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tv   Up to the Minute  Me-TV  December 28, 2015 2:00am-4:00am CST

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denial against an allegation he used human growth hormone. >> complete and total joke. it's defamation. it really ticks me off. >> this is the "cbs overnight news." >> welcome to the overnight news. i'm jeff glor. it was the deadliest tornado in the dallas area in 88 years. an ef-4 with winds topping 160 miles an hour plowed through garland, texas, flattening hundreds of homes. in north texas at least 11 were killed, part of a system of severe weather this weekend from the gulf of mexico to the great lakes. the death toll from five days of storms stands at least at 41. including 11 people swept away by floods in illinois and missouri. we begin with david begnaud in rowlett, texas. >> there is no mistaking a tornado disaster zone. along this residential street where we are every home is damaged. some severely. these vehicles here look like they crashed into each other.
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blown out, a piece of plywood came flying through the windshield, impaled in the passenger seat. eyewitnesses who lived through this tornado say it blew through around 7:00 p.m. and lasted less >> there it is, i see it. >> reporter: even by texas standards it was a monstrosity. >> oh, i see it, it's crossing the highway right there. big, big tornado. >> reporter: at least eight tornados exploded through dallas county, the hardest-hit areas are garland and rowlett. >> oh! there's stuff flying in the air! >> reporter: damage has been reported along a 40-mile stretch of homes and businesses. in the darkness last night the destruction was hard to see. but by this morning the path of the tornados was clear. entire communities are flattened. many of the houses still standing are without roofs. vehicles are flipped or buried under debris. in garland the storms killed eight and destroyed 600
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in rowlett, the tornados injured 23 people and level the 40 homes. high winds tossed trailers at this mobile home park and damaged this strip mall. >> we pray and support those who have lost a family member. >> reporter: texas governor greg abbott says more storms today are complicating recovery efforts. >> i want you to know that texas is doing everything we can to help you piece your lives back together, to help you better deal with the challenges that you are facing right now. >> reporter: this afternoon, mike girard brought his wife nancy back to their home for the first time since they lived through the tornado last night. >> we were on our patio in the back of the house. >> what was that? >> that was the ceiling falling in. we went from being just inconvenienced to -- to
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been dead. and in an instant, it hit. and less than 60 seconds, it seemed like eternity, it was gone. >> nancy, are you okay? >> no. my boys grew up in this house. everything's gone. >> i'm sorry, baby. >> everything's gone. >> we just -- we -- we don't know what to do. we went from happy to homeless in a minute. but we'll -- we'll rebuild or we'll do what we have to do. >> reporter: mike says when the tornado finally moved out of the area he walked outside to see what was left. and he saw his neighbor, who lives here on the second story of her home. the roof was gone. and there she was waving for help. jeff, she was stranded but she wasn't hurt. >> david begnaud in rowlett, texas. before this week, 2015 was shaping up to be a record low
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but since wednesday, they have claimed at least 28 lives, nearly tripling the number this year. survivors are telling remarkable stories tonight. here is dan hagerty of our cbs dallas station ktvt. >> it's unbelievable anybody could come out of there alive. >> reporter: linda helen's family survived. they had two minutes to get into a closet when the tornado hit. >> the front of the house is gone. the only thing left was the closet they were hiding in. and the kitchen. >> reporter: the twister ripped off the roof of neighbor david dennison's house. >> me and my roommate were holding each other. i was just praying, whatever. you just -- it's crazy. it's -- it's an experience i wouldn't wish on anybody. >> heartbreaking. you know, lose everything you ever owned. >> reporter: michael norris was at a christmas party. his house is now gone. >> i -- it flipped over and hit my car, hit the next door neighbor's.
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again. >> sounded like a train. >> reporter: frank montgomery and his family took cover under a stairwell. >> sounded like so many trains were coming. it was frightening for all of us. >> reporter: several homes were destroyed in the glen heights community outside dallas. residents broke down to tears when they saw what's left. >> it's just sad. it's hard to see all these people's livelihoods gone. cars destroyed, flipped over in front of houses. it's just hard to see. >> reporter: here in garland more than 600 homes were damaged. eight people lost their lives. and jeff, many others returning to scenes like this, total losses with nothing left to return home to. >> dan hagerty, thank you. more dangerous weather tonight. blizzard conditions in parts of texas, oklahoma, and new mexico. let's bring in david payne, chief meteorologist at our oklahoma city affiliate kwtv. david, what's happening there? >> well, it's been a wild day so we've had a lot of ice, a lot of sleet in oklahoma.
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oklahoma. just a big mess around here. i-40 westbound west of oklahoma city has been shut down several times today, to just simply too much ice and sleet. we are not through, more on the way. jeff, back to you. >> david payne, thank you very much. farther west in roswell, new mexico, here's cheyenne cope of our albuquerque affiliate krqe. >> i'm standing in two and a half feet of snow, it's up to my knees and causing dangerous road conditions. several roads have been shut down due to dangerous conditions across the area. police are asking people to play it safe and stay off the roads saying they've never seen snowdrifts like this before. the snow started falling yesterday and hasn't stopped. a blizzard warning is in effect across the east central plains. yesterday people here in roswell scrambled to get last-minute essential supplies, clearing store shelves of snow shovels and other goods to tide them over through the storm.
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cope, cbs news. almost sixty million americans are affected by mental illness. together we can help them with three simple words. my name is chris noth and i will listen. from maine to maui, thousands of high school students across the country are getting in on the action by volunteering in their communities. chris young: action teams of high school students are joining volunteers of america and major league baseball players to help train and inspire the next generation of volunteers.
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so you, too, can get in on the action.
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if you were a hippie in the '60s, you need to know. it's the dawning of the age of aquarius. yeah, and something else that's cool. what? osteoporosis is preventable. all: osteo's preventable? right on! if you dig your bones, protect them. all: cbs cares! more now on the forecast from chief meteorologist eric fisher of our cbs boston station wbz. even with all of this activity the storms aren't done yet. >> certainly not. very powerful winter storm here. jeff all sorts of weather hazards from blizzard conditions eastern new mexico and west texas, flooding in between, a tornado watch is in effect to the east, and more flash flood watches farther east than that. so everything in a very sloppy
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we've already seen some destructive storms with this. we'll be tracking it north and eastward through tonight. by tomorrow evening all the wintry mess across the upper midwest including chicago, davenport, des moines, heavy rain on the eastern end of the storm. tuesday by the morning we've got our first winter storm in the northeast. many folks seeing snow and ice for the first time this season. it took quite a while. finally it all winds down on tuesday evening. in terms of the snow, a swath of very significant snow totals here. around kansas reaching up toward the twin cities and into parts of wisconsin into that snow on the northern end coming across new england. the ski areas finally getting some of their first snow of the season. the other thing to note, heavy, heavy rainfall in areas that have already seen their wettest year on record. >> eric fisher, thank you. the iraqi army tonight is claiming they are close to a major victory over isis. after weeks of fighting in the western city of ramadi.
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on the streets of ramadi today as iraqi soldiers pushed to retake the city after months of isis control. an iraqi military source says troops control most of the city though pockets of resistance remain. united states defense department could not confirm those reports. troops inched forward street by street securing a path to its intended targets. a government compound held by isis fighters. iraq's counterterrorism soldiers moved cautiously, tearing out buildings once controlled by isis fighters, fearing that some of the structures had been rigged with explosives. the offensive, which began five days ago, has been slow and tough going. iraqi forces were hampered by sniper fire and were forced to navigate roads littered with ieds. recapturing ramadi will not only be a psychological leap for the iraqi military, which suffered a humiliating defeat and were seen fleeing the city when isis took control of it in may this year.
