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tv   ABC World News Now  ABC  July 28, 2010 1:05am-3:00am PST

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ancestries when they don't have gonna be on lisa's series. how >> well, two ways--ancestry.com, do it online. i think there's a not very much. you type in the name of an ancestor, and it will
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we are following a developing news story this morning. a plane carrying 152 passengers has crashed in the mountainous regions of islamabad, pakistan. as you can see, smoke is still billowing into the air. what we do know, it was an air blue flight going from karachi to islamabad. again, 152 people on board. this is what we can show you now. again, a developing and breaking news story at this hour. >> certainly stick with abc, we'll bring you the latest details on that tragedy as they become available. good morning, everybody, welcome back. cleanup crews in michigan are trying to contain 800,000 gallons of oil now leaking into the kalamazoo river. >> that's after a pipeline broke and posed an environmental threat there. here now is "american landscape" coverage from wzzm in grand rapids. >> governor jennifer granholm has declared a state of disaster. and says the response to the oil spill on the kalamazoo river is "anemic" and much more must be
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done quickly. >> more than 800,000 gallons of crude leaked into a river tributary from an underground pipeline near marshall and it is moving quickly downstream. >> phil dawson is live in battle creek with big story coverage of the governor's response to the oil spill. >> reporter: the governor spoke here at what they're calling the emergency command center after flying over the kalamazoo river in a helicopter. she says the spill is now 12 miles long and in several vulnerable spots on the river there is no equipment, no effort to capture and clean up the oil. the governor says the stakes are enormous. keeping the oil from reaching lake michigan. >> the last thing any of us want to see is a smaller version of what has happened in the gulf. we have got to stop the spread of the crude right now. >> reporter: a leak in a pipeline owned by enbridge energy partners, carrying crude from canadian oil fields to
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midwest refineries, spilled thousands of gallons from a creek leading into the kalamazoo river. >> i believe around 840,000 gallons. >> reporter: the oil has traveled miles down the river and now enbridge and government agencies are scrambling to clean up the mess. >> this is our responsibility, it's our mess, we're going to clean it up. >> i'm a layperson but from my perspective the response has been anemic. they need to have more. there's miles with nothing. >> reporter: at ten locations on the river, enbridge is trying to capture and suck up the oil. at pristine morrow lake they're taking a last stand, trying to channel any oil that makes it this far into ocean booms. >> we hope it will not reach lake morrow. >> it's closer to morrow lake than previously reported. if we do not get containment near morrow lake, then there will be far worse consequences. >> reporter: enbridge estimates 840,000 gallons of oil spilled into the river. other estimates are higher. >> governor, do you trust this
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company? >> i'll say this, i have great knowledge that companies will do what they can to protect their reputation, their interests, and their shareholders. >> it will be months before total cleanup but we are absolutely going to do that. >> president obama is pledging a fast response to requests for help with the oil spill. here's what the kalamazoo river looks like from above. you can see the dark oil coating the top of the river. the oil spill dumped from 800,000 to some estimates of 1 million gallons of oil into the waters in calhoun county. the company that runs the pipeline, enbridge, says they first found out about the problem because of a reading hundreds of miles away. >> our control center located up in edmonton noticed a drop in pressure on our line 6b. they contacted our local pipeline maintenance crew and asked them to do a visual inspection of the line to find out what was going on. upon that visual inspection, they noticed that there was oil
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released. >> according to enbridge, the line was shut down immediately after crews saw oil. isolation valves are on either side of where that leak actually occurred. the severe storms that hit west michigan last week are now playing a role in how quickly the oil could reach lake michigan. wzzm 13 joins us from the weather center with a look at where the oil is going. >> the national weather service says it could be three to four days before the oil gets to the lake. the kalamazoo river is moving quickly. you can easily see those oil slicks. they are heading west toward lake michigan. booms placed in the river are catching some oil but much of it is getting through. the national weather service says because of thunderstorms last week, river levels are higher than normal. so there are currently flood advisories and more water means the flow is faster. >> the national transportation safety board is getting involved in the calhoun county oil spill. the agency is spending three
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pipeline investigators to the source of the leak in marshall. another investigator will go to enbridge's pipeline control center in edmonton, alberta, canada. the so-called go teams will investigate the pipeline accident and the oil spill. >> that again was coverage from our affiliate wzzm in grand rapids. we'll be right back with more news.
