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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  September 16, 2016 2:44am-4:00am MDT

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reassured and they then happen to have a bonobo handshake to feel better. >> males will do that with females, males will do it with males, females with females. >> any combination. any age. >> reporter: it's an irony that this peace-loving primate is being hunted to extinction. though it's illegal to kill or capture bonobos in congo, that hasn't slowed their decline. forest animals are sold in bustling bush meat markets for food. the largest in congo's capital kinshasa, you can buy monkeys, porcupines, even alligators, dead or alive. bonobos aren't openly sold here anymore. but you can still buy them in many parts of congo. their orphan babies often end up in the only place that can care for them.
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the babies arrive traumatized, often injured. each is assigned a surrogate human mother, and their job is to raise the babies as their own, showering them with the love and attention the orphan apes so desperately need. it's incredible to see them up close like this. i >> human. >> yeah. >> you know, i say all the time that for sure they are great apes. they are not us. and we are not them. but we have a line in the middle of the two worlds that we cross all the time. >> reporter: baby bon beobos ar playful as any human toddler,
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she's in charge of their welfare at lola and oversees their rehabilitation. >> you have a child of your own. >> yes. >> how are they different? >> i can say there's no different. >> i mean, you really have to be a mother to -- >> yes. and most of time you need experienced mother. so they give a lot of affection and this is the only way to save them. >> that's what saves these babies. >> yes. and make them in life. >> they need love. >> yeah. absolutely. without that they die. bonobos because she felt they could teach us a lot about human evolution. after five years at lola she realized that their behavior is closer to ours than she'd ever imagined. is it hard not to think of them as human? >> yes. yes. because we share most of time, we share time with them. >> you spend all day with them. >> all day. >> reporter: and at the end of that day suzie sees to it the
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at 6:00 p.m. it's lights out. >> do you read them a story? >> no. they don't need because they're tired. they spend all the time jumping and playing so much as now. >> they're exhausted. >> they're very exhausted. >> reporter: by age 35 t5 the orphaned apes move from the nursery to the kindergarten where their peers teach them something their human mothers never could. they teach introducing new k-y touch gel cr?me. every touch, gently intensified. a little touch is all it takes. k-y touch. >> i'm alex trebek. if you're age 50 to 85, this is an important message. so please, write down the number on your screen. the lock i want to talk to you about isn't the one on your door. it's a rate lock for your life insurance that guarantees your rate
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the beach boys have sold more than 100 million records over the past half century. but "good vibrations" didn't always exist between the band members. lead singer mike love is back on tour without his cousin brian wilson. love discussed their ups and downs with anthony mason. ? i'm picking up good vibrations ? >> reporter: 50 years ago the beach boys rode this song to mike love says he actually wrote the lyrics riding to the recording studio with his then wife. >> i said take this down. i'm driving along. you know. i love the colorful clothes she wears and the way the sunlight plays upon her hair. ? i love the colorful clothes she wears ? >> reporter: "good vibrations" is the title of love's new autobiography. ? i'm picking up good vibrations ?
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harmonies has a history of discord. >> when did your interest in singing start? >> well, since i sang together with my cousin brian when we were little kids. ? if everybody had an ocean ? ? across the usa ? >> reporter: the beach boys were a family band. the three wilson brothers, brian, dennis, and carl. cousin mike and friend al jardine. ? round, round get around ? arranged their intricate harmonies. mike, the lead singer, often supplied the lyrics. but the wilsons' father, who managed the band early on, didn't give him credit. >> he never put my name on the label copy of the song. so i never got paid, nor did i get credit for doing like "surfing usa," "california girls," "can help me rhonda," "i get around." >> which led to you --
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but there was no other recourse. ? i may not always love you ? >> reporter: in the mid '60s at the height of the beach boys' success brian wilson abruptly quit touring with the group and retreated to the studio. ? wouldn't it be nice ? he produced the band's highly acclaimed album "pet sounds" but began a long battle with drugs and mental illness. >> there's a point there where you say you basically lost your quarterback. >> well, yeah. and more than even a your cousin. you know, because drugs intervened and took him away. it wasn't the same brian after the lsd. >> did your relationship ever really recover after that? >> not entirely. i don't think so. >> reporter: charles manson even entered the picture in the late '60s when he briefly moved into dennis wilson's house with his family. love remembers showing up after
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it was full-on orgy. so i bailed. >> reporter: so he went to take a shower. >> and somebody followed me into the shower. and then charlie followed that someone and said you can't do that. you can't leave the group. and the way he said it, it was charlie manson style. "you can't leave the group." i mean, it was freakish. ? little surfer ? >> reporter: for years the three surviving original beach boys, have each toured with their own bands. in 2012 they reunited for a 50th anniversary tour. in an interview for "cbs sunday morning" the reyoun appeared to get off to a promising start. >> brian said how does a 70-year-old guy sound that good? >> i meant that literally, not in a bad way.