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stepping stone for the iraqi military's plan to take back mosul, the largest city in iraq controlled by isis. tonight a major wildfire in southern california is 70% contained. it destroyed more than 1,200 acres this weekend in ventura county north of los angeles. here's maria villarreal. >> reporter: this is the nightmare southern california residents fear most after four years of drought conditions. a wall of flames overtaking a major highway within inches of homes and evacuees like jane johnson, caught in the middle. >> go, go go! we've got to get out of here! >> reporter: it's been more than 40 years since the coastal community of solimar beach last burned. as flames exploded this family had minutes to evacuate. >> we're probably going to head to santa barbara. i'm 29 years old. i don't think there's ever been a fire here. >> reporter: once residents
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head on. this video from the ventura county fire department shows a bulldozer scraping brush near the flames. santa monica deputy fire chief tom clemo -- >> despite the challenges of high winds, steep terrain, significant brush, we were able to bring a stop to all forward progress of the fire and did not lose any structures. >> reporter: it may be another day or two before the fire is fully contained. all that remains now are hot that a major disaster was avoided. maria villarreal, cbs news, los angeles. tensions remain high in chicago after a police officer shot and killed two people this weekend. one of them it appears accidentally. here's anna warner. >> reporter: chicago police admit an officer mistakenly shot and killed a 55-year-old mother of five, betty jones. jones was reportedly shot in the neck as she waited for police to respond to a domestic
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jacqueline walker is her long-time childhood friend. >> she was shot down. a beautiful woman. a beautiful woman. it hurts my heart. to see that. >> reporter: jones was one of two people killed in the police shooting early saturday morning inside this chicago home. after police responded to a call at 4:28 a.m. >> upon their arrival they were confronted by a combative individual. resulting in an officer firing shots. >> reporter: that allegedly combative individual was 19-year-old quintonio lagreer. police shot him multiple times. photos shows a bloodstained floor and bullet in the wall. wearing a sweatshirt critical of chicago mayor rahm emanuel, lagreer's mother spoke to the media. she says her son was a college honors student but was mentally ill. >> i used to watch the news daily. i would grieve for other mothers, other family members. and now today i'm grieving
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>> reporter: the latest incident comes amid protests over a string of deadly police shootings including the death of 17-year-old laquan mcdonald, shot by officer jason van dyke 16 times in october of 2014. >> when is the man going to step up? when is he going to step up? because we can't get no help with the police. >> reporter: the justice department is already investigating whether chicago police used deadly force appropriately. the families of betty jones and quintonio lagreer say for them the question has already been answered. anna warner, cbs news, chicago. off the coast of florida the holiday weekend began with a wild boat chase. julianna goldman has this story. >> reporter: the high-speed chase began early christmas eve when authorities were alerted to a boat theft in ft. myers beach, florida. the men tried to ram into the sheriff's boat and then fled, skimming across the gulf of mexico for nearly 20 hours at speeds of over 70 miles per
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as the boat approached international waters, the coast guard was called in with three aircraft, the small boat crew, and the coast guard cutter "william trump." that was the ship that finally stopped the stolen boat on christmas morning. the suspects had led authorities for more than 345 miles and ended up about 65 miles off the northwest tip of cuba and about 125 miles east of cancun, mexico. >> these folks that were taking part in the illicit activity, they weren't going to quit and neither were we. >> reporter: today the coast guard returned the three suspects to shore in handcuffs. julianna goldman, cbs news, washington. coming up, peyton manning slams a report accusing him of using human growth hormone. a lucky survivor from the australia wildfires can't tell his story but we will.s,
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today peyton manning fiercely rejected an allegation that he used human growth hormone while recovering from a career-threatening neck injury four years ago. that claim was made in a documentary by the al jazeera network. >> it's completely fabricated. complete trash, garbage. it's more adjectives i'd like to be able to use. really makes me sick. >> reporter: peyton manning won the mvp award a record five
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quarterbacks. the 39-year-old has built his career on hard work. >> for my 18 years of playing in the nfl, there are no shortcuts. >> reporter: in a new documentary on sports doping by the al jazeera network, hidden cameras capture a man named charles sly claiming the mannings were receiving banned human growth hormones in 2011. >> all the time we're going to be sending ashley manning drugs. like a growth hormone. all time, everywhere. florida. it would never be under peyton's name, it would be under her name. >> reporter: sly claimed the mannings received the drugs from called the allegations simply not true and said mr. sly was never an employee of the guyer institute and his brief three-month internship occurred
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was not even being treated. the documentary alleges several other professional athletes, including baseball players ryan zimmerman and ryan howard, took illegal performance-enhancing drugs too. their attorney says he plans to take legal action against al jazeera. surprisingly at the end of the documentary, al jazeera says sly backed off his claims. >> charlie sly said his statements about athletes were false and incorrect. >> reporter: the documentary offers no further explanation. manning questioned why the network decided to release the story, knowing one of their main sources changed his. >> i've done it the long way, i've done it the hard way. to insinuate anything otherwise is a complete and total joke, it's defamation, it really ticks me off. >> today the colts and broncos came out with strong statements defending manning. al jazeera america says despite all the denials the network will air the documentary tonight.
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breaks a speed record. china's one-child policy is officially coming to an end. starting in the new year couples will be allowed to have up to two children. according to a law ratififd today. china's one-child policy had been in place since 1979 as a way to control the population. a heart-warming scene amid the devastation of australia's wildfires. a koala was saved from the ashes. firefighters found him, he wasn't moving but he has since been nursed back to health and been given the nickname constable k. fair. the box office force is
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force awakens," the fastest movie ever to hit $1 billion in global sales beating the previous record held by "jurassic world." it took "the force awakens" just 12 days to reach that milestone. still ahead, their plans for vacation in a winter wonderland went downhill fast. woman: what does it feel like when a woman is having a heart attack? chest pain, like there's a ton of weight on your chest. severe shortness of breath. unexplained nausea. cold sweats. there's an unusual tiredness and fatigue. there's unfamiliar dizziness or light-headedness. unusual pain in your back, neck, jaw, one or both arms, even your upper stomach, are signs you're having a heart attack. don't make excuses. make the call to 9-1-1 immediately. learn more at womenshealth.gov/heartattack.
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i was discharged from the army, and i've been working with the wounded warrior project since 2007. warriors, you don't have to be severely wounded to be with the wounded warrior project. we do have a lot of guys that have post-traumatic stress disorder. being able to share your story, i guess it kind of helps you wrap your mind around what did happen over there. my name is norbie, and yes, i do suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder,
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more unusual weather. now in the northeast where those dreaming of a white christmas had to settle for shades of gray and brown. >> reporter: at camelback resort in pennsylvania the chair lift has been temporarily rebranded the sky ride. riders tim and grace drummond from dallas planned this trip six months ago. did you buy skis, buy the gear, buy everything to come out here? >> we packed it all. it's sitting in the hotel room
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>> reporter: in a typical winter camelback makes 15% of its winter revenue the week between christmas and new year's. drew jackson is head of marketing. >> we have 100% snow-making coverage. we just need it to be cold. we don't need a whole lot of natural snow falling from the sky, just cold weather and we can be in business big-time. >> reporter: unseasonably warm weather along the east coast is inspiring new holiday traditions. in vermont, baseball players were the only ones on mounds christmas eve. and santa did get on skis. however, it was on the potomac river outside washington, d.c. when guests can't hit the slopes they can go to the beach. camelback built a water park to better position itself than most winter resorts with weather-proof activities. they're also zip lining and getting on a roller coaster. however grace drummond would rather have snow. >> how much better would it be with snow? >> probably a lot better.
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resorts in the northeast remain closed due to lack of snow. by contrast, deep snow out west has been a boom for resorts. it was a white christmas at southern california's big bear resort after receiving 6 inches of new snow in the past 72 hours. now if it would only push east. that is the "overnight news" for this monday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us later for the morning news and "cbs this morning."
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york city, i'm jeff glor. this is the "cbs overnight news." >> welcome to the overnight news, i'm jeff glor. they are still digging through the devastation in garland, texas, where an ef-4 tornado flattened hundreds of homes. at least 11 were killed in north texas and many more hurt. part of a massive storm system that produced heavy snow in the southwest and floods in the midwest as well. david begnaud reports.
