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tv   CBS Overnight News  Me-TV  January 11, 2016 2:00am-4:00am CST

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with a hefty asking price. guess who gets to stay after it's sold. >> this is the "cbs overnight news." >> welcome to the overnight news, i'm jeff glor. he has made news on and off-screen for decades but this may have been his biggest role yet. now he's hearing the critics' reviews. sean penn's secret meeting with the world's most wanted drug lord. joaquin chapo guzman. authorities say that meeting which took place while penn was on assignment played a role in el chapo being recaptured on friday. we begin with meg oliver. >> reporter: it's an unassuming backdrop for an interview with the most notorious drug kingpin in the world, the first he has given in decades. the questions come from the cameraman. they're written by actor sean penn who met el chapo for seven hours in october deep in the
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this tape soon afterward. during the 17-minute recording, the questions are asked, are you responsible for so many drugs in the world? guzman says, no that is false, because the day i don't exist it's not going to decrease 97 way at all. as for drug trafficking, that's false. the interview is a remarkable twist in an already convoluted tale. it was just two days ago mexican authorities raided this seaside hotel and arrested chapo after a long gunfight. then paraded him in front of the cameras, perhaps to soften their embarrassment over his escape from prison last july. the attorney general said it was actors and producers who led them to the fugitive. joaquin guzman had the intention of making a biographical film so he reached out to producers. but this long article penn wrote for "rolling stone," posted on "rolling stone's" website, revealed he may have been one of the actors. the other was mexican actress
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support for guzman in the past, and who brokered the meeting last october. in the article, penn describes the crazy and risky journey he took. two flights, a 90-minute ride, a bumpy seven-hour drive through the jungle. finally there he is right beside the truck, the world's most famous fugitive, el chapo. during their conversation penn says guzman proudly acknowledged his business, saying, i supply more heroin, methamphetamine, cocaine, and marijuana than anybody else in the world. penn writes he was sure he was being tracked by the government and says just hours after their meeting, law enforcement raided the hideout and guzman had to flee. he agreed to tape an interview later if penn sent questions by blackberry. in the tape sent back to penn guzman defends his work saying, where i grew up there was no other way and there still isn't a way to survive. no other way to work on our economy, to be able to make a living.
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you prone to violence or do you use it as a last resort? guzman responds, look, all i do is defend myself, nothing more. do i start trouble? never. mexican authorities would of course disagree. it is believed guzman is responsible for more than 30,000 deaths. now they're working on starting the extradition process but say they haven't taken a position on sean penn. >> meg oliver, thank you. let's bring in cbs news legal analyst rikki klieman. good to see you. sean penn is obviously facing some public ridicule. this is the guy who's met with individuals or states who are hostile to the u.s., hugo chavez, raul castro in cuba, went to iran a decade ago. he faces that public ridicule he is unlikely to face legal repercussions, why is that? >> not only unlikely, he is not going to face legal repercussions. the reason is simple. we may believe in a moral code that says if you see something, say something. but that's not a duty imposed by
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there is no duty for sean penn to have to inform authorities when he is going to go meet even with someone who is wanted by the law. if it were a reporter who got this interview, who got to go on a plane and even was blindfolded, which penn was not, and brought in the dead of night and got to get this interview? that reporter would have no duty to have to tell the authorities either. >> let's talk about joaquin guzman. the issue of extradition came up before. mexico resisted, did not want to send him back to the u.s. they seem more amenable to that now. why is that and how might that process play out? >> they are more amenable now probably because they're embarrassed about his escapes, and that is plural, that have happened in the past. and that it appears they wanted to try him to prove in mexico that they could keep him but they weren't able to keep him recently. now it seems from everything we get to hear that mexico is more
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extradited to the united states. united states wants him badly. extradition is a long process. it may take six months or more. he has good lawyers or i assume he does, the best that money can buy. and those lawyers are going to fight extradition. but he'll be here. he'll be tried. >> he faces charges in seven states, charges ranging from? >> seven federal jurisdictions. so it's all under the federal umbrella. they're all through the department of justice. these charges show what this cartel was up to. they were bringing into the united states drugs in the most remarkable numbers. we have heroin, we have cocaine, we have marijuana, we have methamphetamine. but they came in by boats and planes and trains and submersibles. what you have here is one of the largest operations of drug distribution that has ever come into this country. what else? money laundering.
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violence. this is probably the greatest defendant in terms of public enemy number one that people who are involved in the drug enforcement administration and the department of justice have ever seen. they want him and they want him badly. >> they may get him in a few
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rikki klieman, thanks very much. almost sixty million americans are affected by mental illness. together we can help them with three simple words. my name is chris noth and i will listen. from maine to maui, thousands of high school students across the country are getting in on the action by volunteering in their communities. chris young: action teams of high school students are joining volunteers of america and major league baseball players to help train and inspire the next generation of volunteers.
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a shot. >> you've never played the lottery before? >> maybe once or twice. not usually. >> you got 20 tickets, all for you? >> all for me, yes, absolutely. >> you know the odds are really slim? >> i know they're huge. if i buy one, the odds aren't as good. if i buy 10, maybe i'll have more chances. >> reporter: lottery officials say the jackpot is the world's largest. an amount with so many digits, billboards across the country can't handle the figure. demand for tickets was so high for last night's drawing, stores reported that some machines ran out of paper to print the tickets. someone purchased 1160 tickets at one time? >> at one time, yes. >> reporter: convenience store manager alex sherrod say they haven't had that problem -- yet. >> we have all extra. >> you ordered extra paper? >> yes. monday. >> reporter: the pot started at $40 million on november 4th and has since rolled over 20 times. the month prior, lottery
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making the odds tougher for the big jackpot. but saturday's drawing did create 28 new millionaires with smaller prizes. the next big drawing will be this wednesday. now, a one-time payment amounts to $806 million. but that's before federal and state taxes which will eat up at least 25% of the winnings. three weeks to go until the first votes are cast in the 2016 presidential race. a new poll out today shows hillary clinton and bernie sanders deadlocked in iowa and new hampshire. on the republican side, donald trump and ted cruz are running close in iowa. more now from julianna goldman in washington. >> reporter: on sunday, donald trump said even if he loses iowa, he won't drop out. >> there's no makes. i'm not leaving. >> you're going straight to the convention? >> all the way. >> reporter: that prospect has party leaders and even some voters grappling with a scenario
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emerges as the trump alternative. >> i do not believe that trump would put a good face on the republican party as president. >> you'd be prepared to see hillary clinton in the white house? >> unfortunately. >> i've never heard that before. that's how much trump has penetrated and how people now think that he has a genuine shot at the nomination. >> reporter: republican pollster frank lutz along with google conducted a focus group of iowa republicans friday night. >> iowa voters have become so sophisticated they know the people they choose is not necessarily the people who the rest of america chooses. they think they're going to choose cruz. but they're starting to think that the rest of america may choose trump. >> reporter: according to the most recent poll of likely iowa caucusgoers, cruz and trump are virtually tied with rubio a distant third. in new hampshire trump has a commanding lead and the fight for second and third is playing out between rubio, chris christie, cruz, jeb bush, and john kasich.
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speaker paul ryan said he'd support trump or cruz if one was the nominee and predict republicans will coalesce around the party's pick. >> primaries inevitably have this kind of friction. once you get through the primary, i think we unify the conservative movement. >> there were potentially concerning numbers in the polls for hillary clinton. they show she beats trump in iowa and new hampshire but sanders does much better against the republican front-runner and ted cruz leads clinton in both states while sanders still beats the texas senator. >> okay, julianna goldman. a tornado hit cape coral, florida, last night. nobody was hurt but there was severe damage to one neighborhood. at one point 10,000 people were without power. the storm was an ef-2 with winds up to 135 miles an hour. the united states sent a b-52 bomber on a low-level flight over south korea today.
