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tv   Up to the Minute  CBS  November 25, 2015 2:07am-4:00am CST

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be enormously helpful and would allow us all to refocus our attention on isil. >> reporter: from washington, president hollande will head for russia where he plans to ask president putin to shift his focus to fighting isis, but, scott, it's a request that's been made many times before without success. >> pelley: chip reid at the white house.
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right back. almost sixty million americans are affected by mental illness. together we can help them with three simple words. my name is chris nothh and i will listen. from maine to maui, thousands of high school students across the country are getting in on the action by volunteering in their communities. chris young: action teams of high school students are joining voluntntrs of america and major league baseball players to help train and inspire the next generation of volunteers. carlos pea: it's easy to start an action team at your school so you, too, can get in on e action. get in on the action at actionteam.org. 'cause you'll be in my heart yes, you'll be in my hehet
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from this day on now and forevermore... narrator: if animals are our best friends, shouldn't we be theirs? visit your local shelter, adopt a pet. you'll be in my heart no matter what... cbs cares.s. if you were a hippie in the '60s,ou need to know. it's the dawning the age of aquarius. yeah, and something else that's cool. what? osteoporosis is preventable.
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if you dig your bones, srotect them. all: cbs s res! with unique insight into all of this, we turn to ambassador nick burns, a career american diplomat, former national security council director for russian affairs, and former u.s. representative for nato. he now teaches diplomacy at harvard. mr. ambassador, what are the stakes in what we've seen today? >> well, it's been a consequential day, scott. we haven't had a nato member
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shoot down a soviet or russian aircraft since 1952, and so the stakes are very high, that the russians learn the lessons of what happened but also that this can be de-escalated so that there's no further action, and russia and turkey and the e her countries can go back, hopefully trying to combat isis. >> pelley: well, the russian president called it a stab in the back. could this escalate? >> it could escalate. i think k ere's-- i think the e united states and president obama are going to work very hard to see that it doesn't, but there's an important principle at stake here, scott. every nation has a right to protect its own borders. and president obama sided with the turks today in saying that they have that right. it was a gross violation of international law for the russians even to fly close to that border, but to cross it, that's a red line that can't be crossed. and so i think the lesson here for the russians has to be they're fairly isolated right now. they don't have many friends in the middle east. th say that they want to tack and defeat isis but they're not really fighting
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isis.. >> pelley: you know, the turks fired on this aircraft after it had been in their airspace for only about 30 seconds or so, we're told. why you think the turks would make a point of shooting this rplane down? >> i think because there's a history here. the russians have violated turkish airspace several times since the russians began air operations in syria two mohs ago. and the turks have warard the russians publicly ananprivately that there's going to be a response at some point. the russians may have thought that the turks weren't serious but they found out today that they were. it's a tragedy. it's not something, obviously, that the united states wants to see happen, but ththturks do have a right to protect that border. the emphasis now has to be on making sure it doesn't happen again. >> pelley: ambassador nicholas burns,hank you very much. >> thank you. >> pelley: well, the war on isis be tighter as millions of americans head out for the holiday. he's jeff pegues. >> reporter: police at los angeles inteational airport today were armededith automatic
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weapons. this thanksgiving week, amid isis threats, there will also be a larger police presence than usual in new york. police commissioner bill bratton. >> i think it quite clear what we're advocating through you, certainly is this idea of don't be afraid. be aware. >> reprter: a new intelligence bulletin sent to law enforcement around the country warns that there could be copycats in the u.s. looking to replicate the paris attacks. ron hosko is a former assistant director of the f.b.i. how much of isis' strategy is about fear? >> i think a large proportion is about fear. could something happen? yes. but is there a greater likelihood of being stck by lightning or struck by a car on e way to d.c.? yes. >> reporter: today, president obama tried to reassure the public. >> what happened in paris is truly horrific. i ununrstand that people worry that something similar could happen here.
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i want you to know that we will continue to do everything in our power to defend our nation. >> repepter: and that stratete invovoes studying tactics used in paris. intelligence officials believe the attackers conducted pre-operation surveillance. lice in the u.s. are being advised to be on the lookout for suspicious people conducting surveillance on soft targets. >> pelley: jeff pegues, thanks. in another big story tonight, a white chicico police officer was charged today with murder more than a year after shooting a black teenager in the back. released tonight and chicago is bracing for a reaction. here's dean reynolds. here is dean reynolds. >> police said nothing as hee turned himself in faces first-degree murder charges and according to his lawyer scared to death.
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state's attorney. >> this officer went over board. >> van dyk's trouble began in october of last year along this street when he and seven other officers pursued a robbery suspect. 17-year-old laquan mcdonald who wass acts e radically and waiving a three-inch knife. no other officer felt the need to open fire accept van dyk, who prosecutors say, 6 seconds after arriving on the scene shot mcdonald 16 times. it took 14 seconds, 13 of which the teenager was on the ground. prosecutors say van dyk was preparing to reload when ordered to h hd fire. van dyk said mcdonald lunged at him and that he feared for his life, but the prosecutor said a lice videotape tells a far diffent story andnd soo did ann eyewitness. >> the motorist stated that mcdonald never movered toward, lunged at or did anything threatening towards the officer beforee was shot and fell to the ground. >> for 13 months chicago
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the video arguing it would jeopardize local and federal investigations of the shooti. a county judge last week over rode that argument and ordered the tapes be released the video is graphic, violent and chilling and there's concern once it's available for all to see it could provoke a violent reaction and painful questions about why it took so long to arrest the shooter seen on the tape. >> reporter: now here at the police headquartershe mayor and the superintendent of police have just held a press conference where they insisted that officer van dyk is no way representative of the chicago police department. scott, if van dyk is convicted he faces 20 years to life behind sars. >> and the video is in the process of being released tonight. dean, thank you. we now know where the paris attackers were planning to strike next until the police took them out.
