area and that is when things went terribly wrong. >> the drug dealers have her out on this road, one drug dealer gets into the car with her. >> reporter: and the 20 cops who were nearby? >> they lost her. >> hoffman is 5'7", 135 pounds.
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forest meadows park. >> reporter: she shot her seven times when they found the wire in her purse and dumped the body in a ditch 50 miles away. >> watch "60 minutes" on sunday to find out what law enforcement say about using young confidential informants sunday on cbs. ahead, republican presidential hopeful marco rubio is here with his thoughts on good morning. it's a frosty start to this friday with temps below freezing. widespread sunshine will quickly warm temps to near 51 this afternoon. saturday looks warm again with highs near 50 with clouds increasing by the afternoon. a few sprinkles are possible saturday night and early sunday with quiet and mild days returning to last into mid-week. have a great day. good afternoon...
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even if you're a detroit lions fan, it's just the sheer athleticism. >> hail mary by quarterback aaron rodgers gave green bay a come-from-behind win on "thursday night football." the packers trailed detroit 20-0 in the third quarter! green bay ended up winning 27-23. rodgers said it was the most amazing game of his life. >> you have to roll back again and say did that just happen? yes, it did. >> i know. >> one of the greats moments. >> great moment. >> why people love football right there. >> yeah. >> the packers victory wasn't the only surprise last night. the nfl announced that coldplay, there they are. they will headline super bowl 50 halftime show. they hinted the super bowl performance could be joined on stage by past performers. maybe beyonce is the big surprise. you can see the super bowl
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>> is marco rubio poised to make a run at donald trump is in the florida senator is right here in studio 57. good morning, senator! we will ask him about his plan for stopping home-grown terror. that is ahead on "cbs this morning." another day, and i'm still struggling with my diabetes. i do my best to manage. but it's hard to keep up with it.
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it's been her fight for twenty years. something is wrong with our healthcare system and it needs to be fixed. then, it was about health reform and getting eight million kids covered. now, it's about stopping republicans from repealing obamacare, and taking on insurance companies to bring down drug prices. i'm not going to let any family be deprived of healthcare. i'm not going to let the republicans rip up obamacare and throw it away. i'm hillary clinton and i approve this message. friday with temps below freezing. widespread sunshine will quickly warm temps to near 51 this afternoon. saturday looks warm again with highs near 50 with clouds increasing by the afternoon. a few sprinkles are possible saturday night and early sunday with quiet and mild
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it is friday, december 4th, 2015. welcome back to "cbs this morning." there's more real news ahead, including a possible motive for the san bernardino massacre. and we'll have presidential candidate marco rubio saying how to make the violence stop. first here's today's "eye opener" at 8:00. >> law enforcement still won't speculate on why the couple opened fire but they have not ruled out terrorism. >> the most urgent question is were they working with anybody else? are there any other co-conspirators out there? >> the two shooters were armed to the teeth. officials want to know how the weapons were purchased and paid for. >> the youngest of the victims was 26, the oldest was 60. some worked so closely together they called themselves family. >> it is their first interview ever since police told them their brother committed mass murder. >> i want to say i'm sorry, deeply saddened. it's a sad day for all of us. >> you did say in the state of
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poses a greater threat to future generations than climate change. do you mean that it's a greater threat than terrorism? >> what i mean by that is that we're going to get isil. they will be defeated. >> thousands gathered in san bernardino last night at a candlelight and prayer vigil to honor the victims. >> this is my city. what affects one part of the city affects us all. and we need at this time to come together. i'm charlie rose with gayle king and norah o'donnell. authorities are still trying to understand why 14 people were murdered in san bernardino, california. the evidence is point them more towards terrorism. thousands attended a vigil last victims. identified. they range in age from 26 to 60. families are sharing stories of how they lived their lives.