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in response to north korea's nuclear test last week. the american bomber was escorted by fighter jets from south korea. since october there have been a series of disappearances in hong kong. five employees of a store that sells books critical of the chinese government. today, thousands of protesters turned out to demand answers. seth doane reports. >> reporter: protesters carried signs reading, "today, lee bo. tomorrow you and me." lee disappeared december 30th. days later he purportedly sent a letter suggesting he was in mainland china, assisting with an investigation. lee was the fifth person tied to causeway bay books to go missing. this bookshop specializes in stories that could never be on sale in mainland china criticizing the communist party and the rulers. protesters worry chinese government agents illegally snatched lee and took him into mainland china. the hong kong government
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enforcement officers of other jurisdictions do not have the authority to take actions if they are in hong kong. protester sammy chow said the chinese government shouldn't use their tricks to arrest hong kong people. william ni is following this case for amnesty international. >> beijing sees this type of company as posing a threat to national security because they say they're producing rumors and slander about the country's leadership and political system. >> reporter: lee bo's picture is just the latest face in the fight against beijing's efforts to exert control. seth doane, cbs news, beijing. coming up next, a young woman arrested in a string of brazen jewel heists. and the game that redefined
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a brutally cold start with an even more painful finish in minnesota today. the temperature was 6 below at kickoff with a windchill of 25 below. that makes it the third-coldest game in nfl history. fans were given free hand warmers and coffee but cold comfort. the hometown vikings lost on a last-second missed 27-yard field
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final seahawks 10, vikings 9. a woman in georgia has been arrested in connection with a multi-million dollar string of jewelry thefts. among the most damaging evidence according to fbi, she was caught on camera and appeared not to care. here's mark strassmann. >> reporter: the fbi says this video shows 24-year-old abigail lee kemp mid-robbery, walk in the front door of a jared jewelry store in north carolina on january 4. she had allegedly forced two employees into a back room at gunpoint and zip tied their hands before helping herself to the store's pricey jewelry. authorities say kemp and this man are behind at least six jewelry heists in georgia, florida, south carolina, tennessee, and north carolina. kemp often dressed in workout clothing but for some reason never hid her face during the robberies. fbi released these surveillance photos and videos. it's unclear whether this man, her alleged accomplice, was also
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according to social media profiles, the 24-year-old modeled for at least one photo shoot and once tried out for an atlanta lingerie football team. kemp and her accomplice cased their targets and chose locations close to highways for quick getaways. lawrence borgini is an fbi special agent. >> these are very well-planned jewelry store robberies. they are not just walking into the jewelry stores. they have some knowledge about the industry. >> reporter: kemp is expected to show her face again tomorrow morning in atlanta -- inside a federal courtroom. mark strassmann, cbs news, atlanta. police in florence, italy, are investigating the murder of an american woman. 35-year-old ashley olsen of summer haven, florida, was found dead in her apartment yesterday with bruises on her neck. olsen had been living in italy for several years. her boyfriend, a painter, has been questioned but police say the investigation is wide open. up next here, a rare look at
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inside syria. efforts continue to get
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a starving town in syria. today the world food program loaded trucks with food and medical supplies, hoping to get security clearance tomorrow. the assad regime hasn't allowed aid in since october 18. tonight an unprecedented look inside syria. "60 minute" correspondent bill whitaker takes us to the main russian air base in syria where strikes are being launched against enemies of bashar al assad. >> reporter: it was almost midnight when our plane took off from a russian air base outside moscow. as we started to take pictures out the window, we were told nyet, no. something we heard often during the next three days. >> no, no, no, no. >> reporter: this was the first face we saw after landing. that's syrian president bashar al assad. this once was a syrian airport. since the summer, the russians have built barracks, brought in
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rolled in truckloads of equipment and munitions. erecting a bit of russia in the heart of assad-controlled syria. this is mostly friendly territory. at least 20 miles from the closest front lines. but the russians aren't taking any chances. helicopter gunships constantly patrolled the perimeter. they took us out along newly extended runways to watch a steady series of planes taking off. the roar was deafening. the russians invited about a dozen news organizations on this tour of the latakia air base. they especially wanted us to take note their newest fighter bomber the su-34. our russian guide in syria, major general kanashenkov, is chief spokesman for the ministry
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over the previous 24 hours, he said, 320 insurgents and 34 armored vehicles were destroyed. independent monitoring groups told us some of the planes we saw taking off did bomb isis targets, but most bombed more immediate threats to the assad regime. groups like the u.s.-backed free syrian army and al nusra, the syrian arm of al qaeda. a mansion is apparently up for sale, with a big catch.a heart attack? chest pain, like there's a ton of weight on your chest. severe shortness of breath. unexplained nausea. cold sweats. there's an unusual tiredness and fatigue. there's unfamiliar dizziness or light-headedness. unusual pain in your back, neck, jaw, one or both arms, even your upper stomach, are signs you're having a heart attack. don't make excuses. make the call to 9-1-1 immediately. learn more at womenshealth.gov/heartattack. while i was on a combat patrol in baqubah, iraq, a rocket-propelled grenade took my arm off at the shoulder.
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finally the most famous party house in the world, the playboy mansion, said to be going up for sale. the asking price, a hefty sum. here's maria villarreal. >> reporter: from the sky or on the ground, the mansion is the picture of elegance. but for decades the insides were less than stately. hefner bought the playboy
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million. now playboy enterprises is said to be looking for nearly 200 times that much. >> i think that's a stretch. the street certainly supports $50 million, maybe $60 million. they are not making individual lots that size any longer. >> reporter: greg harris specializes in l.a.'s luxury real estate. the house appraises for about $35 million. but he acknowledges there's added historical value to the 22,000 square foot holby hills home, like graceland or michael jackson's neverland. there's a catch. the buyer has to agree to a roommate, hefner himself. >> hef will be able to stay in the house until he passes away. >> somebody's going to pay $200 million and hef gets to stay on the property? >> we haven't seen it at that price point ever happen before but it could. >> reporter: at that asking price harris says a corporation or international investor would be the next likely owner. >> it's pools, grottos, all that kind of thing. it's a pretty big property. a lot to maintain.
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>> you're putting it very g-rated. >> it's somebody who entertains a lot. >> reporter: while the names on the mansion's title may change, its reputation for excess could likely live on, which might be exactly what certain buyers are looking for. maria villarreal, cbs news, los angeles. >> that is the "cbs overnight news" for this monday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning."
