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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  October 22, 2015 2:07am-4:00am CDT

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look what you did! >> it's you! >> what was in that coke? >> your vodka cran is all over the floor! [laughter] >> clean it up! harvey: you want to see me clean? you want to see me clean? you want to see me clean? look what i have to do, because of dax! >> this is the only time you have done that. harvey: that's not true. >> harvey is like, what are these cottony paper things in my hand here? >> he cleed it but he still has attendants bringing him the towels and -- [laughter] >> and cleaning is like high florida lutant!th three simple words. my name is chris noth
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from maine to maui, thousands of high school students across the country a gettin by vol are joining volunteers of america and major league baseball players to help train and inspire the next generation of volunteers. carlos pea: it's easy to start an action team at your school so you, too, can get in on the action. get in on the action at actionteam.org. 'cause you'll be in my heart yes, you'll be in my heart from this day on now and forevermore... narrator: if animals are our best friends, shouldn't we be theirs? visit your local shelter, adopt a pet. you'll be in my heart no matter what...
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if you were a hippie in the '60s, you need to know. it's the dawning of the age of aquarius. yeah, and something else that's cool. what? osteoporosis is preventable. all: osteo's preventable? right on! if you dig your bones, protect them.
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another politician who wants things on his own terms is russian president vladimir putin, who has now gone to war to save syrian dictator bashar al assad. last night assad showed up unexpectedly in moscow, the first time he's left home since a rebellion broke out four years ago. mark phillips now on putin's game plan. >> reporter: this was a lot more than just a courtesy drop-by between old friends. it was a "thanks for everything, and i mean everything" drop-by. vladimir putin's jets are now effectively bashar al assad's air force. that may explain the smile. and that air force was in action during the meeting. the russians say they hit 83 targets over the past day, including these two strikes on what moscow claims were a rebel leader's meeting place and a logistics camp. there's no longer any pretense of only hitting isis targets. most russian attacks have been on assad's other enemies,
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including rebels supported by the u.s. and the airstrikes have another purpose -- they're bombing russia back to being a major player in the middle east. vladimir putin is now running the diplomatic show as well, telling assad the bombing must be followed by peace talks. and putin's been working the phones. he called turkish president recep tayyip erdogan after the meeting, and he called another major player, king salman of saudi arabia, as well. the welcome afforded assad in moscow, including a gilded kremlin dinner, was clearly designed to show russia's unwavering support for him. in the west the syrian president may be irreparably damaged goods, who the u.s. and others say must go, but he's still moscow's man. and scott, the clearest sign that vladimir putin has his own
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independent actor on the syrian issue -- no one in the u.s. government had a clue about the assad moscow visit until after it happened. >> mark phillips in our london newsroom. mark, thank you. we noticed a study today by the world health organization that said that long-term exposure to radiation, even at low levels, can dramatically increase the risk of dying from cancer. last night we told you about a high number of rare cancers near an old storage site in missouri. tonight vinita nair tells us about dozens of similar storage sites around the country. >> you miss that child. >> reporter: carl chappell lost his 44-year-old son steven to appendix cancer three months ago. we talked with him and six of his neighbors, all of whom either had cancer or lost a parent or child to it. they all grew up here in north county, st. louis where radioactive material left over from america's nuclear weapons program was stored.
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thousands of dirty barrels near a creek that ran alongside their playgrounds and back yards. using social media, the neighbors say they have documented more than 2,700 cases of cancer, autoimmune disorders, and brain and thyroid tumors in their area. mary oscko has stage 4 lung cancer. >> they're not statistics and they're not numbers. they were my neighbors. >> reporter: currently the army corps of engineers lists 24 other sites in 10 states with low-level radioactive contamination that they are in the process of cleaning up. there are three other sites with low-level contamination under consideration for cleanup. this former chemical processing plant in queens, new york is one of them. radiation barriers were installed as a band-aid solution in 2013. michael feldmann with the army corps of engineers says the cleanup moves slowly for a reason. >> in general, there are things that we need to do at the pace that we are performing in order to make sure that we are protecting the health and environment of the area.
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>> reporter: dr. faisal khan is the director of public health in st. louis county. >> some disasters unfold slowly over time and their true nature and extent and severity only becomes clear in terms of human cost once you start counting people around you. >> reporter: to keep count these neighbors keep a list. >> the landises, the dubells, shirley shank died of breast cancer. >> there's 21 people on this list. >> and they were all on the same street? >> right. on palm drive. >> reporter: all of the residents in north st. louis with health issues told us they believe they had long-term exposure to the low-level contamination. this type of prolonged exposure has rarely been studied. scott, we are going to continue to follow this story. >> vinita, thank you very much. something that surprised us today, in west virginia president obama said drug overdoses kill more americans each day than car wrecks. 120 overdose deaths every day. in a decade heroin use by young
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and anna werner met a young woman who's in the fight of her life. >> i want my life back. and i am ready. i'm so ready to stop. >> reporter: this is 19-year-old mariah powers, in a video she made while high on heroin on the day she says she hit bottom. >> i don't want to live my life this way. i'm going to end up dead or in prison.- >> reporter: mariah had overdosed four times in the previous month. she told us she made the video as a reminder of how low she was that night. she detoxed alone, at home, after she couldn't find a facility to take her in. >> just to see my face, like even how i looked that day is like, wow. >> reporter: this was mariah ten days later, when we sat down with her. she says she was just 16 when a boyfriend introduced her to heroin.
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>> it starts with your first high where it is just complete euphoria. and then when i didn't get that high again after i did it again i thought maybe i need to do a little more. >> reporter: before she knew it that first high had turned into a $100 a day habit. >> i would steal, lie, cheat, sell my body. >> reporter: you would sell your body? >> yes. >> reporter: why are you willing to go public about that? >> because i know i'm not the only one. >> i felt pretty helpless. >> reporter: mariah's father, joe powers, watched his daughter o.d. over and over. what is that like? >> i pretty much buried my daughter at that point. in my mind. you know, and that sounds cruel. it doesn't mean i gave up with her. but i figured that the disease would get her. >> there's no way. i'm not doing this anymore. >> reporter: powers had never seen that video his daughter
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made. >> i want my dad back. i don't want to be this empty, hollow shell anymore. >> reporter: she told us that that was the night that she made the decision to get sober on her own. >> i hope she stays that way. >> reporter: you're not ready to believe that yet. >> no. she will always be an addict. and there's always going to be a -- a -- waiting for the shoe to drop. >> reporter: at this point do you feel confident that you can beat back that voice of addiction? >> i can only take it one day at a time. i can't say i'm going to be sober for the rest of my life. but as of today, heck yeah, i'm going to stay sober. >> reporter: she's now stayed sober for 60 days. anna werner, cbs news, cleveland. for many americans the road to retirement is getting longer.