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that the menenho planned the paris attacks planned a bombing days later in the city's financial district. those planners were killed in a raid last week tonight, debora patta has learned of another surprising revelation in the assault on paris. (gunfire) >> reporter: while police were still rescuing hostages from the attack on the packed concert hall, french investigators rerealed today that the presumed mastermind of the paris attacks had actually returned to the scene of the crime. abdelhamid abaaoud used his cell phone near the bataclan that night according to prosecutor francoco molins. he also revealed that abaaoud, along with an accomplice, was planning another suicide bomb attack, this time at la defense, a bubu parisian business district. abaaoud was killed in a fierce police gun battle last wednesday, and now there is a
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new addition to europe's most wanted list, 30-year-old mohammed abrini. police believe he may have been traveling in the same car with salah abdeslam, the terrort who escaped d st week and is still on the run. abrini's d.n.a. was found in a car used in the attacks. in brussels, belgian police are still trying to root out a terrororell and most of the e ty is on lockdown, but tomorrow things will start returning to normal. most of the subways will reopen, and, scott, children will be going back to school. >> pelley: debora patta reporting for us tonight. debora, thank yoyo
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refugee crisis next. >> pelley: today, presidents obama and hollande defended their plans to accept syrian refugees. mr. obama said america is strengthened by people of every faith. bubuopponents say that terrorists could hide among the migrants. well as america prepares to observe the holiday that celebrates the first refugees on our shores, we asked adriana diaz to look into the controvevey in kentucky. >> reporter: it's a first thanksgiving for america's newest pilgrims, refugees, some who arrived from syria less than two months ago, all breakiki bread in their new home in kentucky. newcomers like 15-year-old
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old nour alkunuss. >> w wn i remember my country, i feel like i'm dying. >> reporter: why? >> because people in my country e every day. every day. >> reporter: they met here at a school for refugees in kentucky, far from the front lines of syria, but now, they're facing other brewing problem. since the paris attacks,s, protesters have taken to the streets across the united states voicing their opposition to syrian refugees coming in. more than 30 governors across the country y ree, including matt bevin, who takes office here in kentucky in two weeks. people have to go through years of background checks, interviews that last hours at a time. why change things now. >> let's be thoughtful. let's pause. let's use a measured approach. that's all anybody is saying. if we are delusional to think
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to do bad things to ourselves we are going to do so, be delusional to our own detriment. >> reporter: shadi, who asked us not to use his last name, is a new arrival. "if there is an explosioioin a coununy and syrians are stopped from coming in, of course, that creates some fear," he says. "it's the same kind of fear we felt when we were in syria." he says gettininto the u.s. was grueling. nur is eager to start a new life here. these new arrivals sayayhey're thankful for the warm welcome they've received here but are worried with what lies ahead. adriana diaz, cbs news, uisville, kentucky. >> pelley: an extraordinary group of americans was honored
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>> pelley: today, president obama awarded the medal of freedom to an incredible array of great americans. people who need people >> pelley: people li streisand and sondheim, berra and mays, and shirley chisholm, the first black woman in congress. >> i want to be remembered as a catalyst for change. >> pelley:y:7 people who changeded
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here's bill plante. >> reporter: they've enriched our lives with music. don't bring around a cloud to rain on my parade. >> reporter: thrilled us on the field. made movies leap off the screen. james taylor was honored for his 50 years of exploring life. >> that's the thing about james- - you always feel like he's singing only to you. in my mind i'm goin' to carolina >> the issues that i comple me are still the same ones. you know, it's whahai love to do. i think that over time, you get incrementally better at it. >> reporter: how long can you keep doing this? >> it's hard to believe i'm not closer to the end than i a ato the beginning, but i'll carry on as long as-- as long as there seems to be support for it. >> reporter: because, in the words of another one of today's honorees--
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yogi berra, amazing. >> r rorter: and as the great yankee catcher also said, "you can observe a lot by just watching." i've seen fire and i've seen rain. >> reporter: watching a play, an impassioned speech, a concert. thought they'd never end >> reporter: 17 americans who all made a mark on our national life. when you could not find a friend >> reporter: bill plante, cbs news, washington. but i always thought i'd see you again. that's the overnight news for this wednesday. for some of you the news with us a little bit later for other news of course, cbs this morning.
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york city. >> welcome to the overnight news. nato held an emergency session trying to contain the political and military fall out after turkey shot down a russian plane. vladimir putin called it a stab in the back and causing it significant consequences. it was bombing militants across the border in syria. they opened fire when the jet was on opened fire over turkish corage. >> reporter: turkey says the russian warplane strayed over a mile into the airspacece
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>> that video is going to show its firy decent crashing down in northwest syria. turkey says this radar map shows where the aircraft briefly crossed over, but russia denies the plane ever left syrian airspace, and the visibly angry russiaiapresident vladimir p pin called turkey's actions a stab in the back, describing the turkish as terrorists' accomplices. turkey had already warned moscow about violating its airspace and says russian planes did so twice in october. a syrian rebel g gup posted this video, which seems to show the bloody body of one of the russian pilots. the fate of the other pilot is unknown. russia and turkey are on opposite sides of ththsyrian civil war.
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supports the syrian rebels. while russia backs he syrianan regime and in september began launching airstrikes. moscow claims to be targeting isis, but the u.s. says it's also hit so-called moderate rebels because russia's real goal is to prop up syria's dictator, bashar al-assad. there were hopes that russia cod be coaxed into coooorating with the u.s. and its allies in the fight against isis, but, scott, after this incident, that now looks even more uncertain. >> when the moment russian war planes began operating after that air space in syria it was waiting to happen. russian planes violated turkish airspace on at least two previous occasions, flew within 500 feet of american aircraft striking isis targets in syria, and bombed opposition groups supported by the u.s. and its allies. to avoid incidents, , hot line was set up between the russian
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defense ministry and the u.s.- run command center for coalition airstrikes against isis. but to no avail. after vladadir putin's angry reaction to the shootdown, the russian military said a cruiser armed with surface-to-air missiles would be stationed off the syrian coast ready to shoot down any planes that threatened d its aircraft. president obama urged both sides to remain calm and described the incident as a consequence of russia's policy of flying airstrikes in support of the syrian regime of bashar al- assad. >> i do think that this points to an ongoing problem with the russian operations in the sense that they are operating very close to a turkish border, and they are going after moderate opposition. >> reporter: turkey is a member of nato, whichas spent the past year and a half scrambling jeje and deploying troops to counter what is seen as increasingly aggressive russian behavior.
