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tv   Up to the Minute  CBS  December 15, 2015 2:07am-4:00am CST

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nation's security. >> reporter: last year there were mor than 460,000 visas issued. scott, there are concerns that adding a layer of social media scrutiny could delay the process, hurting tourism and business. >> jeff pegues in washington. jeff, thanks. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. almost sixty million americans are affected by mental illness. together we can help them with three simple words. my name is chris noth and i will listen. from maine to maui, thousands of high school students across the country are getting in on the action by volunteering in their communities. chris young: action teams of high school students are joining volunteers of america and major league baseball players to help train and inspire the next generation of volunteers. carlos pea: it's easy to start an action team at your school
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if you were a hippie in the '60s, you need to know. it's the dawning of the age of aquarius. yeah, and something else that's cool. what? osteoporosis is preventable. all: osteo's preventable? right on! if you dig your bones, protect them. all: cbs cares! today, donald trump's physician said the republican candidate would be, and this is a quote, "the healthiest individual ever elected to the presidency." he called trump's blood pressure of 110/65 "astonishingly excellent," but even that trumpian hyperbole couldn't help with other numbers today that aren't so healthy. seven weeks before the caucuses, trump trails ted cruz in iowa by
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here's major garrett. >> we're doing really well. iowa's been amazing. >> reporter: donald trump is no longer winning in iowa. the "des moines register"/bloomberg politics poll is one of two in the last week to show ted cruz on top. the third poll out today has trump and cruz tied. faced with adversity, trump is now attacking cruz. >> i don't think he has the right temperament. i don't think he's got the right judgment. >> reporter: trump mocked cruz's frequent clashes with gop leaders, most memorably when he triggered the 2013 government shutdown in a futile attempt to end obamacare. >> you look at the way he's dealt with the senate, where he goes in there like, frankly like a little bit of a maniac. you're never going to get things done that way. >> reporter: cruz considers the shutdown a demonstration of conservative zeal among gop establishment timidity, but cruz, ever wary of aggravating
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the point. instead he posted this throwback video of the movie "flashdance," dedicated, cruz said, to maniacs everywhere. trump and cruz's battle in iowa has come at the expense of former leader ben carson. he told an iowa radio show he's fallen behind as terrorism has become a top campaign issue. >> reporter: tomorrow night's prime time debate will give carson a chance to turn the tide on foreign policy. marco rubio, whose november rise in the polls, has suddenly stalled, is also in need of fresh momentum. scott, rubio is still best positioned as the republican alternative should voters want one, to trump, cruz and carson. >> major garrett not in venice
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major, thanks very much. today the army said that bowe bergdahl will be court-martialed for desertion and endangering his fellow troops. bergdahl was a taliban prisoner for five years after he walked away from his post in afghanistan. he was swapped last year for five prisoners at guantanamo. an army hearing officer had recommended no jail time, but bergdahl now, if convicted, could face up to life in prison. it was three years ago today that a gunman opened fire at sandy hook elementary school in newtown, connecticut, killing 20 first graders and six adults. vice president biden tweeted, "since that nightmare, an estimated 555 children have been killed by guns in america. it is shameful that congress has not acted." as the nation continues to
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mental health care, newtown parents are reminding us of the urgency. and here's michelle miller. >> we gather here in memory of 20 beautiful children. >> reporter: when the numbers became names -- >> charlotte, daniel... >> reporter: -- and the names became faces, suddenly they were america's children. 20 first graders gunned down in their classrooms along with their teachers. >> it's always 12:14. it is always the last day that they went to school. that's never going to change. >> reporter: but something had to change for nicole hockly, who lost her six-year-old son dylan. >> this is about not accepting this. we can't just passively sit back and say, "these shootings happen." >> reporter: together with other newtown parents, she helped found sandy hook promise, a group working to prevent gun violence. >> i can still feel him.
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i can hear his little voice. >> reporter: mark barden also lost his six-year-old son daniel. >> in almost every one of these mass shootings, there are signs and signals. there are opportunities to intervene to stop that continuum before it leads to tragedy. >> reporter: together they travel the country teaching others how to respond to those signs. they call it the say something campaign. if you see someone at risk, say something. that training worked recently in cincinnati when a student reported someone plotting an attack. >> the whole thing was stopped and diffused. >> reporter: did the hairs... >> oh, yeah. >> i burst into tears. >> it was overwhelming. >> to actually know we potentially saved lives, that means something. >> reporter: and so does sweeping gun legislation they helped pass in connecticut two years ago. it expands the ban on assault weapons and limits the number of rounds per magazine.
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setbacks. with the defeat of a bill two years ago that would have closed loopholes in background checks for gun buyers. a lot of people say, if it didn't happen with newtown, when will it happen? >> it is happening. >> sandy hook was the start. it was a catalyst for change. it's too late for us, but there's a lot of other positive change for this country that will come. >> reporter: change that will keep a promise to the children of sandy hook. michelle miller, cbs news, new york. >> we have been bringing you a variety of opinions on how to curb gun violence, from gun rights to gun control. tonight we continue our series, "voices against violence." >> i'm tom farley, the former health commissioner for new york city, and now the chief executive officer for an
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good projects. let me put the problem of gun violence into perspective. think of the most horrific mass shootings in american history. newtown, 26 people killed, virginia tech, 32 people killed, and we lose that many people to gun violence every day in america. on an average day in america, 31 people are killed with gun homicides, and 58 people shoot themselves with guns. this isn't just a law enforcement problem, it's a public health problem. homicides and suicides are the number-two and number-three causes of death in young people and teenagers in america today. those people aren't being killed with viruses. they're being killed for the most part by bullets. the gun is, after all a machine, a mechanical object that causes injuries, like a car, and car crash deaths in this country have dropped by more than half since 1980 by a public health approach with safer highways and safer car design. we can take a public health approach to design safer guns and put in other public health policies to reduce gun deaths, as well.
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process for background checks. you can undergo a more thorough vetting if you want to adopt a cat from a shelter than to get a gun. if you can reduce the number of guns in america, we can prevent an awful lot of those shootings. >> former new york city health commissioner tom farley. if a drone is on your shopping list, there's something you need to do before it takes off. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. i don't use super poligrip for hold, because my dentures fit well. before those little pieces would get in between my dentures and my gum and it was uncomfortable. even well fitting dentures let in food particles. just a few dabs of super poligrip free is clinically proven to seal out more food particles so you're more comfortable and confident while you eat. so it's not about keeping my dentures in, it's about keeping the food particles out. try super poligrip free. we've been changing things up with k-y love. oh yeah. it's a pleasure gel that magnifies both our sensations. it gives us chills in places we've never gotten chills before.
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the skies are getting crowded with drones. so today, the federal government said they'll have to be registered. transportation correspondent kris van cleave shows us how that will work. >> reporter: when the faa registration website goes live next monday, current drone owners will have two months to register. newly purchased devices will have to be registered before taking flight. >> i think this does add a level of seriousness to the operation of the drone. >> reporter: former faa assistant administrator scott brenner. do they need to have a drone registration program? >> i think the faa was struggling with how do we educate new users, and by creating this registry, now we have a direct link to every user, which will allow us to do a tremendous amount of education. >> reporter: the faa hopes that education will prevent more close calls in the air. a new report identified 158 incidents in the last two years where a drone came within 200 feet of another aircraft.