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unraveled, in part because love resented interference from melinda wilson, brian's wife. >> she once told me that brian's not your partner, i'm your [ bleep ] partner. that's what she said. >> and your response to that was? >> well, i think my response was to turn and leave. it was not a pleasant thing to hear. because you know, i wrote all these songs with my you know. and as i said before, and i still say, it was just he and i, it would be fine. >> have you talked to him since then? >> no. >> why not? >> he's unavailable. >> reporter: for those who believe that brian walks on water, love writes, "i will always be the antichrist."
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wfrnlths . if you could reimagine your high school education, what would it be like? well, the super school project held a contest, and ten schools came out on top. each gets $10 million to put their ideas in place. chip reid visited one of the winners. >> yellow. >> reporter: at the washington leadership ac charter high school in the nation's capital, learning is hands on. >> we got one. >> reporter: to learn cryptography, teams compete to unlock codes to open boxes that hold prizes. >> one, two, three, four. >> reporter: in music class they learn about rhythm by becoming djs. >> one, two, three, four. >> reporter: and they don't just experience virtual reality. >> immersed in this full 360
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coding to create alternate worlds. the school's high-tech approach to teaching is so out of the box that yesterday it was named as one of ten schools across the nation to receive a $10 million grant from xq, the super school project. the contest was funded by lore yeen powell jobs, the wife of the late apple founder, steve jobs. >> they're working together to solve a problem. >> reporter: at the school she found the kind of creative and collaborative approach to learning she says students need >> they feel very nervous and anxious ridden that they're not prepared to enter the workforce. they actually want to understand how to be part of the 21st century workforce, and they feel like they're not being equipped to do that. >> reporter: another $10 million winner is fair high school in houston. >> congratulations. you are a super school. [ cheers and applause ] >> reporter: when 82-year-old bernie simmons hold the news in
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but simmons transformed it over the past 15 years. something she never imagined when she took the job. >> and i knew they had in excess of 12 gangs, and i didn't think they would want me there. and i said i must be some kind of crazy old woman to be out here thinking i could make a difference in this school. >> reporter: how'd she do it? she started by meeting with all of the gang leaders. >> inside were you frightened? >> inside i was fright. and i would just smile and say let's talk about this. >> reporter: so they did. a lot. and eventually they came to trust her and the gang violence stopped. >> i think what i've learned from that is that if you show respect that you get respect. >> reporter: the graduation rate, barely 50% when she arrived, is now over 90%. and that's the overnight news for this friday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning
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from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm don dahler. ? she's back. ? i feel good ? >> hillary clinton returns to the trail as the race tightens to a tie. also tonight, the death of a muslim recruit. the marines call it suicide. the family's lawyer thinks he knows why. been provided so far indicate that his religion may have had a major role. a desperate call to 911 from the home of an alleged killer. >> what's the problem? >> i've been abducted. and the wrigley field of dreams, transplanted. >> see how my grass is doing today.
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>> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." 53 days to the election, and have a look at this. a tie. a cbs news/"new york times" poll shows equal numbers of likely voters nationwide favoring hillary clinton and donald trump. but remember, the election is really 51 separate contests to rack up the 270 electoral votes we're going to tell you how that's shaping up in a moment, but first clinton, home three days with pneumonia, appeared yesterday in north carolina. here's nancy cordes. >> reporter: clinton returned to the campaign trail with a wave and a tongue-in-cheek new theme song. ? i feel good ? ? i knew that i would now ? determined to send a message that she's on the mend. >> nobody ever accuses me of quitting.
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i'll never walk away, no matter how tough the going gets. [ cheers and applause ] i'm actually asking americans to hold me accountable for my ideas and hold my opponent accountable for his. >> reporter: when it comes to those ideas, the new cbs news/"new york times" poll finds voters think clinton would do a better job handling terrorism, immigration, and foreign policy. but they say trump would do a better job with the ecy. trump's voters are also more likely than clinton's to say they are very enthusiastic about voting. >> it's important to sit with your thoughts every now and then. >> reporter: in greensboro clinton said her sick days had given her time to reflect on the kind of race she wants to run in the final seven weeks. >> i want to give americans something to vote for, not just against. with all the noise and
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focus on what really matters and the real choice in this election. >> reporter: she'd like to put her illness behind her but was asked repeatedly today why her running mate wasn't informed about her pneumonia diagnosis until she nearly fainted at ground zero. >> we communicated. we've communicated. but i am, you know, not going to go into our personal conversations. and i feel very comfortable and confident about our relationship. >> reporter: clinton said she's going to focus in this final stretch on the issues that motivated her to run in the first place. opportunities for kids and fairness for families. she called it the cause of her life and said it would be her driving passion as president. scott. >> nancy cordes, thanks. today we got trump's doctor's report. he's 6'3", 236 pounds. blood pressure 116 over 70. he takes a low-dose aspirin and a statin to lower his cholesterol, which is 169. excellent health, his doctor
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today trump talked about the health of the economy, and here's major garrett. >> my economic plan rejects the cynicism that says our labor force will keep declining, that our jobs will keep leaving, and that our economy can never grow as it did once before. >> reporter: donald trump today called for more than $4 trillion in across-the-board tax cuts, an increase in defense spending, and a massive expansion of domestic energy production. >> over the next ten years our economic team estimates that under our plan the economy will average 3.5% growth and create a total of 25 million new jobs. >> reporter: economic growth has hovered between 1.6% and 2.6% since the great recession ended in 2009.