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speculate on the motive of syed rizwan farook and his wife, tashfeen malik. cell phone video captured images of where the couple died. >> oh, my gosh. >> officials say the couple fired 76 shots at police. more than 20 officers returned the fire with 380 rounds. carter evans is in san bernardino with the newest information about the shooters. carter, good morning. >> reporter: good morning. officials still aren't ruling out terrorism in this case. now, sources have told cbs news that 28-year-old saeed -- syed rizwan farook had suspected ties to terrorism. he was also communicating online with people overseas. his wife originally from pakistan underwent and passed counterterrorism screening in order to get her k-1 visa. that's a visa for fiancees of u.s. citizens.
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consulate in islamabad. an evidence team combed through a house the couple rented. inside they found nearly 5,000 bullets along with 12 pipe bombs and enough material and tools to build several more. for the first time authorities showed us the weapons used in the attack. all of the guns were purchased legally. as many as 80 people were enjoying a company holiday lunch in a conference room when the couple stepped inside and simply started shooting. now, sources tell cbs news that department managers were the first one to be shot before the couple sprayed the room with as many as 75 rifle rounds. char low. >> thanks, carter. the senate voted to repeal much of obamacare but it failed to pass new gun control measures. they included expanding background checks to gun shows and online purchases, preventing people on the terror watch list from buying guns or ammunition and stronger treatment for
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four republican senators voted for expanded background checks. presidential candidate marco rubio was not one of them. the florida senator is with us now in studio 57. senator, welcome back. >> thank you. >> why don't i start with that. >> none of these crimes have been committed or in this case what i believe was a terror attack would have been prevented boy the expanded background checks. the fact of the matter is these individuals would have passed expanded background checks, these individuals in california, these terrorists that was able to access these weapons is not someone that would have wound up in any database. this is one of the risk of homegrown violent extremism. these are not people that have done anything before, who suddenly become radicalized and within months are taking action. >> but the president said that it's far too easy for people to get weapons and we need to figure out a way to make it harder for them. there are so many cases that it would have made a difference. >> none of the major shootings
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few months or years that have outraged us would gun laws have prevented them. many of them existed despite the fact that local jurisdictions had gun laws even stricter than jurisdictions. we have a violence problem in concerned about that. >> why is that? why is there more gun violence than any other country? >> even nongun violence. first of all, over 60% or about 60% of the gun deaths in america are due to suicide and that's a terrible thing. the other remaining 40% of the gun deaths, a significant percentage of them are due to other crimes that are being committed and in the process a gun is used and then you have these horrifying incidents that occur. if you look at it more broadly, i think the fundamental question needs to be why is there so much violence in america. it is a combination of cultural changes in our country and mental health changes as well. >> you generally agree background checks are a good thing? >> i think background checks that are properly conducted, like in florida, you already have to undergo a background
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i have a concealed weapons permit and that's done by telephone. what they're trying to do now with impede the second amendment right of a large number of americans. >> i'm just wondering why given that background checks are common place now in the law of the land, why wouldn't you do them for online gun sales and gun shows. >> because you're putting an incredible burden on people. the gun show thing, it's not a gun show loophole. it is an individual, i decide i want to sell my gun to a friend of mine. now you have put an extraordinary burden on me to go out and conduct a background check and i'm liable if i get it wrong. as an individual, it's just very difficult to implement, almost impossible to enforce and it ignores the fact that despite the background checks that we're seeing now, people are still getting access to these weapons. >> you mentioned mental health. a lot of people mention mental health. but in the majority of the cases they aren't conducted by mentally ill people. what about the freedom of americans to go to the mall, to go to church, to go to school. people talk about the rights of the mentally ill.