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evasive maneuvers. there has never been a confirmed collision between a drone and another aircraft. the new registration system will require drone owners to give their name, mailing address and e-mail and pay a $5 fee. >> i think it's going to create a deterrent. i think some will not want to pay that fee. >> reporter: lawyer michael drobac works with the drone industry, which has been supportive of a registration system. does having the registration system make the skies safer, do you think? >> do i think those who would act in an inappropriate manner, do i think they will register? probably not. >> reporter: the faa will waive that $5 fee for the first 30 days. scott, all operators will be given an identification number that has to be displayed on their drones. >> kris van cleave, thanks very much. still ahead, the bully
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swiftly and carry a big stick. today, bill cosby filed suit against seven of the women who have accused him of sexual misconduct. they are suing him claiming he defamed them by trying to brand them as liars. in his countersuit, he says they are "trying to assassinate his reputation." more trouble today for americans who make a living in the oil patch. shell says it will cut 2,800 more jobs. shell's total for the year comes to 10,000 layoffs. oil closed today at $36 a barrel, down nearly $25 since may. 18 months ago in the summer of 2014, it was $105, nearly three times higher. stocks closed higher. the dow gained 103 points. on cape cod it's not foul weather that stays this courier from the swift completion of his
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in turkeys. the letter carrier carries a pole to keep the birds at bay. not clear why they follow him. perhaps they're looking for "mail" companionship. we're not looking for a stamp of approval on that last line. after the diplomatic breakthrough, the sounds of havana are playing in chicago. and that story is next.having a heart attack? chest pain, like there's a ton of weight on your chest. severe shortness of breath. unexplained nausea. cold sweats. there's an unusual tiredness and fatigue. there's unfamiliar dizziness or light-headedness. unusual pain in your back, neck, jaw, one or both arms, even your upper stomach, are signs you're having a heart attack. don't make excuses. make the call to 9-1-1 immediately. learn more at womenshealth.gov/heartattack. while i was on a combat patrol in baqubah, iraq, a rocket-propelled grenade took my arm off at the shoulder. i was discharged from the army, and i've been working with
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warriors, you don't have to be severely wounded to be with the wounded warrior project. we do have a lot of guys that have post-traumatic stress disorder. being able to share your story, i guess it kind of helps you wrap your mind around what did happen over there. my name is norbie, and yes, i do suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder,
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today president obama said he is very interested in visiting cuba, but not until cubans are given more freedom. it was one year ago this week that the u.s. began restoring diplomatic ties that were severed half a century ago. and dean reynolds tells us that has led to a musical breakthrough. >> reporter: for this ensemble of young, cuban jazz musicians, better relations with the united states sound like this.
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american soil at chicago's auditorium theater, 24-year-old conductor ernesto lima says there is a message in their music. >> well, the improvisation is freedom of the music. >> reporter: so improvisation is freedom. >> yes, i think so. >> reporter: their concert was a year in the making, and the dream of the chicago jazz philharmonic's artistic director orbert davis. >> we have to think about the people, the musicians, the culture. music is everybody's and it's what they value. if they can trust us with that, they'll trust us with other things. >> reporter: we first met davis and these students a year ago in havana. 21-year-old wendi galvez has been playing violin since she was seven. >> billie holiday, ella fitzgerald, those are my gods.
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the rest of the students study music here, where the residue of jazz left over from america before the castro revolution still echoes through the instruments. dizzy gillespie's 1947 "manteca" is one of the best examples of the two nation's musical collaboration before fidel castro closed jazz halls and took over clubs like the famous tropicana. the u.s. embargo that followed created another challenge. you don't have the best-quality instruments. >> no, because we don't produce instruments in cuba. >> reporter: so this is not a stradivarius? >> no. [ laughter ] >> reporter: which made their performance on this night all the more remarkable. do you think music is a universal language? >> yes, if you don't know how to speak english, but when you are playing, you understand
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>> reporter: with music there is no language barrier. dean reynolds, cbs news, chicago. >> and that's the "overnight news" for this tuesday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back with us just a little bit later for the morning news and of course, "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm scott pelley. this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the "overnight news." i'm don dahler. with the holidays right around the corner, president obama is trying to assure americans that their celebrations will be safe. one week afer his oval office address on terrorism, the president made the rounds of his security agencies. at the pentagon, mr. obama insisted u.s. intelligence has uncovered no credible threat of an attack over the next few weeks, and he said the u.s. military is taking the fight to the islamic state in both iraq
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>> this fall, even before the revolting attacks in paris and san bernardino, i ordered new actions to intensify our war against isil. these actions, including more firepower and special operations forces are well under way. this continues to be a difficult fight. as i said before, isil is dug in, including in urban areas and hide behind civilians, using defenseless men, women, and children as human shields. even as we're relentless, we have to be smart, targeting isil surgically, with precision. at the same time, our partners on the ground are rooting isil out town by town, neighborhood by neighborhood, block by block. that is what this campaign is doing. we are hitting isil harder than ever. coalition aircraft, our fighters, bombers, and drones have been increasing the pace of their strikes. nearly 9,000 as of today. last month in november, we
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targets than any other month since this campaign started. we're also taking out isil leaders, demanders, and killers one by one. going after them from their strongholds in downtown raqqah to libya, where we took out the isil leader there. the point is, isil leaders cannot hide, and our next message to them is simple -- you are next. every day, we destroy as well more of isil's forces, their fighting positions, bunkers, staging areas, heavy weapons, bomb making factories, compounds and training camps. many places isil has lost its freedom of maneuver, because they know if they mass their forces, we will wipe them out. in fact, since this summer, isil has not had a single successful major offensive operation on the ground in either syria or iraq. in recent weeks, we've unleashed a new wave of strikes on their lifeline, their oil
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hundreds of their tanker trucks, wells, and refineries. and we're going to keep on hammering those. isil also continues to lose territory in iraq. isil had already lost across kircut province and tikrit. more recently, isil lost at sinjar and baiji, where its oil refinery. we saw a daring raid supported by our special forces which rescued dozens of prisoners from isil, which master sergeant joshua wheeler made the ultimate sacrifice. so far isil has lost about 40% of the populated areas it once controlled in iraq. and it will lose more. iraqi forces are now fighting their way deeper into ramadi. they're working to encircle fallujah and cut off supply routes into mosul.
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our partners on the ground face a tough tight ahead, and we're going to continue to back them up with the support they need to ultimately clear isil from iraq. >> the president's strategy is playing out on the front lines in northern iraq. although isis still controls vast territory, their offensive to overrun the kurds has been stopped in its tracks outside mosul. charlie d'agata took a news crew there. >> reporter: in ways it was a routine assignment. head out to the front lines and see how kurdish peshmerga forces are holding up against isis. but we got to within a half mile of isis territory and man, did we witness how deadly and determined this enemy can be. colonel badal bandi and his forces have been fighting to hold this line outside of mosul for more than a year.