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a new study says that new college graduates won't be able to retire until they are 75. in part because average student loan debt is over $35,000 and that's up more than $5,000 from just three years ago. their financial problems are also forcing their parents to delay retirement. and anthony mason has tonight's
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"eye on money." >> reporter: this area's pretty much always been home. >> uh-huh. >> reporter: steve and beth burau both grew up in the chicago area and were hoping to retire here soon. but then the youngest of their three daughters went off to college. >> and we started realizing the little one was going to be going away to school. we knew it was going to be delayed. >> i don't see it before 70. at least. >> reporter: that's probably not what you planned. >> mm-mm. no. no. >> reporter: steve is a 58-year-old packaging designer. beth, who's 56, works in a medical clinic. >> i thought when i got a little bit older that we could travel or we could do other things. but right now all i'm looking at is working and making money. >> reporter: and the buraus are doing better than most boomers. 4 in 10 have no retirement savings at all, and nearly 70% have no defined pension plans. financial advisers say a nest egg needs to be big enough that
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christine benz at morningstar says it also helps to put off taking social security benefits. >> for every year that you're able to delay past your full retirement age you're able to pick up a roughly 8% inflation-adjusted increase in your benefit. >> that's been six years. >> reporter: the buraus are working with a financial planner now. what would you tell another couple in your situation? >> you know, realize that, yeah, the end is in sight and you know, what are those things you want to do and think about those things when you're 20 and 30 and 40. don't wait until you're 45, 50 years old to really start thinking seriously about them. >> reporter: most of all, scott, financial planners say put something aside and remember, a late start is better than no start at all. >> anthony mason, thanks very
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and we'll be right back. cory wells, one of the singers in three dog night, has died. joy to the fishes in the deep blue sea joy to you and me you couldn't tune in a rock station in the early '70s without hearing one of their hits in three-part harmony.
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mama told me not to come wells was an air force veteran and avid fisherman from buffalo, new york. he was still touring with three dog night. cory wells was 74. that ain't the way to have fun that ain't the way to have fun a surprising new neighbor has moved onto sesame street. and we'll introduce you when we come back. woman: what does it feel like when a woman is having a heart attack? chest pain, like there's a ton of weight on your chest. severe shortness of breath. unexplained nausea. cold sweats. there's an unusual tiredness and fatigue.
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unusual pain in your back, neck, jaw, one or both arms, even your upper stomach, are signs you're having a heart attack. don't make excuses. make the call to 9-1-1 immediately. learn more at womenshealth.gov/heartattack. bipolar disorder is a brain condition that causes unusual or dramatic mood swings. it affects millions of americans and compromises their ability to function. when diagnosed, bipolar disorder can be effectively treated by mood stabilizers. but most people with bipolar disorder suffer for years without help because the symptoms are missed or confused with other illnesses, like depression. learn how easily you can help keep this from happening to a loved one.
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the folks who've been bringing us "sesame street" for 46 years say that their mission is to help kids grow smarter, stronger, and kinder. and to that end they're adding a new character. here's jim axelrod. >> reporter: in "sesame street's" new online story the new kid on the block seems to be a little different, and it's not just julia's bright orange hair. >> hi, abby calls loudly. julia doesn't answer. "your friend doesn't like me," says abby sadly. >> reporter: but since this block is sesame street, elmo's
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>> elmo's daddy told elmo that julia has autism, he says. so she does things a little differently. >> reporter: julia's story is part of a campaign to see the amazing in all children. more than 6 out of 10 children with autism have been bullied at some point. the idea behind julia is familiarity breeds compassion and compassion helps reduce that number. the twittersphere blew up at the news. like this from @rutiregan. "seeing kids like i was depicted positively on a mainstream show, that means a lot to me." the story ends like you might imagine. >> one, two, three, counts julia. yeah! one, two, three friends, counts abby. >> reporter: with confusion cleared up, friendship triumphant. sunny days and the sunny days on "sesame
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jim axelrod, cbs news, new york. and that's the overnight news for this thursday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us just a little bit later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm scott pelley. >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the "overnight
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i'm don dahler. vice president joe biden has made it official. he will not seek the democratic nomination for president. his announcement ends months of speculation. here's what he had to say. >> mr. president, thank you for lending me the rose garden for a minute. >> it's a pretty nice place. >> as my family and i have worked through the grieving process, i've said all along what i've said time and again to others, that it may very well be that that process, by the time we get through it, closes the window on mounting a realistic campaign for president. that it might close. i've concluded it has closed. i know from previous experience that there is no timetable for
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the process doesn't respect or much care about things like filing deadlines or debates and primaries and caucuses. but i also know that i could do this -- i couldn't do this if the family wasn't ready. the good news is the family has reached that point. but as i've said many times, my family has suffered loss and i hoped there would come a time, and i've said this to other families, that sooner rather than later when you think of your loved one it brings a smile to your lips before it brings a tear to your eyes. well, that's where the bidens are today, thank god. beau -- beau is our inspiration. unfortunately, i believe we're out of time, the time necessary to mount a winning campaign for the nomination.
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candidate, i will not be silent. i intend to speak out clearly and forcefully, to influence as much as i can where we stand as a party and where we need to go as a nation. and this is what i believe. i believe that president obama has led this nation from crisis to recovery and we're now on the cusp of resurgence. i'm proud to have played a part in that. this party, our nation, will be making a tragic mistake if we walk away or attempt to undo the obama legacy. the american people have worked too hard and we've come too far for that. democrats should not only defend this record and protect this record, they should run on the record. >> vice president joe biden.