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there is no mistaking a tornado disaster zone. along this residential street where we are every home is damaged. some severely. these vehicles look like they crashed into each other. this one right here, the windows blown out, a piece of plywood came flying through the wind shield, impaled in the passenger seat. eyewitnesses who lived through this tornado say it blew through here around 7:00 p.m. and lasted less than 45 seconds. >> there it is, i see it. >> reporter: even by texas standards it was a monstrosity. >> oh, i see it, it's crossing the highway right there. business, big tornado. >> reporter: at least eight tornados exploded through dallas county, the hardest-hit areas are garland and rowlett. >> oh! there's stuff flying in the air! >> reporter: damage has been reported along a 40-mile stretch of homes and businesses. in the darkness last night the destruction was hard to see. but by this morning the path of the tornados was clear. entire communities are
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many of the houses still standing are without roofs. vehicles are flipped or buried under debris. in garland the storms killed eight and destroyed 600 structures in a two-mile area. in rowlett, the tornados injured 23 people and leveled 40 homes. high winds tossed trailers at this mobile home park and damaged this strip mall. >> we pray and support those who have lost a family member. >> reporter: texas governor greg abbott says more storms today are complicating recovery efforts. >> i want you to know that texas is doing everything we can to help you piece your lives back together, to help you better deal with the challenges that you are facing right now. >> reporter: this afternoon, mike girard brought his wife nancy back to their home for the first time since they lived through the tornado last night. >> we were on our patio in the back of the house. >> what was that?
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in. we went from being just inconvenienced to -- to realizing that we could have been dead. and in an instant, it hit. and less than 60 seconds, it seemed like eternity, it was gone. >> nancy, are you okay? >> no. my boys grew up in this house. everything's gone. >> reporter: mike says when the tornado finally moved out of the area he walked outside to see what was left. and he saw his neighbor, who lives here on the second story of her home. the roof was gone. and there she was waving for help. jeff, she was stranded but she wasn't hurt. >> david begnaud in rowlett, texas. long-time "face the nation" host bob schaffer stepped down replaced by scott dickerson. "the late show" became "the late
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they sat down to compare notes for "face the nation." >> i'm looking for a theory of this election. do you have one? >> anything goes, i guess. all bets are off. there's a populism to trump that i find very appealing. and it's only this. is that the party elders would like him to go away but the people have decided that he's not going to. >> so you like that? >> i may disagree with anything that he's saying and think his proposals are a little -- more than a little shocking. but there is something really hopeful about the fact that 36% of the likely voters want him, so the people in the machine don't get to say otherwise. that's the one saving grace i think of his candidacy. >> you have to look at this mess of an election and make something of it, make a joke of it, come to terms with -- >> i always feel bad. i feel bad for the candidates now. you know, because what did we start off with, something like 22 at one point?
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power games." how do we talk about them? most of them we know are going to fall by the wayside. it's not literally with an arrow in their chest but certainly massive campaign debt. god knows what's going to happen to george pataki. swept into the turbines of this election. tossed over a railing to a pit full of piranhas. something bad is going to happen to all the lower-tier candidates. i started feeling bad about how excited i was about each of them dropping out. >> what's your view about the facts? >> facts? >> facts and their salience in the conversation? >> i'm a big fan of facts. i'm not sure they have any bearing on what a person's popularity is. donald trump is like -- i'm not the first person to say this but i completely agree that he's my old character with $10 billion. you know, he doesn't -- he's completely playing on an emotional level. and so beautifully. it's one of the reasons why i just can't do that old character anymore, he's doing it better than i ever could. he's willing to drink his own
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distribute it because he's got all the cash. he's this very interesting -- like frankenstein of the idea that facts don't matter, only money does. because if money is speech, he's got a $10 billion mouth. and doesn't have to spend any of it because everyone will point a camera at him. >> before you started the show you said you were hoping he'd stay in the race long enough -- >> i really didn't think he'd do this well. i didn't know anything about politics, spoiler, i pretended to know about it. i know something about human behavior. i'm really just an actor and a writer. >> you also have a big heart and you want good stuff to come out of the process. >> well, yeah. no joke for donald trump or anything -- no joke for any individual candidate means more to me than what i think is best for the country. i've tried to be very respectful to -- i try to be respectful to donald trump. the first thing i did was apologize to him.
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at ted cruz or boo him. i wanted kasich to have a good time. i hope all the candidates will come on. >> it sounded like there was a little bit of trump respect in you for his ability to channel the populist. >> well, i mean, i have respect for trump for knowing who the real audience is. that if you really want to win, you've got to get the people. the people get to make the call. especially now. because the parties are so beholden to big money. that the party apparatus itself has been dismantled in favor of just cash. and so there aren't, you know, wise old people who get to make the call. because that's been farmed out to super pacs. which don't seem to be that powerful themselves, really. but in giving the power over to the super pacs, they've actually completely defanged the parties themselves.
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trump. that's a real blowback to the idea that we're going to take power away from the party and just give it to cash. what i do respect is that he knows that it is an emotional appeal. and it might be emotional appeals that i can't respect. but he knows that you have to appeal to the voter. and that's why i may be wrong. i made a big deal about, there's no way he's going to win. >> you weren't the only one. >> yeah. again, i don't know anything about politics. >> important message for residents age 50 to 85. write down this number now. right now, people are receiving this free information kit for guaranteed acceptance life insurance with a rate lock through the colonial penn program. if you are on a fixed income, learn about affordable
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for your free information kit. i did everything i could to make her party perfect. almost everything. you know, 1 i n 10 houses could get hit by an expensive septic disaster. but for only $7 a month, rid-x helps break down waste. avoid a septic disaster with rid-x. the entire beatles catalog is now available through streaming services. and fans of the fab four can also go online to get a tour of the band's favorite recording studio abbey road. >> reporter: it has become a mecca for music fans the world over where they come to follow in the footsteps of the beatles
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studio where the beatles made their mark on history. i want to hold your hand >> reporter: but in 1969, it was one album in particular that put abbey road on the map and journalist and author andrew mueller says things might have been very different had the band not been nearing the end of their long and winding road. >> this album was going to be called "everest." their idea was they would do this publishing tour of the great mountain. and then somebody flying them all the way from the pole to do a photo. a bit of a schlep, why not go outside, take the picture on the crosswalk, call it "abbey road," and be done with it? i really hope it's true this great famous image and title exists because the beatles couldn't be bothered to get on a plane at that point. >> reporter: so from the myth to the mythology. over the years maybe millions of fans have made the pilgrimage to this crosswalk.
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roll. but this is where their journey came to an end. until now. >> welcome to abbey road. >> reporter: thanks to a new collaboration with google, abbey road studios has opened its doors for the very first time. >> where only legends have been able to step inside -- >> reporter: a virtual mystery tour offering 360-degree views, games and gadgets, an interactive abbey road experience. the real abbey road isn't open to the public or the press, for that matter. it's a fully operational recording studio. we came early. no self-respecting rock star would be up at this hour. the sound of a room makes the room special -- >> reporter: not much has changed, chief sound engineer stiles told us if it was good enough for the beatles -- >> you start playing around with the floor or walls you're going to change the sound at the end of the day, and we don't want to change the sound, we love the
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well she was just 17 you know what i mean >> reporter: meant to sound live, as if you were standing there. when the beatles brought 190 songs to the world, recorded right here. and if a band is only as good as its songs, then the band's records are only as good as the equipment used to record them. >> how many microphones have you got? >> oh, thousands. >> these things aren't just for show. >> no, absolutely not, no. they're used pretty much every day. >> reporter: pink floyd's epic. dark side of the moon >> reporter: sam smith. you'd say i'm sorry believe me i love you >> reporter: and amy winehouse's last recording session with tony
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she died. >> this hasn't changed. >> yeah, this room -- >> reporter: it's the studio's rich history that lends it such soul. like the steinway piano that's been in use for more than 60 years. maybe one little tinkle couldn't hurt. >> this features quite heavily on -- penny lane is in my ears and in my eyes >> it's also the piano used on -- lady madonna children at your feet wonder how you manage to make ends meet >> you can explore the studio and discover what goes on -- >> reporter: while the virtual tour might not be the same it opens doors to a world most have never seen. and it may help keep some of the
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>> maybe they're thinking that the people can sit at home in front of their computers or their phones and click their way through our building, they won't come here and draw things all over our fence. >> it has been 20 years since pixar made the revolutionary "toy story." john blackstone was invited to pixar's campus to meet the people who make the movie magic. >> i am buzz lightyear. i come in peace. >> reporter: when buzz, woody, and the gang from "toy story" were first brought to life 20 years ago, they seemed more realistic than anything previously created in an animated movie. >> please be careful. you don't want to be in the way when my laser goes off. >> reporter: it was the result of more than four years of work at pixar animation studios. >> we were still kind of doing the same thing -- >> reporter: pete docter was one of the animators. >> you come to work and somebody would have figured something else out that you'd never seen before. >> to infinity and beyond!