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"they attack whenever they can, sometimes three or four nights in a row." until he showed us where three suicide car bombers tried to charge their outpost at dawn. his soldiers were able to kill the drivers before they detonated their explosives. but two car bombs remained there not more than 50 yards away posing a deadly threat to the troops. here on the front line, the bomb squad is a .50-caliber gunner. he fired rounds into one vehicle until it went up in a plume of smoke. he then opened up on the car much closer to us. we watched from a bunker hole until finally, a direct hit. [ explosion ] that noise you can hear is debris raining down on top of us. shrapnel from the bomb and twisted remains of the week blown sky high after the explosion.
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but the next sound was laughter. it's a happier ending when car bombs blow up on the other side of the front line. we are up close to one of those huge car bombs, you realize how destructive they can be in civilian areas and why they are the most feared isis weapon on the battlefield. attacks like these are happening every day. another component of the u.s. strategy is to cut off funding for the islamic state. the treasury department says isis makes about $40 million a month, just selling oil. so that's become a prime target. elizabeth palmer reports. >> reporter: u.s. and coalition planes have now begun to bomb tankers full of oil sold by isis in syria. part of an effort to cut off an estimated $40 million a month the group makes from petroleum sales.
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economics of war, some of that oil even goes to president assad's government, isis' sworn enemy. most of the oil fields in syria are in isis controlled territory. once pumped, it's moved by tanker to be sold locally, to buyers in regime controlled syria, or smuggled over the border in iraq and turkey. the coalition began bombing isis refineries last year and the russians have now joined in, choosing oil related bombing targets. that may have made a dent in isis' ability to supply oil clean enough to be used, but it didn't stop it. matthew phillips is with bloomberg. >> we overestimated really the damage that we did, the long-term damage and underestimated their ability to kind of adapt to that. >> reporter: syrian locals simply set up crude refineries, basically cooking the oil in pits in the desert before selling it on to traders who get it to market. attacks on what are isis
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inevitably kill innocent civilians who are simply working in it to survive. one more thought while cutting off revenue is going to hurt isis, it won't bring the group to collapse. solid numbers are hard to come by. the best estimates say isis is making twice as much money on widespread, what they call taxes on every person in business
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while its extended release medicine lasts for 12 hours. try delsym . the republican party holds round five in its series of presidential debates tonight. this one in las vegas. donald trump will be front and center with ben carson on his right and ted cruz on his left. new jersey governor chris christie was a late add. a des moines register poll of likely iowa caucus goers shows cruz leading by ten points with just seven weeks to go before the caucuses. nancy cordes reports. >> reporter: this is the second poll in less than a week to show
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iowa. the trump campaign trashed the poll, while trump himself chose to trash cruz, saying he's unfit for the job. >> i don't think he's qualified to be president. >> reporter: donald trump had this message for gop leaders who might think his support in iowa is waning. >> i don't go down, i go up. my whole life has been about winning. i'm going to win. >> reporter: and he went after his sometimes ally ted cruz after promising for weeks he wouldn't. >> you look how he's dealt with the senate where he goes in there like a maniac. >> reporter: on twitter, cruz brushed off the comments. maniac posting a link to this 1980s movie clip for the song "maniac." cruz refrained from attacking trump, whose supporters he would like to win over. >> i like donald trump. a lot of our friends here have encouraged me to criticize and attack donald trump. i'm not interested in doing so. >> reporter: nationwide, the
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big lead, beating cruz by nearly 20 points in the latest cbs news/"new york times" poll. still, the texas senator's outspoken opposition to obamacare and his willingness to take on both sides of the washington establishment resonates with iowa conservatives. >> the way republican leadership punishes anyone who stands up to the cartel is they engage in public flagellation. >> reporter: that approach has made him unpopular with leaders in his own party. who worry that he could be just as polarizing of a nominee as trump. brian walsh worked to elect republicans to the senate in 2010 and 2012. >> he would be equally problematic. >> reporter: why? >> again, going back to if we're going to win in 2016, we need to expand the electorate. we need more females and hispanics. instead of learning those lessons, you have candidates like cruz and trump who are doing the opposite. >> meanwhile, trump's comments on banning muslims from entering
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overseas. julianna goldman reports from from the site of the trump hotel in washington. >> reporter: donald trump has made his fortune in part by plastering his name around the world from washington, d.c. to istanbul, people have bought into the trump brand as a symbol of luxury and success. but with each new controversy, more and more business partners are severing ties. these twisting high rises in turkey bear the name of donald trump. some who work inside trump towers in istanbul say the building's namesake has given them reason to quit their jobs. this 20-year-old sales consultant said trump should close the building. there are muslim people working here. this is affecting me in an unfavorable way. this week, a major middle east retailer, with 190 department stores, stopped selling the trump home decor brand.
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the muslim community are calling on the developer to strike trump's name from this high rise. and at this trump residence in new york city -- >> it's embarrassing to have his name on the building. considering the bigotry that comes out of his mouth sometimes. >> reporter: gordon gray with the u.s. arab chamber of commerce said he can't calculate the damage to trump's reputation in the muslim world. >> he gets the nomination, that prolongs his exposure in the public eye. then of course if he's e elected president, the question is what policies is he going to implement? >> if some of the businesses are affected, it's not important to me. >> reporter: since he declared his candidacy, trump's rhetoric may have had a cost. after his cost about mexican immigrants, more than a dozen companies from macy's to the pga and nascar severed ties. >> those are small in his empire compared to his real estate fortune.
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muslim world. >> randall lane is an editor at "forbes" magazine. >> it's hard to quantify the consequences exactly, because it's not just deals he may or may not lose, it's deals that you don't know he may or may not have gotten. so that's always the big question mark out there. >> reporter: trump's own financial disclosures don't break down the dollar amount of each investment, but forbes estimates that last year trump brought in about $128 million in branding and licensing fees. in other news tonight, dog flu. there's a new strain threateteng our four-legged friends this year, along with a new vaccine to fight it. but as molly hall reports, the shots are expensive and may not be necessary. >> reporter: veterinarian katie gribbs says a new strain of canine flu that started in chicago last spring is spreading fast and has proven deadly for some dogs.
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progresses so quickly, it moves into the lungs, causing severe pneumonia. >> reporter: the united states department of agriculture has conditionally approved a new vaccine to address the epidemic. it's being shipped to veterinarians right now. dr. douglas aspros, former president of the american veterinary association. >> it's a totally novel virus. dogs don't have -- u.s. dogs don't have any historical experience with this virus. therefore, they have no protective cross reaction with any other antibodies that they've formed in the past. >> reporter: since the epidemic began, more than 1500 dogs became ill in a few months. at least eight died from secondary infections. the strain has now spread across the country. the new strain is different from the common dog flu, which already has an effective vaccine available. in some cases, two vaccinations might be necessary. the old shot can cost up to $90
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the vaccine for the new strain costs double that. >> if your dog is in close contact with other dogs very frequently, then it's extremely important to be thinking about and talking to your vet about doing this vaccine series. >> reporter: veterinarians don't know how effective the new vaccine will be. they hope down the road, a shot will be developed that covers both strains of flu. for now, check with your vet to see how common each flu is in your area. if your dog never leaves the yard, , u're probably safe. >> the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. it's a pleasure gel that magnifies both our sensations. it gives us chills in places we've never gotten chills before. yeah, it makes us feel like... dare to feel more with new k-y love. i absolutely love my new york apartment, but the rent is outrageous. good thing geico offers affordable renters insurance. with great coverage it protects my personal belongings should they get damaged, stolen or destroyed. [doorbell] uh, excuse me. delivery.