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this is news for all you insomniacs. we assume there's a lot watching at this hour. we're going to introduce you to a fourth-generation insomniac who went searching for the cure for her sleep disorder. >> patricia morrisroe is the author of the book fittingly entitled "wide awake," something we know very well. our barry mitchell set down his accordion to get some advice on sleep. >> from the city that never sleeps, the journalist that never sleeps. patricia morrisroe, author of "wide awake." a memoir of insomnia. tell us some of the stranger places your research took you. >> i went to the ice hotel beyond the arctic circle. where i tried to sleep in the hotel made completely of ice and then went to interview a reindeer herder about sleeping
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patterns there. and learned that sleep is not, you know, the idea of just getting into bed and sleeping for eight hours, is not necessarily the norm. >> your research shows that sleep in america is big business. over a $20 billion industry. pills, mattresses. >> but for all the money we're spending, we're sleeping -- we seem to be sleeping less than we've ever slept before. or that's what we're being told. >> you mention in your book sleeping pills really only help you maybe sleep an extra 11 minutes a night. >> yeah, according to a 2007 study by the national institutes of health. in addition, they interfere with memory formation. so you may think you're sleeping when you may not be. >> what you need is a bed that will support and mold to you and hug you and relax you. will it cure insomnia? no. it will just make you as comfortable as you can possibly be and allow you to get the most restful quality per hour a night sleep you could possibly get. >> after all is said and done
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how did you learn to manage your insomnia? >> i walked around the corner and took a meditation course. and i found that doing the breathing really helped. ♪ >> soooo -- aaahhh -- >> our thanks to long's bedding on west 72nd street. the main reason people can't sleep at night? >> pillow fight! >> our new reporter. >> my biggest fear is that we are the cure for some people's insomnia, that we put them to sleep. >> we hope not. >> never the goal. also note miss morrisroe, she's an insomniac that has never seen ou n honking.
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for nighttime pain, make advil pm your #1 choice. welcome back, everybody. finally this half hour, the story of a young woman who gave up a romance and changed her life to save lives. >> she is helping strangers thousands of miles away from her hometown of oregon. deborah roberts reports. >> reporter: lisa shannon is running and doesn't plan to stop. a middle class woman from portland, oregon, she looked up one day and saw a tv program on the war in congo. the faces were strangers. but lisa was shaken to the core. >> i was shocked. i couldn't believe that the deadliest war since world war ii was going on and i had never
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even heard of it. >> reporter: hundreds of thousands of women and children raped, tortured, killed. >> there was one woman's story in particular that really struck me. she was told, you're like an animal. even if i killed you, you would not be missed. so i felt like i needed to find some simple way to just send the opposite message. >> reporter: so lisa organized run for congo women, raising thousands for her african sisters, for job training and education. in 2007, she went to meet them. >> oh my god! >> reporter: and discovered how much it meant that someone cared. >> they would carry around the letters that we had sent them like it was their most prized possession. >> reporter: one was this mother of five. >> jenna rose, my sister whose village was attacked, her husband was killed in front of her, her child was killed, and they cut off her leg. she has a prosthetic leg now. >> reporter: suddenly lisa's priorities had changed. you walked away from your
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business and your fiance for the women of the congo. >> absolutely. i don't have a fiance but i have more than 1,000 women in congo who consider me their sister and i consider them my sister. >> reporter: soon there were more sisters all over the world joining lisa's run. from snowy central park to her first run in congo with the survivors themselves. >> i was running next to jenna rosen. after everything a militia had taken from her, she showed up in a red suit and pearls. >> reporter: so far, lisa's raised more than $700,000. and she's just written a book about her journey, which has brought hope to some 35,000 women in congo determined to rebuild their shattered lives. deborah roberts, abc news, new york. >> never doubt that one person really can make a difference. that's incredible, that level of selflessness. >> the nice thing about this also that is these running groups are really picking up. not only are they now in the u.s., they are taking over in europe as well.