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americans who just want to live in a world where we can -- >> increasingly living in fear. >> violence is a big problem and adding to that problem is the risk of homegrown violent extremism which is the most faced. >> what would you do? >> first of all, we have to have robust intelligence gathering capabilities to disrupt plots. that's one of the reasons i was opposed to this law that even some of my opponents running for president voted for, this usa act. it took away the right to collect meta data which means we cannot access the phone records of individuals that we suspect of being involved in terrorism or who carry out an attack to see who they were coordinating and talking to. that's one example of things we need to do more of. ultimately, i will say this in full candor, it is going to be very hard to find someone who has never done anything wrong in their life, who was radicalized six months ago online, who is a u.s. citizen who lives what
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life and one day to the next decides to join a jihadist movement and conduct an attack in the homeland. >> we'd better find an answer. >> i want to ask you about what's happening in paris because we have 190 nations about to agree to a massive climate change deal. and i sat down with the president on wednesday and asked him about the criticism that you and some of the other republican candidates have leveled at him. let's listen. >> when chris christie says i don't see evidence that climate change is a crisis, when marco rubio says not sure what percentage of it is due to man's activity, there's no consensus on it, you say what, they're just wrong? >> they're absolutely wrong. it's not subject to dispute. mr. rubio is from florida and you can go now to places in south florida where when the sun is out during high tide, you've got fish swimming in the streets because the flooding is so high. the evidence is there right now that drought, floods, storm
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now. and that's only going to get worse. >> is the evidence -- >> fish swimming in the streets? we've had some flooding issues on miami beach. one of the reasons might be because of some rise in the sea level but primarily it's because of miami and all of south florida is built on a swamp. miami beach is an artificial part. the fundamental issue for policy makers is what to do about it. everything the president is advocating for, even the scientists admit we don't believe it would make a dramatic impact any time in the near future on trends in the climate but i tell you would have a dramatic impact on our economy. here's one more point. the united states has already significantly reduced carbon emissions in comparison to other countries in the world. all the growth in carbon emission over the next 30 years will come out of india and china and other developing countries and they don't intend to do anything about it. no matter what document they intend to sign so their economy meets parity with ours. >> you don't believe they'll
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they're signing in paris? >> what deal has china ever followed through on. their economy. they have millions of people to employ and feed and they're not going to cut back until they reach parity. farce? >> i don't think they'll arrive at any solution or arrive at any measures that are going to solve any problem. i do think there's a potential for the united states to pursue policies that will be very harmful to our economy and basically have no impact on our >> all right. you're going back out on the campaign trail. if you could vote for a republican other than yourself, what would that be? >> i'd vote for myself again. >> fair enough. >> don't ask we that question. i'd vote for myself. >> if you had a choice. i'm going to support the republican nominee. i don't think it's going to be mr. trump, i think it's going to be me. so let's be optimistic here, guys. >> we will continue to watch. >> thank you.
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president obama is going to talk more about climate change and the political footprint he wants to leave after his presidency. more from our white house good morning. it's a frosty start to this friday with temps below freezing. widespread sunshine will quickly warm temps to near 51 this afternoon. saturday looks warm again with highs near 50 with clouds increasing by the afternoon. a few sprinkles are possible saturday night and early sunday with quiet and mild days returning to last into mid-week. have a great day.
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mandy mandy patinkin is after an even bigger challenge than homeland. he shows us how he's personally involved in one of the world's most pressing issues. what is that? we'll talk about it with mandy right after the break, ahead on "cbs this morning." mandy.
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jeb bush: here's the truth you will not hear from our president: we are at war with radical islamic terrorism. it is the struggle that will determine the fate of the free world. the united states should not delay in leading a global coalition to take out isis with overwhelming force. their aim is our total destruction. we can't withdraw from this threat or negotiate with it. we have but one choice: to defeat it. vo: right to rise usa is responsible
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we have more now from our one on on one interview with president obama who is back home but in paris this morning, negotiations from around the world are in the middle of two weeks of talk and they are trying to reach an agreement to limit global warming. during our white house visit, we asked the president about his effort to take historic action and how his climate change priorities could affect his legacy. >> reporter: in order for this deal to work in pairris and in order to get developing countries like india to sign on, they want money from developed countries. >> right. >> reporter: you promised $3 billion. if you can't get congress on board, how can you deliver on
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>> keep in mind, these are pledges over a number of years. this is in our interest. take a country like india that has over a billion people. if they are to develop using, let's say, coal as their main way of generating electricity, with a billion people, four times as many people as the united states, over the next 20, 30 years, you know, you're looking at an amount of carbon that would mean south florida is gone because the oceans would have risen too high. you can't build a border wall when it comes to carbon emissions or global temperatures or the oceans. and so we have got to make sure work with us. >> reporter: how much of your legacy do you want to be about climate change?