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some day soon, you won't need a superman cape or special glasses to see through walls. researchers at m.i.t. are making real breakthroughs in the technology. it's a story i first reported for "cbs this morning." step onto the campus of m.i.t. and you're likely to get a glimpse of the future. there are flight flying, a inging autonomous drones, and plenty of robots. and another with a soft enough grip to handle an egg. some of the most recent breakthroughs, however, are happening here at the e university's computer science and artificial intelligence lab. where this simple looking box applies a complex set of algorithms. to do something once limited to science fiction.
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tracking people through walls. >> reporter: dina is the professor leading the project, dubbed emerald. which has this ph.d. student demonsnsating a wireless technology that captures motion in realtime and regardless of obstruction. >> this red hot is chen moving. >> reporter: so he's not wearing anything special? >> nothing. >> reporter: it's just picking up his movement through the wall? >> no cell phone, no sen fors. it's purely based on how the signal reflects off our body. >> reporter: what was the inception for this? >> we work on wireless networks. the question is, can we use this for purposes other than communication? can you sense ththenvironment with it? >> reporter: the wireless signals not only detect his position in the room, but his el vision from the floor. >> you want to see the red dot fall? >> reporter: yeah, let's see the red dot fall.
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seniors at risk for falling. a problem that sends an estimated 2.5 million elderly americans to hospitals each year at a cost of $34 billion. >> when it detects a fall, it sends an s.o.s. message to the caregiver. >> reporter: that's just scratching the surface of emerald's capabilities. with chen seated, it hones in on his vitals. respiration and heart rate are read without wires. >> being able to get the heart rate, wow, it's that sensitive. >> reporter: and it's not in any way as dangerous as say constant exposure to x-rays would be? >> no, not at all. i tell people all the time, the technology is the same carrier as wi-fi. it's actually 10,000 times or more lower power than wi-fi. so if you're not worried about wi-fi in your home, you
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>> are there any privacy concerns about this, like maybe a burglar can use this to see where you are in the house? >> basically like with any new technology, it comes with a challenge. i think as society discovers new technologies, there are rulings and laws a person has to abide by. >> if you u ok at that red dot over there -- >> reporter: after more than three years, the m.i.t. team demonstrated their work for the president last summer. what was his reaction to this? >> so i think when he saw the breathing and heart rate, he said, wow. >> that potentially has applications for baby monitors. >> reporter: the goal now is to take it to people's homes within the next year. you and your partners have this great invention that has huge promise, do you stay a professor
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both? >> reporter: is there enough hours in the day to be both? >> i have 24 hours a day. i don't even track holidays. i don't know that there is a holiday. come to the lab and d students say oh, yeah, it's a holiday today. so i think there are plenty of hours as long as a person is interested in what they are doing. and having a great team like i have here. >> they also point out that first responders could benefit a great deal by knowing exactly where people are in life threatening situations. another wi-fi solution she's exploring is a way to charge smartphones without having to plug them in. >> we like her. i like that she kind of told you, yeah, she can do it. i can be both. >> i just ask the questions. >> and i think it's good seeing through the wall, because i was concerned that you could physically see like if someone
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bhu no, all you see is the dots. >> it's like sonar. >> and do with that information what you will. >> thank you. >> got to go. [ laughter ] >> this is new information for me. >> you know what? the news is back in the morning. what can we say? >> what can you say? thth"cbs overnight news"s"ill be right back. when the engines failed on the plane i was flying, i knewewhat to do to save my passengers. but when my father sank into depression,
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when he ultimately shot himself, he left our family devastated. don't let thth happen to you. if you or a loved one is suicidal, call the national suicide prevention lifeline. no matter how hopeless or helpless you feel, with the right help, you can get well. (franklin d. roosevelt) the inherent right to work is one of the elemental privileges of a free people. endowed, as our nation is, with abundant physical resources... ...and inspired as it should be to make those resources and opportunities available for the enjoyment of all... ...we approach reemployment with real hope of finding a better answer than we have now. narrator: donate to goodwill where your donations help fund
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wisconsin has a state pastry called the kringle, and like chris kringle, it's a big hit at christmas time. >> reporter: in racine, wisconsin, the holidays are all about the kringle. there's certain skill involved in making the wisconsin state papary. good lord, that's a lot of dough. it takes lots of this. to make the dough flaky.
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layers. does everybody do this much by hand? >> as far as i know. now nobody at all does. i think we're the last ones. >> reporter: for four generations, benson's bakery has been mastering the technique. >> you can see the layers. >> reporter: when the benson family opened its bakery 81 years ago, t ty followed the danish tradition of a pretzel shaped pastry. its popularity quickly earned racine the nickname kringleville. complete with a kringle queen and kringle inspired polka. originally the danish pastry had an almond filling with raisins. now ben, jr. and his son, ben iii, make close to 30 flavors. >> my grandpa, until he died, would say, just keep the quality and you'll be here forever.
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>> reporter: not far from benson's is this danish bakery, family run since 1949. >> that looks good. >> we make our own fillings here. >> reporter: owner eric olson took us on a tour of his 39,000 square foot facility, where machines have mastered the delicate layers ananfolds. daily, they make 5,000 to 7,000 kringles. during the holidays, they ship up to 20,000 in one day. >> in the 1950s, some of the bakers started shipping kringle as gifts. and that became very popular. so the word kind of spread. >> people come here becauswe have kringles. and we're known for it. >> reporter: at larson's bakery, they combined techniques rolling the dough by machine. then filling and forming their kringles by hand. don hutchison's father bought the bakery in 1969, and heheays a kringle from anywhere else
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>> you know, it's kind of like going to new york and having a new york bagel. you can't get new york bagel anywywre else, because they put the time and the labor into making it right. >> and that's "cbs overnight news" for this tuesday. the commander-in-chief tries again to reassure an anxious nation. >> we are fighting isil harder than ever. >> cbs news is on the frontlines with the kurds, fighting the terror group on the ground. also tonight, trailing in iowa, trump goes after front-runner cruz. >> i don't think he has the right temperament. controlling the soaring drone population. owners will soon have to register. and the sounds of growing
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united states. >this is the "cbs overnight news." president obama revealed that the dozens of special operations commandos he ordered into syria are now on the ground and haha begun to work with local forces fighting isis, or as he prefers to call the group, isil. this was the president at the pentagon. >> we're going after isil in downtown raqqah to libya, where we took out the isil leader there. the point is, isil leaders cannot hidedeand our next message to them is simple -- you are next. every day we destroy as well more of isil's forces, their fighting positions, bunkers, and staging areas, their heavy weapons, bomb making factories, compounds and training catches.
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freedom to maneuver, because they know if they mass their forces we'll wipe them out. since this summer, isil has not had a single successfull offensive operation on the ground in syria or iraq. we've destroyed eded hundreds of their tankers and refineries. isil also continues to lose territory in iraq. isil had already lost across kircut province and in tikrit and lost at sinjar, losing a strategic highway. isil lost at baiji with its oil refinery. we saw the raid supported by our special forces which master sergeant sergeant wheeler made the ultimate sacrifice.