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wherever you are, you can find a group if you're inteáñáñáñáñáñáñ
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funding fight. capitol hill democrats defy the president. >> costs of this war are too enormous in blood and treasure. >> the battle over money for the afghanistan war. then, arizona exodus. the impact of the state's controversial immigration law, just before it takes effect. and, challenging case. the difficulty in tracking down a suspected serial murderer. it's wednesday, july 28th. >> from abc news, this is "world news now." >> good morning. i'm vinita nair. >> i'm rob nelson. we begin with breaking news out of pakistan. authorities say at least five people have died after a commercial jetliner crashed into
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the hills above islamabad. >> investigators say the plane, owned by air blue, was taking off from karachi when it was about to land and lost control with the control tower and crashed. as you can see in that video it is still a very active scene and rescue crews are on the way throughout the morning. we'll have the latest on this developing story so please stay with abc news. now to the newest front in the war in afghanistan, which is capitol hill. president obama is now battling his very own party. >> democrats revolted as the house debated a $33 billion bill to pay for the war. here's jonathan karl. >> reporter: democrat after democrat came forward, not just to oppose the war, but to cut off funding for it. >> wake up, america. wikileaks' release of secret war documents gave us 92,000 reasons to end the wars. >> it is wrong to be borrowing money from china, laying off american police officers, to train police officers in afghanistan.
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>> the costs of this war are too enormous in blood and treasure. >> reporter: last year, when the house last voted on war funding, 32 democrats voted no. more than three times as many democrats came out against funding the war. a stand they took even after a last-ditch appeal by the president to vote yes. >> ensure that our troops have the resources they need and that we're able to do what's necessary for our national security. >> reporter: but they weren't listening. >> it is a mistake to give this administration yet another blank check for this war. >> there's nowhere in the constitution that says that the president just gets to go and fight wars without the oversight of the congress. >> reporter: opposition to the war came from some of the top democrats in congress. including appropriations chairman david obey who voted in favor of the war funding last time around. >> i cannot look my constituents
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in the eye and say that this operation will hurt our enemies more than it hurts us. and so i will reluctantly vote no. >> reporter: in contrast, democratic supporters of the war kept a low profile and so did the democratic leadership. during the debate, neither nancy pelosi nor any other democratic house leader came forward to speak in favor of funding the war. for the most part, it was republicans that made the case for the obama administration's policy in afghanistan and gave the president the votes he needed to fund the war. jonathan karl, abc news, capitol hill. a young woman is under house arrest in texas, accused of trying to smuggle u.s. weapons into russia. anna fermanova was born in latvia but grew up in dallas. investigators say they found three night vision rifle sights in her luggage as she boarded a plane in new york headed for moscow. her attorney says she was taking them to her husband who works in russia. fermanova is now charged with smuggling but not espionage. president obama is promising
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quick action, responding to an 800,000 gallon oil spill in southern michigan. it has been leaking since monday from a broken pipeline. it carries about 8,000 gallons of oil a day from indiana to ontario. the oil flowed into a creek and then into the kalamazoo river, coating birds and fish. about 20 homes have been evacuated. now to the gulf oil spill. it has now been 100 days since the deadly deepwater horizon explosion which led to the environmental disaster. >> the chairman of bp says his priority now is to stop the leak and clean up the shores but also keep bp shareholders in mind. diana alvear has the latest now from buras, louisiana. diana? >> reporter: vinita and rob, good morning. today marks the 100th day since the initial explosion. but american bob dudley, the new man at bp, is wasting no time laying out his plan of attack. first of all he says they have to kill that damaged well completely. he's hoping that will take place