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averaged 4% annual growth was during the bill clinton presidency. trump also vowed to shred existing trade deals and cancel pending ones with asia and europe. >> i'm not running to be the president of the world. i'm running to be the president of the united states of america. >> hillary clinton supported nafta. >> reporter: yesterday in flint, michigan while addressing members of an african-american church helping residents deal with lead-tainted water, trump veered into political attacks on hillary clinton when pastor faith green timmons intervened. >> everything she touched didn't work out. nothing. >> mr. trump, i invited you here to thank us -- >> oh, okay. >> -- not to give a political speech. >> okay. >> reporter: this is what trump said about pastor timmons today. >> the audience was fantastic. but she was so nervous. she was like a nervous mess. >> reporter: in fact, some in the audience were hostile, even heckled trump about complaints of discrimination at trump housing developments. scott, back on the economy,
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but bipartisan analysts say it relies on "rosy assumptions and murky policy changes." >> major garrett, thanks. well, with the direction of the election a little bit murky, we turn to our cbs news director of elections, anthony salvanto. anthony, nancy mentioned the enthusiasm gap. what does that mean to clinton? >> well, scott, right now the polls show the voters who are most likely to turn out in november. if they're not enthusiastic, ey tied. here's another. donald trump is now doing as well with his republican base as hillary clinton is with her democratic base. that wasn't the case this summer. finally, remember they both still have some work to do. in this poll 2/3 of voters, the highest we've ever seen, tell us they feel this campaign is the most negative that they can recall. >> now, we found that tie in the national contest, but of course what really matters is that the race is also tightening in the
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>> right. scott, coming into this, hillary clinton still has the electoral college lead. but i think it's going to come down ultimately to these four states. we start with florida, where the race has tightened. if donald trump can put that in his column, then we go to ohio, where we've also seen polling suggesting that race is tightening. he gets ohio, he goes on to north carolina. now, he's been trailing there, but that voted republican last time, so he's got hope. but then he would still need to win one more big, democratic-leaning state like pennsylvania. if he gets that, he'd go over the top. tough, but what we see from today's polling is that he does have the momentum. >> insight from anthony salvanto. thanks, anthony. the "cbs overnight news" will be
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now, in another important story tonight one marine recruit is dead, another injured, amid allegations of brutal hazing during basic training. both men were muslims. and now more than a dozen marines could face punishment. here's david martin. >> start crawling. parris island boot camp is supposed to be tough. but a marine corps investigation found that earlier this year a drill sergeant assaulted a recruit, who then jumped to his death. the sergeant slapped raheel siddiqui, a 20-year-old pakistani american recruit who claimed he had a sore throat. after being slapped siddiqui vaulted the railing of a stairwell, causing him to fall
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attorney shiraz khan says the family believes their son was hounded to his death because of his religion. >> all the evidence that have been provided so far indicate that his religion may have had a major role in this. >> reporter: the investigation found siddiqui should already have been declared unfit for training because of an earlier suicide threat. and the drill sergeant who slapped siddiqui should already have been suspended from his duties because of allegations he haus that recruit testified the drill sergeant had accused him of being a terrorist, demanding to know what he had to do with 9/11. two drill sergeants ordered the recruit into an industrial-strength clothes dryer. they closed the door and ran the dryer for about 30 seconds. when the recruit refused to admit he was a terrorist, they
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up on criminal charges and found clear evidence of dereliction of duty by the officers in charge. some commanders have already been fired. and scott, a total of 20 marines face possible disciplinary action. >> david martin with the story for us tonight. david, thank you. two new york city police officers were attacked today by a man with a meat cleaver. it happened at the start of the evening rush hour this evening in midtown manhattan. one officer was cut, the other grazed. police shot the suspect. he's in the hospital. today the family of sandra bland reached a $1.9 million settlement in a wrongful death lawsuit. it was in july of last year that bland died in a texas jail cell after a minor traffic violation. omar villafranca is at the waller county jail. >> reporter: it started like a routine traffic stop when a texas state trooper pulled over sandra bland for failing to signal a lane change in july of