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york city, i'm jeff glor. this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the "overnight news." i'm jeff glor. he has made news on and off screen for decades but this may have been his biggest role yet. now he's hearing the critics' reviews. it was sean penn's secret meeting with the world's most wanted drug lord, joaquin el chapo guzman. mexican authorities say that meeting, which took place while penn was on assignment for "rolling stone," played a role in el chapo being recaptured on
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meg oliver has the story. >> reporter: it's an unassuming backdrop for an interview with the most notorious drug kingpin in the world, the first he has given in decades. the questions come from the cameraman. they're written by actor sean penn who met el chapo for seven hours in october deep in the jungle, convinced chapo to send this tape soon afterward. during the 17-minute recording, the questions are asked are you responsible for so many drugs in the world? guzman says, no, that is false, because the day i don't exist it's not going to decrease in any way at all. as for drug trafficking, that's false. the interview is a remarkable twist in an already convoluted tale. it was just two days ago mexican authorities raided this seaside hotel and arrested chapo after a long gunfight. then paraded him in front of the
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embarrassment over his escape from prison last july. the attorney general said it was actors and producers who led them to the fugitive. joaquin guzman had the intention of making a biographical film so he reached out to producers. but this long article penn wrote for "rolling stone," posted on "rolling stone's" website, revealed he may have been one of the actors. the other was mexican actress kate del castillo, who tweeted support for guzman in the past, and who brokered the meeting last october. in the article, penn describes the crazy and risky journey he took. two flights, a 90-minute ride, a bumpy seven-hour drive through the jungle. finally there he is right beside the truck, the world's most famous fugitive, el chapo. during their conversation penn says guzman proudly acknowledged his business, saying, i supply more heroin, methamphetamine, cocaine, and marijuana than anybody else in the world. penn writes he was sure he was
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and says just hours after their meeting, law enforcement raided the hideout and guzman had to flee. he agreed to tape an interview later if penn sent questions by blackberry. in the tape sent back to penn guzman defends his work saying, where i grew up there was no other way and there still isn't a way to survive. no other way to work on our economy, to be able to make a living. the interpreter also asked, are you prone to violence or do you use it as a last resort? guzman responds, look, all i do is defend myself, nothing more. do i start trouble? never. mexican authorities would of course disagree. it is believed guzman is responsible for more than 30,000 deaths. now they're working on starting the extradition process but say they haven't taken a position on sean penn. meg oliver, cbs news, new york. congressional investigators continue to pore over the latest batch of diplomatic e-mails from hillary clinton's personal server. the state department released
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clinton's e-mails while she was secretary of state. one of them is drawing extra attention. >> reporter: republicans argue the newly released e-mail proves former secretary of state knowingly shared sensitive information on her private account. in an exchange from 2011 a top aide alerts clinton that staffers are having issues sending her some talking points via secure fax. clinton responds, if they can't, turn into nonpaper. in other words, an e-mail. with no identifying heading and send nonsecure. the topic and sensitivity of the talking points aren't clear. that part is redacted. still, the republican chair of the senate judiciary committee called the exchange disturbing and called for a criminal inquiry. the clinton campaign told cbs news, it is false that hillary clinton asked for classified material to be sent over a
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the exchange was among 2,900 pages of clinton's e-mails released by the state department. just this week the state department's own internal watchdog said the agency's responses to questions about clinton's e-mails have been inaccurate and incomplete. state department officials insist they don't have the resources to keep up with all the requests they get from the public and the media. john dickerson discussed the latest e-mail controversy with clinton on "face the nation." >> this week another batch of your e-mails were released by the state department. one of them is a back and forth between you and a staffer about a secure fax that wouldn't come through. and you directed him to "turn into nonpaper with no identifying heading and send nonsecure." aren't you ordering him to violate the laws on handling classified material there? >> no, not at all. and as the state department said just this week, that did not happen.
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happened. because that's just not the way i treated classified information. headings are not classification notices. so oftentimes we're trying to get the best information we can and obviously what i'm asking for is whatever can be transmitted if it doesn't come through secure, to be transmitted on the unclassified system. so, no, there is nothing to that, like so much else that has been talked about in the last year. >> so in no instance -- what's striking about that particular e-mail, it suggests you were very facile with how to do this, this process. you knew the instructions how to get around the restriction for sending classified information. you're saying there was never an instance, any other instance in which you did not? >> no. and it wasn't sent. so i think this is another instance where what is common practice, namely, look, i need information, i had some points i had to make, and i was waiting
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me the whole picture. but oftentimes there's a lot of information that isn't at all classified. so whatever information can be appropriately transmitted, unclassified, often was. that's true for every agency in the government and everybody who does business with the government. but the important point here is i had great confidence because i'd worked with jake sullivan for years, he is the most meticulous, careful person you could possibly do business with. and he knew exactly what was and wasn't appropriate. and in fact, as the state department has said, there was no transmission of any classified information. so it's another effort by people looking for something to throw against the wall, as you said in the beginning of the program, to see what sticks. but there's no there there. >> this one is a little different since the fbi is investigating this specific question of whether a classification was meddled with.
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e-mail in this batch which was one in which you seemed to express surprise somebody e-mailed on their nonstate department personal e-mail which is what you were doing. why was that a surprise to you? >> i e-mailed two people on their government accounts because i knew that all of that would be part of the government system. and indeed the vast majority of all my e-mails are in the government system. so that's how i conduct the business. i was very clear about e-mailing anything having to do with business to people on their government accounts. kinds of yucky germs. but not all disinfecting wipes... are approved to kill the same number of them. lysol wipes are approved to kill more types of germs than clorox. don't pick just any wipe. try that one! this cold and flu season lysol that.
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over whether the u.s. is doing enough to screen refugees from syria and iraq. omar al hardan was escorted into a texas courtroom friday facing charges he attempted to provide material support to isis. the 24-year-old iraqi refugee who lives in houston has been in the u.s. since 2009. hours later, in sacramento, aws al jayab was in court. investigators are calling him a foreign fighter. the 24-year-old came to the u.s. in 2012. investigators allege soon after he was communicating via social media with terrorist organizations. jayab traveled to syria to fight with rebels opposing president assad. in march and april of 2013, he messages "i am coming to syria. i am eager to see blood." that november, he flew from chicago to turkey and then to aleppo where investigators say he took up arms with terrorist organizations and concealed that conduct from immigration
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the u.s. in 2014. the two arrests have added fuel to the fiery political debate over admitting refugees from the region into the u.s. >> this is the kind of threat that keeps me up at night. >> reporter: on capitol hill, house homeland security chairman michael mccall said the two men may have been radicalized after they came to the u.s. >> how many ticking time bombs are we going to bring in in this refugee program without a proper vetting system in place? >> reporter: on the campaign trail, republican presidential candidate ted cruz echoed those concerns. the texas senator brought up the two arrests at stops across iowa on friday. >> president obama's proposing bringing tens of thousands of syrian refugees to america even though the fbi says we cannot vet those refugees to determine whether or not they are isis terrorists. >> reporter: and donald trump, who has called for a ban on muslims entering the country, also weighed in. >> we're not going to let people come in from syria that we never saw before, that we have no idea where they are.
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>> reporter: according to u.s. intelligence officials, more than 36,000 foreign fighters have traveled to syria, 250 have come from the u.s. police in philadelphia say a muslim man who ambushed a police officer while he sat in his squad car said he was inspired by isis. despite being wounded the officer returned fire and the suspect is under arrest. >> reporter: chilling video, a man seen shooting directly into this philadelphia police car thursday night. authorities say 30-year-old edward archer confessed to the shooting which involved a 9 millimeter pistol stolen from an officer's home in 2013. archer told authorities he ambushed 33-year-old officer jesse hartnett in the name of isis. >> shots fired! i'm shot, i'm bleeding heavily! >> reporter: the officer, shot three times, could have easily been killed. commissioner richard ross, along with fbi officials, are looking
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motive. is this, in fact, connected to a terrorist organization? >> he wouldn't say that, and we don't know. he certainly doesn't strike me as a guy who has intelligence around him. stopping just short of implicating himself too much or anyone else. >> reporter: cbs has learned the fbi is investigating two overseas trips archer made to cairo in 2011 and saudi arabia in 2012. archer's arrest record includes aggravated assault, weapons charges, and terroristic threats in 2012. in that case he was accused of pointing a gun at a man. in 2013, he was arrested again on an illegal gun possession charge. at the home where police say archer lived with his mother, no one answered the door. the two people who arrived later said they had no comment. the officer is in the hospital tonight recovering from a broken arm and nerve damage.