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animators went beyond what had been done before by creating on computers. by getting closer to reality more challenging than they expected. >> almost every scene we would go, that's going to be really hard. but part of the fun of working here was this was a new toy. i was a kid who enjoyed figuring out how things work. >> reporter: pixar was owned by somebody else who liked to figure things out, steve jobs. >> how do you think of yourself? >> reporter: when "toy story" was released charlie rose talked to jobs about his role as a moviemaker. >> the things i've done in my life, the things we do at pixar, these are team sports. >> reporter: 1986, jobs bought pixar for $5 million from filmmaker george lucas. gail sus man was a technical director on "toy story" and has worked on every sequel. >> there's no way "toy story" would have been made without steve. he had the belief, the passion, the gumption to fight for us to get us the resources we needed to make the movie.
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arsenal of films about talking fish -- >> i'm coming, nemo! >> reporter: robots -- >> wall-e! >> reporter: and a rat who likes to cook -- has received massive critical acclaim and collected 12 academy awards. but when pixar had no movie ready for release in 2014, some in the industry wondered whether the studio had lost its edge. >> pizza sounds delicious. >> reporter: then came the release this year of "inside out." >> what the heck is that? >> who puts broccoli on pizza? >> that's it, i'm done. >> congratulations, san francisco, you've ruined pizza! >> reporter: so far the movie about the inner workings of an 11-year-old girl's mind has earned over $800 million. in spite of the animation technology pixar has pioneered, its films still start the old-fashioned way. >> yeah, it still starts with a
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although we do draw digitally. >> reporter: from these drawings and the imagination of all those working on a movie the a pixar, the story takes shape. >> and i can turn like all around, like what's going on? huh? what? >> do you know -- >> reporter: the good dinosaur marks the first time pixar is releasing two movies in one year. originally scheduled to be in theaters two years ago the movie was delayed by production problems. >> the northwest was a huge inspiration -- >> reporter: 2013, peter sohn replaced the first director. >> "the good dinosaur" has had painful moments over many years now. >> a lot of the pixar films go through these challenges of trying to make the story right. >> reporter: "the good dinosaur" is his debut as a director. in 15 years at pixar he has filled many other jobs, from animation to voice-over work. >> my name is russell. >> reporter: in "up" he was the inspiration for the wilderness
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>> are you in need of any assistance today, sir? >> when you're in a story room with these artists everyone is going to be drawing you. the guys would draw me like a giant thumb with a hat. >> reporter: more than 90 animators worked on "the good dinosaur." >> we start with posing -- >> reporter: three seconds of animation takes about a week to complete. >> you have to be patient, you have to have long vision. it's all about the long game. >> we're flying! >> reporter: in the 20 years since "toy story," pixar has been playing that long game. >> to infinity and beyond! >> reporter: and winning. john blackstone, emeryville, california. mucinex fast max. it's the same difference. these are multi-symptom. well so are these. this one is max strength and fights mucus. that one doesn't. uh...think fast! you dropped something. oh...i'll put it back on the shelf... new from mucinex fast max.
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a detective from pittsburgh didn't have a clue what was missing -- until he found it. steve hartman found his story "on the road." >> reporter: generally speaking, if you're a kid growing up in pittsburgh like jesse and josh lyle the last place you ever want to be is in a courtroom across the table from detective jack mook, a by the book, no nonsense, chew them up, spit them out 22-year veteran of the force. outside of work he's a committed bachelor, a man's man, who would never so much as let a vidalia see his soft side. for fun he hits people. and volunteers at the steel city boxing gym teaching the sport to
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gym are street kids. many of them have been born into poverty. >> reporter: kids like jesse and his older brother josh. long before their day in court jack had been working with them. he really liked these kids and knew the feeling was mutual. when they just stopped showing up at the gym one day, jack went out and found them. >> he was asking me about it. and then -- i just cried. >> reporter: what jack didn't know, what no one knew till that moment, was just how bad these kids had it. they were in a foster home with foster parents who jack says were extremely abusive and neglectful. >> they have had it as worse as any other kid that's ever lived in the city of pittsburgh. living conditions-wise. and that just -- i had enough of it. >> reporter: jack mook took matters into his own hands. cashed in some favors and got
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eat? >> reporter: his. for jack, it's been quite an adjustment. >> i'm in here trying to learn my culinary skills, brother. >> i get the sense you're really loving this. >> yeah, yes. it's awesome. it's the best thing i ever did in my life. >> reporter: at least it was the best thing. until the day he went to court and did one better. adopted the boys. and made them mooks. >> you're a mook, right? you happy? >> reporter: after this story first aired in 2014, we got a lot of e-mail. a surprising amount from women who wanted to meet this guy. did you e-mail us? are you one of those? >> no. no. >> reporter: mary says she saw the story but she met him at a bar. >> did you go to the bar because you knew he'd be there? >> yes. >> ah! >> ah-ha, yes. >> i am answering honestly. >> now we see. >> reporter: they were married last summer. she came with three of her own so now jack and the boys are part of a brady bunch.
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ever imagined just a few years ago. jack especially. >> i thought being single was fun. because you don't have no responsibilities. but when you're single, you don't realize what you're missing. i'm glad i let her break through that barrier. and take me away from that life. >> reporter: sounds like it wasn't just the boys who were rescued. steve hartman "on the road" in pittsburgh. when the engines failed on the plane i was flying,
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but when my father sank into depression, i didn't know how to help him. when he ultimately shot himself, he left our family devastated. don't let this happen to you. if you or a loved one is suicidal, call the national suicide prevention lifeline. no matter how hopeless or helpless you feel, with the right help, you can get well. (franklin d. roosevelt) the inherent right to work is one of the elemental privileges of a free people. endowed, as our nation is, with abundant physical resources... ...and inspired as it should be to make those resources and opportunities available for the enjoyment of all... ...we approach reemployment with real hope of finding a better answer than we have now. narrator: donate to goodwill where your donations help fund
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a singing santa from new york has been cast in a real-life medical drama of his own. this one has a happy ending. from the ground floor apartment to the party up above here's love love love >> reporter: at the john angeman theater in motor port, new york, actor and singer kevin mcguire kris kringle in the musical adaptation of "miracle on 34th street" where his sweet baritone and rosy checks are on full
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like christmas >> reporter: but that ruddy complexion was an outward sign of a serious problem inside his body, one he couldn't put a name to. >> my skin was very red, very purple. and i started getting joint pain, a lot of joint pain. >> and trouble singing? >> oh, yeah, definitely. >> you worried about your career? >> of course. your vocal cords are in distress, you don't know why. it's terrifying. >> reporter: in may 2012, a blood test showed sky-high iron levels and a doctor finally figured out the cause. >> he said, kevin, you have hemochromatosis. >> when he explained it? in simple terms, what did he say was the problem? >> he said you're rusting from the inside out. >> reporter: the disorder is caused by a genetic defect that allows too much iron to be absorbed and gradually overload tissues and organs. in addition to joint pain and fatigue symptoms can include abdominal discomfort and loss of libido. more than 1 million americans have the gene mutation for the
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diagnosed. left untreated buildup can cause organ damage and even death. mcguire began weekly blood draws that slowly removed the excess iron. it's a simple yet effective remedy that helps restore iron levels to a normal range. >> i've never felt better in my life. i dreamed a dream >> reporter: especially new that his vocal pipes are no longer rusting. as the iron came out of your body, especially out of your vocal cords, what happened to you as an actor, as a performer? >> i can do pretty much just about anything. for a long time. from the land to >> reporter: cbs news, north fork, new york. >> that is the "overnight news" for this monday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs news this morning."