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within the next few weeks. then the focus turns completely to cleanup efforts. >> we clean up the beaches, we restore the gulf, and we'll be doing that for a long time. and that is my number one focus. >> reporter: but there are some things that are complicating those efforts. crews have to find those 180 million barrels that have gushed into the gulf. a lot of it has broken up and sunk beneath the surface of the water. >> there's a lot of dispersed oil in the water and tt s could end up in the food web. >> reporter: researchers say tho fishing bed can get back out on the water and make a living. >> we have to be sure that when we put these out there, that they're safe for the consumer. >> reporter: on capitol hill, the man in charge of handling claims promised to speed up the process. >> i am working as fast as i can, as diligently as i can, full-time, to get the gulf coast claims facility up and running, to get it funded, so that these emergency claims can be made as
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soon as possible. >> reporter: meanwhile, officials have to worry about yet another leak in the gulf. this time, a tow boat ran into a wellhead near the spill zone. the good news here is that it seems the oil's going to be easier to contain because there's already so many boats and boom on the water. rob, vinita? a new law cracking down on illegal immigrants in fremont, nebraska, will not go into effect tomorrow as planned. the fremont city council voted unanimously to suspend the law. council members want to save money in legal costs because of several court challenges still pending. last month voters approved the law which bans hiring illegal immigrants anprop arizona's even fiercer crackdown on illegal immigrants is se a federal judge could decide today if legal chales s stop it. as bill weice o ready. >> reporter: there is a fear-driven exodus going on in arizona. more vacant apartments, more empty shops, more kids disappearing from schoo >> this is my home.
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i don't want to be separated from my family. >> reporter: it's happening as police departments ready their jails and themselves for a surge in arrests. this video is now mandatory viewing, giving guidance on the new fine line between enforcement and profiling. >> diplomacy may be the greatest asset in these days to come. >> meanwhile, latino activists are encouraging their community to check their tail lights, not travel in big groups, and even remove the catholic rosary beads from their rear-view mirrors. all the better to avoid suspicion. law student daniel rodriguez, undocumented since his mother brought him at age 6, tells of all the parents giving power of attorney to neighbors in case they're deported without their american-born children. >> kids will be placed in child protective services and may not see their parents again for a long time. >> reporter: beefed-up patrols and the recession have actually made american borders more secure than any time in decades. but anger is still high in the state. and while this law may add
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another deterrent, it is most frightening to people already here. francisco has been in phoenix without papers for 14 years. but says now he's afraid to walk the streets. so he'll take his family and leave as soon as he can. >> my kids, born here. and now i have to come back to mexico. >> what do you say to the person who says you are breaking a law by being in this country? >> i think i would tell that person that the laws do not make sense. i didn't commit any moral wrong by being 6 1/2 and coming with my family here. >> reporter: he is just one of many hoping for reform while bracing for possible arrest. bill weir, abc news, phoenix. now here is a look at your forecast. stormy from des moines to buffalo with 80-mile-an-hour winds, flash flooding and baseball-sized hail. wet from texas to the carolinas and florida. thunderstorms in much of the
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west. >> 101 in phoenix. 88 in albuquerque. 92 in billings. upper 80s from kansas city to indianapolis. mostly 90s from boston to miami. 95 in new orleans. and 92 in dallas. if you are just joining us if you fight to sleep in the middle of the night, why go one more round ? you don't need a rematch, but a rethink. with lunesta. lunesta is thought to interact with gaba receptors associated with sleep. lunesta helps you get the restful sleep you need. lunesta has some risk of dependency. when taking lunesta, don't drive or operate machinery until you feel fully awake. walking, eating, driving or engaging in other activities
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if you are just joining us we are following a breaking news story this morning. a plane carrying 152 people has crashed in pakistan. as you can see from those dramatic images, we know this has happened in a mountainous region. right now authorities are saying that bad weather may have been the cause of this crash. the flight was owned by air blue. it's an airbus jet. it was en route from karachi to islamabad. now, the initial reports are that this flight lost contact with the control room just as it was about to land into the islamabad airport. we know rescue crews are on the scene. so far, at least five people are dead, three more are wounded. >> we'll follow that story throughout the morning and bring you the latest details as they become available. we now move to the chilling