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kampf" is on sale in germany for the first time since world war ii. the first printing sold out quickly. the report from our london bureau. >> reporter: the nuremberg rallies of the 1930s were for many the first glimpse of hitler's nazi germany. his anti-semitic tirades divided the country. long before the atrocities of the holocaust and the millions of jews murdered history had an outline. hitler's "mein kampf," or "my struggle," his 1920s manifesto that paved the way. the nazis printed at least 10 million copies. they were sold widely and handed out by the government to newlyweds and soldiers. 1945 when hitler died and world war ii ended the allies handed the copyright to the bavarian government, who stopped the presses. 75 years later that copyright has expired and "mein kampf" is back in german bookstores for the first time. it's a chapter in history some
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stay closed. this latest printing has some key additions to the original copy. the german government would only allow an annotated version with academic analysis of the text. "this edition exposes the false information spread by hitler, his downright lies, and his many half-truths," said this professor, director of germany's institute for contemporary history, the book's publisher. scholars also say the reprint will demystify hitler by exposing just how bad a writer he was. >> it's a waffle. it's a rant. it's unstructured. it is unreadable. i think making that open and showing that to potentially interested students is a good thing. >> reporter: the publishing house behind the new edition says they can't keep up with the demand. controversy, it appears, sells books. reaction has been mixed in israel. >> it's complicated. on the one hand, i'm not thrilled about the fact that
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wider dissemination around the world, given the hateful content that it contains. but on the other hand, it's kind of impossible to control speech. and i'm not even sure that we should. >> reporter: hitler's original "mein kampf" is already sold widely in countries outside of germany and online. scholars say far from being a fascist bible, the new version offers crucial context that exposes a horrific past so history can't repeat itself. a political mystery is being written in hong kong where five people who either publish or sell books critical of china's communist government have disappeared. the latest to vanish owned a bookstore. seth doane has the story from hong kong. >> reporter: since hong kong was handed over from british to chinese rule in 1997 it has retained some of its autonomy, notably its own legal system and freedom of speech. now with the case of those missing booksellers and word of
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mainland, some worry those freedoms may be under threat. sandwiched between a pharmacy and a nail salon, up a cramped stairwell, is causeway bay books which was closed today. in the hallway, some of the gossipy, salacious titles it was known for. criticizing china's leaders. this book talks about china's first lady's private lave. this title predicts the downfall of china's president, xi jinping. now the story of this bookstore is harder to believe since five men tied to it have disappeared. the most recent, lee bo, expected home for dinner december 30th but never showed. days later this faxed letter purportly from lee said, due to some urgent matters i have made my own way to the mainland. it might take a bit of time. protesters carrying photos of the missing booksellers have demanded answers. there was no record of lee crossing the hong kong border.
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bookseller so important? >> well, i think it concerns the basic security and safety of hong kong people. >> reporter: hong kong legislator albert ho worries chinese authorities or their agents may have illegally taken lee into the mainland. >> we are concerned about an incident of political kidnap. >> reporter: china's government linked global times newspaper wrote lee was not taken away by chinese mainland police officers, but was critical of the bookstore, calling it a source of political rumors and evil influence. >> this seems like an attack on freedom the press. >> reporter: amnesty international's william ni notes china does not have jurisdiction to come to hong kong and detain someone. >> in china right now, this type of thing is completely normal. what's common in mainland china is not common in hong kong. hong kong has a different system and that's why people are so alarmed in this case. >> reporter: it is widely known that mainlanders come to hong kong to buy books and the fear
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authorities are now reaching into hong kong's affairs. we contacted officials both here and in beijing but were not able to get any more answers as to where lee bo may be.id gels and go. but these liquid gels are new. mucinex fast max. it's the same difference. these are multi-symptom. well so are these. this one is max strength and fights mucus. that one doesn't. uh...think fast! you dropped something. oh...i'll put it back on the shelf... new from mucinex fast max. the only cold and flu liquid gel that's max-strength and fights mucus. start the relief. ditch the misery.
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it's not always as easy for me as it is for him... it's easy for me cause look at her. aw... so we use k-y ultragel. it enhances my body's natural moisture so i can get into the swing of it a bit quicker. and when i know she's feeling like that,
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when she enjoys it, we enjoy it even more. and i enjoy it. feel the difference with k-y ultragel. a newborn in texas shares a special bond with her grandmother.
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her daughter. omar villafranca has the story from plano, texas. >> reporter: it's a modern family tree of sorts. kelly and her husband aaron have been trying for three years to have a baby resulting in several heartbreaking miscarriages. that's when kelly said her mother stepped in and gave her what she described as the greatest gift of her life. >> when she was 13 years old she said, mom, if i can't have a baby, would you have one for me? at 13. and i said, sure, absolutely. you know, not thinking that's what god was telling me that many years ago. >> reporter: the birth of baby kelsey was truly a family affair. kelly was there for the birth of her daughter, sharing the moment with her mother tracy. >> pulled her little head out, that was the most amazing thing i've ever seen in my life, ever. >> reporter: for years kelly and her husband aaron tried to have a baby on their own. the couple tried several infertility treatments. and experienced multiple miscarriages. did at any point you think,
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>> no. that was never an option for us. >> reporter: they had four remaining embryos from their final round of in vitro fertilization. so her mom offered to make good on her promise from years ago. >> she was like, i think i need to do this. and -- i said, i think you need to think about it. >> were you hesitant? >> i mean, just -- just for her health. >> reporter: at 53, tracy was already seven years into menopause. but in excellent health. so doctors put her on treatments to allow her body to carry a baby again. >> when i was in my 20s and pregnant with her and her brother, it was easy. >> how was it in your 50s? >> it was difficult. it was just exhausting. >> reporter: while it's not necessarily the norm in surrogacy, this isn't the first time a grandmother has given birth to her own grandchild. the first case on record took place in 1987 in south africa. a 48-year-old woman was the surrogate for her 25-year-old daughter. she gave birth to healthy triplets.
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u.s. was in 1991. 42-year-old arlette schweitzer carried twins for her 22-year-old daughter, who was born without a uterus. it's happened multiple times in the years since then. when kelsey gets older how do you tell this story to her? >> we will make sure that she literally, growing up, knows every step. it will be part of her story. when the engines failed on the plane i was flying,
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but when my father sank into depression, i didn't know how to help him. when he ultimately shot himself, he left our family devastated. don't let this happen to you. if you or a loved one is suicidal, call the national suicide prevention lifeline. no matter how hopeless or helpless you feel, with the right help, you can get well. (franklin d. roosevelt) the inherent right to work is one of the elemental privileges of a free people. endowed, as our nation is, with abundant physical resources... ...and inspired as it should be to make those resources and opportunities available for the enjoyment of all... ...we approach reemployment with real hope of finding a better answer than we have now. narrator: donate to goodwill where your donations help fund
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>> steve hartman caught up with a young man who might be worth twice his weight in olympic gold. >> reporter: at the olympic training center in colorado springs, american weight lifters carry a heavy burden. the u.s. men's team hasn't won a gold medal in 56 years. but coach sigmund smallfairs says that streak may be ending thanks to one incredible lifter. >> he's massive. so fantastic. this is what he got from the gods.
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hercules? you won't believe. here at beaufort high school in beaufort, south carolina. 15-year-old c.j. cummings looks like just another kid. in fact, everyone thought he was just another kid. until three years ago when he walked into his first national men's tournament. >> they thought i was just like a spectator. >> a spectator? how well did you do? >> i got second. >> you got second? >> yes. >> reporter: at the age of 12. since then, he has been dubbed the lebron james of u.s. weightlifting. but even that may be selling him short. last august, this 5'4", 150-pound kid attempted the unimaginable. >> this is 385 pounds? >> yes. >> reporter: picture a kitchen stove on each end of that bar. >> okay, that's good. >> reporter: no american in his weight class had ever done that much in the clean and jerk.