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york city, i'm jeff glor. oh, it's massive! >> a devastating at any hits texas. the latest impact of a winter storm warning system. at least 11 kill ded outside dallas. prompting a state of emergency. the intens fight to take the city of ramadi back from isis. in chicago new calls for accountability after police kill
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and peyton manning's furious denial against an allegation he used human growth hormone. >> complete and total joke. it's defamation. it really ticks me off. >> this is the "cbs overnight news." >> welcome to the overnight news. i'm jeff glor. it was the deadliest tornado in the dallas area in 88 years. an ef-4 with winds topping 160 miles an hour plowed through garland, texas, flattening hundreds of homes. in north texas at least 11 were killed, part of a system of severe weather this weekend from the gulf of mexico to the great lakes. the death toll from five days of storms stands at least at 41. including 11 people swept away by floods in illinois and missouri. we begin with david begnaud in rou let, texas. >> there is no mistaking a tornado disaster zone. along this residential street where we are every home is damaged. some severely. these vehicles here look like
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this one right here, the windows blown out, a piece of plywood came flying through the wind shield, impaled in the passenger seat. eyewitnesses who lived through this tornado say it blew through around 7:00 p.m. and lasted less than 45 seconds. >> there it is, i see it. >> reporter: even by texas standards it was a monstrosity. >> oh, i see it, it's crossing the highway right there. business, big tornado. >> reporter: at least eight tornados exploded through dallas county, the hardest-hit areas are gar lond and roulet. >> oh! >> reporter: damage has been reported along a 40-mile stretch of homes and businesses. in the darkness last night the destruction was hard to see. but by this morning the path of the tornados was clear. entire communities are flattened. many of the houses still standing are without roofs. vehicles are flipped or buried under debris. in garland the storms killed eight and destroyed 600
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in roulet the tornados injured 23 people and leveled 40 homes. high winds tossed trailers at this mobile home park and damaged this strip mall. >> we pray and support those who have lost a family member. >> reporter: texas governor greg abbott says more storms today are complicating recovery efforts. >> i want you to know that texas is doing everything we can to help you piece your lives back together, to help you better deal with the challenges that you are facing right now. >> reporter: this afternoon, mike girard brought his wife nancy back to their home for the first time since they lived through the tornado last night. >> we were on our patio in the back of the house. what was that? >> that was the ceiling falling in. >> we went from being just
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realizing that we could have been dead. and in an instant, it hit. and less than 60 seconds, it seemed like eternity, it was gone. >> nancy, are you okay? >> no. >> i'm sorry, baby. >> everything's gone. >> we just -- we -- we don't know what to do. we went from happy to homeless in a minute. but we'll -- we'll rebuild or we'll do what we have to do. >> reporter: mike says when the tornado finally moved out of the area he walked outside to see what was left. and he saw his neighbor, who lives here on the second story of her home. the roof was gone. and there she was waving for help. jeff, she was stranded but she wasn't hurt. >> david begnaud in roulet, texas. before this week, 2015 was
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year for deaths from tornados. but since wednesday, they have claimed at least 28 lives, nearly tripling the number this year. survivors are telling remarkable stories tonight. here is dan hagerty of our cbs dallas station ktvt. >> it's unbelievable anybody could come out of there alive. >> reporter: linda helen's family survived. they had two minutes to get into a closet when the tornado hit. >> the front of the house is gone. the only thing left was the closet they were hiding in. and the kitchen. >> reporter: the twister ripped off the roof of neighbor david dennison's house. >> me and my roommate were holding each other. i was just praying, whatever. you just -- it's crazy. it's -- it's an experience i wouldn't wish on anybody. >> heartbreaking. you know, lose everything you ever owned. >> reporter: michael norris was at a christmas party. his house is now gone.
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my car, hit the next door neighbor's. now i got to start all over again. >> sounded like a train. >> reporter: frank montgomery and his family took cover under a stairwell. >> sounded like so many trains were coming. it was frightening for all of us. >> reporter: several homes were destroyed in the glen heights community outside dallas. residents broke down to tears when they saw what's left. >> it's just sad. it's hard to see all these people's life hi hoods gone. cars destroyed, flipped over in front of houses. it's just hard to see. >> reporter: here in garland more than 600 homes were damaged. eight people lost their lives. and jeff, many others returning to scenes like this, total losses with nothing left to return home to. >> dan hagerty, thank you. more dangerous weather tonight. blizzard conditions in parts of texas, oklahoma, and new mexico. let's bring in david paine, chief meteorologist at our oklahoma city affiliate kwtv. david, what's happening there? >> well, it's been a wild day so far.
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sleet in oklahoma. flooding rains in eastern oklahoma. i-40 westbound west of oklahoma city has been shut down several times today, to just simply too much ice and sleet. we are not through, more on the way. jeff, back to you. >> david paine, thank you very much. farther west in roswell, new mexico, here's cheyenne cope of our albuquerque affiliate. >> i'm standing in two and a half feet of snow, it's up to my knees and causing dangerous road conditions. several roads have been shut down due to dangerous conditions across the area. police are asking people to play it safe and stay off the roads saying they've never seen snowdrifts like this before. the snow started falling yesterday and hasn't stopped. a blizzard warning is in effect across the east central plains. yesterday people here in roswell scrambled to get last-minute essential supplies, clearing store she was of snow shovels and other goods to tide them over through the storm.
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cope, cbs news. [ vocalizing ] [ buzzing ] [ tree crashes ] [ wind howling ]
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more now on the forecast from chief meteorologist eric fisher of our cbs boston station wbz. even with all of this activity the storms aren't done yet. >> certainly not. very powerful winter storm here. jeff all sorts of weather hazards from blizzard conditions eastern new mexico and west texas, flooding in between, a tornado watch is in effect to the east, and more flash flood
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so everything in a very sloppy storm system. we've already seen some destructive storms with this. we'll be tracking it north and eastward through tonight. by tomorrow evening all the upper midwest including chicago, davenport, des moines, heavy rain on the eastern end of the storm. tuesday by the morning we've got our first winter storm in the northeast. many folks seeing snow and ice for the first time this season. it took quite a while. finally it all winds down on tuesday evening. in terms of the snow, a swath of very significant snow totals here. around kansas reaching up toward the twin cities and into parts of wisconsin into that snow on the northern end coming across new england. the ski areas finally getting some of their first snow of the season. the other thing to note, heavy, heavy rainfall in areas that have already seen their withest year on record. >> eric fisher, thank you. the iraqi army tonight is claiming they are close to a major victory over isis. after weeks of fighting in the western city of ramadi. >> reporter: gun battles raged
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as iraqi soldiers pushed to retake the city after months of isis control. an iraqi military source says troops control most of the city though pockets of resistance remain. united states defense department could not confirm those reports. troops inched forward street by street securing a path to its intended targets. a government compound held by isis fighters. iraq's counterterrorism soldiers moved cautiously, tearing out buildings once controlled by isis fighters, fearing that some of the structures had been rigged with explosives. the offensive, which began five days ago, has been slow and tough going. iraqi forces were hampered by sniper fire and were forced to navigate roads littered with ieds. recapturing ramadi will not only be a psychological leap for the iraqi military, which suffered a humiliating defeat and were seen fleeing the city when isis took
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but it will also serve as a stepping stone for the iraqi military's plan to take back mosul, the largest city in iraq controlled by isis. tonight a major wildfire in southern california is 70% contained. it destroyed more than 1,200 acres this weekend in ventura county north of los angeles. here's maria villarreal. >> reporter: this is the nightmare southern california residents fear most after four years of drought conditions. a wall of flames overtaking a major highway within inches of homes and evacuees like jane johnson, caught in the middle. >> go, go go! we've got to get out of here! >> reporter: it's been more than 40 years since the coastal community of solimar beach last burned. as flames exploded this family had minutes to evacuate. >> we're probably going to head to santa barbara. i'm 29 years old. i don't think there's ever been
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>> reporter: once residents escaped crews attacked the fire head on. this video from the ventura county fire department shows a bull dozer scraping brush near the flames. santa monica deputy fire chief tom clemo -- >> despite the challenges of high winds, steep terrain, significant brush, we were able to bring a stop to all forward progress of the fire and did not lose any structures. >> reporter: it may be another day or two before the fire is fully contain the. all that remains now are hot spots, calmer winds, and relief that a major disaster was avoided. maria villarreal, cbs news, long. tensions remain high in chicago after a police officer shot and killed two people this weekend. one of them it appears accidentally. here's anna warner. >> reporter: police admit an officer mistakenly shot and killed a 55-year-old mother of five, betty jones. jones was reportedly shot in the
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respond to a domestic disturbance. jacqueline walker is her long-time childhood friend. >> she was shot down. a beautiful woman. a beautiful woman. it hurts my heart. to see that. >> reporter: jones was one of two people killed in the police shooting early saturday morning inside this chicago home. after police responded to a call at 4:28 a.m. >> upon their arrival they were confronted by a combative individual. resulting in an officer firing shots. >> reporter: that allegedly combative individual was 19-year-old quinntonio lagreer. police shot him multiple times. photos shows a blood stained floor and bullet in the wall. lagreer's mother spoke to the media. she says her son was a college honors student but was mentally ill. >> i used to watch the news daily. i would grieve for other mothers, other family members.