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story of a 27-year-old man in maryland that police call a suspect in a series of mother-daughter murders. >> capturing jason thomas scott and cracking the case was quite a challenge for investigators near washington, d.c. pierre thomas reports. >> reporter: the horror began at this home on january 26th, 2009, as an intruder neutralized the alarm system and slipped in. karen lofton, a 45-year-old nurse, was fatally shot as she tried to hide in this corner. her 16-year-old daughter was repeatedly shot as she frantically dialed 911 from her bed. police were perplexed. the doors were locked. no signs of forced entry. neighbors were terrified. two months later, the bodies of dolores dewitt, 42, and her 20-year-old daughter, ebony, were found in a burning car less than a mile away from the loftons' home. another nurse and a daughter killed. >> i will tell you mr. scott presented us with a very challenging ability to identify him as a suspect. >> reporter: this man, jason
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thomas scott, was charged in the murders of the dewitts and the chief of police here is convinced he's responsible for more. >> here's a mother and a daughter in a very quiet community where we don't see violence. yes, we've had some burglaries here. but again, they're saying the way the crime scene is left very troublesome. it does not tell us so much about what's occurring. there's things that don't make any sense in the crime scene. we're beginning to wonder what we have here. >> reporter: there were similarities in the crime scenes but also stark differences. the loftons were murdered in their home in what appeared to be a controlled, planned execution. the dewitts may have been killed in a random act of violence, perhaps a carjacking. and then there was vilma butler. killed and left in this burning house. five murders in nine months. the police got a break when thomas was arrested last july in this u.p.s. parking lot after atf received a tip he was selling weapons out of the trunk of his car. he was charged with selling
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stolen weapons, including assault rifles and silencers. the investigation eventually led police to this vacant mansion that they suspect has served as the thieves' lair. it was there investigators found evidence linking thomas to the murders of the loftons and dewitts. scott is 27 years old. he's a college graduate and is pursuing a master's degree in computer science. he also worked at the u.p.s. and law enforcement sources say he may have used the company's database to help select victims. >> again, he utilizes employment to methodically identify his victims. so again, he had inside information. he knew a lot about his victims. he studied our response, the way we investigated crimes. so he managed to actually throw us off and disguise the crime scene based on his knowledge of police investigations. >> reporter: scott allegedly used bleach to clean his crime scenes. arson to destroy evidence. and changed the location of
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bodies to confuse police. he also studied other serial killers. he also studied other serial killers. neighbors who have known scott for years say there were hints early on that he might be a predator. >> most of the problem started when he was around 10. started him being a peeping tom, leading to videotaping people, breaking and entering. you'd never have known he was going to commit murder. >> reporter: police worry scott might be responsible for other unsolved homicides in d.c., texas and florida, other locations he's known to have frequented. there are about 40 unsolved murders in his home county which will also be looked at again. >> i'm looking at these -- the number of crimes associated with this individual. in my experience, 30 years of policing, i've not seen, never seen such type of criminal in our midst. >> reporter: rosa smith, dolores dewitt's mother, still can't understand. >> to do this without knowing a person.
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you can be so evil, knowing a person -- not knowing a person and you're going to do this, that's sad to be so evil. >> reporter: the question is whether there are more victims and more evil. i'm pierre thomas in prince george's county, maryland. coming up, who is suing "american idol" producers for, get this, 300 million bucks? >> and what brought a former secretary of state and the queen of soul together onstage. it's next in "the skinny." >> ♪ what do you want from me? ♪ oprah: "american idol's" wild child, adam lambert. that scandal. did something just come over you -- "i wanna kiss somebody"? and record-smasher susan boyle.
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kind of a slow "skinny" on this wednesday. >> not too much juicy stuff. >> we need celebrities to pull another mel gibson or do something lindsay lohan-esque to lighten things up. >> it's almost the weekend, give them some time.