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along. an american men's record. set by a boy. after this lift, his personal coach, ray jones, says a lot of people didn't believe the reports. >> and i can understand that. if i wasn't there, i d d't know that i would. i'm telling you. >> reporter: to that end a local professor of sports medicine set up a bunch of cameras and sensors to try to figure out exactly how c.j.'s doing this. he found nothing special in his technique, proving that c.j. was either sent here directly from the planet krypton, or he's just plain strong. and get this. coaches say he's still at least ten years away from reaching his full potential. probably another four till his first olympics. until then, he'll be busy inspiring young weight lifters across the country. and exercising a great deal of
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>> i'm going to take it as far as i could go, hopefully get a gold medal for the u.s. >> have you thought about a wheaties box? >> what is that? >> what's a wheaties box? >> yeah. >> reporter: i told you he was young. steve hartman on the road in beaufort, south carolina. >> that is the "cbs overnight news" for this monday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm jeff glor. sean penn's latest role, el chapo's hollywood connection. did their secret meeting in mexico lead to the fugitive drug lord's arrest? is the oscar winner now in legal trouble? the jackpot bounces over $1 billion, leading millions to try, try again. the fbi busts a young woman suspected of stealing millions of dollars in jewels from stores across the south. the playboy mansion may be
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with a hefty asking price. guess who gets to stay after it's sold. >> this is the "cbs overnight news." >> welcome to the overnight news, i'm jeff glor. he has made news on and off-screen for decades but this may have been his biggest role yet. now he's hearing the critics' views. sean penn's secret meeting with the lord's most wanted drug lord joaquin chapo guzman. authorities say that meeting while penn was on assignment played a role in el chapo being recaptured on friday. we begin with meg oliver. >> reporter: it's an unassuming backdrop for an interview with the most notorious drug kingpin in the world, the first he has given in decades. the questions come from the cameraman cameraman. they're written by actor sean penn who met el chapo for seven hours in october deep in the
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this tape soon afterward. during the 17-minute recording, the questions are asked are you responsible for so many drugs in the world? guzman says no, that is false us bass the day i don't exist it's not going to decrease in any way at all. as for drug trafficking, that's false. the interview is a remarkable twist in an already convoluted tale. it was just two days ago mexican authorities raided this seaside hotel and arrested chapo after a long gunfight. then paraded him in front of the cameras, perhaps to soften their embarrassment over his escape from prison last july. the attorney general said it was actors and producers who led them to the fugitive. joaquin guzman had the intention of making a buy grooskal film so he reached out to producers. but this long article penn wrote for "rolling stone," posted on "rolling stone's" website, revealed he may have been one of the actors.
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kate del castillo, who tweeted support for guzman in the past, and who brokered the meeting last october. in the article, penn describes the crazy and risky journey he took. two flights, a 90-minute ride, a bumpy seven-hour drive through the jungle. finally there he is right beside the truck, the world's most famous fugitive, el chapo. during their conversation penn says guzman proudly acknowledged his business, saying, i supply more heroin, methamphetamine, cocaine, and marijuana than anybody else in the world. penn writes he was sure he was being tracked by the government and says just hours after their meeting, law enforcement raided the hideout and guzman had to flee. he agreed to tape an interview later if penn sent questions by blackberry. in the tape sent back to penn guzman defends his work saying, where i grew up there was no other way and there still isn't a way to survive. no other way to work on our economy, to be able to make a living.
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you called to violence or do you use it as a last resort? guzman responds, look, all i do is defend myself, nothing more. do i start trouble? never. mexican authorities would of course disagree. it is believed guzman is responsible for more than 30,000 deaths. now they're working on starting the extradition process but say they haven't taken a position on sean penn. >> meg oliver, thank you. let's bring in cbs news legal analyst rikkically man. good to see you. sean penn is obviously facing some public ridicule. this is the guy who's met with individuals or states who are hostile to the u.s., hugo chavez, raul castro in cuba, went to iran a decade ago. he faces that public ridicule he is unlikely to face legal repercussions, why is that? >> not only unlikely, he is not going to face legal repercussions. the reason is simple. we may believe in a moral code that says if you see something,
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but that's not a duty imposed by law. there is no duty for sean penn to have to inform authorities when he is going to go meet even with someone who is wanted by the law. if it were a reporter who got this interview, who got to go on a plane and even was blindfolded, which penn was not, and brought in the dead of night and got to get this interview? that reporter would have no duty to have to tell the authorities either. >> let's talk about joaquin guzman. the issue of extradition came up before. mexico resisted, did not want to send him back to the u.s. they seem more amenable to that now. why is that and how might that process play out? >> they are more amenable now probably because they're embarrassed about his escapes, that is plural that have happened in the past. and that it appears they wanted to try him to prove in mexico that they could keep him but they weren't able to keep him recently. now it seems from everything we
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amenable to having him extradited to the united states. united states wants him badly. extradition is a long process. it may take six months or more. he has good lawyers or i assume buy. and those lawyers are going to fight extradition. he'll be tried. >> he faces charges in seven states, charges ranging from? >> seven federal jurisdictions. so it's all under the federal umbrella. they're all through the department of justice. these charges show what this cartel was up to. they were bringing into the united states drugs in the most remarkable numbers. we have heroin, we have cocaine, we have marijuana, we have methamphetamine. but they came in by boats and planes and trains and submersibles. what you have here is one of the largest operations of drug distribution that has ever come into this country. what else?
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kidnapping. violence. this is probably the greatest defendant in terms of public enemy number one that people who are involved in the drug enforcement administration and the department of justice have ever seen. they want him and they want him badly.
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rikki klieman, thanks very much. [ vocalizing ] [ buzzing ] [ tree crashes ] [ wind howling ]
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the record power ball jackpot is now $1.3 billion. after nobody won last night's drawing. as tareka duncan reports, tens of millions are keeping their lottery dreams alive. >> tonight's jackpot has climbed up to a record-breaking estimated $949.8 million. i hope you have your ticket --
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jackpot is over $1 billion, even those who rarely play are taking a shot. >> you've never played the lottery before? >> maybe once or twice. not usually. you? >> all for me yes, absolutely. >> you know the odds are really slim? >> i know they're huge. fy buy one, the odds aren't as good. fy buy 10, maybe i'll have more chances. >> reporter: lottery officials say the jackpot is the world's largest. an amount with so many digits, billboards across the country can't handle the figure. demand for tickets was so high for last night's drawing, stores reported that some machines ran out of paper to print the tickets. someone purchased 1160 tickets at one time? >> at one time, yes. >> reporter: convenience store manager alex sherrod say they haven't had that problem -- yet. >> we have all extra. >> you ordered extra paper? >> yes. monday. >> reporter: the pot started at $40 million on november 4th and has since rolled over 20 times.