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last year, and i think about what i've gotten done and what i still haven't gotten done yet, i don't think any president ends the presidency saying i got everything done. you're always a little dissatisfied, you always wish, if i just had a little more time, maybe this would have happened and that would have happened. but i think about it this say. malia is 17 and sasha is 14. every once in a while, i tear up thinking about how fast it's gone and they are about to go. and i do picture that if i'm lucky, you know, i have enough years left, that 20 years from now, let's say, and i'm still around, i've got some grandkids, i want to be able to take my little grandson or granddaughter on a walk to the park and know that the planet is in pretty good shape. and i want to feel like i contributed to that. and when with i'm holding that
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on a swing, if he or she are able to enjoy that sunny day and feel good about it and breathe clean air and go swimming in an ocean and i can watch them play, that will be a pretty good legacy. i'll feel pretty good about that. >> this is a great interview. >> yeah. >> thank you. we have had 13 of the 14 hottest years in the past couple of years. 2015 was the hottest year on record. and it's clear the world wants to do something about it. the question is whether china and india, who are the first and third largest carbon emitters in the country will agree to that. india is a big story two. 3 million people in india without electricity will be coming online in the future and economy is a big issue according to marco rubio. will they slow down and use ways to build their economy -- >> we celebrate warmer temperatures in november and december and that is a problem. >> especially when you live on an island like manhattan. >> we need to find a way to get
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to the economy versus what it does to our life. >> agree. agree. but look. you'll see in paris, i think something come out of there where not just 190 countries, but also business leaders are trying to craft some sort of compromise on this. for more of our interview with president obama and the issue of climate change, we want you to go to cbsthis morning.com. >> tiger woods says plenty in a candid new interview. a look at his plans if he can't play golf any more and how he and his ex-wife are moving forward. >> this is a great interview. >> looking forward to this one too. we will be right back. i don't want to live with the uncertainties of hep c. or wonder... ...whether i should seek treatment. i am ready. because today there's harvoni. a revolutionary treatment for the most common type of chronic hepatitis c. harvoni is proven to cure up to 99% of patients... ...who've had no prior treatment. it's the one and only cure that's... ...one pill, once a day for 12 weeks. certain patients...
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. when they told me that i was diagnosed with cancer, all i could think of was my kids and that i didn't want to leave them. i beat cancer, but it is still scary. now i have a pre-existing condition. so, if republicans take away obamacare, breast cancer survivors like me could be denied coverage. if hillary's in the white house, she's going to continue obamacare, so that i don't have to worry anymore. i trust her, and i know she's going to fight for all of us. i'm hillary clinton, and i approve this message. (vo) with thousands of quality pre-owned vehicles... and exceptional customer service, head to your neighborhood enterprise car sales and let the people who buy more vehicles than anyone... flip your thinking about buying your next one. you want to feel connected, informed, included, on every screen in your life. we are broadcasters; always here for you, wherever here may be. text washington.
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tiger woods is opening up about his troubled career and life after divorce. the legendary golfer tells "time" magazine about his relationship now with his ex-wife elin. he says she is one of my best friends now and all because of his kids. he wishes his marriage had been what he called a more open, honest relationship and also acknowledges can so many injuries, he doesn't want to stop playing on the pga tour but he has to, life with his kid is much more important. it's so great the two have been able to move forward and work this welcome back, it's now 8:25! new steps are being taken to
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out to court avenue tonight. managers at court center, which houses legend's and several other popular bars at 3rd and court have hired extra security to patrol 11:30 pm to 2:30 am on the weekends. there have been dozens of assaults on court this year - and just last weekend a man was shot and killed. the downtown neighborhood alliance also wants more lights and surveillance cameras. police will also be trying today to track down a missing set of keys - that unlock a lot of doors in des moines! a city employee left the keys in his truck on monday - and someone stole them. the city is already replacing locks to properties and equipment. and we're still giving away free breakfast in west des moines until 9 am! all we ask is you to bring a toy or cash donation
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breakfast in return! if you can't get there today, we'll be telling you about lots of other ways to help out in the coming days. let's first get a check on traffic!