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escalated. >> and then you -- >> i will light you up! get out! >> wow. >> reporter: 28-year-old bland was later taken to the waller county jail. and three days later she was found hanging in her jail cell. >> no justice! >> no peace! >> reporter: activists questioned her death and why she was even arrested. no one was charged in bland's death. but trooper brian encinia was fired for violating department procedures, which require officers to be courteous and patient. an autopsy found that bland had hanged herself with a trash bag in her jail cell, raising questions about how inmates are monitored. a year later bland's mother, geneva reed-veal, welcomes the settlement. >> sandy's death meant something. and literally, across the country she is known now. so she's got a legacy. >> reporter: in addition to the ayout to the bland family, waller county agreed to change procedures at the jail, including improved electronic
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cells, a nurse or emergency medical technician must be on duty during all shifts, and pledging to seek state help to improve jail functions. any legislation passed will be named in honor of bland. >> these are things that needed to be in place prior to her death, but for now i think that it's important that no other family has to go through this type of pain. >> reporter: the attorney for waller county says the deal has not been finalized. scott, he also released a statement saying they vigorously deny any fault or wrongdoing. >> omar villafranca. omar, thank you. in syria tonight the cease-fire is holding by and large, but desperately needed aid has still not arrived in aleppo, once syria's largest city. elizabeth palmer is there. >> reporter: oh, yeah. youseff ibrahim is showing me around what was his neighborhood. six weeks ago syrian soldiers and russian bombers in a ferocious battle took it back
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and this is what's left. in the background as we spoke, the sounds of war. youseff, i just heard a big boom there. what was that? "oh, it's coming from over there," he told me. but isn't there supposed to be a cease-fire? "yes, it's those gunmen from al-nusra, one of the islamist militias," he said. "last night the shelling was nonstop." but with nowhere to go youseff and his family have moved back in. and they're now hoping like hundreds of thousands of others for united nations aid. but it remains so far stalled in turkey. until under a u.s.-russian proposal all armed groups and the syrian army have withdrawn from the castello road, the main highway into northern aleppo, and the russian military has secured it. i'm standing on a section of the
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under the terms of the proposal, syrian soldiers like the ones at the checkpoint behind me would be pulled out and the u.n. trucks would be not only guaranteed safe passage but also no one would be able to stop them until they reached their destination. but a blame game has stalled the whole process. the russians point the finger at u.s.-backed rebel groups, who they say haven't pulled back. meanwhile, an exhausted and battered population has no option but to wait. to ward off any attempt by the assad government to channel more aid into the areas it controls, the u.n. has made it clear that the trucks will be sealed and only u.n. officials, scott, will decide who gets the contents. >> liz palmer inside syria tonight. i take prilosec otc each morning for my frequent heartburn because you can't beat zero heartburn!
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a woman's desperate call to police capture a possible serial killer. anna werner has more on this. >> what's the problem? >> i've been abducted. >> reporter: the 18-minute-long 911 call came from a kidnapped woman held for three days, whispering to a dispatcher. >> is there any way you can get out of the building? >> i don't know without waking him, and i'm scared. >> reporter: she called 911 from the bedroom where her abductor slept, in this abandoned house
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>> please hurry. oh, [ bleep ]. oh, [ bleep ]. i woke him up. >> set the phone down. >> reporter: the woman escaped out of the bedroom and saw officers walking near the house through a window. >> hurry, hurry. >> she said to hurry up and come back. >> reporter: moments later the officers broke in. >> where is he? >> sleeping. >> sleeping? >> yeah. >> okay. they have her. >> show me your hands. right now! do it! >> reporter: after the rescue police found the remains of two women inside the house. officers arrested 40-year-old shawn michael grate at the scene and charged him with two counts of murder and one count of kidnapping. authorities say grate later led them to a third body in a neighboring town. 43-year-old stacey stanley was identified as one of the women found dead inside the home. she had been missing since last thursday. her sister, jeana stanley.
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her, it was -- and to these other women, he's a monster. >> reporter: well, it may take weeks for one of those bodies to be identified because it was badly decomposed. scott, shawn grate will be in court for his arraignment tomorrow. >> anna werner, thank you very much. up next, an update on that smartphone recall. our bacteria family's been on this cushion for generations. alright kiddos! everybody off the backpack, we made it to the ottoman. i like to watch them clean, finally there's a disinfectant mist designed for sofas, mattresses and more. introducing new lysol max cover. its innovative cap has a 2x wider spray that kills 99.9% of bacteria. max cover is another great way to lysol that. hi! welcome to the katy kat collection. my new mascara katy kat eye it's the all-day 360 cat eye ten times volume, darkness and no smudging katy kat eye and new katy kat matte lipstick
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l covergirl ? music ? extraordinary starts here. new k-y intense. a stimulating gel that takes her pleasure to new heights. k-y intense. today the u.s. government ordered a recall of the galaxy note 7 smartphone.