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of the populated areas it controlled in iraq and will lose more. iraqi forces are now fighting deeper into ramadi and working to circlee fallujah and cut off supply routes into mosul. mr. obama said he is accelerating the war in syria and iraq after isis bombed a russian jetliner, directed the attack in paris and inspired another in san bernardino. tonight we have a rare look at what u.s. forces are facing. charlie d'agata linked up with america's kurdish allies. his story begins in iraq. >> reporter: even when colonel badal bandi told us his forces face isis attacks every day, we didn't expect this would be one of them, until he showed us where three suicide car bombers tried to charge their outpost at dawn. his soldiers shot the drivers dead before they detonated their bombs, but the car bombs remained no more than 50 yards
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[ explosion ] here on the front line, the bomb squad is a .50-caliber gunner. the first went up in a plume of smoke. he then opened up on the car in the ditch, the one much closer we watched until he finally made a direct hit. [ explosion ] the massive explosion blew shrapnel in every direction and filled the bunker with choking dust. that noise is debris from the bomb and wreckage from the car that came crashing down. everybody's ears were ringing, but no one was hurt. hours later, we crossed into syria where rebel commander coconel talal ali selo gave us a grim picture of just how many
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can you give me an idea, how manynyave you had to face e the past month? "42 car and truck bombers," he said, "three on motorcycles and four suicide bombers on foot." this week three car bombs killed 28 people. the colonel told us the town had run out of sugar, so to get past checkpoints, isis hid the bombs in trucks deliveri sugar. you went to the funeral todada what are people there telling you? "they want revenge for the dead," he told us, "and they want us to make sure this doesn't happen againin the colonel told us although they stopped most attacks, scott, it's hard to stop them all because isis is constantly changing tactics. they never know when they're going to strike, and they seem to have an unlimited supply of suicide bombers. >> charlie d'agata on the battlefield, thanks. there's also apparently an unlimited supply of followers
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so today the white house is reviewing how immigrants are screened. one of the terrorists who killed 14 in california wrote online two years ago of her desire for jihad. then she got an american visa. jeff pegues has more. >> reporter: when tashfeen malik applied for a fiance visa in 2014, she had her name and face checked against terror watch lists, but whether she posted radical views on social media was not checked. alberto fernandez until recently ran the state department's program to counter isis online. nowadays every company that hires is looking through your social media. >> yes. >> reporter: should the government be doing more? >> this is the crazy thing about this debate. you would think that people who are trying to come to the united states to live in the united states, a privilege that most people don't have, would
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>> reporter: the department of homeland security says it began three pilot programs in 2014 to examine whether screening social media was consnstent with current laws and privacy protections. today government officials dismissed allegations homeland security secretary jeh johnson delayed the implementatiti of new rules because of public relations concerns. a review of the policy is under way. since the attack, some members of congress have been demanding chchges to the visa screening system. new york senator charles schumer. >> and had they checked out tashfeen malik a little more, maybe she wouldn't have gotten a visa. >> reporter: even one of the country's largest muslim organizations is not against increased social media scrutiny. ibrahim cooper is with the council on american islamic relations. >> measures that target only one faith group, only one ethnic group or people fromom certain national origin, that raises concerns, and it's also
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nation's security. >> reporter: last year there were more thth 460,000 visas issued. scott, there are concerns that adding a layer of social media scrutiny could delay the process, hurting tourism and business. >> jeff pegues in washington. jeff, thanks. the "cbs overnight news" [ vocalizing ] [ buzzing ] [ [ ee crashes ] [ wind howling ]
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today, donald trump's physician said the republican candidate would be, and this is a quote, "the healthiest individual ever elected to the presidency." he called trump's blood pressure of 110/65 "astononhingly excellent," but even that trumpian hyperbole couldn't help with other numbers today that aren't so healthy.
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ten points. here's major garrett. >> we're doing really well. iowa's been amazing. >> reporter: donald trump is no longer winning in iowa. the "des moines regigier"/bloomberg politics poll is one of two in the last week to show ted cruz on top. the third poll out today has trump and cruz tied. faced with adversity, trump is now attacking cruz. >> i don't think he has the right temperament. i don't think he's got the right judgment. >> reporter: trump mocked cruz's frequent clalaes with gop leaders, most memorably when he triggered the 2013 government shutdown in a futile attempt to end obamacare. >> you look at the way he's dealt with the senate, where he goes in there like, frankly like a little bit of a maniac. you're never going to get things done that way. >> reporter: cruz considers the shutdown a demonstration of conservative zeal among gop establishment timidity, but cruz, ever wary of aggravating
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the point. instead he posted this throwback video of the movie "flhdance," dedicated, cruz said, to maniacs everywhere. trump and cruz's battle in iowa has come at the expense of former leader ben carson. heheold an iowa radio shsh he's fallen behind as terrorism has become a top campaign issue. >> reporter: t torrow night's prime time debate will give carson a chance to turn the tide on foreign policy. marco rubio, whose november rise in the polls, has suddenly stalled, is also in need of fresh momentumum scott, rubio is still best positioned as the republican alternative should voters want one, to trump, cruz and carson.
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but in vegas. major, thanks very much. today the army said that bowe bergdahl will be court-martialed for desertion and endangering his fellow troops. bergdahl was a taliban prisoner for five years after he walked away from his post in afghanistan. he was swapped last year for five prisoners at guantanamo. an army hearing officer had reremmended no jail timemebut bergdahl now, if convicted, could face up to life in prison. it was three years ago today that a gunman opened fire at sandy hook elementary school in newtown, connecticut, killing 20 first graders and six adults. vice president biden tweeted, "since that nightmare, an estimated 555 children have been killed by guns in america. it is shameful that congress has not acted." as the nation continues to debateteun laws and access t t
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parents are reminding us of the urgency. and here's michelle miller. >> we gather here in memory y 20 beautiful children. >> reporter: when the numbers became names -- >> charlotte, daniel... >> reporter: -- and the names became faces, suddenly they were america's children. 20 first graders gunned down in their classrooms along with their teachers. >> it's always 12:14. it is alwaysyshe last day that they went to school. that's never going to change. >> reporter: but something had to change for nicole hockly, who lost her six-year-old son dylan. >> this is a aut not accepting this. we can't just passively sit back and say, "these shootings happen." >> reporter: together with other newtown parents, she helped found d ndy hook promise, a group working to prevent gun violence. >> i can still feel him.
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i can hear his little voice. >> reporter: mark barden also lost his six-year-old son daniel. >> in almost every one of these mass shootings, there are signs and signals. there are opportunities to intervene to stop that continuum before it leads to tragedy. >> reportete together they travel the country teaching others how to respond to those signs. they call it the say something campaign. if you see someone at risk, say something. that training worked recently in cincinnati when a student reported someone plotting an attack. >> the whole thing was stopped and diffused. >> reporter: did the hairs... >> oh, yeah. >> i burst into tearar >> it was overwhelmimi. >> to actually know we potentially saved lives, that means something. >> reporter: and so does sweeeeng gun legislation they helped p ps in connecticut two years ago. it expands the ban on assault weapons and limits the number of rounds per magazine.