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the sudden appearance of russian warplanes in syria represented another threat to nato, this time on its southern flank, when the u.s. sent planes to turkey in an effort to increase the number of strikes against isis, it also sent air-to-air fighters to defenenturkish airspace against russian warplanes. russia may be causing problems, but in this particular incident, scott, u.s. officials blame turkey for over-reacting to a minor violation of its airspac >> news came as president obama in the wait of the paris terror attacks. they're trying to lly international suppororfor a military campaign against islamic state. president obama agreed that isis mustste destroyed. >> we're here today that the yiet and fraps stand united in total solidarity to deliver justice to these terrorists and
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nations. and that spirit with heavy but strong hearts, i welcome you here today. this barbaric terrorist group, isil and its murderist i'dology pose a serious threat to all of us. it cannot be t terated and it must be destroyed and we must do it together. this is a unity of purpose that we serve here today. it's been noted that the terrorist did not dirirt their attacks against the french government military, rather they focused their violence on very spirits by extension of all deliberate democracies. it's an attack on our free and open societies, where people come together to celebrate and sing and compete. targetinin venues where people
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come together from around the world killing citizens of nearly 20 countries, including america. it's an attack onnhe very idea that people of different races, religions and backgrounds can live together in peace. in short, this was not only8a strike against one of the world's great cities, it was an attack against the world itself. it's the same madness and to slaughter the innocent from nigeria to the sinai and from lebanon to iraq. itits a scourge which harms all of us. that's why for more than a year, the united ates, france and our coalition of some 65 nations have been unitedd in one mission, to destroy these isil terrorist and defeat they vile etiology. >> w wt is your reaction to turkey shooting down russian plane today? >> first of all we're still
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happened and i expect tbe in communicationsns potentiallll directly with the president over time over the next several days. turkey, like every country, has the right to defend its territory and its air space. i think it's very important, right now, for us to make sure that both the russians and the turks are talking to each other to find out exactly what happened and take measures to discourage any kind of es ska escalationon escalation. i do think that this points to an on-going problem with the russian operations, ij the sense that they are operating very close to a turkish border and they are going after moderate
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by, not only turkey but a de-range of countries. >> the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. i asked my dentist if an electric toothbrush was going to clean better than a manual? he said sure. but don't get just any one. get one inspired by dentists. with a round brush head. go pro with oral-b. oral-b's rounded brush head cups your teeth to break up plaque and rotates to sweep it away. and oral-b delivers a clinically proven superior clean versus sonicare diamondclean. my mouth feels super clean. oral-b know you're getting a superior clean. i'm never going backto a manual brush. the leading cough liquid only provides relief for four hours, but did you know there's a product that lasts for twelve hours? try delsym twelve hour cough liquid. its advanced formula works by immediately releasing powerful medicine that acts fast whililits extended release medicine lasts for 12 hours. in fact, delsym lasts three times longer than the leading cough liquid. for all day or all night relief,
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>> in the wake of paris terror attacks france has stepped up its bombing campaigns in syria and iraq. on the ground the fight has been left the kurdish fighters iraqi security forces. and shiite militia backed by iran. there are also a handful of american officers helping to > we're in the combined operations center. >> >> general thurston where iraqis and americans have been sitting side by side. for more than a year. thousands of calls for u.s. and coalition air strikes have come through here >> who is bringing intelligence that feeds these coals? >> we have national
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intelligence, everything is sing in different papas of this building and coming to this strike zone, that's where it's checked and coordinated and approved. >> on their screens live feeds from drones that record every minute o othe war. and seens from inside islamic state health territoriy that like this one in a town of western iraq that they were watching on sent 11 this year. these are isis photographs that general thurston confirmed were from the same scene. the town square, 12 islamic state fighters wererpreparing to execute this man. >> there are small children brought into the very front of the crowd and we sat there helplessly, calls are coming for strike, they're going to assassinate this person in front of these children. we can't because they're children and we had to watch that. moments later, the execution took place and t t victim lay
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shot by this man, once in the head and once more in the body. the american drone stayed with the 12 terrorists. >> we followed them as they got into three vehicles and drove out of town. then they made a mistake because they always made mistakes and all 12 went into the building on the side of the e ver and none of those 12 came out. >> gurston told us tht the air strike that destroyed that building. it's more than one of 5,000 strikes to support the iraqi army and kurdish forces on the ground over the past year. yet the islam state remains entrenched in its strong hold. this was the first city to fall in january 2014. 5 months later most of the country's second largest city fell and the iraqi army collapsed. islamic state terrorist quickly advanced toward the iraqi capitol attempting to encircle
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baghdad infiltrating towns and villages on the out skirts. with the iraqi army largely absent from the the fight it was the shiite my till lants backed by shiite's that heleld push back the militants of the islamic state. one of the shiite militants that the organization. it's known here as the population mobilization forces. after months of negotiation they agreed to take us up to e front. treacherous journey we couou not have made e thout them. for more than a year, the islamic state held this ground, but our fighters told us they fought hard to winint back. now, through desolate landscape, scarred by recent battles they were taking us toward their
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front line just outside boluga. a islamic state base for almost two years. >> we're going up to part of the front line that's closest, we're told that this point is only a mile away and the bibiest threat here is from snipers. >> it was in 2004 that 82 americans died fighting the bloodiest battle of ththiraq war. the local commander here showed us a tunnel islamic state terrorists used to move undetected from anmerican plane. he showed us exploited bomb they left behind. this river, he said, it is the distant between his fighters and the enemy. huh? >> that's about two months. shooting? so they used the buildings to cover and they come and attack inmall groups. >> sometimes they fight from the
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the trees and the bushes for cover. >> the tasks that lies ahead of trying to liberate the major city still occupied by the enemy is daunting. it remains the eventual goal of their lead who was among the first to r rh into b btle against the islamic state or die. >> i consider myself a fighter defending my country against diesh with all that i can. >> one of the most powerful and feared men in iraq. known for his brutal attacks on the iraq population in the civiv war that followed the u.s. invasion. this is him as a young man in ootage from iranian tv he spent much of his life in exile in iran.
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and he still has the ties to iranian regime. >> everyone who fights along aside us is afraid. everyone who fights alongside diesh is an enemy. >> so that mea america ih this fight is your friend? >> no, only if they seriously fight diesh. >> are you saying they're not seriously@ fighting diesh now? >> frankly, well below expectations. we have struck thoususds and thousands of positions. we're giving a considerable amount of equipment, effort, money and training to obscuriri the government of iraq. >> but is that you're in the fight but you're not really in the fight, no 100%. >> if thousands of coalition members here, i have spepe 25 years in this region. i would find it hard to believe that we're not interested in the safety and security of the
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>> it's part of the general's job to know where the men are on the battlefield. command the largest shiite force in the country. seen here in images the captured this spring as they held a major victory, winning back sad dam hussein's hometown from the islamic state. they're fighting without weapons or support from the u.s. the fighters like these men at a training camp we visited deepn ththsouth of the country are among more than 100,000 volunteers that make up the popular mobilization forces. men who rushed into the fight in the days afterhe iraqi army fell apart. now, in ba@tle, they come to camps like this to continue
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their training i i betweenen deployments to the front line. >> these young people took their weapons and defended baghdad from being over run, then they carried on and returned vast areas of iraq to government control. everyone accepts now that if it wasn't for them, not only baghdad but the entire iraq would have been over run by diesh. >> how many men have been lost so far? >> significant number, more than 2,000 mortars in this war. >> more than 2,000 militia fighters and thousands more iraqi police a a soldiers. the faces of the deadline the streets of the capitol stretching for blocks. it's one of the first things we noticed as werove around the city.