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organizers announced a redesign, making the odds tougher for the big jackpot. but saturday's drawing did create 28 new millionaires with smaller prizes. the next big drawing will be this wednesday. now, a one-time payment amounts to $806 million. but that's before federal and state taxes which will eat up at least 25% of the winnings. $weeks to go until the first votes are cast in the 2016 presidential race. a new poll out today shows hillary clinton and bernie sanders deadlocked in iowa and new hampshire. on the republican side, donald trump and ted cruz are running close in iowa. more now from julianna goldman in washington. >> reporter: on sunday, donald trump said even if he loses iowa, he won't drop out. >> there's no makes. i'm not leaving. >> you're going straight to the convention? >> all the way. >> reporter: that prospect has party leaders and even some
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where no establishment candidate emerges as the trump alternative. >> i do not believe that trump would put a good face on the republican party as president. >> you'd be prepared to see hillary clinton in the white house? >> unfortunately. >> i've never heard that before. that's how much trump has penetrated and how people now think that he has a genuine shot at the nomination. >> reporter: republican pollster frank lutz conducted a poll of iowa republicans friday night. >> iowa voters have become so sophisticated they know the people they choose is not necessarily the people who the rest of america chooses. they think they're going to choose cruz. but they're starting to think that the rest of america may choose trump. >> reporter: according to the most recent poll of likely iowa caucusgoers, cruz and trump are virtually tied with rubio a distant third. in new hampshire trump has a commanding lead and the fight for second and third is playing out between rubio, chris christie, cruz, jeb bush, and
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on "face the nation" house speaker paul ryan said he'd support trump or cruz if one was the nominee and predict republicans will coalesce around the party's pick. >> primaries inevitably have this kind of friction. once you get to the primary i think we unify as a conservative movement. >> there were potentially concerning numbers in the polls for hillary clinton. they show she beats trump in iowa and new hampshire but sanders does much better against the republican front-runner and ted cruz leads clinton in both states while sanders still beats the texas senator. >> okay, julianna goldman. a tornado hit cape coral, florida, last night. nobody was hurt but there was severe damage to one neighborhood. at one point 10,000 people were without power. the storm was an ef-2 with winds up to 135 miles an hour. the united states sent a b-52 bomber on a low-level flight over south korea today. the show of force was said to be in response to north korea's
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the american bomber was escorted by fighter jets from south korea. since october there have been a series of disappearances in hong kong. five employees of a store that sells books critical of the chinese government. today, thousands of protesters turned out to demand answers. seth doane reports. >> reporter: protesters carried signs reading "lead li wo, tomorrow you and me." li disappeared, days later reportedly sent a letter suggesting he was in mainland china assisting with an investigation. li was the fifth person tied to causeway bay books to go missing. >> this book shop specializes in stories that could never be on sale in mainland china criticizing the communist party and the rulers. protesters worry chinese government agents illegally snatched li and took him into
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the hong kong government released a statement saying, law enforcement officers of other jurisdictions do not have the authority to take actions if they are in hong kong. protest sammy chow said the chinese government shouldn't use their tricks to praeft hong kong people. william ni is following this case for amnesty international. >> beijing has -- sees this type of company as posing a threat to national security because they say they're producing rumors and slander about the country's leadership and political system. >> reporter: li wo's picture is just the latest face in the fight against beijing's efforts to exert control. seth doane, cbs news, beijing. coming up next, a young woman arrested in a string of brazen jewel heists. and the game that redefined
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a brutally cold start with an even more painful finnish minnesota today. the temperature was 6 below at kickoff with a windchill of 25 below. that makes it the third-coldest game in nfl history. fans were given free hand warmers and coffee but cold comfort. the hometown vikings lost on a last-second missed 27-yard field
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final seahawks 10, vikings 9. a woman in georgia has been arrested in connection with a multi-million dollar string of jewelry thefts. among the most damaging evidence according to fbi, she was caught on camera and appeared not to care. here's mark strauss man. >> reporter: the fbi says this video shows 24-year-old abigail lee kemp mid-robbery, walk in the front door of a jared jewelry store in north carolina on january 4. she had allegedly forced two employees into a back room at gunpoint and zip tied their hands before helping herself to the store's pricey jewelry. authorities say kemp and this man are behind at least six jewelry heists in georgia, florida, south carolina, tennessee, and north carolina. kemp often dressed in workout clothing but for some reason never hid her face during the robberies. she was caught shortly after the fbi released these surveillance photos and videos. it's unclear whether this man,
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arrested. according to social media profiles, the 24-year-old modeled for at least one photo shoot and once tried out for an atlanta lingerie football team. kemp and her accomplice cased their targets and chose locations close to highways for quick getaways. lawrence borgini is an fbi special agent. >> these are very well-planned jewelry store robberies. they are not just walking into the jewelry stores. they have some knowledge about the industry. >> reporter: kemp is expected to show her face again tomorrow morning in atlanta -- inside a federal courtroom. mark straussman, cbs news, atlanta. police in florence, italy, are investigating the murder of an american woman. 35-year-old ashley olsen of summer haven, florida, was found dead in her apartment yesterday with bruises on her neck. olsen had been living in italy for several years. her boyfriend, a painter, has been questioned but police say
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up next here, a rare look at russia's military operation inside syria. efforts continue to get
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a starving town in syria. today the world food program loaded trucks with food and medical supplies, hoping to get security clearance tomorrow. the assad regime hasn't allowed aid in since october 18. tonight an unprecedented look inside syria. "60 minute" correspondent bill whitaker takes us to the main russian air base in syria where strikes are being launched against enemies of bashar al assad. >> reporter: it was almost midnight when our plane took off from a russian air base outside moscow. as we started to take pictures out the window, we were told nyet, no. something we heard often during the next three days. >> no, no, no, no. >> reporter: this was the first face we saw after landing. that's syrian president bashar al assad. this once was a syrian airport. since the summer, the russians
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4,000 personnel, paved roads, rolled in truckloads of equipment and munitions. erecting a bit of russia in the heart of assad-controlled syria. this is mostly friendly territory. at least 20 miles from the closest front lines. but the russians aren't taking any chances. helicopter gunships constantly patrolled the perimeter. they took us out along newly extended runways to watch a steady series of planes taking off. the roar was deafening. the russians invited about a dozen news organizations on this tour of the latakia air base. they especially wanted us to take note their newest fighter bomber the su-34. our russian guide in syria, major general kanashenkov, is chief spokesman for the ministry
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over the previous 24 hours, he said, 320 insurgents and 34 armored vehicles were destroyed. independent monitoring groups told us some of the planes we saw taking off did bomb isis targets, but most bombed more immediate threats to the assad regime. groups like the u.s.-backed free syrian army and al nusra, the
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going faster than a roller coaster a love like yours will surely come my way hey, hey, hey babies aren't fully developed until at least 39 weeks. if your pregnancy is healthy, wait for labor to begin on its own. a healthy baby is worth the wait. o0 c1 travel is part of the american way of life. when we're on vacation, we keep an eye out for anything that looks out of place. [ indistinct conversations ] miss, your bag. when we travel from city to city, we pay attention to our surroundings. [ cheering ] everyone plays a role in keeping our community safe. whether you're traveling for business or pleasure, be aware of your surroundings. if you see something suspicious,
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finally the most famous party house in the world, the playboy mansion, said to be going up for sale. the asking price, a hefty sum. here's maria villarreal. >> reporter: from the sky or on the ground, the mansion is the picture of elegance. but for decades the insides were less than stately. hefner bought the playboy mansion in 1971 for $1.1 million.
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to be looking for nearly 200 times that much. >> i think that's a stretch. the street certainly supports $50 million, maybe $60 million. they are not making individual lots that size any longer. >> reporter: greg harris specializes in l.a.'s luxury real estate. the house appraises for about $35 million. but he acknowledges there's added historical value to the 22,000 square foot holby hills home, like graceland or michael jackson's neverland. there's a catch. the buyer has to agree to a roommate, hefner himself. >> hef will be able to stay in the house until he passes away. >> somebody's going to pay $200 million and hef gets to stay on the propproperty? >> we haven't seen it at that price point ever happen before but it could. >> reporter: at that asking price harris says a corporation or international investor would be the next likely owner. >> it's pools, grottos, all that kind of thing.
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a lot to maintain. it's an entertainer's home. >> you're putting it very g-rated. >> it's somebody who entertains a lot. >> reporter: while the names on the mansion's title may change, its reputation for excess could likely live on, which might be exactly what certain buyers are looking for. maria villarreal, cbs news, los angeles. >> that is the "cbs overnight news" for this monday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning."
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york city, i'm jeff glor. this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the "overnight news." i'm glef gore. he has made news on and off screen for decades but this may have been his biggest role yet. now he's hearing the critics' reviews. it was sean penn's secret meeting with the world's most wanted drug lord, joaquin el chapo guzman. mexican authorities say that meeting, which took place while
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"rolling stone," played a role in el chapo being recaptured on friday. meg oliver has the story. >> reporter: it's an unassuming backdrop for an interview with the most notorious drug kingpin in the world, the first he has given in decades. the questions come from the cameraman. they're written by actor sean penn who met el chapo for seven hours in october deep in the jungle, convinced chapo to send this tape soon afterward. during the 17-minute recording, the questions are asked are you responsible for so many drugs in the world? guzman says, no, that is false, it's not going to decrease in as for drug trafficking, that's false. the interview is a remarkable twist in an already convoluted tale. it was just two days ago mexican authorities raided this seaside hotel and arrested chapo after a then paraded him in front of the cameras, perhaps to soften their
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from prison last july. the attorney general said it was actors and producers who led them to the fugitive. joaquin guzman had the intention of making a biographical film so he reached out to producers. but this long article penn wrote for "rolling stone," posted on "rolling stone's" website, revealed he may have been one of the actors. the other was mexican actress kate del castillo, who tweeted support for guzman in the past, and who brokered the meeting last october. in the article, penn describes the crazy and risky journey he took. two flights, a 90-minute ride, a bumpy seven-hour drive through the jungle. finally there he is right beside the truck, the world's most famous fugitive, el chapo. during their conversation penn says guzman proudly acknowledged his business, saying, i supply more heroin, methamphetamine, cocaine, and marijuana than anybody else in the world. penn writes he was sure he was being tracked by the government
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meeting, law enforcement raided the hideout and guzman had to flee. he agreed to tape an interview later if penn sent questions by blackberry. in the tape sent back to penn guzman defends his work saying, where i grew up there was no other way and there still isn't a way to survive. no other way to work on our economy, to be able to make a living. the interpreter also asked, are you prone to violence or do you use it as a last resort? guzman responds, look, all i do is defend myself, nothing more. do i start trouble? never. mexican authorities would of course disagree. it is believed guzman is responsible for more than 30,000 deaths. now they're working on starting the extradition process but say they haven't taken a position on sean penn. meg oliver, cbs news, new york. congressional investigators continue to pore over the latest batch of diplomatic e-mails from hillary clinton's personal server.