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congressman paul ryan is singing a different tune. after weeks of refusing calls to run for speaker of the house, ryan now says he's open to the job but he has conditions. nancy cordes has the story. >> reporter: first and foremost, ryan says that all the different wings of the house republican conference must endorse him by friday or he won't run. that turns the tables on hard-line conservatives who were hoping to extract concessions from their next speaker in exchange for their support. >> what i told members is if you can agree to these requests and if i can truly be a unifying figure then i will gladly serve. >> reporter: ryan laid out his republicans and then for the press, starting with a call for the gop to start focusing on solutions. >> we need to move from an opposition party to being a proposition party. >> reporter: then he said the house rule book must be changed. >> and it needs to include fixes that ensure that we do not experience constant leadership
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>> reporter: the last request was personal. >> i cannot and i will not give up my family time. i may not be on the road as often as previous speakers, but i pledge to try and make up for it with more time communicating our vision, our message. >> reporter: most house republicans were happy to oblige after begging the father of three to take the job. >> there was overwhelming applause. i didn't see anyone booing. >> reporter: one candidate in the speaker's race promptly dropped out. >> i'm out, and i'm in with paul. he's the right person at the right time. >> reporter: ryan's unusual approach is a reflection of his strong leverage. as a conservative who's also cut deals with democrats, he's seen as one of the only people who can unite his fractured party after hard-liners threatened to force out the current speaker, john boehner, and doomed his replacement, kevin mccarthy. ryan warned them, as speaker he would work with the other side. >> my greatest worry is the
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consequence of not stepping up. of someday having my own kids ask me, when the stakes were so high, why didn't you do all you could do? why didn't you stand and fight for my future when you had a chance to do so? >> reporter: ryan says if the entire party doesn't get behind him by friday he will happily stay in the job he has. and it puts the hard-liners in a situation where they'll get blamed if he backs out. ironically, gale, that is exactly what they say they've been wanting from the next speaker, a hardball approach. police in st. louis still have no suspects in a rash of fires at predominantly black churches. six churches have been burned over the past two weeks. they are all within five miles of each other and stand on the doorstep of ferguson, missouri. ferguson, as you recall, was the scene of weeks of riots following the police shooting of an unarmed black teen. adriana diaz is inside one of the churches, the new life missionary church in st. louis. >> reporter: this church was one of the hardest hit. flames tore through this entire entrance. the pastor here told us the arsonist likely squirted chemicals through this mail slot so that the fire would spread faster.
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>> we are called today to address what is possibly the most dangerous onslaught that we have experienced in many, many years, which is an attack on god's house. >> reporter: with a suspected arsonist still at large, church leaders in and around st. louis urged community members to remain vigilant. >> call the authorities if you see anything that doesn't look right. >> reporter: since october 8th six churches in predominantly black neighborhoods have been set on fire. the new life missionary baptist church was so badly damaged it held services outside sunday. authorities don't yet know who sparked the flames or why. but they believe the crimes are connected. in each case an accelerant was used to light the front door to the churches on fire. the buildings were all unoccupied at the times of the attacks. >> there's a very alarming pattern to these fires. we don't want them to get out of hand. >> reporter: the churches are not far from ferguson, missouri.
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>> hands up, don't shoot. >> reporter: an area still reeling from riots that erupted following the shooting death of 18-year-old michael brown by a white police officer. authorities believe whoever is behind the fires may be someone struggling with stress and trying to send a message. but community leaders have their own response. >> this is not over. it's just the beginning. and we want the city to know that the churches, the pastors, the christians are coming together to stand as one. if you burn one, you're burning >> reporter: to make matters worse, this building has no insurance. but already several organizations have offered to rebuild. community members will gather to show strength in the face of these attacks. >>e "cbs overnightews"
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in the world of cinema. especially for fans of the "back to the future" movies. it was the day that marty mcfly and doc brown emerged from their delorean time machine 30 years after they got in it. as vladimir duthiers reports, the movie was way ahead of its time. >> reporter: in the original "back to the future" marty and doc leave 1985 and travel three decades back to 1955. in the sequel they go 30 years into the future to october 21st, 2015. that's today. so what'd they get right and what predictions didn't materialize? we decided to take a look. >> all right, doc, what's going on? huh? where are we? when are we? >> we're descending toward hill valley, california at 4:29 p.m. on wednesday october 21st, 2015. >> 2015? you mean we're in the future.
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arrived in 2015 aboard doc brown's delorean time machine, he had no idea what to expect. later today the past prediction for the future will finally become the present. >> it's our exit. >> reporter: and here we are in cinematic 2015 where flying cars are clouding up the skyways. in the real 20 teens it's all about self-driving cars. >> if they dug up the delorean -- >> reporter: screenwriter bob gale had a clear vision for the future. inside the cooper union clock tower gale told us he wanted 2015 to be recognizable. >> we knew going in nobody ever successfully predicts the future accurately, it can't be done, and we want the future to be a positive optimistic future. we want people to see this movie and say hey, i like that future, i'd like to live there. >> hey, hey, hey, hey. stop. little girl. little girl. stop. look. i need to borrow your -- hover board?
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hello, hoverboards. a gang chased marty around town in 2015, each flying their own >> welcome to the cafe '80s, where it's always morning in america. >> reporter: visual effects art director john bell designed many of the movie's futuristic elements, including hover boards and a nostalgic cafe '80s. >> all we know is we go 30 years in the future and there's something called a hoverboard. i'll take something that's 85% familiar, it could be a shape, could be a color, could be a pattern, and then if i'm projecting it in the future throw something that's just a little 15% twist. >> ah! >> reporter: today companies are still testing how to make a reliable working hover board for the general public. on the real streets of 2015, though, toys like this swagway are the closest we've gotten to gliding around.
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>> there was a lot of predictions we made, we thought maybe that will come true, that has a good chance. hoverboards, no, we never thought -- and the fact they said life imitates art. so kids like you saw "back to the future part 2" in the day and they said, well, if i can't have a hoverboard -- >> i'm going to make one. >> i'm going to make one. >> i was framed! >> yes. >> let's talk drones. >> by everybody. we started out thinking this is kind of like this gag technology. you know, it's just a joke. but little did we know 30 years later people are using them all over the world. >> we're not thinking about we're making an important statement about the future here. no, no, no. we're having a good time. >> read my fax! >> reporter: while nobody uses fax machines anymore for instant communication the movie nails other everyday technology. in the movie fingerprint scanners unlock the front door and pay for things like taxis. today we use biometric technology to open doors, unlock
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digital payments. >> over here, please. >> reporter: the mcflys use a giant flat screen tv that responds to audio commands and makes video calls. flat screens have been around for a while now but samsung's smart tv has voice recognition. as for video calls there's face-time and skype. hi, krista. >> hi, vlad. >> reporter: krista smith here is the executive west coast editor of "vanity fair." do you think that the movie can still influence young people today? >> i think it still holds up. absolutely. the stuff that they were talking about in '85 to '90 is stuff that's actually our reality now. >> hey, mcfly! i thought i told you to stay in here. >> reporter: as a teenager it's still very relevant because you're still going through the same things. it doesn't matter if you have an iphone or you can fly around the world. 15-year-olds are feeling the same thing that 15-year-olds were feeling in the '50s. >> wait a minute. cubs win world series. against miami?
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>> reporter: 107 years after its last title, the cubs are still trying to advance to this year's world series. and so we wait. just a bit longer to see if the movie's ultimate prediction comes true. >> you're not going to believe this! we've got to go back to 1955. >> i don't believe it. >> reporter: why do you think "back to the future" remains so popular? >> it's the humanity of "back to the future." and the movie says you have some control over your own destiny. the things that you do today can have a life-changing effect in your future. >> reporter: to the future. to the past. and back to the future. if we're all caught up, then what do we have to look forward to? to be continued. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.asure gel that magnifies both our sensations. it gives us chills in places we've never gotten chills before. yeah, it makes us feel like...