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fighters using a weapon so lethal, the general told us the americans have given it aname, franken truck. >> franken trucks are something out of a movie, something you see in a science fiction movie. these are vehicles that they've welded metal plates too, loaded them with high explosives put a suicide bomber inside of them and set themselves off. that is their precision weapon. >> you can see more of lara's report on our web site cbs news.com. the overnight news will be right back.
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>> if you plan on traveling to your thanksgiving feast, you're not alone, about 47 million americans will travel 50 miles for the holiday. most of them will go by car. and that means traffic jams. 40% of road delays are caused by bottlenecks and have nothing to do with accidents, weather or construction. kris van cleave reports from one notorious trouble spot, the entrance t t the lincoln tunnel in new jersey. >> the lincoln tunnel that connects new jersey to new york city, the worst traffic bottleneck on the east coast and anyone sitting in it can tell you that. researchers looked at the bottle necks and found the amount of money for sitting in the traffic, more than $2.4 billion a year and when we say bottlenecks we don't mean rush
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that always seem to be bad. drivers it doesn't get any worse than this, a 12 mile stretch of red lights crawlincars and pure commuter agony, interstste 90 in chicago around o'hare airport is considered the worst traffic bottleneck in the country resulting in 16.9 million hrs of wasted time. that's an estimated $418 million of lost productivity a year according to a new report out this morning. the reason, pure volume. >> they've destroyed so many neighborhoods to b bld it and yet t ople can't get anywhwhe. >> i give myself about an hour and a half to get to work. >> reporter: the report identifies the 50 worst bottlenecks in the country. six of the top ten are in los angeles. the south land scores 12 of the worst traffic stopping choke points over all. the new york city area has nine brutal bottlenecks the 2.6 miles around the lincoln tunnel
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driver delay every year. >> compared 2005 to 2015, are the bottlenecks getting worse? >> it is getting worse over time, certainly between 1982 and today there's a lot of studies that show that traffic that once was just in l.a. is now worse than what l.a. was like back then in dozens of cities around the country. >> yeg wo han runs t american highway user alliance that did the study. one e udy that dropped off the wood row wilson bridge outside washington, d.c. it was rebuilt and traffic improved. he says much more infrastructure work needs to be done. >> there's an opportunity there do something that, you know, is good for people, saves lives, saves the environment. >> reporter: now, all 50 of these suffer from too much volume, too many cars. but one stretch of the hollywood freeway y ttleneck, other also because of prolonged work
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zones and here at the lincoln tonl this is 80-year-old infrastructure that just can't keep up with d dand and to pand it would require a huge investment. >> the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. when the engines failed on the plane i was flying, i knew what to do to save my passengers. but when my father sank into depression, i didn't know how to help him. when he ultimately shot himself, he left our family devastated. don't let this happen to you. if you or a loved one is suicidal, call the national suicide prevention lifeline. no matter how hopeless or helpless you feel,
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reporter: interactiti games are no longer just for kids and they're not just fun and games either, businesses all around the country are taking their employees to escape rooms you have one hour to work together to find your way out. omar villa franca shows us how it works. >> you have one hour starting now. >> andrew mcjanet smith gets paid to lock people in a small room and monitor them as they plot their escape by finding riddles and solving hidden clues. >> you can s s he's getting a really frustrated. >> what may seem like a cruel prank is becoming big business in dallas for andrew andis wife tracy. the couple openeneescape expert in late january, the 6,000 square foot building has
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five-rooms where contestants must work together to try and escape. >> my name could refer to fake money. >> today they average 700 customers s week. >> wait. wait. black. round and fuzzy. >> and at about $30 a person, that's about $80,000 in sales a month. >> it's taken from off of computer game and made for real life so you can actually play like a real live computer game. >> reporr: unlike many other escape room businesses their business customers aren't screaming teenagers or adrenaline junkies,they're employees from companies like dex, frito lay, and 7-eleven. [ cheering and applause ] >> we won fair and square and we worked together and we have -- now we have stories to go
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back andndell other teams. smartest person in the office isn't always the best teammate in the room. >> who over thinks? >> accountants over think, financial people tend to over think things. >> and that can be a problem. >> it can be. if you're looking too deeply you and the answer is in front of you, you can miss the clue completely. >> each room has a theme. >> this is our advanced room, , currently has 20% escape rate. >> reporter: teens need a particular set of skills. >> you have to know where things are on maps. >> repepter: escape expert is one of three hundred escape room businesses in the u.s. >> can i help you get number three? >> for andrew and tracy the only thing harder from escaping from the room might be coming up with ideas for new rooms and clues. omar villafrancnc dallas tx. >> that's the overnight news for this wednesday. for some of you the news continues, for others check back with us a little later for the
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morning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city. >> turkey, like e ery country, has s right to defend its territory and its airspace. >> pelley: also tonight, a warning about a copycat terror attack in the u.s. > don't be afraid. be aware. >> pelley: a white chicago popoce officer is charged with rdering a black teenener. and the nation's highest civilian honor is presented to a group of great americans from yogi berra-- >> it ain't over till it's over. >> pelley: to james taylor. >> this is the cbs over night news. >> pelley: the incident has
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on isis and peace in europe. >> after turkey shot down a war plane killing at least one of two pilots. it's the first time atlanta alliance russian or soviet plane since the 1950s. russian president putin insists the plane was in syrian airspace, but the turks released this radar image, which they say that dotd red line, as it holly williams begins our coverage. >> reporter: turkey says the russian warplane strayed over a le into the airspacece after 10 warnings without a response, a turkish fighter jet shot it down. this video is thought to show its s ery descent, crashinindown in northwest syria. turkey says this radar map shows where the aircraft briefly crossed over, but russia denies
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airspace, and the visibly angry russian president vladimir putin called turkey's actions a stab turkish as terrorists' accomplices. turkey had already warned moscow about violating its airspace and says russian planes did so twice in october. a syrian rebel group posted this video, which seems to show the bloody body of one of the russian lots. the e te of the other pilot is unknown. russia and turkey are on opposite sides of the syrian civil war. turkey, like its ally the u.s., , supports the syrian rebels. rebels, while russia backs the syrian regime and in september began launching airstrikes. moscow claimed to be targeting isis, but the u.s. says it's