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setbacks. with the defeat of a bililtwo years ago that would have closed loopholes in background checks for gun buyers. a lot of people say, if it didn't happen with newtown, when will it happen? >> it is happening. >> sandy hook was the start. it was a catalyst for change. it's too late for us, but therers a lot of other positive change for this country that will come. >> reporter: change that will keep a promise to the children of sandy hook. michelle miller, cbs news, new york. >> we have been bringing you a variety of opinions on how to curb gun violence, from gun rights to gun control. tonight we cononnue our series, "voices against violence." >> i'm tom farley, the former
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city, and now the chief executive officecefor an organization called the public good projects. let me put the problem of gun violence into perspective. think of the most horrific mass shootings in american history. newtown, 26 people killed, virginia tech, 32 people killed, and we lose that many people to gun violence eveve day in america. on an average day in america, 31 people are killed with gun homicides, and 58 people shoot themselves with guns. this isn't just a law enforcement problem, it's a public health problem. homicides and suicides are the number-two and number-three causes of death in young people and teenagers in america today. those people aren't being killed with viruses. they're being killll for the most part by bullets. the gun is, after all a machine, a mechanical object that causes injuries, like a car, and car crash deaths in this country have dropped by more than half since 1980 by a public health approaoa with safer highways and safer car design. we can take a public health approach to design safer guns and put in other public health policies to reduce gun deaths, as well.
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process for background checkck you can undergo a more thorough vetting if you want to adopt a cat from a shelter than to get a gun. if you can ruce the number of guns in america, we can prevent an awful lot of those shootitis. >> former new york city health commissioner tom farley. if a drone is on your shopping list, there's something you ne to do before we've been changing things up wi k-y love. oh yeah. it's a pleasure gel that magnifies both our sensations. it gives us chills in places we've never gotten chills before.
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the skies are getting crowded with drones. so today, the federal government said they'll have to be registered. transportation correspondent kris van cleave shows us how that will work. >> reporter: when the f.a.a. registration webte goes live next monday, current drone owners will have two months to register. newly purchased devices will have to be registered before taking flight. >> i think this does add a level of seriousness to the operation of the drone. >> reporter: former faa assistant administrator scott brenner. do they need to have a drone registration program? >> i think the faa was struggling with how do we educate new users, and by creating this registry, now we have a direct link to every user, which will allow us to do a tremendous amoununof education. >> reporter: the faa hopes that education will prevent more close calls in the air. a new report identified 158 incidents in the last two years where a drone came within 200
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28 times the pilot had to take evasive maneuvers. there has never been a confirmed collision between a drone and another aircraft. the new registration system will require drone owners to give their name, mailing address and e-mail and pay a $5 fee. >> i think some will not want to pay that fee. >> reporter: lawyeyemichael drobac works with the drone industry, which has been supportive of a registration system. does having the registration system make the skies safer, do you think? >> do i think those who would act in an inappropriate manner, do i think they will register? probably not. >> reporter: the faa will waive that $5 fee for the first 30 days. scott, all operators will be givevean identification number that has to be displayed on their drones. >> kris van cleave, thanks very much. still ahead, the bully poultry.
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swiftly and carry a big stick. today, bill cosby filed suit against seven of the women who have accused him of sexual misconduct. they are suing him claiming he defamed them by trying to brand them as liars. in his countersuit, he says they are "trying to assassinate his reputation." more trouble today for americans who make a living in the oil patch. shell says it will cut 2,800 more jobs. shell's total for the year comes to 10,000 layoffs. oil closed today at $36 a barrel, down nearly $25 since may. 18 months ago in the summer of 2014, it was $105, nearly three times higher. stocks closed higher. the dow gained 103 points. on cape cod it's not foul weathethat stays this courier from the swift completion of his
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ininurkeys. the letter carrier carries a pole to keep the birds at bay. not clear why they follow him. perhaps they're looking for "mail" companionship. we're not looking for a stamp of approval on that last line. after the diplomatic breakthrough, the sounds of havana are playing in chicago. and that story want to do sething special this holiday season? support i have a dream foundndion. help a child achieve the d dam of a higher ededation. cbs cares. organ donation can truly provide a second chance at life. find out how you can help someone in need be a real survivor. go to donatelife.net. cbs cares. want to do something special this christmas? support i have a dream foundation. help a child achieve the dream of a higher education. cbs cares.s. every day it's getting closer
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a love like yours will surely come my way hey, hey, hey babies aren't fully deveveped until at least 39 weeks. if your pregnancy is healthy, wait for labor to begin on its own. a healthy baby is worth the wait. o0 c1 travel is part of the american way of life. when we're on vacation, we keep an eye out for anything that looks out of place. [ indistinct conversations ] miss, your bag. when we travel om city to city, we pay attention to our surroundings. [ cheering ] everyone plays a role in keeping our community safe. whether you're traveling for business or pleasure, be aware of your surroundings. if you see something suspicious,
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today president obama said he is very interested in visiting cuba, but not until cubans are given more freedom. it was one year ago this week that the u.s. began restoring diplomatic ties that were severed half a century ago. and dean reynolds tells us that has led to a musical breakthrough. >> reporter: for this ensemble of young, cuban jazz musicians, better relations with the united states sound like this.
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american soil at chicago's auditorium theater, 24-year-old conductor ernesto lima says there is a message in their music. >> well, the improvisation i i freedom of the music. >> reporter: so improvisation is freedom. >> yes, i think so. >> reporter: their concert was a year in the making, and the dream of the chicago jazz philharmonic's artistic director orbert davis. >> we have to think about the people, the musicians, the culture. music is everybody's and it's what they value. if they can trust us with that, they'll trust us wititother things. >> reporter: we first met davis and these students a year ago in havana. 21-year-old wendi galvez has been playing violin since she was seven. >> billie holiday, ella fitzgerald, those are my gods.
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the rere of the students study music here, where the residue of jazz left over from america before the castro revolution still echoes through the instruments. dizzy gillespie's 1947 "manteca" is one of the best examples of the two nation's musical collaboration before fidel castro closed jazz halls and took over clubs like the famous tropicana.a. the u.s. embargo that followed created another challenge. you don't have the best-quality instruments. >> no, because we don't produce struments in cuba. >> reporter: so this is not a stradivarius? >> no. [ laughter ] >> reporter: which made their peormance on this nighghall the more rememkable. do you think music is a universal language? >> yes, if you don't know how to speak english, but when you are playing, you understand evevything.
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no language barrier. dean reynolds, cbs news, chicago. >> and that's the overnight news for this tuesday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back with us just a little bit later for the mong news and of course, "cbs thisismorning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm scott pelley. this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the "overnight news." i'm don dahler. with the holidays right around the corner, president obama is tryi to assure americans that their celelration also be safe. one week after his oval office address on terrorism, the president made the rounds of his security agencies. at the pentagon, mr. obama insisted u.s. intelligence has uncovered no credidie threat of an attttk over the next few weeks, and he said the u.s. military is taking the fight to
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and syria. >> this ll, even before the revolting attacks in paris and san bernardino, i ordered new actions to intensify our war against isil. these actions, including more firepower and special operations forces are well under way. this continues to be a difficult fight. as i said before, isil is dug in, including in urban areas and hide behind civilians, using defenseless men, women, and children as human shields. even as we're relentless, we have to be smart, targeting isil surgically, with precision. our partners on the ground are rooting them out block by block. that is what this campaign is doing. we are hitting isil harder than ever. coalition aircraft, our fighters, bombers, and drones have been increasing the pace of their strikes.