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myself. >> reporter: the latest incident comes amid protests over a string of deadly police shootings including the death of 17-year-old laquan dakmcdonald, shot by officer jason vac dike, 16 times in 2014. >> when is the man going to step up? when is he going to step up? because we can't get no help with the police. >> reporter: the justice department is already investigating whether chicago police used deadly force appropriately. the families of betty jones and quinntonio lagreer say for them the question has already been answered. anna warner, cbs news, chicago. off the coast of florida the holiday weekend began with a wild boat chase. julianna goldman has this story. >> reporter: the high-speed chase began early christmas eve when authorities were alerted to a boat in ft. myers beach, florida. the men tried to ram into the sheriff's boat and then fled skimming across the gulf of
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speeds of over 70 miles per hour. as the boat approached international waters, the coast guard was called in with three aircraft, the small boat crew, and the coast guard cutter "william trump." that was the ship that finally stopped the stolen boat on christmas morning. the suspects had led authorities for more than 345 miles and ended up about 65 miles off the northwest tip of cuba and about 125 miles east of cancun, mexico. >> these folks that were taking part in the illicit activity, they weren't going to quit and neither were we. >> reporter: today the coast guard returned the three suspects to shore in handcuffs. julianna goldman, cbs news, washington. coming up, peyton manning slams, a report accusing him of using human growth hormone. a lucky survivor from the australia wildfires can't tel (cell phone rings)
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today peyton manning fiercely rejected an allegation that he used human growth hormone while recovering from a career-threatening neck injury four years ago. that claim was made in a documentary by the al jazeera network. >> it's completely fabricated. complete trash, garbage. it's more adjectives i'd like to be able to use. really makes me sick. >> reporter: peyton manning won the mvp award a record five
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he comes from a family of nfl quarterbacks. the 39-year-old has built his career on hard work. >> for my 18 years of playing in the nfl, there are no shortcuts. >> reporter: in a new documentary on sports doping by the al jazeera network, hidden cameras capture a man named charles sly claiming the mannings were receiving banned human growth hormones in 2011. >> all the time we're going to be sending ashley manning drugs. like a growth hormone. all time, everywhere. florida. it would never be under peyton's name, it would be under her name. >> reporter: sly claimed the mannings received the drugs from a clinic called the buyer institute in indiana where he says he worked. in a statement to cbs news, dr. dale guyer called the allegations simply not true and said mr. sly was never an employee of the guyer institute and his brief three-month internship occurred in 2013, during which time peyton was not even being treated.
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other professional athletes, including baseball players ryan zimmerman and ryan howard, took illegal performance-enhancing drugs too. their attorney says he plans to take legal action against al jazeera. surprisingly at the end of the documentary, al jazeera says sly backed off his claims. >> charlie sly said his statements about athletes were false and incorrect. >> reporter: the documentary offers no further explanation. manning questioned why the network decided to release the story, knowing one of their main sources changed his. >> i've done it the long way, i've done it the hard way. to insinuate anything otherwise is a complete and total joke, me off. >> today the colts and broncos came out with strong statements defending manning. al jazeera america says despite all the denials the station will air the documentary tonight.
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breaks a speed record. china's one-child policy is officially coming to an end. starting in the new year couples will be allowed to have up to two children. according to a law ratified today. china's one-child policy had been in place since 1979 as a way to control the population. a heart-warming scene amid the devastation of australia's wildfires. a koala was saved from the ashes. firefighters found him, he wasn't moving but he has since been nursed back to health and been given the nickname
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the box office force is strong with "star wars: the force awakens," the fastest movie ever to hit $1 billion in sales. it took just 12 days to reach that milestone. still ahead, their plans for vacation in a winter wonderland
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going faster than a roller coaster a love like yours will surely come my way hey, hey, hey babies aren't fully developed until at least 39 weeks. if your pregnancy is healthy, wait for labor to begin on its own. a healthy baby is worth the wait. o0 c1 travel is part of the american way of life. when we're on vacation, we keep an eye out for anything that looks out of place. [ indistinct conversations ] miss, your bag. when we travel from city to city, we pay attention to our surroundings. [ cheering ] everyone plays a role in keeping our community safe. whether you're traveling for business or pleasure, be aware of your surroundings. if you see something suspicious,
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more unusual weather. now in the northeast where those dreaming of a white christmas had to settle for shades of gray and brown. >> reporter: at camelback resort in pennsylvania the chair lift has been temporarily rebranded the sky ride. riders tim and grace drummond from dallas planned this trip six months ago. did you buy skis, buy the gear, buy everything to come out here? >> we pack the it all.
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>> reporter: in a typical winter camelback makes 15% of its winter revenue the week between christmas and new year's. drew jackson is head of marketing. >> we have 100% snow-making coverage. we just need it to be cold. we don't need a whole lot of natural snow falling from the sky, just cold weather and we can be in business big-time. >> reporter: unseasonably warm weather along the east coast is inspiring new holiday traditions. in vermont, baseball players were the only ones on mounds christmas eve. and santa did get on skis. however, it was on the potomac river outside washington, d.c. when guests can't hit the slopes they can go to the beach. camelback built a water park to better position itself than most winter resorts with weather-proof activities. they're also zip lining and getting on a roller coaster. however grace drummond would rather have snow. >> how much better would it be with snow? >> probably a lot better. >> reporter: according to
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resorts in the northeast remain closed due to lack of snow. by contrast, deep snow out west has been a boom for resorts. it was a white christmas at southern california's big bear resort after receiving 6 inches of new snow in the past 72 hours. now if it would only push east. that is the "overnight news" for this monday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us later for the morning news and "cbs this morning."
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york city, i'm jeff glor. this is the "cbs overnight news." >> welcome to the overnight news, i'm jeff glor. they are still digging through the devastation in garland, texas, where an ef-4 tornado flattened hundreds of homes. at least 11 were killed in north texas and many more hurt. part of a massive storm system that produced heavy snow in the southwest and floods in the midwest as well. david begnaud reports.