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the phones after batteries had caught fire. the government says customers should turn the phones off immediately. today friends and family gathered at jazz at lincoln center's rose theater to celebrate the life of morley safer. ? in 45 years at "60 minutes" safer wrote more than 900 stories, with style, grace, and honesty. in 1987 he took us to a ? >> each person that i spoke to here said they love this place but each one wondered what all those untalented others were doing here. >> reporter: he was most proud of his investigation of the conviction of lenell geter, a texas man wrongly imprisoned for armed robbery. >> i consider myself a hostage
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>> and there's one more thing -- >> well, the more we started to check it out the more this story of conviction just smelled to high heaven. >> reporter: eyewitnesses agreed. >> is that the men who held up the kentucky fried chicken? >> no. >> was that the man who held up the kentucky fried chicken? >> no, sir. >> when "60 minutes" ran their segment, i was out within about seven days. i wouldn't have a family had he not taken the time to come down here and take a snapshot of my experience. he saved my life. >> morley's life ended in may. but he lives by example in all
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the chicago cubs could clinch the national league central title tonight. they have the best record in baseball. 93 wins, 52 losses. they also hold a less proud record. 108 years without a world championship. here's the dean of beleaguered
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>> programs! >> reporter: wrigley field, home of the cubs, is known around here as the friendly confines. but for generations and generations of devoted or perhaps delusional fans it's been a torture chamber. >> reaching into the stands and coldn't get it. and he's livid with a fan. >> ground ball hit the dirt. right through his legs! >> reporter: the bobbles, brain cramps and bad luck have added up to more than a century of called third strikes and crushing losses. sure, the vines on the walls are nice, but the play on the field has often been less attractive. >> julio, you're not gardening in panama. >> reporter: who but the cubs could score 22 runs in a game and lose? their last world championship occurred when roosevelt was president. teddy roosevelt. and while they did manage another world series appearance, that was 71 years ago, and they lost. supposedly because of a curse
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>> nice green. >> i'd like to think so. >> reporter: so it's kind of hard to explain people like richie gracia. gracia is such a fan that he has reverently resodded his back yard with actual grass from wrigley field. >> how many times have the cubs broken your heart? just hearing the words "the cubs have the best record in baseball" could send more superstitious fans into a defensive crouch. but not gracia. >> i really believe this is the year and it's just going to make all those years so much sweeter, you know? >> reporter: did you believe last year was the year? >> every year. i've been buying these jerseys since 2002. >> reporter: since 2002. and nothing's happened. >> it's okay. this is different. this is a new team. it's a new year. and that's the overnight news for this friday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and of course "cbs this
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from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm scott pelley. >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." and welcome to the overnight news. i'm don dahler. 20 united states marines including officers and drill instructors could face charges in the death of a recruit last march. 20-year-old raheel siddiqui fell basic training. the marines called it a suicide but his family doesn't believe it. they say siddiqui was targeted for hazing and abuse because he was a muslim. david martin reports. >> reporter: parris island in south carolina is a notoriously tough boot camp for marine corps recruits. but an investigation has found what appears to be singling out
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>> starting now you will treat me and all other marines with the highest respect. >> reporter: every class of marine recruits gets a speech like this from their drill instructor. >> physical or verbal abuse by any marine or recruit will not be tolerated! >> reporter: according to marine corps investigators, raheel siddiqui, a 20-year-old pakistani american, committed suicide last march by throwing himself down a stairwell after being slapped by a drill sergeant. in for siddiqui's jumping from the building. it also found clear indicators that siddiqui should have been disqualified from training because he had threatened to commit suicide five days earlier. >> the family does not believe that their son, a patriotic young man, an intelligent young man, would take his own life. to them it makes no sense. >> reporter: family attorney shiraz khan says there isn't
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>> when there's clear findings of hazing, maltreatment, and abuse, how they can still say this was a suicide. >> reporter: the same drill sergeant who allegedly assaulted siddiqui was already under investigation for an earlier incident in which he allegedly ordered another muslim recruit into an industrial clothes dryer. the recruit told investigators two drill sergeants accused him of being a terrorist and demanded to know if he was part of 9/11. when the recruit denied he was working for a terrorist organization, the drill sergeants closed the dryer and ran it for about 30 seconds. they repeated hat at least two more times, burning the recruit on his neck and shoulders. the recruit testified he could smell alcohol on the drill sergeants' breath. >> my intuition said that something was wrong. >> reporter: congresswoman debbie dingell has been looking into the circumstances surrounding private siddiqui's death. she visited parris island last weekend. >> i know this young muslim from my district should be with us today.