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about 3,000 more pages of clinton's e-mails while she was secretary of state. one of them is drawing extra attention. >> reporter: republicans argue the newly released e-mail proves former secretary of state knowingly shared sensitive information on her private account. in an exchange from 2011 a top aide alerts clinton that staffers are having issues sending her some talking points via secure fax. clinton responds, if they can't, turn into nonpaper. in other words, an e-mail. with no identifying heading and send nonsecure. the topic and sensitivity of the talking points aren't clear. that part is redacted. still, the republican chair of the senate judiciary committee called the exchange disturbing and called for a criminal inquiry. the clinton campaign told cbs news, it is false that hillary clinton asked for classified material to be sent over a
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the exchange was among 2,900 pages of clinton's e-mails released by the state department. just this week the state department's own internal watchdog said the agency's responses to questions about clinton's i mails have been inaccurate and incomplete. state department officials insist they don't have the resources to keep up with all the requests they get from the public and the media. john dickerson discussed the latest controversy on "face the nation." >> another batch of your e-mails were released by the state department. one of them is a back and forth between you and a staffer about a secure fax that wouldn't come through. and you directed him to "turn into nonpaper with no identifying heading and send nonsecure." aren't you ordering him to violate the laws on handling classified material there? >> no, not at all. and as the state department said just this week, that did not happen. and it never would have happened.
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i treated classified information. headings are not classification notices. so oftentimes we're frying to get the best information we can and obviously what i'm asking for is whatever can be transmitted if it doesn't come through secure, to be transmitted on the unclassified system. so, no, there is nothing to that, like so much else that has been talked about in the last year. >> so in no instance -- what's striking about that particular e-mail, it suggests you were very pass sill with how to do this, this process. you knew the instructions how to get around sending restrictions for classified information. you're saying there was never an instance, any other instance in which you did not? >> no. and it wasn't sent. so i think this is another instance where what is common practice, namely, look, i need
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had to make, and i was waiting for a secure fax that could give me the whole picture. but oftentimes there's a lot of information that isn't at all classified. so whatever information can be appropriately transmitted, unclassified, often was. that's true for every agency in the government and everybody who does business with the government. but the important point here is i had great confidence because i'd worked with jake sullivan for years, he is the most meticulous meticulous, careful person you could possibly do business with. and he knew exactly what was and wasn't appropriate. and in fact, as the state department has said, there was no transmission of any classified information. so it's another effort by people looking for something to throw against the wall, as you said in the beginning of the program, to see what sticks. but there's no there there. >> this one is a little different since the fbi is investigating this specific question of whether a classification was meddled with. let me ask you about another
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one in which you seemed to express surprise somebody e-mailed on their nonstate department personal e-mail which is what you were doing. why was that a surprise to you? >> i e-mailed two people on their government accounts because i knew that all of that would be part of the government system. and indeed the vast majority of all my e-mails are in the government system. so that's how i conduct the
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two migrants who fled the war-torn middle east are now under arrest in the u.s. on terror charges. one is from texas, the other california. julianna goldman reports. >> the criminal complaints suggest the two men did talk with one another and discuss traveling to syria to train and to fight. but there's no evidence that they intended or planned attacks in the u.s. and from capitol hill to the
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reigniting the political debate over whether the u.s. is doing enough to screen refugees from syria and iraq. omar al hardan was escorted into a texas courtroom friday facing charges he attempted to provide material support to isis. the 24-year-old iraqi refugee who lives in houston has been in the u.s. since 2009. hours later, in sacramento, al jaab was in court. the 24-year-old came to the u.s. in 2012. investigators allege soon after he was communicating via social media with terrorist organizations. he traveled to syria to fight with rebels opposing president assad. in march and april of 2013, he messages "i am coming to syria. i am eager to see blood." that november, he flew from chicago to turkey and then to aleppo where investigators say he took up arms with terrorist organizations and concealed that conduct from immigration
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the u.s. in 2014. the two arrests have added fuel to the fiery political debate over admitting refugees from the region into the u.s. >> this is the kind of threat that keeps me up at night. >> reporter: on capitol hill, house homeland security chairman michael mccall said the two men may have been radicalized after they came to the u.s. >> how many ticking time bombs are we going to bring in in this prefuji program without a proper vetting system in place? >> reporter: on the campaign trail, republican presidential candidate ted cruz echoed those concerns. the texas senator brought up the two arrests at stops across iowa on friday. >> president obama's proposing bringing tens of thousands of syrian refugees to america even though the fbi says we cannot vet those refugees to determine whether or not they are isis terrorists. >> reporter: and donald trump, who has called for a ban on muslims entering the country, also weighed in. >> we're not going to let people come in from syria that we never
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they could be isis. >> reporter: according to u.s. intelligence officials, more than 36,000 foreign fighters have traveled to syria, 250 have come from the u.s. police in philadelphia say a muslim man who ambushed a police officer while he sat in his squad car said he was inspired by isis. despite being wounded the officer returned fire and the suspect is under arrest. tariqa dun condition has more. >> reporter: chilling video, a man seen shooting directly into this philadelphia police car thursday night. authorities say 30-year-old edward archer confessed to the shooting which involved a 9 millimeter pistol stolen from an officer's home in 2013. archer told authorities he ambushed 33-year-old officer jesse hartnett in the name of isis. >> shots fired! i'm shot, i'm bleeding heavily! >> reporter: the officer, shot three times, could have easily been killed. commissioner richard ross, along
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into the suspect's alleged motive. is this, in fact, connected to a terrorist organization? >> we wouldn't say that, and we don't know. he certainly doesn't strike me as a guy who has intelligence around him. stopping just short of implicating himself too much or anyone else. >> reporter: cbs has learned the fbi is investigating two overseas trips archer made to cairo in 2011 and saudi arabia in 2012. archer's arrest record includes aggravated assault, weapons charges, and terroristic threats in 2012. in that case he was accused of pointing a gun at a man. in 2013, he was arrested again on an illegal gun possession charge. at the home where police say archer lived with his mother, no one answered the door. the two people who arrived later said they had no comment. the officer is in the hospital tonight recovering from a broken
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adolf hitler's memoir "mein kampf" is on sale in germany for the first time since world war ii. the first printing sold out quickly. the report from our london bureau. >> reporter: the nuremberg rallies of the 1930s were for many the first glimpse of hitler's nazi germany. his anti-semitic tirades divided the country. long before the atrocities of the holocaust and the millions of jews murdered history had an outline. hitler's "mein kampf," or "my struggle," his 1920s manifesto that paved the way. the nazis printed at least 10 million copies. they were sold widely and handed out by the government to newlyweds and soldiers are. 1945 when hitler died and world war ii ended the allies handed the copyright to the bavarian government, who stopped the presses. 75 years later that copyright has expired and "mein kampf" is back in german bookstores for the first time.