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there is no mistaking a tornado disaster zone. along this residential street where we are every home is damaged. some severely. these vehicles look like they crashed into each other. this one right here, the windows blown out, a piece of plywood came flying through the wind shield, impaled in the passenger seat. eyewitnesses who lived think this tornado say it blew through here around 7:00 p.m. and lasted less than 45 seconds. >> there it is, i see it. >> reporter: even by texas standards it was a monstrosity. >> oh, i see it, it's crossing the highway right there. business, big tornado. >> reporter: at least eight tornados exploded through dallas county, the hardest-hit areas are garland and rowlett. >> oh! >> reporter: damage has been reported along a 40-mile stretch of homes and businesses. in the darkness last night the destruction was hard to see. but by this morning the path of the tornados was clear. entire communities are flattened. many of the houses still
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vehicles are flipped or buried under debris. in garland the storms killed eight and destroyed 600 structures in a two-mile area. in rowlett, the tornados injured 23 people and leveled 40 homes. high winds tossed trailers at this mobile home park and damaged this strip mall. >> we pray and support those who have lost a family member. >> reporter: texas governor greg abbott says more storms today are complicating recovery efforts. >> i want you to know that texas is doing everything we can to help you piece your lives back together, to help you better deal with the challenges that you are facing right now. >> reporter: this afternoon, mike girard brought his wife nancy back to their home for the first time since they lived through the tornado last night. >> we were on our patio in the back of the house.
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in. we went from being just inconvenienced to -- to realizing that we could have been dead. and in an instant, it hit. and less than 60 seconds, it seemed like eternity, it was gone. >> nancy, are you okay? >> no. gone. everything's gone. >> reporter: mike says when the tornado finally moved out of the area he walked outside to see what was left. and he saw his neighbor, who lives here on the second story of her home. the roof was gone. and there she was waving for help. jeff, she was stranded but she wasn't hurt. >> david begnaud in rowlett, texas. long-time "face the nation" host john schaefer stepped down and was replaced. dickerson and colbert sat down to compare notes for "face the nation."
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do you have one? >> anything goes, i guess. all bets are off. there's a populism to trump that i find very appealing. and it's only this. is that the party elders would like him to go away but the people have decided that he's not going to. >> so you like that? >> i may disagree with anything that he's saying and think his proposals ss are a little -- more than a little shocking. but there is something really hopeful about the fact that 36% of the likely voters want him, so the people in the machine don't get to say otherwise. that's the one saving grace i think of his candidacy. >> you have to look at this mess of an election and make something of it, make a joke of it, come to terms with -- >> i always feel bad. i feel bad for the candidates now. you know, because what did we
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that's why we did "hungry for power games." how do we talk about them? most of them we know are going to fall by the wayside. it's not literally with an arrow in their chest but certainly massive campaign debt. god knows what's going to happen to george pataki. swept into the turbines of this election. tossed over a railing to a pit full of piranhas. something bad is going to happen to all the lower-tier candidates. i started feeling bad about how excited i was about each of them dropping out. >> what's your view about the facts? >> facts? >> facts and their salience in the conversation? >> i'm a big fan of facts. i'm not sure they have any bearing on what a person's popularity is. donald trump is like -- i'm not the first person to say this but i completely agree that he's my old character with $10 billion. you know, he doesn't -- he's completely playing on an emotional level. and so beautifully. it's one of the reasons why i just can't do that old character anymore, he's doing it better than i ever could.
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kool-aid and manufacture and distribute it because he's got all the cash. he's this very interesting -- like frankenstein of the idea that facts don't matter, only money does. because if money is speech, he's got a $10 billion mouth. and itdoesn't have to spend any of it because everyone will point a camera at him. >> before you started the show you said you were hoping he'd stay in the race long enough -- >> i really didn't think he'd do this well. i didn't know anything about politics, spoiler, i pretended to know about it. i know something about human behavior. i'm really just an actor and a writer. >> you also have a big heart and you want good stuff to come out of the process. >> well, yeah. no joke for donald trump or anything -- no joke for any individual candidate means more to me than what i think is best for the country. i've tried to be very respectful to -- i try to be respectful to donald trump.
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apologize to him. i didn't let my audience get mad at ted cruz or boo him. i wanted kasich to have a good time. i hope all the candidates will come on. >> it sounded like there was a little bit of trump respect in you for his ability to channel the populist. >> well, i mean, i have respect for trump for knowing who the real audience is. that if you really want to win, you've got to get the people. the people get to make the call. especially now. because the parties are so beholden to big money. that the party apparatus itself has been dismantled in favor of just cash. and so there aren't, you know, wise old people who get to make the call. because that's been farmed out to super pacs. which don't seem to be that powerful themselves, really. but in giving the power over to the super pacs, they've actually completely defanged the parties themselves. that's why you can't stop a trump. that's a real blowback to the
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power away from the party and just give it to cash. what i do respect is that he knows that it is an emotional appeal. and it might be emotional appeals that i can't respect. but he knows that you have to appeal to the voter. and that's why i may be wrong. i made a big deal about, there's no way he's going to win. >> you weren't the only one. >> yeah.
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about politics. phil! oh no... (under his breath) hey man! hey peter. (unenthusiastic) oh... ha ha ha! joanne? is that you? it's me... you don't look a day over 70. am i right? jingle jingle. if you're peter pan, you stay young forever. it's what you do. if you want to save fifteen percent or more on car insurance, you switch to geico. you make me feel so young... it's what you do. you make me feel
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the entire beatles catalog is now available through streaming services. and fans of the fab four can also go online to get a tour of the band's favorite recording studio abbey road. charlie dagata went inside. >> reporter: it has become a mecca for music fans the world over where they come to follow in the footsteps of the beatles
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studio where the beatles made their mark on history. i want to hold your hand >> reporter: but in 1969, it was one album in particular that put abbey road on the map and journalist and author andrew mueller says things might have been very different had the band not been nearing the end of their long and winding road. >> that along bum is going to be called "everest." their idea was they would do this publishing tour of the great mountain. and then somebody flying all the way from the pole to do a photo, a bit of a schlep, why not go outside, take the picture on the crosswalk, call it "abbey road," and be done with it? i really hope it's true this great famous image and title exists because the beatles couldn't be bothered to get on a plane at that point. >> reporter: so from the myth to the mythology. >> over the years maybe millions of fans have made the pilgrimage to this crosswalk.
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roll. but this is where their journey came to an end. until now. >> welcome to abbey road. >> reporter: thanks to a new collaboration with google, abbey road studios has opened its doors for the very first time. >> where only legends have been able to step inside -- >> reporter: a virtual mystery tour offering 360-degree views, games and gadgets, an interactive abbey road experience. the real abbey road isn't open to the public or the press, for that matter. it's a fully operational recording studio. we came early. no self-respecting rock star would be up at this hour. the sound of a room makes the room special -- >> reporter: not much has changed, chief sound engineer stiles told us if it was good enough for the beatles -- >> you start playing around with the floor or walls you're going to change the sound at the end of the day, and we don't want to
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well she was just 17 you know what i mean >> reporter: meant to sound live, as if you were standing there. when the beatles brought 190 songs to the world, recorded right here. and if a band is only as good as its songs, then the band's records are only as good as the equipment used to record them. >> how many microphones have you got? >> oh, thousands. >> these things aren't just for show. >> no, absolutely not, no. they're used pretty much every day. >> reporter: pink floyd's epic. dark side of the moon >> reporter: sam smith. you'd say i'm sorry believe me i love you >> reporter: and amy winehouse's last recording session with tony
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she died. >> this hasn't changed. >> yeah, this room -- reporter: it's the studio's rich history that lends it such soul. like the stein way piano that's been in use for more than 60 years. maybe one little tinkle couldn't hurt. >> this features quite heavily on -- penny lane is in my ears and in my eyes >> it's also the piano used on -- lady madonna children at your feet wonder how you manage to make ends meet >> you can explore the studio and discover what goes on -- p>> reporter: while the virtual tour might not be the same it opens doors to a world most have never seen. and it may help keep some of the
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>> maybe they're thinking that the people can sit at home in front of their computers or their phones and click their way through our building, they won't come here and draw things all over our fence. >> it has been 20 years since pixar made the revolutionary "toy story." john blackstone was invited to pixar's campus to meet the people who make the movie magic. >> i am buzz lightyear. i come in peace. >> reporter: when buzz, woody, and the gang from "toy story" were first brought to life 20 years ago, they seemed more realistic than anything previously created in an animated movie. >> please be careful. you don't want to be in the way when my laser goes off. >> reporter: it was the result of more than four years of work at pixar animation studios. >> we were still kind of doing the same thing -- >> reporter: peatte docter was one of the an naters. >> you come to work and somebody would have figured something else out that you'd never seen before.