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days returning to last into mid-week. have a great day. 's called a rigged economy, and this is how it works. most new wealth flows to the top 1%. it's a system held in place by corrupt politics where wall street banks and billionaires buy elections.
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people like you who want to fight back. the truth is you can't change a corrupt system by taking its money. i'm bernie sanders. i approve this message.
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yeah, i like that big band sound and that voice. i love that voice! welcome back to "cbs this morning." coming up in this half hour, you know the voice too, celebrating frank sinatra. las vegas rolls out the red carpet for his 100th birthday. we'll preview a new cbs special. lee cowan talks with john legend, carrie underwood, harry connick jr. and some other people. >> plus mandy patinkin is in our toyota green room with stories from season five of "homeland." he said it will shape the future of that drama. that's ahead. right now it's time to show you some of the morning headlines. the dallas morning news says authorities are investigating a texas teenage accused have affluenza. he said he was damaged because he grew up in a wealthy family. well, this week someone tweeted a video that shows couch violating his probation. couch, who is now 18, appears to
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his lawyer has no comment. "forbes" has an update on a story we've been following. martin freeley raised the price of a life-saving drug by more than 5,000%. he said on thursday he should go higher. he has gone back on a promise to cut the price. he said companies are still begging for his business. "the los angeles times" says a game of thrones preview has fans wondering. the preview focuses on the john snow character, but he was killed last season, or at least that's what we thought. the new season debuts in april. that's what you call a good tease. >> and showtime. >> and "homeland." >> speaking of "homeland". >> perfect segue to you, mandy patinkin. he's a powerhouse on the stage,
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he played cia european division leader saul. he confronts his colleague and love interest, allison, after learning she's a mole for russia's intelligence service. >> you tried to have carrie killed. >> nonsense. >> she was your friend, allison. >> you were my friend. more than that. >> those butchered agesnt in cairo, that was yours too, wasn't it? what about drew sanders? your kiev deputy. what did he do to deserve a bullet in the face at extremely close range? tell me, god dammit. >> or what? >> a wife and three kids. >> and i'm still in touch with youngest. >> you betrayed them all. all the networks rolled up, all the good people, what do you think happened with them?
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to the table. mandy in real life. >> man! >> how do you trust anybody when you play such a dark side and see such dark things on tv? >> i trust everyone. you know, i -- i tell you, i don't know. i mean i just -- i just do -- i'm very hopeful, i'm very optimistic about the world, about the mess that we're all living in right now. i think people dune into our show because they're looking for some insight to a world that's on fire, a world that's burning and you wonder why. and my prayer, my hope, saul's prayer and hope is there's something in between the lines, anymore. and what that something is i think, saul thinks, we need to come up with a new paradigm because the violence isn't working. if you really watch what those heads of the institutions say
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they have failed. all these bombs, an incident in paris happens, you send planes and you bomb more and then it makes more people who are marginalized by society living in towns where they have no education, no opportunity, so live. so what if we bombed all of these people with opportunity, with infrastructure, with schools, with medical facilities, with homes, with everything the west has. what if we gave them everything imaginable to make their lives wonderful so that they had no need to turn away. >> this is so interesting. you're talking about spy masters, which is an incredible documentary where we were able to interview -- other producers were able to interview 12 of the living cia directors and described post-9/11 and you narrate this series. >> yes. >> because of "homeland," because of this, you now talk to a lot of members of the intelligence community. you're going in january again. >> yeah.