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rebels because russia's real goal is to prop up syria's didiator, bashar al-assad. there were hopes that russia could be coaxed into cooperating with the u.s. and its allies in the fight against isis, but, scott, after this incident, that w looks even more ununrtain. >> pelley: holly williams reporting from istanbul tonight, holly, thanks. david martin reports the shootdown has the potential to draw nato allies into a conflict with russia.a. >> reporter: from the moment russian warplanes began operating out of that airbase in syria, it was an international incident waiting to happen. russian planes violated turkish airspace on at least two previous occasions, flew within 500 feet of american aircraft striking isis targets in syria, and dombed opposition groups supported by the u.s. and its allies. to avoid incidents, a hot line was set up between the russian defense ministry and the u.s.-run command center for
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coalition airstrikes again isis. but to no avail. after vladimir putin's angry reaction to the shootdown, the russian military said a cruiser armed with surface-to-air missiles would be stationed off the syriananoast ready to shoot t dodo any planes that thrhrtened its aircraft. president obama urged both sides to remain calm and described the incident as a consequence of russia's policy of flying airstrikes in support of the syrian regime of bashar al-assad. >> io think that this points to an ongoing problem with the russian operations in the sense that they are operating very close to a turkish border, and they are going after moderate opposition. >> reporter: turkey is a member of nato, w wch has spent the past year and a half scrambling jets and deploying troops to counter what is seen as increasingly aggressive russian behavior. the sudden appearance of russian warplanes in syria represented
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time on n s southern flank, when the u.s. sent planes to turkey in an effort to increase the number of strikes against isis, it also sent air-to-air fighters to defend turkish airspace against russian warplanes. russia may be causing problems, but in this particular incident, scott, u.s. officials blame turkey for over-reacting to a minor violation of its airspace. >> pelley: davididartin at the pentagon tonight. thank you, david. as holly williams mentioned the u.s. and francwere hoping to bring russia into an anti-isis liance. isis bombed a russian n rliner last month. as chip reid reports today, french president francois hollande vised the white house where president obama said this about isis. >> it cannot be tolerated. it must be destroyed. and we must do it together. >> reporter: president hollande said france woulramp up its air campaign, targeting isis command centers, training
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cities controlled by the terror group. president obama said his national security team had already put together a plan to accelerate pressure on isis before the paris attacks. >> and we intend to execute on those plans. >> reporter: but, mr. obama gave no details and instead talked more about what's already been accomplished.. >> we've taken thousands of strikes, have taken thousands of isil fighters, including top commanders and leaders, off the battlefield. >> reporter: the president again called on russia to stop propping up the regime of syrian president bashar al-assad and join the u.s. coalition of 65 nations fighting isis. >> rusa right now is a coalition of two-- iran and russia-- supporting assad. given russia's militity capabilities and given the influence they have on the assad
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regime, them cooperating would be enormously helpful and would allow us all to rerecus our attention on isil. >> reporter: from washington, president hollande will head for russia where he plans to ask president putin to shift his focus to figiging isis, but, scott, it's a request that's been made many times before without success. >> pelley: chip reid at the white house. thanks.
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be right back. [ vocalizing [ buzzing ] [ tree crashes ] [ wind howling ]
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with unique insight into all of this, we turn to ambassador nick burns, a career american diplomat, former national security council director for russian affairs, and former u.s. representative for nato. he now teaches diplomacy at harvard. mr. ambassador, what are the stakes in what we've seen today? >> well, it's been a consequential day, scott. we haven't had a nato member
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shoot down a soviet or russian aircraft since 1952, and so the stakes are very high, that the russians learn the lessons of what happened but also that this can be de-escalated so that there's no further action, and russia and turkey and the other countries can go bac hopefully trying to combat isis. >> pelley: well, the russian president called it a stab in the baba. could this escalate? >> it could escalate. i think there's-- i think the united states and president obama are going to work very hard to see that it doesn't, but there's an important principle at stake here, scoco. every nation has a right to protect its own borders. and president obama sided with the turks today in saying that they have that right. it was a gross violation of international law for the russians even to fly close to that border, but to cross it, that's a red line that can't be crossed. and so i think the lesson here for the russians has to be they're fairly isolated right now. they don't have many friends in the middle east. they say that they want to attack and defeat isis but they're not really fighting
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>> pelley: you know, the turks fired on this aircraft&after it had been in their airspace for only about 30 seconds or so, we're told. why do you think the turks would make a point of shooting this airplane down? >> i think because there's a history here. the russians have violated turkish airspace several times since ththrussians began air operations in syria two months ago. and the turks have warned the russians publicly and privately that there's going to be a response at some point. the ruruians may have thoughgh that the turks weren't serious but they found out today that they were. it's a tragedy. it's not something, obviously, that the united states wants to see happen, but the turks do have a right to protect that border. the emphasis now has to be on making sure e doesn't happen again. >> pelley: ambassador nicholas burns, thank you very much. >> thank you. >> pelley: well, the war on isis means that secity at home will be tighter as millions of americans s ad out for the holiday. here's jeff pegues. >> reporter: police at los angeles international airport today were armed with automatic
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weapons. this thanksgiving week, amid isis threats, there will also bebe a larger police presence than usual in new york. police commissioner bill bratton. >> i think it quite clear what we're advocating through you, certainly is this idea of don't be afraid. aware. >> reporter: a new intelligence bulletin sent to law enforcement around the country warns that there could be copycats in the u.s. looking to replicate the paris attacks. ron hosko is a former assiststt director of the f.b.i. how much of isis' strategy is about fear? >> i think a large proportion is about fear. could something happen? but is there a greater likelihood of being struck by lightning orortruck by a car on the way to d.c.? yes. obama tried to reaure the public. >> what t ppened in paris is i understand that people worry that something similar could happen here. i want you to know that we will
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continue to do everything in our power to defend our nation. >> reporter: and that strategy involves studying tactics used in paris. intelligence officials believe the attackers conducted pre-operation surveillance. police in the u.s. are being advised to be on the lookout for suspicious people conducting surveillance on soft targets. >> pelley: jeff pegues, thanks. in another big story tonighthta white chicago police officer was charged today with murder more than a year after shooting a black teenager in the back. a videdeof the shooting was released tonight and chicago is bracing for a reaction. here's dean reynolds. on october 20th of last year, $% >> scared to death. anita alvarez is cook county state's attorney.