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>> reporter: "toy story's" animators went beyond what had been done before by creating on computers. by getting closer to reality more challenging than they expected. >> almost every scene we would go, that's going to be really hard. but part of the fun of working here was this was a new toy. i was a kid who enjoyed figuring out how things work. >> reporter: pixar was owned by somebody else who liked to figure things out, steve jobs. >> how do you think of yourself? >> reporter: when "toy story" was released charlie rose talked to jobs about his role as a moviemaker. >> the things i've done in my life, the things we do at pixar, these are team sports. >> reporter: 1986, jobs bought pixar for $5 million from filmmaker george lucas. gail sus man was a technical director on "toy story" and has worked on every sequel. >> there's no way "toy story" would have been made without steve. he had the belief, the passion, the gumption to fight for us to get us the resources we needed
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>> reporter: the studio and its arsenal of films about talking fish -- >> i'm coming, nemo! >> reporter: robots -- >> wall-e! >> reporter: and a rat who likes to cook -- has received massive critical acclaim and collected 12 academy awards. but when pixar had no movie ready for release in 2014, some in the industry wondered whether the studio had lost its edge. >> pizza sounds delicious. >> reporter: then came the release this year of "inside out." >> what the heck is that? >> who puts broccoli on pizza? >> that's it, i'm done. >> congratulations, san francisco, you've ruined pizza! >> reporter: so far the movie about the inner workings of an 11-year-old girl's mind has earned over $800 million. in spite of the animation technology pixar has pioneered, its films still start the old-fashioned way. >> yeah, it still starts with a
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although we do draw digitally. >> reporter: from these drawings and the imagination of all those working on a movie the a pixar, the story takes shape. >> and i can turn like all around, like what's going on? huh? what? >> do you know -- >> reporter: the good dinosaur marks the first time 6pixar is releasing two movies in one year. originally scheduled to be in theaters two years ago the movie was delayed by production problems. >> the northwest was a huge inspiration -- >> reporter: 2013, peter sohn replaced the first director. >> "the good dinosaur" has had painful moments over many years now. >> a lot of the pixar films go through these challenges of trying to make the story right. >> reporter: "the good dinosaur" is his debut as a director. in 15 years at pixar he has filled many other jobs, from animation to voice-over work. >> my name is russell. >> reporter: in "up" he was the
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explorer russell. >> are you in need of any assistance today, sir? >> when you're in a story room with these artists everyone is going to be drawing you. the guys would draw me like a giant thumb with a hat. >> reporter: more than 90 animators worked on "the good dinosaur." >> we start with posing -- >> reporter: three seconds of animation takes about a week to complete. >> you have to be patient, you have to have long vision. it's all about the long game. >> we're flying! >> reporter: in the 20 years since "toy story," pixar has
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>> to infinity and beyond! seriously? where do you think you're going? to work, with you. it's taco tuesday. you're not coming. i took mucinex to help get rid of my mucusy congestion. oh, right then i'll swing by in like 4 hours. forget the tacos! one pill lasts 12 hours. i'm good all day. wait! your loss. i was going to wear a sombrero. only mucinex has a bi-layer tablet that starts fast,
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start the relief. ditch the misery. let's end this. a detective from pittsburgh didn't have a clue what was missing -- until he found it. steve hartman found his story "on the road." >> reporter: generally speaking, if you're a kid growing up in pittsburgh like jesse and josh lyle the last place you ever want to be is in a courtroom across the table from detective jack wilk, a by the book, no nonsense, chew them up, spit them out 22-year veteran of the force. outside of work he's a committed bachelor, a man's man, who would never so much as let a vidalia see his soft side. for fun he hits people. and volunteers at the field city boxing gym teaching the sport to
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>> mostly kids that come in this gym are street kids. many of them have been born into poverty. >> reporter: kids like jesse and his older brother josh. long before their day in court jack had been working with them. he really liked these kids and knew the feel was mutual. when they just stopped showing up at the gym one day, jack went out and found them. >> he was asking me about it. and then -- i just cried. >> reporter: what jack didn't know, what no one knew till that kids had it. they were in a foster home with foster parents who jack says neglectful. >> they have had it as worse as any other kid that's ever lived in the city of pittsburgh. living conditions-wise. and that just -- i had enough of it. >> reporter: jack took matters into his own hands. cashed in some favors and got the kids placed in a new home.
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>> reporter: his. for jack, it's been quite an adjustment. >> i'm in here trying to learn my culinary skills, brother. >> i get the sense you're really loving this. >> yeah, yes. it's awesome. it's the best thing i ever did in my life. >> reporter: at least it was the best thing. until the day he went to court and did one better. adopted the boys. and made them mooks. >> you're a mook, right? you happy? >> reporter: after this story buries aired in 2014, we got a lot of e-mail. a surprising amount from women who wanted to meet this guy. did you e-mail us? are you one of those? >> no. no. >> reporter: mary says she saw the story but she met him at a bar. >> did you go to the bar because you knew he'd be there? >> yes. >> ah! >> ah-ha, yes. >> reporter: they were married last summer. she came with three of her own so now jack and the boys are
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a family none of them could have ever imagined just a few years ago. jack especially. >> i thought being single was fun. because you don't have no responsibilities. but when you're single, you don't realize what you're missing. i'm glad i let her break through that barrier. and take me away from that life. >> reporter: sounds like it wasn't just the boys who were rescued. steve hartman "on the road" in embarrassed by a prostate exam? imagine how your doctor feels. as a urologist, i have performed 9,421 and a half prostate exams. so why do i do it? because i get paid. und... on this side of the glove i know prostate exams can save lives. so, if you are a man over 50, talk to you doctor to see if a prostate exam is right for you. if we can do it, so can you.
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a singing santa from new york has been cast in a real-life melodrama of his own. this one has a happy ending. from the ground floor apartment to the party up above here's love love love >> reporter: at the john angeman theater, actor and singer is kris kringle in the musical adaptation of "miracle on 34th
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and rosy checks are on full display. it's beginning to look a lot like christmas >> reporter: but that ruddy complexion was an outward sign of a serious problem inside his body, one he couldn't put a name to. >> my skin was very red, very purple. and i started getting joint pain, a lot of joint pain. >> trouble thinking? >> oh, yeah, definitely. >> you worried about your career? >> of course. your vocal cords are in distress, you don't know why. it's terrifying. >> reporter: in may 2012, a blood test showed sky-high iron levels and a doctor finally figured out the cause. >> he said, kevin, you havefve hemochromatosis. >> when he explained it? >> he said you're rusting from the inside out. >> reporter: a genetic defect that allows too much iron to be absorbed and overload tissues and organs. in addition to joint pain and fatigue symptoms can include abdominal discomfort and loss of
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more than 1 million americans have the gene mutation for the disorder but many are never diagnosed. left untreated buildup can cause organ damage and even death. mcguire began weekly blood draws that slowly removed the excess iron. it's a simple yet effective remedy that helps restore iron levels to a normal range. >> i've never felt better in my life. i dreamed a dream >> reporter: especially new that his vocal pipes are no longer rusting. as the iron came out of your body, especially out of your vocal cords, what happened to you as an actor, as a performer? >> i can do pretty much just about anything. for a long time. from the land to >> reporter: cbs news, north fork, new york. >> that is the "overnight news" for this monday. for some of you the news continues.
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little later for the morning news and "cbs news this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm jeff glor. captioning funded by cbs captioning funded by cbs it's monday, december 28th, 2015. this is the "cbs morning news." a deadly outbreak of at least nine tornadoes ransacked north texas, damaging or destroying nearly 1,500 homes. >> i was just praying.
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