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there's an invasion under way along the east coast. lionfish, beautiful to look at and tasty to eat, but they're also venomous and wreaking havoc along the ocean floor. marlie hall reports for "sunday morning." >> reporter: the atlantic's coral reefs bustle with marine life. natural paradises filled with creatures of all colors, shapes, and sizes. including the lionfish.
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but this species is far from its native habitat. in fact, it's a sign of troubled waters. >> the lionfish is a beautiful, wonderful ornate reef fish. it's native to the indo-pacific ocean. and now in these oceans we have lionfish which don't belong swimming all over our reef areas. >> reporter: from scales to tails, ladd akin studies lion fish for the reef environmental education foundation. how did they get here? >> well, they're super popular in aquariums. and just like we see with other things, people sometimes set their pets free. >> reporter: and soon a few abandoned pets started multiplying. a single lionfish can produce 2 million eggs a year. and with no natural predator in the atlantic there's plenty of this fish in the sea.
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keep growing and growing. lionfish are always on the hunt for their next meal, gulping down whatever they can find. many of them the young of fish we eat like grouper and snapper. >> we could see extinctions of species. we could see reductions in populations of species we rely on economically. and those are worst case scenarios. >> you guys are removing a lot of lionfish from these surrounding waters. >> i'm a best case scenario kind of guy and i see we're engaging a lot of people right now. >> it's a great event. >> reporter: that's mainly through what akins calls derbies. >> i think we should hand out some award money and prizes. >> reporter: competitions across the u.s. and caribbean for scuba divers to kill as many lionfish as they can.
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the goal is to leave no lionfish behind. for a better look at a derby near ft. lauderdale. >> back. >> reporter: we went underwater with project baseline. >> prepare to dive. >> reporter: it's a non-profit organization hat's documenting the condition of the world's oceans. >> nemo reporting. my life support systems are okay, and my vents are secured. >> reporter: co-founder robert carmichael took us to a shipwreck 120 feet down, where lion fish like to feed. >> here they are. >> oh, yeah. okay. maybe they can snag that lionfish over there. >> reporter: lionfish can't be baited, trapped, or trawled. so the derby's scuba divers must
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exercising patience and caution to avoid their venomous spines, to prevent painful though not deadly stings they place the fish in a plastic tube known as a zookeeper. >> is it scary, do you think, for the divers to come face to face with the lionfish? >> they don't really attack you. it's just the only risk you really run is if you mishandle the lionfish. >> reporter: which is exactly what happened to diver patrick peacock. you got stung today. >> i did. i wasn't careful. he came free and he poked me, and i had to end the dive. >> reporter: what did it feel like? >> it feels like a wasp times ten. >> the venom is contained in the entire length of the spine. >> reporter: but cut off those spines, as they did at the derby. >> and you can handle it just like any other fish. >> reporter: and lionfish go
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>> a little bit of celery. >> reporter: really. lion fish ceviche, anyone? >> it's good. >> reporter: some of that day's catch was sent here, to norman's key, a caribbean restaurant in new york city. since lionfish must be killed one at a time, it's expensive. and this is one of the few restaurants serving it. >> we're not making any money on the fish. that's for sure. >> reporter: owner ryan chadwick sells the fish for around $26 a plate. less than what it costs. >> it's more about helping the ecosystem and doing something different. >> so this is not about money for you. >> not this, no. >> reporter: and as for the taste -- >> it's a light flaky buttery fish. this version is actually the jerk lionfish. so you'll have a little heat, a little spice. >> and this is me spearing a lionfish. >> yes. >> with a fork. with the fish on a plate. >> that's right. >> okay.
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oh, wow. that is really good. >> what do you think? >> i love it. it's actually very similar to snapper. >> reporter: which makes ladd akin's hope that maybe we can eat our way out of this problem. >> i think we have a lot of examples of eating through fish stocks. here's a fish that needs to be controlled. and if we can provide a culinary value, i think we can impact the lionfish population just through removal for consumption. >> that sounds pretty good to me. >> it's a win-win for everybody. except the lionfish. >> reporter: if you bring your wallet and a sense of adventure. >> bon appetit. enjoy. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.ng pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345
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abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc- cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 678 it's ryan's cell phone. gibbs: isolate calls from psy-ops, government-issued lines. there's five or six different numbers here. cross-reference with incoming calls to banks over the past month. when the engines failed on the plane i was flying, i knew what to do to save my passengers. but when my father sank into depression, i didn't know how to help him. when he ultimately shot himself, he left our family devastated.
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don't let this happen to you. if you or a loved one is suicidal, call the national suicide prevention lifeline. no matter how hopeless or helpless you feel, with the right help, you can get well. (franklin d. roosevelt) the inherent right to work is one of the elemental privileges of a free people. endowed, as our nation is, with abundant physical resources... ...and inspired as it should be to make those resources and opportunities available for the enjoyment of all... ...we approach reemployment with real hope of finding a better answer than we have now. narrator: donate to goodwill where your donations help fund job placement and training for people in your community. three teenagers in new york face criminal charges over an alleged cyber attack on their school. the students are accused of
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hacking into school district computers, changing grades, and even class schedules. anna werner reports. >> reporter: the original attack was three months ago. it led investigators to the house of the teen they call the mastermind behind the scheme. it's a story that seems fit for a hollywood screenplay, but it's no -- pardon me. it's no joke that three 17-year-old students are facing serious time in prison. walking out of a long island courtroom tuesday, 17-year-old daniel soares. police say he was the ringleader behind the brazen cyber attack. his alleged accomplices, alex mosquera and erick vaysman, covered their faces as they were released on their own recognizance. the three teens are accused of hacking into their school's computers and changing students' grades and schedules. >> at this point we believe daniel changed at least four of his own grades and one erick vaysman's grade. on his own grade it was changed i believe from a 94 to a 100, a perfect score of 100. >> reporter: police say soares
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a device known as as a key log to a school computer. it enabled him to collect log-ins and password credentials while operating remotely from his home. >> it's a piece of hardware that you can put on a computer, interfaces with the keyboard and it records every stroke of the keyboard. >> reporter: school officials called police in july after their investigation led them to soares, who disappeared for about a week before police located him. >> we're waiting for a full investigation to be done and he maintains his innocence. >> what are you doing? >> dialing into the school's computer. >> reporter: it's reminiscent of the 1983 film "war games" that featured another high school-aged hacker, matthew broderick. but this real-life case has serious repercussions. mosquera and vaysman are facing up to four years in prison. if convicted soares could see up to 11 years.