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>> this officer went over board. >> van dyk's trouble began in october of last year along this street when he and seven other officers pursued a robobry suspect. 17-year-old laquan mcdonald who was acting erratically and waiving a three inch knife. no other officer felt the need to open fire except for van dyk who prosecutors say 6 seconds after arriving on the scene shot mcdonald 16 times it tk 14 seconds 13 of which the teenanar was on the ground. van dyk was preparing to reload when ordered to hold fire. dan dike said mcdald lunged at him and that he feared for his lifefe polili videotape tells a far different story and so did an eyewitness. >> the motorist stated that mcdonald never moved toward, lalached at or did anything threatening towards the officers before he was shot and to the ground. >> chicago officials had
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arguing it would jeopardize local and federal investigations of the shooting. when a county judge last week over rode that argument and ordered the tapes release. prosecutors said the veo is graphic, violent a a chilling and there is concern once it's available for all to see, it could revoke a violent reaction and painful questions about why it t/ok so long to arrest the shooter seen on the tape. >> now, here at the police headquarters the mayor and the superintendent of police sl just held a -- have just held a press conference where they insisted that officer dan van dyk is no represented of the police department. if he's convicted he faces 20 years to life behind bars. >> and the video is in process of being released tonight. dean, thank you. we now know where the paris attackers were planning to strike next until the police took them out.
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>> french prosecutor said today that the men who planned the paris attacks planned a bombing days later in the city's financial district. those planners were killed in a raid last week. tonight, debora patta has learned of another surprising revelation in the assault on pas. (gunfire) >> reporter: while police were still rescuingng hostages from the attack on the packed concert hall, french investigators revealed today that the presumed mastermind of the paris attacks had actually returned to the scene of the crime. abdelhamid abaaoud used his cell phone near the bataclan that night according to prosecutor francois molins. he also revealed that abaaoud, along with an accomplice, was planning another suicide bomb attack, this time at la defense, a busy parisian business district. abaaoud was killed in a fierce police gun battle last
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new addition to europe's most wanted list, 30-year-old mohammed abrini. police believe he may have been traveling in the same car with salah abdeslam, the terrorist who escaped last week and is still on the run. abrini's d.n.a. was found in a r used in the attackck in brussels, belgian police are still trying to root out a terror cell and most of the city is on lockdown, but tomorrow things will start returning to normal. most of the subways will reopen, and,d,cott, children will be going back to school. >> pelley: debora patta reporting for us tonight. debora, thank you.
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refugee crisis next. obama and hollande defended their plans to accept syrian refugees. mr. obama said america is strengthened by people of every faith. but opponents say that terrorists could hide among the migrants. well as america prepares to observe the holiday that celebrates the first refugees on our r ores, we asked adriaia diaz to look into the controversy in kentucky. >> reporter: it's a first thanksgiving for america's newest pilims, refugees, some who arrived from syria less than two months ago, all breaking bread in their new home in kentucky. newcomers like 15-year-old koussay ghalyoun, and 18-year-
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old noururlkunuss. >> when i remember my country, i feel like i'm dying. >> reporter: why? >> because people in my country die every day. every day. >> reporter: they met here at a school for refugees in kentucky, far from the front lines of syria, but now, they're facing another brewing problem. since the paris attacks, protesters have taken to the streets across the united states voicing their opposition to syrian refugees coming in. more than 30 governors across the country agree, including matt bevin, who takes office here in kentucky in two weeks. people have to go through years of background checks, interviews that last hohos at a time. why change things now. >> let's be thoughtful. let's pause. let's use a measured approach. that's all anybody is saying. we are delusional to think there are not evil people trying
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are going to do so, be delusional to our own detriment. >> reporter: shadi, who asked us not to use his lasname, is a new arrival. "if there is an explosion in a country and syrians are stopped from coming in, of course, that creates some fear," he says. "it's the same kind of fear we feltlthen we were in syriaia he says getting to the u.s. was grueling. here. these new arrivals say they're thankful for the warm welcome they've received here but are adriana diaz, cbs news, louisville, kentucky. >> pelley: an extraordinary group of americans was honored
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that story is next. every day it's getting closer going faster than a roller coaster love like yours will surely come my way hey, hey, hey babies aren't fully developed until at least 39 weeks. if your pregnancy is healthy,
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wait for labor to begin on its own. a healthy baby is worth the wait. o0 c1 travel is part of the american way of life. when we're on vacation, we keep an eye out for anything that looks out of place. [ indistinct conversations ] miss, your bag. when we travel from city to city, we pay attention to ourururroundings. [ cheering ] everyone plays a role in keeping our community safe. whether you're traveling for siness or pleasure, be aware of your surroundings. if you seeee something suspicious,
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>> pelley: today, president obama awarded the medal of freedom to an incredible array of great americans. people who need people >> pelley: people like s seisand and sondheim, berra and mays, and shirley chisholm, the first black woman in congress. >> i want to be remembered as a catalyst for change. >> pelley: 17 people who changed america for the better.
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>> reporter: they've enriched our lives with music. don't bring around a cloud to rain on my parade >> a long drive way back. >> reporter: thrilled us on the field. >> willy mays... >> reporter: made movies leap off the screen. james taylor was honored&for his 50 years of exploring life through musisi >> that's the thing about james- - you always feel like he's singing only to you. in my mind i'm goin' to carolina >> the issues that i kwom pell me are still the same ones. you know, it's what i love to do. i think k at over time, you get incrementally better at itit >> reporter: how long can you keep doing this? >> it's hard to believe i'm not closer to the end than i am to the beginning, but i'll carry on as long as-- as long as there seems to be suppt for it. >> reporter: because, in the words of another one of today's honorees-- >> it ain't over till it's over.