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but what's the dark side? >> well, they come in two hours apiece, three days, ten-hour days, each guy for two hours. we have lunch and dinners and they tell us what they feel. they're very patriotic, they care deeply about humanity all over the world and they're trying to save humanity and trying to figure this out. you don't have to be einstein to figure out this is going to keep happening. this is going to happen long past our children's and grandchildren's lifetime. this is a different kind of war. >> two things. you have often talked about listening. >> yes. >> you need to listen more. secondly, you're talking about providing all kinds of things in terms of education and caring and a lot of other things. >> yes. >> what do you think will make it happen? what is required to see your points in action? >> little steps. don't tell me that guns aren't a part of the problem. they are a part of the problem. we need to stop gun violence in america and all over the world. other places have done it. in this country we can take just
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the west bank alone and give them the best schools, give them the best road system, agricultural systems, medical systems, give them everything we have and want for our children so no one in that epicenter of existence can sit back and say we're being cheated, we are not given freedom, justice and dignity, which is all any human -- >> and that would change the image of our country in their minds? >> absolutely. and we can show that we are the human beings that we claim, that our forefathers wished us to be. >> just on the bbc the other day they said another day in america, another shooting. that was at the bbc. so for yourself personally, you're always looking for the good in people and you found it in greece. >> my friend who played in season four, i said if you come for the emmy awards, let me show you my country. let me take you to utah and the
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he said i can't go there. i said why? he said if i get in a fight in this country, i'll get hurt but in your country i'll get killed. that's what he believes about my country and that broke my heart. >> so you did what? >> it blue up in greece and all the immigrants, millions of people waiting to fullylee this violent war. i went there. i went to lesbos and i wanted to hold a baby in my arms, i wanted to help them and i did. and these families are like my family. i met this family that lost everything in the water. they had no money to get the ferry, to get to athens, to get to the train, to get to europe, and i was fortunate, i gave them the money for that but their boys looked like my boys. people. i just went to elizabeth, new jersey, yesterday and spent a day with a family there. they're beautiful and we're going to invite them over for
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wherever you are in america, there are 24 centers from the international rescue committee. find out where these families are and invite them to your home. >> you have to come back soon. we have a clock problem. >> i understand. >> thank you so much, mandy. >> i love morning tv. >> and we love you. >> thank you, thank you. >> an important message about compassion. certainly with what we've been covering the past few days. >> reach out to all humanity and welcome them to our home, to our country. >> we should note "homeland" airs sundays on showtime. that is also where you can see the spymasters, cia in the crosshairs, the documentary narrated by mandy patinkin. up next, good morning. it's a frosty start to this friday with temps below freezing. widespread sunshine will quickly warm temps to near 51 this afternoon. saturday looks warm again with highs near 50 with clouds increasing by the afternoon. a few sprinkles are possible saturday night and early sunday with quiet and mild days
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i'm more and more, much more than this i did it my way >> the voice. frank sinatra will always be famous for his pop music standards but musicians from every genre are celebrating what would have been his 100th birthday this month. a concert airs sunday on "cbs sunday morning." the party started in sinatra's
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just let a gentleman see just how nice a dame you can be >> frank sinatra was a lot of things to a lot of people, but to most, he was simply the voice. he was the perfect mix of wise guy cool and romantic vulnerability, or as john legend puts it -- >> he had that charisma that everyone was attracted to. the women wanted him and the guys wanted to be him. >> legend is just one of more than a dozen grammy greats set to toast ole blue eyes during an all star 100th birthday bash in las vegas. >> do you have a favorite sinatra song? when i was 17 it was a very good year it was a very good year
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many a time but rarely copied. everyone here knows they have big shoes to fill. come fly with me >> you can't sound just like him. >> no matter how hard you try. >> yeah. even backstage, harry connick jr. was helping me figure out make. >> music like his would never, ever, die. >> he made it look easy? >> take it from somebody who does it, it's unbelievable how easy he made it look. i'm the guy that you came in with >> this is not conic's first birthday celebration for sinatra, he sang for him as his 75th birthday. >> i did great on the first line and then forgot the song. >> you forgot the lyrics? >> i forgot them because i could see him sitting there. as a singer it's not every day that you sing in front of the greatest singer you ever lived.
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now too. >> thanks. thanks a lot. >> that's sinatra's youngest daughter, tina, who had a front row seat to her father's stellar career. >> i remember being very proud at 7. being whoa, i'm his kid. it is a little melancholy. >> years ago she gave harry connick jr. a wrist watch that belonged to her father. >> i'm wearing it tonight, and then it's going back in the safe. i want to wake up in that city that doesn't sleep >> like that gift, sinatra's music is timeless. he set the bar year after year. no wonder there were so many very good years.