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who lived through it hoped would stay closed. this latest printing has some key additions to the original copy. the german government would only allow an annotated version with academic analysis of the text. "this edition exposes the false information spread by hitler, his downright lies, and his many half-truths," said this professor, director of germany's institute for contemporary history, the book's publisher. scholars also say the reprint will demystify hitler by exposing just how bad a writer he was. >> it's a waffle. it's a rant. it's unstructured. it is unreadable. i think making that open and showing that to potentially interested students is a good thing. >> reporter: the publishing house behind the new edition says they can't keep up with the demand. controversy, it appears, sells books. reaction has been mixed in israel. >> it's complicated. on the one hand, i'm not
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"mein kampf" can now are in even wider dissemination around the world, given the hateful content that it contains. but on the other hand, it's kind of impossible to control speech. and i'm not even sure that we should. >> reporter: hitler's original "mein kampf" is already sold widely in countries outside of germany and online. scholars say far from being a fascist bible, the new version offers crucial context that exposes a horrific past so history can't repeat itself. a political mystery is being written in hong kong where five people who either publish or sell books critical of china's communist government have disappeared. the latest to vanish owned a bookstore. seth doane has the story from honk done. >> reporter: since hong kong was handed over from british to chinese rule in 1997 it has retained some of its autonomy, notably its own legal system and freedom of speech. now with the case of those missing booksellers and word of
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mainland, some worry those freedoms may be under threat. sandwiched between a pharmacy and a nail salon, up a cramped stairwell, is causeway bay books which was closed today. in the hallway, some of the gossipy, salacious titles it was known for. criticizing china's leaders. this book talks about china's first lady's private lave. this title predicts the downfall of china's president, xi jinping. now the story of this bookstore is harder to believe since five men tied to it have disappeared. the most recent, li wo, expected home for dinner december 30th but never showed. days later this faxed letter purportedly from li said, due to some urgent matters i have made my own way to the mainland. it might take a bit of time. protesters carrying fote else to of the missing booksellers have demanded answers. there was no record of li
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why is the case of this missing book bookseller so important? >> well, i think it concerns the basic security and safety of hong kong people. >> reporter: hong kong legislator albert ho worries chinese authorities or their agents may have illegally taken li into the mainland. >> we are concerned about an incident of political kidnap. >> reporter: china's government linked global times newspaper wrote li was not taken away by chinese mainland police officers, but was critical of the bookstore, calling it a source of political rumors and evil influence. >> this seems like an attack on freedom the press. >> reporter: amnesty international's william ni notes china does not have jurisdiction to come to hong kong and detain someone. >> in china right now, this type of thing is completely normal. what's common in mainland china is not common in hong kong. hong kong has a different system and that's why people are so alarmed in this case. >> reporter: it is widely known that mainlanders come to hong kong to buy books and the fear
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authorities are now reaching into hong kong's affairs. we contacted officials both here and in beijing but were not able to get any more answers as to where li (ugh.) does your carpet ever feel rough and dirty? don't avoid it, resolve it. our formula with a special conditioning ingredient, softens your carpet with every use. it's resolve, so you know it cleans and freshens. but it also softens. resolve. a carpet that welcomes you. and to clean pet messes, try resolve pet expert. olay regenerist renews from within, plumping surface cells for a dramatic transformation without the need for fillers your concert tee might show your age...
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for your joints, cartilage and bones. and unlike the big osteo-bi flex pills, it's all in one tiny pill. move free ultra. get your move on. we were below the 88th southern parallel. we had traveled for over 850 miles. my men driven nearly mad from starvation and frostbite. today we make history. >>bienvenidos! welcome to the south pole! if you're dora the explorer, you explore. it's what you do. >>what took you so long? if you want to save fifteen percent or more on car insurance, you switch to geico. it's what you do. >>you did it, yay! a newborn in texas shares a special bond with her
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grandma carried the baby to term, acting as a surrogate for her daughter. >> reporter: it's a modern family tree of sorts. kelly and her husband aaron have been trying for three years to have a baby resulting in several heartbreaking miscarriages. that's when kelly said her mother stepped in and gave her what she described as the greatest gift of her life. >> when she was 13 years old she said, mom, if i can't have a baby, would you have one for me? at 13. and i said, sure, absolutely. you know, not thinking that's what god was telling me that many years ago. >> reporter: the birth of baby kelsey was truly a family affair. kelly was there for the birth of her daughter, sharing the moment with her mother tracy. >> pulled her little head out, that was the most amazing thing i've ever seen in my life, ever. >> reporter: for years kelly and her husband aaron tried to have a baby on their own. the couple tried several infertility treatments.
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did at any point you think, we're not going to have kids? >> no. that was never an option for us. >> reporter: they had four remaining embryos from their final round of in vitro fertilization. so her mom offered to make good on her promise from years ago. >> she was like, i think i need to do this. and -- i said, i think you need to think about it. >> were you hesitant? >> i mean, just -- just for her health. >> reporter: at 53, tracy was already seven years into menopause. but in excellent health. so doctors put her on treatments to allow her body to carry a baby again. >> when i was in my 20s and pregnant with her and her brother, it was easy. >> how was it in your 50s? >> it was difficult. it was just exhausting. >> reporter: while it's not necessarily the norm in surrogacy surrogacy, this isn't the first time a grandmother has given birth to her own grandchild. the first case on record took place in 1987 in south africa. a 48-year-old woman was the surrogate for her 25-year-old daughter. she gave birth to healthy
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the first reported case in the u.s. was in 1991. 42-year-old arlet schweitzer carried twins for her 22-year-old daughter, who was born without a uterus. it's happened multiple times in the years since then. when kelsey gets older how do you tell this story to her? >> we will make sure that she literally, growing up, knows every step. it will be part of her story. embarrassed by a prostate exam? imagine how your doctor feels. as a urologist, i have performed 9,421 and a half prostate exams. so why do i do it? because i get paid. und... on this side of the glove i know prostate exams can save lives. so, if you are a man over 50, talk to you doctor to see if a prostate exam is right for you. if we can do it, so can you.
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steve hartman caught up with a young man who might be worth twice his weight in olympic gold. at the olympic training center in colorado springs, american weight lifters carry a heavy burden. the u.s. men's team hasn't won a gold medal in 56 years. but coach sigmund smallfairs says that streak may be ending thanks to one incredible lifter. >> he's massive. so fantastic.
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gods. >> reporter: where is this hercules? you won't believe. here at beaufort high school in beaufort, south carolina. 15-year-old c.j. cummings looks like just another kid. in fact, everyone thought he was just another kid. until three years ago when he walked into his first national men's tournament. >> they thought i was just like a spectator. >> a spectator? how well did you do? >> i got second. >> reporter: at the age of 12. since then, he has been dubbed the lebron james of u.s. weightlifting. but even that may be selling him short. last august, this 5'4", 150-pound kid attempted the unimaginable. >> this is 385 pounds? >> yes. >> reporter: picture a kitchen stove on each end of that bar. >> okay, that's good. >> reporter: no american in his weight class had ever done that much in the clean and jerk.
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along. an american men's record. set by a boy. after this lift, his personal coach, ray jones, says a lot of people didn't believe the reports. >> and i can understand that. if i wasn't there, i don't know that i would. i'm telling you. >> reporter: to that end a local professor of sports medicine set up a bunch of cameras and sensors to try to figure out exactly how c.j.'s doing this. he found nothing special in his technique, proving that c.j. was either sent here directly from the planet krypton, or he's just plain strong. and get this. coaches say he's still at least ten years away from reaching his full potential. probably another four till his first olympics. until then, he'll be busy inspiring young weight lifters across the country. and exercising a great deal of patience. >> i should take it as far as i
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medal for the u.s. >> have you thought about a wheaties box? >> what is that? >> what's a wheaties box? >> yeah. >> reporter: told you heas young. steve hartman on the road in beaufort, south carolina. >> that is the "cbs overnight news" for this monday. for some of you the captioning funded by cbs it's monday, january 11th, 2016. this is the "cbs morning news." legendary and influential singer and songwriter david
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