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military. but there's a line. you've crossed it when you are putting someone in a clothes dryer. >> reporter: the investigation found multiple derelictions of duty by officers and sergeants in charge of training recruits at parris island. 20 marines have been singled out for possible disciplinary action including criminal charges. at least seven children have been hospitalized and hundreds more could be in danger of a serious bacterial infection linked to a california dental john blackstone has the story from anaheim. >> reporter: doctors are closely monitoring 3-year-old jibran and treating him with i.v. antibiotics after they operated to remove an abscess caused by a suspected dangerous bacterial infection. family members say they're lucky his teacher noticed his face was swollen. >> all just from going to the dentist. >> yes. thinking everything's going to go by well, you know, you're going to go in and come out. but it didn't happen like that. now he has an infection.
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taken him to the children's dental group in anaheim in may for a common procedure called a popotomy, also known as a baby root canal. health officials say he's one of more than half a dozen children who had the procedure at the same clinic, then developed symptoms of a serious and potentially life-threatening infection. >> it's very resistant to treatment. it needs to be taken care of quickly. >> reporter: dr. eric handler is public health officer with the orange county health care agency investigating the clinic. >> i have not seen these types of cases in the ten years that i've been here. once we were notified we jumped on it very quickly and notified the cdc. >> reporter: the clinic has agreed to stop performing the procedure for now. >> we are doing everything, whether it's sterilization or anything else that relates to taking care of the patients, we are on it. >> reporter: because the bacteria can progress slowly, health officials say they're contacting 500 children who had
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>> finding out that there's other patients from the same dentist group that also are in there for the same reason, it makes your heart stop a little. like what's going on? >> reporter: all seven children who were hospitalized developed abscesses which can take up to six months to appear. health officials are working to locate the source of the bacteria, which they believe is in water that was used in equipment used during the procedure. they should have results of that next week. russia's sports minister insists moscow had nothing to do with the release of more athletes' medical records stolen from the world anti-doping agency. this time the hackers targeted a wimbledon champion, two tour de france winners, a gold medalist and 21 others. all were allowed to use drugs that would otherwise be banned such as anti-inflammatories and treatments for allergies and asthma. the battle to protect personal data is growing more intense. michelle miller reports. >> reporter: servers like these often contain account numbers, medical records, and other sensitive information that is
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government agencies. that makes them prime targets for hackers. one security expert told us that cybercrime is now more lucrative than the illicit drug trade. >> the old model of trying to rely on anti-virus and firewalls, the bad guys are running circles around that stuff. >> reporter: dan larsen is in a race to outsmart hackers. >>the total amount of cyberthreat risk, it's like projected to be above 10 trillion in the next couple years. >> reporter: 1tr >> yeah. >> reporter: larsen is technical director at crowd strike. >> crowd strike falcon deploys in seconds. >> reporter: his company investigated the attack on the dnc's network and found a sophisticated code they believe points to russian intelligence agencies because of how the code was behaving. >> they did a lot of checking to see if a security product was
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>> they were always looking over their shoulder. >> they were always looking over their shoulder. time to develop a little piece of code like that, it had to be a well-funded professional full-time hacking organization. >> reporter: larsen said those hackers, known as fancy bear and cozy bear, used a classic technique, spearphishing, to gain access to dnc computers. >> six seconds, he's in. >> yep. that's all it takes. >> reporter: he showed us how it worked. on a computer under attack from an actual hacker. a victim receives an e-mail that looks legitimate but actually contains links to a website designed to steal passwords and other important data. >> so he's done. mission accomplished. >> in three minutes. under three minutes. >> yes. exactly. >> reporter: larsen says security firms are now using advanced algorithms and profiling to keep up with hackers who are constantly coming up with new tricks. when major corporations and government agencies are attacked, personal information on millions of americans can be compromised. >> i think it's a bit of a
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most people know that chimpanzees and humans are close cousins sharing more than 98% of the same dna. but humans have another primate cousin just as close. they're called bonobos and they couldn't be more different than chimps. bonobos live in female-dominated groups and they're endangered. found only in the democratic ic anderson cooper paid a visit to central africa to get their story for "60 minutes." ? >> reporter: the world's only sanctuary for bonobos sits on the outskirts of congo's capital, kinshasa.