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computer tampering charges. soares is also face counts of burglary and identity theft. now, in a statement the commack school district says it's reviewing its network security protocols to prevent something like this from happening again. >> and that's the overnight news for this thursday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning."
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york city, i'm don dahler. the health effects from radioactive contamination at dozens of sites. baby boomers are forced to put off retirement. >> right now all i'm looking at is working and making money. and a big change on sesame street. a very special new kid moves into the neighorhood. we all are amazing >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." joseph r. biden jr. stepped into the rose garden, laid out a platform, and then gracefully stepped off, bringing to an end his ambitions of becoming president and a nearly 50-year political career. with president obama at his side, the vice president announced he will not make a third run for the democratic nomination in what would have
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hillary clinton. major garrett broke this story and he begins our coverage. >> i believe we're out of time. the time necessary to mount a winning campaign for the nomination. but while i will not be a candidate, i will not be silent. >> reporter: joe biden stood with president obama and said the democratic nominees should stand on their accomplishments. >> democrats should not only defend this record and protect this record. they should run on the record. >> reporter: but mostly biden framed an agenda for a campaign that was not to be. >> we cannot sustain the current levels of inequality that exists in this country. i believe the huge sums of unlimited and often secret money pouring into our politics is a fundamental threat to our democracy. >> reporter: he also made a plea for bipartisanship and took a veiled swipe at hillary clinton after she half jokingly called republicans her enemies during
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>> i don't think we should look at republicans as our enemies. they're our opposition. they're not our enemies. and for the sake of the country we have to work together. four more years of this kind of pitched battle may be more than this country can take. >> reporter: after losing his son beau to brain cancer earlier this year biden's decision on whether to enter the race hinged largely on his family's emotional readiness for a campaign. today he called for an ambitious assault on the disease that claimed his son. >> if i could be anything, i would have wanted to be the president that ended cancer. because it's possible. it's personal. but i know we can do this. >> reporter: biden, ever cheerful and resilient, ended with a note of optimism that left many friends and supporters wondering what might have been. >> it's about equality. it's about fairness. it's about respect. as my dad used to say, it's about affording every single
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it's not complicated. we can do this. and when we do, america won't just win the future. we will own the finish line. >> reporter: despite president obama's affection and respect for biden, he had grown restless with the vice president's prolonged presidential deliberations. and scott, mr. obama was more than mildly pleased to see the speculation and the distractions that came with it laid to rest. >> major garrett at the white house. major, thanks. now let's bring in john dickerson, our cbs news political director and anchor of "face the nation." john, what struck you about the vice president's statement? >> well, you know, at one point in his remarks he thanked the reporters who'd been covering his deliberation process and then he quickly added "and covered my whole career. it was a subtle acknowledgment of a larger point, which was that biden wasn't just putting an end to this presidential process, he was marking what's likely to be the end of his career in washington. it started in the early '70s.
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and as if to harken back to that he made that pitch that major talked about for bipartisanship with republicans. it would have been interesting to see if he could have campaigned on that. because that is not the mood of his party right now. >> now, tomorrow's a big day. hillary clinton will be testifying before congress on the attack on the u.s. compound in benghazi, libya and no doubt asked questions about her private e-mail server. what are the stakes for her? >> reporter: well, you know, she had a lot of big hurdles to clear in october and there were those she could control and those she couldn't. the debate was one hurdle and she's cleared that. joe biden's possible candidacy was another hurdle which has now been cleared away for her. so tomorrow is really the last big test for her in october. can she weather a full day's worth of testimony in front of a committee that even some republicans have said is aiming to hurt her politically? if she can do that, she will be on stable ground after what was a pretty shaky summer. >> and we'll be watching "face the nation" on sunday. john, thanks very much. we're about to find out if
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one man can unite republicans in congress. many in the house are begging congressman paul ryan of wisconsin to be the new speaker, and last night the reluctant ryan said he would do it but only if all the factions support him. ryan was the gop's 2012 candidate for vice president. he's an expert on the budget and chairs the ways and means committee, which writes tax policy. will his ultimatum work? here's nancy cordes. >> reporter: paul ryan spent the day meeting with conservatives who didn't know quite what to make of his take it or leave it approach. >> there were a list of some pretty strong demands. >> it kind of reversed the psychology on us a little bit. >> reporter: ryan says he will only run for speaker if all the wings of the fractured republican conference endorse him by friday and if hard-liners agree not to constantly threaten his speakership as they did john boehner's. >> we have become the problem. if my colleagues entrust me to be the speaker, i want us to become the solution.
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>> reporter: idaho's raul labrador didn't like the sound of that. >> it appears that he's asking for more power to be in the speaker's office instead of less power. >> reporter: even this condition met with some resistance. >> i cannot and i will not give up my family time. >> reporter: congressman tim hulz kamp of kansas. what did you think of his request to spend most weekends with his family? >> i don't think the speakership is a 9 to 5 job. i've got family. that's why i'm not running for speaker or any other position like that. you've got to work on the weekends. >> reporter: ryan should be a conservative's dream speaker. he's pushed for deep cuts in food stamps, housing assistance, and proposed converting medicare into a voucher program. >> we want to have real fiscal control. >> reporter: most republicans say they'll back him. speaker boehner signaled today ryan's the only viable option. >> what's plan b if he doesn't decide to jump in on friday? >> don't know. >> reporter: "don't know."
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be sitting well with some of the hard-liners, but it is the kind of strategic thinking they've been saying they want in a speaker. and it's all in their hands now, scott, because ryan will not be able to get the 218 votes he would need on the house floor next thursday unless at least some of them support him. >> and ryan has also worked effectively with democrats. nancy cordes on capitol hill. nancy, thank you.
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will be right back. another politician who wants things on his own terms is russian president vladimir putin, who has now gone to war to save syrian dictator bashar al assad.
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they all grew up here in north county, st. louis where radioactive material left over from america's nuclear weapons program was stored.
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thousands of dirty barrels near a creek that ran alongside their playgrounds and back yards. using social media, the neighbors say they have documented more than 2,700 cases of cancer, autoimmune disorders, and brain and thyroid tumors in their area. mary oscko has stage 4 lung cancer. >> they're not statistics and they're not numbers. they w myneighbors. >>orr: current the army corpof enginrs lists 2 contamination that they are in the process of cleaning up. there are three other sites with low-level contamination under consideration for cleanup. this former chemical processing plant in queens, new york is one of them. radiation barriers were installed as a band-aid solution in 2013. michael feldmann with the army corps of engineers says the cleanup moves slowly for a reason. >> in general, there are things that we need to do at the pace that we are performing in order to make sure that we are protecting the health and environment of the area.