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cowan in las vegas. >> wow. >> that looks good. >> 100 years later people still are celebrating your life. >> you can watch that sunday night here on cbs. when we come back, we'll look at the most unforgettable moments of the week. that's next on "cbs this morning."ning." nself. dad: no? culligan man: no. anncr: leave it to the experts. with a culligan whole-house water softening system, you get better water, and service you can actually count on.
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better water, and service you can actually count on. dad: hey, culligan man. culligan man: hey! dad: this is great! culligan man: i know. that does it for us. be sure to tune into "cbs cbsn. as we leave you, take a look back at the past week on "cbs this morning." >> this is supposed to be a holiday ban fetquet and turned into a shooting scene. >> they came prepared to do what they did.
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tactical type clothing. >> the suspects are dead now. they were killed in a rampage. >> one guy down. one guy in the back of a car. >> the street where the suspects lived on is evacuated. it was a concern initially there may be explosives in the area. >> president obama has been juggling the risk to global stability from climate change and the fight against isis. >> we all have a common enemy and that isil. >> to step up efforts on the ground. >> if convicted, the minimum sentence is life without role. >> the initial charge, fmeds first-degree murder. >> some of these dumb ass politicians said, oh, no, oh, no. >> he has gone too far and he is showing a lack of seriousness. >> mark zuckerberg with a pledge to give away 99% of his wealth which is why his daughter's
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>> tiger woods is talking about his struggle to return to professional golf. >> where is the light at the end of the tunnel? i don't know. take me to the river >> a pattern now of mass shootings in this country that has no parallel anywhere else in the world. >> bullet just a rain of bullets everywhere. >> pray for us. >> surely, there can be something to stop people from getting an ak-47. >> what we are trying to do is make sure that what our response is actually addresses the problems without infringing upon the rights of law abiding citizens. >> 27-year-old mother of a 6-month-old is firing off as many rounds like she is. >> i think the entire event doesn't make a whole lot of sense. >> life is precious. >> why do you want to be president? you've been in the white house. >> there it is. right. well, i'm not doing it to move back in, although it's a wonderful place. >> why are you doing this? >> i really love this country. i like to be in america >> the first time i had ever
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who had a sense of dignity. >> i want to know how maurice milklewhite became the sir beb nair michael caine. >> i should get the tea and run to the leading lady. >> i thought that women should look good and strong. >> somebody said they wanted to focus on brains, not bo on obs but the truth of the matter is you can have both. can you have both. >> we don't rush to print, somebody else is going to find these letters and butcher the story. >> a great reporter dedicates his life to his work. >> you can vote for a republican other than yourself, would would you be? >> i'd vote for myself again! >> cbs has -- tape six! that's probably my best.
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>> that's when it comes everyone, it's now 8:55... the national spotlight is shining bright on the iowa
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their chance to beat michigan state and win the big ten championship game. this is the first trip for kirk ferentz's team to the league championship game. the coach says they won't have any big changes. they're going to act this like any other road game. kcci sports director andy garman, tony seeman and our ryan smith are in indianapolis. they'll be getting you ready for the hawkeyes and the big ten championship game with a live pre-game special tonight at 8:00. they'll also have live reports on the news at 5, 6 and 10. the game itself.. against saturday night on fox.
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good morning. it's a frosty start to this friday with temps below freezing. widespread sunshine will quickly warm temps to near 51 this afternoon. saturday looks warm again with highs near 50 with clouds few sprinkles are possible saturday night and early sunday with quiet and mild days
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stream, download, and play on multiple devices at once, with centurylink internet. get up to 40 megs for $20 a month for 1 year when bundled with qualifying home phone plan. just call... ...right now. wanna see this as an action movie? [ deep voice ] get ready. 40 megs is only $20 a month. [ normal voice ] or drama? [ melodramatic voice ] get up to 40 megs for $20 a month. [ normal voice ] only from centurylink. speed may not be available in your area. call now. >> it's "live with kelly & michael." today, from "the leftovers," actor justin theroux.
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