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bonobo paradise. for those endangered apes, it's exactly what it is. ? this refuge was created by conservationist claudine andre. she's belgian-born but has lived in congo most of her life. if you ask her why she cares so much about bonobos, she'll tell you just look into their eyes. >> the way they look in your eyes, deeply, it's just like they look in your soul. >> in your soul. >> yeah. >> and it's rare that most primates don't maintain eye contact like that. >> yeah. because don't try to do this wi >> right. it's a threatening gesture if you do it with a gorilla. but bonobos look right at you. >> oh, yeah. >> reporter: bonobos may have a brain that's a third of the size of ours, but they're remarkably intelligent. those high-pitched screeches are a sophisticated form of communication, and their gestures are unmistakable. like chimpanzees bonobos use
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problem solving. >> she have a baby. so she cannot go deeply. >> so she's breaking the stick actually. >> yeah. she showed the stick, it's too short. >> okay. so she got a longer stick. that's amazing. so she's using the stick to see how deep the water is. >> yeah. >> reporter: bonobos are unique among great apes because they're not dominated by males. and according to brian hare, a duke university evolutionary anthropolo w at lola, it's the females who run the show. >> here if you try to be an alpha male you will be, as the congolese say, corrected by the females. >> not just by one female but by sort of an alliance of females. >> that's right. bonobos really violate a rule of nature, which is normally if you're bigger you're going to be dominant. but here females are actually smaller but they're still not dominated by males because they work together.
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the same can't be said of chimpanzees or of humans for that matter. >> bonobos on the other hand, they don't really have that darker side. so that's how they can help us, is how could it be that a species that has a brain a third of the size of ours can do something that with all our technological prowess we can't accomplish, which is to not kill each other. >> reporter: the answer might be found in bonobos' favorite pastime. other primate on the planet. their sexual contact is so frequent brian hare refers to it as the bonobo handshake. >> it's not that they want to procreate and have a kid. it's not even that they found ea ottraive. it's just -- >> no. it's a negotiation. >> reporter: and it's hardly surprising that many of these negotiations take place over food. chimpanzees will fight each other over food. >> that's right. >> bonobos won't necessarily fight --
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for competition, testosterone increases. bonobos, they get stressed out. and if they feel like they're not going to be able to share they get really anxious and that drives them to want to be reassured and they then happen to have a bonobo handshake to feel better. >> males will do that with females, males will do it with males, females with females. doesn't matter. even the ages. >> any combination. any age. >> reporter: it's an irony that this peace-loving primate is being hunted to extinction. though it's illegal to kill or capture bonobos in congo, that hasn't slowed their rapid decline. forest animals are sold in bustling bush meat markets for food. the largest in congo's capital kinshasa, you can buy monkeys, porcupines, even alligators, dead or alive. bonobos aren't openly sold here anymore. but you can still buy them in many parts of congo. their orphan babies often endup in the only place that can care
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lola yabonobo. the babies arrive traumatized, often injured. each is assigned a surrogate human mother, and their job is to raise the babies as their own, showering them with the love and attention the orphan apes so desperately need. it's incredible to see them up close like this. >> yeah. >> you know, i say all the time that for sure they are great apes. they are not us. and we are not them. but we have a line in the middle of the two worlds that we cross all the time. >> reporter: baby bonobos are playful as any human toddler,
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suzie quatroendo would know. she's in charge of the bonobos' welfare at lola and oversees their rehabilitation. >> you have a child of your own. >> yes. >> how are they different? >> i can say there's no difference. >> i mean, you really have to be a mother to this baby. >> yes. and most of time you need experienced mother. so they give a lot of affection and this is the only way to save them. >> that's what saves these babies. >> yes. and make them in life. >> they need love. >> yeah. absolutely. without that they die. >> suzie decided to study bonobos because she felt they could teach us a lot about human evolution. after five years at lola she realized that their behavior is closer to ours than she'd ever imagined. is it hard not to think of them as human? >> yes. yes. because we share mst of time,
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>> you spend all day with them. >> all day. >> reporter: and at the end of that day suzie sees to it the babies are tucked into their hammocks for the night. at 6:00 p.m. it's lights out. >> do you read them a story? >> no. they don't need because they're tired. they spend all the time jumping and playing so much as now. >> they're exhausted. >> they're very exhausted. >> reporter: by age 5 the orphaned apes move from lola's nursery to the kindergarten where their peers teach them something their human mothers never could. they teach them how to be bonobos. >> ? ? one day a rider made a decision. the decision to ride on and save money. he decided to save money by switching his motorcycle insurance to geico.
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the beach boys have sold more than 100 million records over the past half century. but "good vibrations" didn't always eist between the band members. lead singer mike love is back on tour without his cousin brian wilson. love discussed their ups and downs with anthony mason. ? i'm picking up good vibrations ? >> reporter: 50 years ago the beach boys rode this song to number 1. mike love says he actually wrote the lyrics driving to the recording studio with his then wife. >> i said take this down. i'm driving along. you know. i love the colorful clothes she wears and the way the sunlight plays upon her hair. ? i love the colorful clothes she wears ? >> reporter: "good vibrations" is the title of love's new autobiography. ? i'm picking up good vibrations ?