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>> reporter: dr. faisal kahn is the director of public health in st. louis county. >> some disasters unfold slowly over time and their true nature and extent and severity only becomes clear in terms of human cost once you start counting people around you. >> reporter: to keep count these neighbors keep a list. >> the landises, the dubells, shirley shank died of breast cancer. >> there's 21 people on this list. >> and they were all on the same street? >> right. on palm drive. >> reporter: all of the residents in north st. louis with health issues told us they believe they had long-term exposure to the low-level contamination. this type of prolonged exposure has rarely been studied. scott, we are going to continue to follow this story. >> vinita, thank you very much. something that surprised us today, in west virginia president obama said drug overdoses kill more americans each day than car wrecks. 120 overdose deaths every day.
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adults has more than doubled, and anna werner met a young woman who's in the fight of her life. >> i want my life back. and i am ready. i'm so ready to stop. >> reporter: this is 19-year-old mariah powers, in a video she made while high on heroin on the day she says she hit bottom. >> i don't want to live my life this way. i'm going to end up dead or in prison. >> reporter: mariah had overdosed four times in the previous month. she told us she made the video as a reminder of how low she was that night. she detoxed alone, at home, after she couldn't find a facility to take her in. >> just to see my face, like even how i looked that day is like, wow. >> reporter: this was mariah ten days later, when we sat down with her. she says she was just 16 when a
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>> it starts with your first high where it is just complete euphoria. and then when i didn't get that high again after i did it again i thought maybe i need to do a little more. >> reporter: before she knew it that first high had turned into a $100 a day habit. >> i would steal, lie, cheat, sell my body. >> reporter: you would sell your body? >> yes. >> reporter: why are you willing to go public about that? >> because i know i'm not the only one. >> i felt pretty helpless. >> reporter: mariah's father, joe powers, watched his daughter o.d. over and over. what is that like? >> i pretty much buried my daughter at that point. in my mind. you know, and that sounds cruel. it doesn't mean i gave up with her. but i figured that the disease would get her. >> there's no way. i'm not doing this anymore. >> reporter: powers had never
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>> i want my dad back. i don't want to be this empty, hollow shell anymore. >> reporter: she told us that that was the night that she made the decision to get sober on her own. >> i hope she stays that way. >> reporter: you're not ready to believe that yet. >> no. she will always be an addict. and there's always going to be a -- a -- waiting for the shoe to drop. >> reporter: at this point do you feel confident that you can beat back that voice of addiction? >> i can only take it one day at a time. i can't say i'm going to be sober for the rest of my life. but as of today, heck yeah, i'm going to stay sober. >> reporter: she's now stayed sober for 60 days. anna werner, cbs news, cleveland. >> for many americans the road to retirement is getting longer.
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a new study says that new college graduates won't be able to retire until they are 75. in part because average student loan debt is over $35,000 and that's up more than $5,000 from just three years ago. their financial problems are also forcing their parents to delay retirement.
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"eye on money." >> reporter: this area's pretty much always been home. >> uh-huh. >> reporter: steve and beth burau both grew up in the chicago area and were hoping to retire here soon. but then the youngest of their three daughters went off to college. >> and we started realizing the little one was going to be going away to school. we knew it was going to be delayed. >> i don't see it before 70. at least. >> reporter: that's probably not what you planned. >> mm-mm. no. no. >> reporter: steve is a 58-year-old packaging designer. beth, who's 56, works in a medical clinic. >> i thought when i got a little bit older that we could travel or we could do other things. but right now all i'm looking at is working and making money. >> reporter: and the buraus are doing better than most boomers. 4 in 10 have no retirement savings at all, and nearly 70% have no defined pension plans. financial advisers say a nest egg needs to be big enough that a retiree can live on 4% of that
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savings a year. christine benz at morningstar says it all helps to put off taking social security benefits. >> for every year that you're able to delay past your full retirement age you're able to pick up a roughly 8% inflation-adjusted increase in your benefit. >> that's been six years. >> reporter: the buraus are working with a financial planner now. what would you tell another couple in your situation? >> you know, realize that, yeah, the end is in sight and you know, what are those things you want to do and think about those things when you're 20 and 30 and 40. don't wait until you're 45, 50 years old to really start thinking seriously about them. >> reporter: most of all, scott, financial planners say put something aside and remember, a late start is better than no start at all.
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and we'll be right back. cory wells, one of the singers in three dog night, has died. joy to the fishes in the deep blue sea joy to you and me you couldn't tune in a rock station in the early '70s without hearing one of their hits in three-part harmony.
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mama told me not to come wells was an air force veteran and avid fisherman from buffalo, new york. he was still touring with three dog night. cory wells was 74. that ain't the way to have fun that ain't the way to have fun a surprising new neighbor has moved onto sesame street.
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come back. every day it's getting closer going faster than a roller coaster a love like yours will surely come my way hey, hey, hey babies aren't fully developed until at least 39 weeks. if your pregnancy is healthy, wait for labor to begin on its own. a healthy baby is worth the wait. o0 c1 travel is part of the american way of life. when we're on vacation, we keep an eye out for anything that looks out of place. [ indistinct conversations ] miss, your bag. when we travel from city to city, we pay attention to our surroundings.
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[ cheering ] everyone plays a role in keeping our community safe. whether you're traveling for business or pleasure, be aware of your surroundings. if you see something suspicious, say something to local authorities. [ vocalizing ] [ buzzing ] [ tree crashes ] [ wind howling ]
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the folks who've been bringing us "sesame street" for 46 years say that their mission is to help kids grow smarter, stronger, and kinder. and to that end they're adding a new character. here's jim axelrod. >> reporter: in "sesame street's" new online story the new kid on the block seems to be a little different, and it's not just julia's bright orange hair. >> hi, abby calls loudly. julia doesn't answer. "your friend doesn't like me," says abby sadly. >> reporter: but since this block is sesame street, elmo's
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they need to know. >> elmo's daddy told elmo that julia has autism, he says. so she does things a little differently. >> reporter: julia's story is part of a campaign to see the amazing in all children. more than 6 out of 10 children with autism have been bullied at some point. the idea behind julia is familiarity breeds compassion and compassion helps reduce that number. news. like this from @rutiregan. "seeing kids like i was depicted positively on a mainstream show, that means a lot to me." the story ends like you might imagine. >> one, two, three, counts julia. yeah! one, two, three friends, counts abby. >> reporter: with confusion cleared up, friendship triumphant. sunny days and the sunny days on "sesame
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jim axelrod, cbs news, new york. and that's the overnight news for this thursday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us just a little bit later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm scott pelley. >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news."