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dropped more bombs on isil targets than any other month since this campaign started. we're also taking out isil leaders one by one, going aftft them from their strongholds in downtown raqqah to libya, where we took out the isil leader there. the point is, isil leaders cannot hide, and our next message to them isisimple -- you ararnext. every day, we destroy as well more of isil's forces, their fighting positions, bunkers, staging areas, heavy apons, compounds and training camps. many places isil has lost its freedom of maneuver, because they know if they mask their forces, we will wipe them out. in fact, since this susuer, isil has not had a single successful major offensive operation on the ground in either syria or iraq.
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a new wave of strikes on their lifeline, their oil infrastructure, destroying hundreds of their tanker trucks, wells, and refineries. and we're going to keep on hammering those. il also continues to lose territory y iraq. isil had already lost across kircut province and tikrit. more recently, isil lostt at sinjar and baiji, where its oil refinery. we saw a daring raid supported by our special forces which rescued dozenu of prisoners from il, which master sergeant joshua wheeler made the ultimate sacrifice. so far isil has lost about 40% of the populated areas it once controlled in iraq. and it will loue more. iraqi forces are now fighting their way deeper into ramadi. they're working to encircle fallujah and cut off supply routes into mosul. these e e areas where isil is
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our partners on the ground face a tough tight ahead, and we're going to continue to back them up with the support they need to ultimately clear isil from iraq. >> t t president's strategy is playing out on the front lines in northern iraq. although isis still controls vast territory, their offensive to overrun the kurds has been stopped in its t tcks outside mosul. charlie d'agata took a news crew there. >> reporter: in many ways it was a routine assignment. head out to the front lines and see how kurdish peshmerga forces are holding up against isis. we got to within a half mile of isis territory and man, did we witness how deadly and determined this enemy can be. >> reporter: even when colonel badal bandi told us his forceses face isis attacks every day, we didn't expect this would be one of them, until he showed us where three suicide car bombers
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dawn. his soldiers were able to kill the drivers before they detonated their sboifs. but two car bombs remained there not more than 50 yards away posing a deadly throat to the troops. here on the front line, the bomb squad is a .50-caliber gunner. he fired rounds into one vehicle until it went up in a plume of smoke. he then opened up on the second car. we watched from a bunker hole until finally, a direct hit. [ explosion ] that noise you can hear is debris raining down on top of us. shrapnel from the bomb and isted remains of the week fwloen sky high after the explosion.
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but the next sound was laughter. it's happier ending when c c bombs blow up on t t other side of the front line. we are up close to one of those huge car bombs, you realize how sruptive they can be in civilian areas and why they are the most feared isis weapon on the battlefield. attacks like these are happening every day. another component of the u.s. strategy is to cut off funding for the islamic state. the treasury department says isis makes about $40 million a month, just selling oil. so that's become a prime target. >> reporter: u.s. and coalition planes have now begun to bomb tankers full of oil sold by isis in syria. part of an effort to cut off an estimated $40 million a month the group makes from petroleum sales. and in the cynicle economics of war, some of that oil even goe
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isis' sworn enemy. most of the oil fields in syria are in isis controlled territory. once pumped, it's moved by tanker to be sold locally, to yers in regime controlled syria or iraq and turkey. the coalition began bombing isis refineries last year and the russians have now joined in, choosing oil related bombing targets. that may have made a dent in isis' ability to supply oil clean enough to be used, but it didn't stop it. matthew phillips is with bloomberg. >> we overestimated really the damage that we did, the long-term damage and underestimated%their ability to kind of adapt to that. >> reporter: syrian locals simply set up crude refineries, basically cooking the oil in 3i89s bf selling'9" to traders
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attacks on what are isis operations like this will inevitably till innocent civilians. one more thought while cutting off revenue is going to hurtt isis, it won't bring the group to collapse. the best estimates say isis is making twice as much money on
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the republican party holds round five in its series of presidential debates tonight. this one in las vegas. donald trump will be front and center with ben carson on his right and ted cruz on his left. new jersey governor chris christie was a late add. a des moines register poll of likely iowa caucus goers shows cruz leading by ten points with just seven weeks to go before the caucuses. nancy cordes rererts.
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poll in less than a week to show cruz leading the gop field in iowa. the trump campaign trashed the poll, while trump himself chose to trash cruz, saying he's unfit for the job. >> i don't think he's qualified to be president. >> reporter: donald trump had this message for gop leaders who might think h support in awhat is waning. >> i don't go down, i go up. i'm going to win. >> reporter: and he went after his sometimes ay ted cruz after promising for weeks he wouldn't. >> you look how he's dealt with the senate where he goes in there like a maniac. >> reporter: on twitter, cruz crushed off theomments. maniac posting a link to thisis 1980s clip to the song "maniac." cruz refrained from attacking trump. >> i like donald trump. a lot of our friends here have encouraged me to criticizezend attack donald trump. i'm not interested in doing so.
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real estate mogul still has a big lead, beating cruz by nearly 20 points s the latest cbs news/"new york times" poll. still, his willingness to take on both sides of the washington establishment resonates with iowaconservatives. >> the way republican leadership punishes anyone who stands up to the cartel -- >> reporter: that approach has made him unpopular with leaders in his own party. brian walsh worked to elect republicans to the senate in 2010 and 201. >> he would be equally problematic. >> reporter: why? >> if we're going to win in 2016, we need to expand the electorate. we need more females and hispanics. instead of learnrng those lessons, you h he candidates like cruz and trump who are doing the opposite.
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on banning muslims from entering the united states is becoming a drag to his businessnterests overseas. julianna goldman reports from washington. >> reporter: donald trump has made his fortune in part by plastering his name around the world fromashington, d.c. to istanbul, people have bought into the trump brand as a symbol of luxury and success. but with each new controversy, more and more business partners are severing ties. these high rises in turkey bear the name of donald trump. some who work inside trump towers in istanbul say the building's namesake has given them reason to quit their jobs. this 20-year-old sales consultant said trump should close the building. there are muslim people working here. this is affecting me in an unfavorable way. this week, a major middle east retailer, with 190 department
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trump home decor brand. in stanford, connecticut some in the muslim community are calling on the developer to strike trump's name from this high rise. and at this trump residence in new york city -- >> it's embarrassing to haveve his name on the building. >> reporter: gordon gray with the u.s. chamber of commerce said he can't calculate the damage to trump's reputation in the muslim world. >> he gets the nomination, that prolongs ss ss his exposure in the public eye. >> reporter: since he declared his candidacy, trump's rhetoric may have had a cost. after his cost about mexican immigrants, more than a dozen companies from macy's to the pga and nascar severed ties.