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yogi berra, amazing. >> reporter: and as the great yankee catcher also said, "you can observe a lot by just watching." i've seen fire and i've seen rain. >> reporter: watching a play, an impassioned speech, a concert. thought they'd neverer endnd >> reporter: 17 americans who all made a mark on our national life. when you could not find a friend >> reporter: bill plante, cbs news, washington. but i always thought i'd see you again. ( applausese. that's the overnight news for this wednesday. for some of you the news continues for others check back with us a little bit later for other news of course, cbs this
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city. >> nato held an emergency session trying to contain the political and military fall out after turkey shot down a russian plane. >> the plane was bombing militants the group insist they informed russian pilots seveval timemeand only opened fire when it was over turkish territory. holly williams begins our coverage. >> reporter: turkey says the russian warplane strayed over a mile into the airspace. after 10 warnings without a response, a turkish fighter jet shot it down. this video is thought to show
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in northwest syria. turkey says this radar map shows where the aircraft briefly crossed over, but russia denies the plane ever left syrian airspace, and the visibly angry russian president vladimir putin called turkey's actions a stab in the back, describing the turkish as terrorists' accomplices. turkey had already warned moscow about violating its airspace and says russian planes did so twice in october. a a rian rebel group posted this video, which seems to show the bloody body of one of the russian pilots. the fate of the other pilot is unknown. russia and turkey are on opposite sides of the syrian civil war.
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turkey, like its ally the u.s., supports the syrian rebels. while russia backs the syrian regime and in september began launching airstrikes. moscow claims to be targeting isis, but the u.s. says it's also hit so-called moderate rebels because russia's real goal is to prop up syria's dictator, bashar al-assad. there were hopes that russia could be coaxed into cooperating with the u.s. and its allies in the fight against isis, but, scott, after this incident, that now looks even more uncertain. >> when the moment russian war planes began operating after that air sce in syria it was an international incident waiting to happen. russian planes violated turkish airspace on at least two previous occasions, flew within 500 feet of american aircraft striking isis targets in syria, and bombed opposition oups supported by the u.s. and its allies. to avoid incidenen, a hot line
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defense ministry and the u.s.- run command center for coalition airstrikes against isis. but to no avail. after vladimir putin's angry reaction to the shootdown, the russian military said a cruiser armed with surface-to-air missiles would be utationed off the syrian coast ready to shoot down a a planes that threatened its aircraft. president obama urged both sides to remain calm and described the incident as a consequence of russia's policy of flying airstrikes in support of the rian regime of bashar al- assad. >> i do think that this points to an ongoing problem with the russian operations in the sense that they are operating very close to a turkish border, and they are going after moderate opposition. >> reporter: turkey is a member of nato, which has spent the past year and a half scrambling jets and deploying troops to counter what is seen as increasingly aggressive russian
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behavior. the sudden appearance of russian warplanes in syria represented another threat to nato, this time on its southern flank, when the u.s. sent planes to turkey in an effort to increase the number of strikes agnst isis, it also sent air-to-air r ghters to defend turkish airspace against russian warplanes. russia may be causing problems, but in this particular incident, scott, u.s. officials blame turkey for over-reacting to a minor violation of its airspace. >> news came as president obama in t t wait of thth paris terror attacks. they're trying to rally international support for a military campaign against islamic state. president obama agreed that isis must be destroyed. >> we're here today that the united states of france stand united in total solidarity to deliver justice to these
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thth to defend our nations. >> and that spirit with heavy and strong hearts i welcome you here totoy. this barbaric terrorist group us. it cannot be tolerated and it must be destroyed and we must do it together. this is the unity and purpose that brings us here today. it's been noted t tt the terrorist did not direct their attacks against the french government or military, rather they focused their violence on the very spirit of france. my extension on alliberal democracies. this was an attack on our free and open societies where people me togetetr to celebrate, compete, and targeting venues
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around the world citizens of nearly 20 0 untries, inclulung america. this is an attack on the very idea that people of different races, religions and backgrounds can live together in peace. in short, t ts was not only a strike against one of the world's great cities, it was an attack against the world itself. it's the same madness that has slaughtered the innococt from nigeria to sinai and lebanon to iraq. of us. and that's why for more than a year the united states, france,, and our coalition of some 65 nations have been united in one mission to destroy these isil i'dology. >> what is your reaction to turkey shooting down russian plane today? >> well, first2of all, we're
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what happened and i expect to be in communications, potentially, directly with president and everyone some time over the next several days. >> turkey like every country has r has a right to defend its territory and its air space. i think it's very important for ususight now too makeure both the russians and the turks are talking to each other to find out exactly what happened and take measures to discourage any kind of escalation. i do think that this points to an on-going problem with the russian o orations in the tense that they're operating very close to a turkish border, and they are going after moderate opposition that are supported by not only turkey but a wide range
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this is your eye opener to this day. >> in the wake of paris terror attacks france has stepped up its bombing campaigns in syria and iraq. on the ground the fight has been left the kurdish fighters iraqi security forces. there are also a handful of american officerselping to direct the fighting. >> general thurston where iraqis and americans have been sitting side by side. thousands for calls for u.s. and coalition air strikes have come through here. >> who is bringing intelligence that feeds these coals?