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welcome to the "overnight news." i'm don daylor. vice president joe biden has made it official. he will not seek the democratic nomination for president. his announcement ends months of speculation. here's what he had to say. >> mr. president, thank you for lending me the rose garden for a minute. >> it's a pretty nice place. >> as my family and i have worked through the grieving process, i've said all along what i've said time and again to others, that it may very well be that that process, by the time we get through it, closes the window on mounting a realistic campaign for president. that it might close. i've concluded it has closed. i know from previous experience that there is no timetable for this process. the process doesn't respect or
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much care about things like filing deadlines or debates and primaries and caucuses. but i also know that i could do this -- i couldn't do this if the family wasn't ready. the good news is the family has reached that point. but as i've said many times, my family has suffered loss and i hoped there would come a time, and i've said this to other families, that sooner rather than later when you think of your loved one it brings a smile to your lips before it brings a tear to your eyes. well, that's where the bidens are today, thank god. beau -- beau is our inspiration. unfortunately, i believe we're out of time, the time necessary to mount a winning campaign for
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candidate, i will not be silent. i intend to speak out clearly and forcefully, to influence as much as i can where we stand as a party and where we need to go as a nation. and this is what i believe. i believe that president obama has led this nation from crisis to recovery and we're now on the cusp of resurgence. i'm proud to have played a part in that. this party, our nation, will be making a tragic mistake if we walk away or attempt to undo the obama legacy. the american people have worked too hard and we've come too far for that. democrats have not only defend this record and protect this record record, they should run on the record. >> vice president joe biden. on capitol hill republican congressman paul ryan is singing
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a different tune after weeks of refusing calls to run for speaker of the house, ryan now says he's open to the job but he has conditions. nancy cordes has the story. >> reporter: first and foremost, ryan says that all the different wings of the house republican conference must endorse him by friday or he won't run. that turns the tables on hard-line conservatives who were hoping to extract concessions from their next speaker in exchange for their support. >> what i told members is if you can agree to these requests and if i can truly be a unifying figure then i will gladly serve. >> reporter: ryan laid out his requests first for house republicans and then for the press, starting with a call for the gop to start focusing on solutions. >> we need to move from an opposition party to being a proposition party. >> reporter: then he said the house rule book must be changed. >> and it needs to include fixes that ensure that we do not experience constant leadership challenges and crises.
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>> i cannot and i will not give up my family time. i may not be on the road as often as previous speakers, but i pledge to try and make up for it with more time communicating our vision, our message. >> reporter: most house republicans were happy to oblige after begging the father of three to take the job. applause. i didn't see anyone booing. >> reporter: one candidate in the speaker's race promptly dropped out. >> i'm out, and i'm in with paul. he's the right person at the right time. >> reporter: ryan's unusual approach is a reflection of his strong leverage. as a conservative who's also cut deals with democrats, he's seen as one of the only people who can unite his fractured party after hard-liners threatened to force out the current speaker, john boehner, and doomed his replacement, kevin mccarthy. ryan warned them, as speaker he would work with the other side. >> my greatest worry is the consequence of not stepping up. of someday having my own kids ask me, when the stakes were so high, why didn't you do all you
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could do? why didn't you stand and fight for my future when you had a chance to do so? >> reporter: ryan says if the entire party doesn't get behind him by friday he will happily stay in the job he has. and it puts the hard-liners in a situation where they'll get blamed if he backs out. ironically, gale, that is exactly what they say they've been wanting from the next speaker, a hardball approach. police in st. louis still have no suspects in a rash of fires at predominantly black churches. six churches have been burned over the past two weeks. they are all within five miles of each other and stand on the doorstep of ferguson, missouri. ferguson, as you recall, was the scene of weeks of riots following the police shooting of an unarmed black teen. adriana diaz is inside one of the churches, the new life missionary church in st. louis. >> reporter: this church was one of the hardest hit. flames tore through this entire entrance. the pastor here told us the arsonist likely squirted chemicals through this mail slot so that the fire would spread
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faster. >> we are called today to address what is possibly the most dangerous onslaught that we have experienced in many, many years, which is an attack on god's house. >> reporter: with a suspected arsonist still at large, church leaders in and around st. louis urged community members to remain vigilant. >> call the authorities if you see anything that doesn't look right. >> reporter: since october 8th six churches in predominantly black neighborhoods have been set on fire. the new life missionary baptist church was so badly damaged it held services outside sunday. authorities don't yet know who sparked the flames or why. but they believe the crimes are connected. in each case an accelerant was used to light the front door to the churches on fire. the buildings were all unoccupied at the times of the attacks. >> there's a very alarming pattern to these fires. we don't want them to get out of hand.
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not far from ferguson, missouri. >> hands up, don't shoot. >> reporter: an area still reeling from riots that erupted 18-year-old michael brown by a white police officer. authorities believe whoever is behind the fires may be someone struggling with stress and trying to send a message. but community leaders have their own response. >> this is not over. it's just the beginning. and we want the city to know that the churches, the pastors, the christians are coming together to stand as one. if you burn one, you're burning all of us. >> reporter: to make matters worse, this building has no insurance. but already several organizations have offered to rebuild. later today at another church community members will gather to show str i asked my dentist if an electric toothbrush was going to clean better than a manual? he said sure. but don't get just any one. get one inspired by dentists. with a round brush head. go pro with oral-b. oral-b's rounded brush head cups your teeth
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true, that has a good chance. hover boards, no, we never thought -- and the fact they said life imitates art. so kids like you saw "back to the future part 2" in the day and they said, well, if i can't have a hover board -- >> i'm going to make one. >> i'm going to make one. >> i was framed! >> yes. >> let's talk drones. >> oh, my gosh. >> they're being used now by news organizations. >> by we started out thinking this is kind of like this gag technology. you know, it's just a joke. but litt did we know 30 years later people aresing them all over the world. >> we're n statement about the future here. no, no, no. we're having a good time. >> read my thoughts. >> reporter: while nobody uses fax machines anymore for instant communication the movie nails other everyday technology. in the movie fingerprint scanners unlock the front door and pay for things like taxis. today we use biometric technology to open doors, unlock smartphones, and even authorize
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digital payments. >> over here, please. >> reporter: the mcflys use a giant flat screen tv that responds to audio commands and makes video calls. flat screens have been around for a while now but samsung's flat tv has voice recognition. as for video calls there's face-time and skype. hi, krista. >> hi, vlad. >> reporter: krista smith here is the executive west coast editor of "vanity fair." do you think that the movie can still influence young people today? >> i think it still holds up. absolutely. the stuff that they were talking about in '85 to '90 is stuff that's actually our reality now. >> hey, mcfly! i thought i told you to stay in here. >> reporter: as a teenager it's still very relevant because you're still going through the same things. it doesn't matter if you have an iphone or you can fly around the world. 15-year-olds are feeling the same thing that 15-year-olds were feeling in the '50s. >> wait a minute. cubs win world series.