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harmonies has a history of discord. >> when did your interest in singing start? >> well, since i sang together with my cousin brian when we were little kids. ? if everybody had an ocean ? ? across the usa ? >> reporter: the beach boys were a family band. the three wilson brothers, brian, dennis, and carl. cousin mike and friend al jardine. ? round, round get around ? brian the melodic genius arranged their intricate harmonies. mike, the lead singer, often supplied the lyrics. but the wilsons' father, who managed the band early on, didn't give him credit. >> he never put my name on the label copy of the song. so i never got paid, nor did i get credit for doing like "surfing usa," "california girls," "can help me rhonda," "i
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>> which led to you ultimately selling. >> that was a painful process but there was no other recourse. ? i may not always love you ? >> reporter: in the mid '60s at the height of the beach boys' success brian wilson abruptly quit touring with the group and retreated to the studio. ? wouldn't it be nice ? he produced the band's highly acclaimed album "pet sounds" but began a long battle with drugs and mental illness. >> there's a point there where you say you basically lost your quarterback. >> well, yeah. and more than even a quarterback. you've lost your best friend, your cousin. you know, because drugs intervened and took him away. it wasn't the same brian after the lsd. >> did your relationship ever really recover after that? >> not entirely. i don't think so. >> reporter: charles manson even entered the picture in the late '60s when he briefly moved into dennis wilson's house with his family. love remembers showing up after
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>> it was pretty gnarly. it was full-on orgy. so i bailed. >> reporter: so he went to take a shower. >> and somebody followed me into the shower. and then charlie followed that someone and said you can't do that. you can't leave the group. and the way he said it, it was charlie manson style. "you can't leave the group." i mean, it was freakish. ? little surfer ? >> reporter: for years the three surviving origea have each toured with their own bands. in 2012 they reunited for a 50th anniversary tour. in an interview for "cbs sunday morning" the reunion appeared to get off to a promising start. >> brian said how does a 70-year-old guy sound that good? >> i meant that literally, not in a bad way. >> no, i know.
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unraveled, in part because love resented interference from melinda wilson, brian's wife. >> she once told me that brian's not your partner, i'm your [ bleep ] partner. that's what she said. >> and your response to that was? >> well, i think my response was to turn and leave. it was not a pleasant thing to hear. because you know, i wrote all these songs with my cousin. and as i said before, and i still say, it was just he and i, it would be fine. >> have you talked to him since then? >> no. >> why not? >> he's unavailable. >> reporter: for those who believe that brian walks on water, love writes, "i will always be the antichrist." ? i'm picking up good vibrations ? so they've gone their separate ways again.
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if you could reimagine your high school education, what would it be like? well, the super school project held a contest, and ten schools came out on top. each gets $10 million to put their ideas in place. chip reid visited one of the winners. >> yellow. >> reporter: at the washington leadership academy, a new public charter high schl nation's capital, learning is hands on. >> we got one. >> reporter: to learn cryptography, teams compete to crack codes that unlock boxes holding prizes. >> yay. >> one, two, three, four. >> reporter: in music class they learn about rhythm by becoming djs. >> one, two, three, four. >> reporter: and they don't just experience virtual reality. >> immersed in this full 360
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coding to create alternate worlds. the school's high-tech approach to teaching is so out of the box that yesterday it was named as one of ten schools across the nation to receive a $10 million grant from xq, the super school project. the contest was funded by lorene powell jobs, the wife of the late apple founder, steve jobs. >> they're working together to solve a problem. >> reporter: at the school she found the kind of creative and collaborative approach to learning she says studenee >> they feel very nervous and anxious ridden that they're not prepared to enter the workforce. they actually want to understand how to be part of the 21st century workforce, and they feel like they're not being equipped to do that. >> reporter: another $10 million winner is furr high school in houston. >> congratulations. you are a super school. [ cheers and applause ] >> reporter: when 82-year-old bernie simmons hold the news in a video conference she nearly
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furr had been a dropout factory. but simmons transformed it over the past 15 years. something she never imagined when she took the job. >> and i knew they had in excess of 12 gangs, and i didn't think they would want me there. and i said i must be some kind of crazy old woman to be out here thinking i could make a difference in this school. >> reporter: how'd she do it? of the gang leaders. >> inside were you frightened? >> inside i was frightened. but they didn't know it. and i would just smile and say let's talk about this. >> reporter: so they did. a lot. and eventually they came to trust her and the gang violence stopped. >> i think what i've learned from that is that if you show respect that you get respect. >> reporter: the graduation rate, barely 50% when she arrived, is now over 90%. and that's the overnight
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continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new from the broadcast center in new york c captioning funded by cbs it's friday, september 16th, 2016. this is the "cbs morning news." five years later, a rebirth of theer hillary clinton trashes donald trump after he refuses to say president obama was born in the u.s. >> when will he stop this ugliness, this bigotry? >> but a late night statement from a trump staffer says what the candidate hasn't and so much more. strict orders for samsung customers. the new warning from the federal government for samsung galaxy note 7 owners.

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