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compared to his real estate fortune. he has several projects in the muslim world. it's very hard to quantify the consequences exactly, because it's not just deals he may o may not lose, it's deals that you don't know he may or may not have gotten. so that's always the big question mark out there. >> reporter: trump's own financial disclosures don't break down the dollarr amountnt of each investment, but forbes estimates that last year trump brought in about`$128 million in branding and licensing fees. in other n ns tonight, dog flu. there's a new strain this year, along with a new vaccine to fight it. but as molly hall reports, the shots a a expensive and may not be necessary. >> reporter: veterinarian katie grib says a new strai of canine flu that started in chicago last spring is spreading fastt and has
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>> this type of the virus progresses so quickly, it moves into the lungs, causing severe pneumonini >> reporter: the united states department of agriculture has approved a new vaccine to address the epidemic. it's being shipped to veterinarians right now. >> it's a totally novel virus. dogs don't have -- u.s. dogs don't have any historical experience with this virus. therefore, they have no protective cross reaction with any other antibodies that they've formed in the past. >> reporter: since the epidemic began, more than 1500 dogs became ill in a f f months. at least eight died from secondary infections. the strain has now spread across the country. the new strain is different from the common dog flu, which alreadadhas an effective vaccine available. in some cases, two vaccinations might be necessary.
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for two rounds. the vaccine for the new strain costs double that. >> if your dog is in close contact with other dogs very frequently, then it's extremely important to be thinking about and talking toour vet about doing this vaccine series. >> reporter: veterinarians don't know how effective the new vaccine will be. they hope down the road, a shot will be developed that covers both strains of flu. for now, check with your vet to
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your area. (beat begins) strangelove strange love gucci guilty the fragrances for him and for her man (sternly): where do you think you're going? mr. mucus: to work, with you. it's taco tuesday. man: you're not coming. i took mucinex to help get rid of my mucusy congestion. i'm good all day. [announcer:] mucinex keeps working. not 4, not 6, but 12 hours.
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so day soon, you won't need a superman cape orr special glasses to see t tough walls. researchers at m.i.t. are making real breakthroughs in the technology. it's a story i first reported for "cbs this morning." step on the campusf m.i.t. and you're likely to get a glimpse of the future. there are drones and plenty of robots. and another with a soft enough grip to handle an egg. some of the most recent breakthroughs, however, are happening here at the university's computer science and artificial intelligence lab. where this simple looking box
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>> this shows the ability if tracking people through walls. >> reporter: dina iss the professor leading the project, dubbed emerald. which has this ph.d. student demonstrating a wireless technology. so he's not wearing anything special? it's just picking up his movement through the wall? >> yeah, no cell phone, no sensor, no pendant. it's purely based on how the signal reflects off our dy. >> reporter: what was the inceptiofor this? >> we work on wireless networks. the question is, can we use this for purposes other than communication? can you sense the environment with it? reporter: it not only detected his position in the room, but his elevation from the floor. >> you want to@ see the red dot fall?
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red dot fall. researchers hope it can protect seniors at risk for falling. >> when it detects a fall, it sends a message to the caregiver. >> reporter: that's just scratching the surface of emerald's capabilities. hones in on his vitals, respiration and heart beat. >> being able to get the heart rate, wow, it's that sensitive. >> reporter: and it's not in any way as dangerous as say constant exposure to x-rays would be? >> no, not at all. i tell people all the time, the technology is the same carrier as wi-fi. it's actually 10,000 times or more lower powow than wi-fi.
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wi-fi in your home, you shouldn't be worried about this. >> are there any privacy concerns about this, l le maybe a burglar can use this to see where you are in the house? >> basically like with any new technology, it comes with a challenge. as s siety discovers new technologies, there are rules and laws a person has to abide by. >> if you look at that over there -- >> reporter: after moro than three years, the m.i.t. team demonstratededheir work for the president last summer. what was his reaction to this? >> so i think when he saw the breathing and heart rate, he said, wow. >> that potentially has applications for baby monitors. >> reporter: the goal now is to take it to people's homes within the next year. if you and your partners have this great invention that has huge promise, do you stay a
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>> is there a reason not to be both? >> reporter: is there enough hours in the day to be both? >> i have 24 hours a day. i don't even track holidays. i don't know that there is a holiday. i come to the lab and my students say oh, yeah, it's a holiday today. so i think there are plenty of hours as long as a person is interested in what they are doing. and having a great team like i have here. >> they also point out that first responders could benefit a great deal by knowing exactly where people are in life xhreatening situations. >> we like her. i like that she kind of told you, yeah, she can do it. i can be both. >> i just ask the questions. >> and think it's good seeinin through the wall, because i was concerned that you could physically see like if someone
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>> it's like sonar. >> and do with that information what you will. >> thank you. >> got to go. [ laughter ] >> thihiis new information for me. >> you know what? the news is back in the morning. what can we say? embarrassed by a prostate exam? imagine how your doctor feels. as a urologist, i have performed 9,421 and a half prostate exams. so why do i do it? because i get paid. und... on this side of the glove i know prostate exams can save lives. so, if you arere man over 50, talk to you doctor to see if a prostate exam is right for you. if we can do it, so can you. cbs cares. want to do something special this holiday season? support i have a dream foundation. help a child achieve the dream of a higher education. cbs cares.
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find out how you can help someone in need be a real survivor. go to donatelife.net. cbs cares. nt to do something s scial this christmas? support i have a dream foundation. help a child achieve the dream of a higher education.
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wisconsin has a state pastry called the crinkle and it's a big hit. >> reportete in racine, wisconsin, the holidays are all about the kringle. there's certain skill involved in making thehe wisconsin state pastry. good lord,d,hat's a lot of dough. it takes lots of this.
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then you have to do this, again and again, to make the 36 layers. does everybody do this much by hand? >> as far as i know. i think we're the last ones. >> reporter: for four generations, benson's bakery has been masteteng the technique. >> you can see the layers. >> reporter: when the benson family opened its bakery 81 years ago, they followed the danish tradition of a pretzel shaped pastry. complete with a kringle queen and kringle inspired polka. originally the danish pastry had an almond filling with raisins. now ben, jr. and his son, benen iii, make close to 30 flavors. >> my grandpa, until he died, would say, just keep the quality
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i'm still here. >> reporter: not far from benson's is this danish bakery, family run since 1949. >> that looks good. >> we make our own fillingng here. >> reporter: the owner took us on a tour of his 39,000 square foot facility. daily, thehe make 5,000 to 7,000 krin kringles. >> in the 1950s, some of the bakers started shifting them as a gift. so the word kind of spread. >> people come here because we have kringles. >> reportete at larson's bakery, they combined techniques rolling the dough by machine. don hutchison's father bought
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a kringle from anywhere else just isn't the same. >> you can't get a new york bagel anywhere else, because they put the time and labor into makingngt rightht >> and that's "cbs overnight news" for this tuesday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back with us later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new yorkrkity, i'm don dahler.r. the commander in chief tries again to reassure an anxious nation. >> we are fighting isil harder than ever. >> c c news is on the frononines with the kurds, fighting the terror group on the ground. also tonight, trailing in iowa, trump goes after front-runner cruz. >> i don't think he has the right temperament. controlling the soaring drone population. owners will soon have to register. and the sounds of growing
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