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against miami? >> reporter: 107 years after its last title, the cubs are still trying to advance to this year's world series. and so we wait. just a bit longer to see if the movie's ultimate prediction comes true. >> you're not going to believe this! we've got to go back to 1955. >> i don't believe it. >> reporter: why do you think "back to the future" remains so popular? >> it's the humanity of "back to the future." and the movie says you have some control over your own destiny. the things that you do today can have a life-changing effect in your future. >> reporter: to the future. to the past. and back to the future. if we're all caught up, then what do we have to look forward to? to be continued. the "cbs overnight news"
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there's an invasion under way along the east coast. lion fish, beautiful to look at and tasty to eat, but they're also venomous and wreaking havoc along the ocean floor. morning." >> reporter: the atlantic's coral reefs bustle with marine life. natural paradises filled with creatures of all colors, shapes, and sizes.
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but this species is far from its native habitat. in fact, it's a sign of troubled waters. >> the lion fish is a beautiful, wonderful ornate reef fish. it's native to the indo-pacific ocean. and now in these oceans we have lion fish which don't belong swimming all over our reef areas. >> reporter: from scales to tails, vlad akin studies lion fish for the reef environmental education foundation. how did they get here? >> well, they're super popular in aquariums. and just like we see with other things, people sometimes set their pets free. >> reporter: and soon a few abandoned pets started multiplying. a single lion fish can produce 2 million eggs a year. and with no natural predator in the atlantic there's plenty of this fish in the sea.
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keep growing and growing. lion fish are always on the hunt for their next meal. gulping down whatever they can find. many of them the young of fish we eat like grouper and snapper. >> we could see extinctions of species. we could see reductions in populations of species we rely on economically. and those are worst case scenarios. >> you guys are moving a lot of lion fish from these surrounding waters. >> i'm a best case scenario kind of guy and i see we're engaging a lot of people right now. >> it's a great event. >> reporter: that's mainly through what akins calls derbies. >> i think we should hand out some award money and prizes. >> reporter: competitions across the u.s. and caribbean for scuba divers to kill as many lion fish as they can.
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fish behind. for a better look at a derby near ft. lauderdale. >> back. >> reporter: we went underwater with project baseline. >> prepare to dive. >> reporter: it's a non-profit organization that's documenting the condition of the world's oceans. >> nemo reporting. my life support systems are okay, and my vents are secured. >> reporter: co-founder robert carmichael took us to a shipwreck 120 feet down, where lion fish like to feed. >> here they are. >> oh, yeah. okay. maybe we can snag that lion fish over there. >> reporter: lion fish can't be baited, trapped, or trawled. so the derby's scuba divers must spear them one by one,
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to avoid their venomous spines, to prevent painful though not deadly stings they place the fish in a plastic tube known as a zookeeper. >> is it scary, do you think, for the divers to come face to face with the lion fish? >> they don't really attack you. it's just the only risk you really run is if you mishandle the lion fish. >> reporter: which is exactly what happened to diver patrick peacock. you got stung today. >> i did. i wasn't careful. he came free and he poked me, and i had to end the dive. >> reporter: what did it feel like? >> it feels like a wasp times ten. >> the venom is contained in the entire length of the spine. >> reporter: but cut off those spines, as they did at the derby. >> and you can handle it just like any other fish. >> reporter: and lion fish go
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>> a little bit of celery. >> reporter: really. lion fish ceviche, anyone? >> it's good. >> reporter: some of that day's catch was sent here, to norman's key, a caribbean restaurant in new york city. since lion fish must be killed one at a time, it's expense i. and this is one of the few restaurants serving it. >> we're not making any money on the fish. that's for sure. >> reporter: owner ryan chadwick sells the fish for around $26 a plate. less than what it costs. >> it's more about helping the ecosystem and doing something different. >> so this is not about money for you. >> not this, no. >> reporter: and as for the taste -- >> it's a light flaky buttery fish. this version is actually the jerk lion fish. so you'll have a little heat, a little spice. >> and this is me spearing a lion fish. >> yes. >> with a fork. with the fish on a plate. >> that's right. >> okay. oh, wow.
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that is really good. >> what do you think? >> i love it. it's actually very similar to snapper. >> reporter: which makes lad akin's hope that maybe we can eat our way out of this problem. >> i think we have a lot of examples of eating through fish stocks. here's a fish that needs to be controlled. and if we can provide a culinary value, i think we can impact the lion fish population just through removal for consumption. >> that sounds pretty good to me. >> it's a win-win for everybody. except the lion fish. >> reporter: if you bring your wallet and a sense of adventure. >> bon appetit. enjoy. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. embarrassed by a prostate exam? imagine how your doctor feels. as a urologist, i have performed 9,421 and a half prostate exams. so why do i do it? because i get paid. und... on this side of the glove
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so, if you are a man over 50, talk to you doctor if we can do it, so can you.
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three teenagers in new york
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computers, changing grades, and even class schedules. anna werner reports. >> reporter: the original attack was three months ago. it led investigators to the house of the teen they call the mastermind behind the scheme. it's a story that seems fit for a hollywood screenplay, but it's -- pardon me. it's no joke that three 17-year-old students are facing serious time in prison. walking out of a long island courtroom tuesday, 17-year-old daniel soares. police say he was the ringleader behind the brazen cyber attack. his alleged accomplices, alex muscara and eric vaisman covered their faces as they were released on their own recognizance recognizance. the three teens are accuse of hacking into their school's computers and changing grades and schedules. >> at this point we believe daniel changed at left one of his own grades and one of eric vaisman's grade. his grade was changed from 49 to a perfect score of 100. >> reporter: police say soares
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broke into comack high school after school hours and installed a device known as as a key log to a school computer. it enabled him to collect log-ins and password credentials while operating remotely from his home. >> it's a piece of hardware that you can put on a computer, interfaces with the keyboard and it records every stroke of the keyboard. >> reporter: school officials called police in july after raeldsing the class schedules of about 300 students had been changed without authorization. their investigators led them to soares, who disappeared for about a week before police located him. >> we're waiting for a full investigation to be done and he maintains his innocence. >> what are you doing? >> dialing into the school's computer. >> reporter: it's reminiscent of the 1983 film "war games" that featured another high school-aged hacker, matthew broderick. but this real-life case has serious repercussions. muscara and vaisman are facing up to four years in prison. if convicted soares could see up to 11 years.
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computer tampering charges. soares is also facing charges of burglary and identity theft. now, in a statement the commack school district says it's reviewing its network security protocols to prevent something like this from happening again. >> and that's the overnight news for this thursday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm don dahler. joe biden shakes up the race. >> unfortunately, i believe we're out of time.
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