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>> we have natioiol intelligence, everything is fusing in different parts of this building and coming to this strike zone, that's where it's approved. >> otheir screens live feeds from drones thaha record every minute of the war. and seens from inside islamic state health territoryiy that 11 this year. these are photographs that were confirmed ton the same scene in the town square, 12slamic state fighters were preparing to execute this man. >> there are small childre brought into the very front o the crowd and we sat there helplessly, calls are coming for strike, they're going to assassinate this person in front of these children. we can't because they're children and we had to watat that. >> moments later, the execution
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took place and the victim lay dead. shot by this man, once in the head and once more in the body. the e erican drone stayed with the 12 terrorists. >> we followed them as they got into three vehicles and drove out of town. then they made a mistake because they always made mistatas and all l went into the building on the side of the river and none of those 12 came out. >> gurston told us tht their strike that destroyed that building. it's moree than 5,000 strikes to support the iraqi army and kurdish forces on the ground over the past year. yet the islamic state remains intrenched in its strong hold. 5 months later, the country's second largest city fell and the iraqi ay collapsed. islamic state terrorist quickly
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capitol attempting to encircle baghdad infiltrating towns and villages on the out skirts. we the army largely absent it was the shiite militants, iraq's neighbor to the east that helped push back the militants of the islamic state. one of the shiite ma mathat's known here as the popular mobilitization forces. after months of negotiation they front. treacherous journey we could not have made without them. for more than a year, the islamic state held this ground, but r fighters told us they fought hard t t win it back. now, through desolate landscape, scarred by recent battles they
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front line just outside boluga. a islamic state base for almost two years. >> we're going up to part of the front line that's closest, we're told that this point is only a mile away and the biggest threat here is from snipers. >> it was in 2004 that 82 americans died fighting the bloodiest battle of the iraq war. the local commander here showed us a tunnel islamic state terrorist moved to undefected from american planes. >> ied right here. >> and he showed us unexploded bombs they left behind. this river, he said, is the distance between his fighters and the enemy. >> this is a lot of spent rounds, huh? >> that's about two months. >> this is about two months of shooting? so they used the buildings for cover anddhey comom and attack in small groups? >> sometimes they fight from the
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cover. >> the tasks that lieie ahead of trying to liberate the major cities still occupied by the enemy is daunting. but it remains the eventual gl of their leader who was among the first to battle against the united states. >> translator: i consider myself a fighter defendingy country against all that i can. >> reporter: one of the most powerful and feared men in iraq. known for his brutal tactics against iraq population in the civil war that followed the u.s. invasion. this is him as a young man in footage from ieranian tv he spent
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commander in resistance agast hussssn. >> everyononwho fights alongside us is afraid, everyone who fights alongside diche is a a enemy. >> that means america in this fight is your friend? >> no only if they're serious fight? >> are you saying they're not fighting now? >> frankly, well below expectations. >> we have struck thousands and thousands of positions. we are giving a considerable amount of equipment, effort, money and training to a obscuring the government of iraq. >> the perception among iraqis you're in the fight but you're not really in the fight, no 100%. >> if thousands of coalition members here i've spent 25 years in this region i would find that hard to believe that we're not interested in the safy and
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>> it's part of the general's job to know where the men are on the battlefield. command the largest shiite force in the country. >> they captured this as they helped secure a major history winning back saw daum hussein's hometown from the islamic state. but they're fighting without weapons or support from the u.s. fielgters like these many men at a training camp that we visited deep in the south of the country are among more than 100,000 volunteers that -- volunteers thatake up the mobilizizion forces, men who rushed into the fight in the days after the iraqi army fell aparar >> now they come to camps like
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this to continue their training in between deployments to the front line. >> these young people took their weapons and defended baghdad from being over run, then t ty carried on and returned vast areas of iraq to government control. everyoneneccepts nowhat if it wasn't for them, not only baghdad but the entirety of iraq diesh. >> how many men have been lost so far. significant number, more than 2,000 mortars in this war. >> more than 2,000 militia fighters and thousands more iraqi police and soldiers, the faces of the deadline the streets of the capitol stretching for blocks. it's one of the first things we city.
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fighters using a weapon so lethal, general told us the americans have given it a name, frank an truck. >> they're something you see in a science fiction movie. these are vehicles that they've welded, metal plates too loaded them, put a suicide bomber inside of them and set themselves off.
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tuesday. >> if you plan on traveling to your thanksgiving feast, you're not alone, about 47 million americans will travel 50 miles for the holiday. most of themill go b b car. 40% of road delays are caused by bottlenecks and have nothing to do with accidents, weather or construction. kris van cleave reports from one trouble spot, the entranceo the lincoln tunnel in new jersey. >> the lincoln tunnel that connects new jersey to new york city, the worst traffic bottleneck on the east coast and anyone sitting in itan tell you thth. researchers looked at the bottle necks and found the amount of money for sitting in the traffic, more than $2.4 billion a year and when we say bottlenecks we d d't mean rush
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that always seem to be bad. drivers it doesn't get any worse than this, a 12 mile stretch of red lightss crawling cars and pure commuter agony, interstate 90 in chicago around o'hare airport is considered the worst traffic bottleneck in the cocotry resululng in 16.9 million 16.9 million hours of wasted time. that's an estimated $418 million of lost productivity a year according to a new report out this morning. the reason,, pure volume. >> they've destroyed so many neighborhoods to build it and yet people can't get anywhere. >> i give myself about an hour and a half to get to work. >> reporter: the report identifies the 50 worst bottlenecks in the country. six of the top ten are in los angeles. the south land scores 12 of the stop points over all. the new york cityty area has nine brutal bottlenecks the 2.6 miles around the lincoln tunnel
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results in 3.4 million hours of driver delay every year. >> comparere 2005 to 2015, are the bottlenecks getting worse? >> it is getting worse over time, certainly between 1982 and today there's a lot of studies that show thth traffic that once was just in l.a. is now worse than what l.a. was like back then in dozens of cities around the country. >> greg cowant runs the alliance who runs the study. one study that dropped off the wood row wilson bridge outside washington, d.c. it was rebuilt and traffic improved. >> there's an opportunity there to do something that, you know, is good for people, saves lives, saves the environment. >> reporter: now, all 50 of these suffer from too much volume, too many cars. but one stretch of the hollywood freeway bottleneck, other
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here at the lincoln tunnel this
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that just can't keep up with >>. >> reporter: interactive games are no longer just for kids and they're not just fun and games either, businesses all around the country will taking their employees to escape rooms you have one hour to work together to find your way out. omar via fran ka shows us how it works. >> janet smith gets paid to lock pele in a small room and monitor them as they plot their escape by finding riddles and solving hidden clues. >> you can see he's getting really frustrated. >> what may seem like a cruel prank is becoming big business in dallas for andrew and his wife tracy. the couple opened escape expert in late january, the 6,000
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squa foot building has five-rooms where contestants must work together to try and escape. >> my name could refer to fake money. >> today they average 700 customers a week. >> wait. wait. black. round and fuzzy. >> and at about $30 a person, that's about $80,000 in sales a month. >> it's taken from off of computer game and made for real life so you can actually pla like a real live computer game. >> reporter: unlike many other escape room businesses their business customers aren't screaming teenagers or adrereline junkies, they're employees from companies like fedex, free toe lay, and 7-eleven. [ cheering and applause ] >> we won fair and square and we worked t/gether and we have stories to go back and tell
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>> reporter:r:racy says the smartest person in the office sn't always the best teammate in the room. >> who over thinks? >> financial peoplpl acontinue tant -- accountants over think. >> that can be a problem. >> it can be. if you're looking too deeply you can miss the clue completely. >> each room has a theme. >> this is our advanced room, currently has 20% escape rate. >> reporter: teens need a particular set of skills. >> you have to know where things are on maps. >> reporter: escape expert is one of three hundred escape room businesses in the u.s. for andrew and tracy the only thing harder than escaping from their rooms might be coming up with ideas for new rooms and clues. omar, dallas, texas. >> that's the overnight news for this wednesy. for some of you the news continues, for others check back with us a little later for the
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morning news and cbs this morning.
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