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>> we start with daniel craig who has been cast to star in that movie "the girl with the dragon tattoo." it was a huge best-selling mystery novel. now he has been cast to play the grubby journalist. this really couldn't be better timing for daniel craig in the sense that there's supposed to be the production of a 23rd installment to 007. apparently mgm is out of cash to the tune of $4 billion in debt. >> just spare change. >> he'll at least be able to pick up extra work during the time he's not filming for 007. >> you're a big fan of his as bond? >> when he was initially cast, who is this guy, i don't like him at all. now he's my favorite. i thought he was fun snow, sexy. a different bond. >> no one ever beats sean connery but you think he's been stopped? >> i don't want to say topped. but daniel craig's hot. >> it's getting hot on "american idol" as well. we talked earlier this week about simon cowell getting sued, the woman who got her feelings
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hurt when he said she was lousy which she was. she took offense, got all emotionally distraught, suing "american idol," suing simon cowell. now there's another lawsuit the show is facing for a hefty $300 million. i must have missed this episode. apparently in the live show earlier this year, ian bernardo was a contestant on the show. he went out there, stole the mike from dane cook who was also on the show, caused a brouhaha behind the scenes. now he said he was prompted by producers to be outrageous, to gay it up, he says he was exploiting his sexual orientation. dane got upset after the mike episode, kind of threatens him, now this young man ian says he has suffered emotionally injuries and loss. take a look at what he said. >> "american idol" is rampant homophobia, what goes behind the scenes nobody sees. i was treated disgustingly. and i was just really violated and i'm really hurt. >> so hurt he wants 300 million bucks. saying producers took advantage of him and caused a scene on
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"american idol." >> the first lawsuit, "britain's got talent," simon cowell's other show. >> okay. >> they seem so similar, it's easy to confuse the two of them. i don't know that this is a sign of good things for the stock exchange. take a look at who they decided to allow to ring the opening bell. can you see? can you tell who that is? >> that's right. from my home state, the cast of what, everyone's favorite reality show, "the jersey shore." >> the train wreck that it is. one of the funniest things, ringing the new york stock exchange, people are saying that the floor was the most crowded it's really ever been. people were coming from all over the place and they basically just wanted to get a signature, they wanted to get something, maybe a fist bump, maybe learn how to do the hair from snooki. >> oh, man. they said tanning salon stock soared yesterday. maybe that's why. who makes that call? who decides, so-and-so rings the bell? i wonder who does that?
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last but not least, aretha franklin and condoleezza rice are performing "the diplomat and the diva." "good morning america" will have a lot of stuff. they're covering this intensely. she'll be singing, condoleezza rice will be on the piano. hó
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rushing real liquid relief to ease you to sleep fast. for nighttime pain, make advil pm your #1 choice. here are some stories to watch today on abc news. we are following a breaking story in islamabad, pakistan. the fatal airline jet crash in a hilly area there during a rainstorm. the control tower lost track of the crew as it approached the airport. also, jurors in the rod blagojevich corruption trial get their deliberation instructions today from the judge in the case. the former illinois governor is accused of trying to sell president obama's former seat in the u.s. senate. and new york public health experts plan to launch a new attack on a bedbug outbreak in the city. the mayor may appoint a so-called bedbug czar. i had no idea when i moved here that was a huge problem in new york. >> every time i get a bump or an itch i'll like, it's a bedbug! finally this half hour, the
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countdown to the next summer olympics. in two years the 2012 games in london will be under way. >> as the bbc's james pierce reports, things seem to be right on track and people in london are ready for action. >> reporter: the opening of the bridge that in 2012 will be the gateway to the olympic park. a collection of athletes, children, tv presenters, and builders, the first to take a walk that in two years' time, hundreds of thousands more will follow. inside the velodrome, a little piece of history. sir chris hoy became the first to ride a bike at the venue where he hopes to add to his gold medal collection in 2012. >> just walking in there, get the fans going, just to realize that's the venue where the olympic games are taking place, potentially to be standing on the top step of the podium to receive a gold medal, it was
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inspirational stuff. >> reporter: another first, the main stadium where a special track had been laid for the former olympic champion michael johnson. it is all very relaxed, light-hearted. still hugely symbolic. with the olympics two years away it's already possible to sprint inside the stadium. >> three, two, one! >> reporter: less of a sprint, more of a jog for michael johnson. but it will go down as the venue's first race. just as this was the first action in the basketball arena. plenty of progress for one of the men at the heart of london's original bid to reflect on. >> it's already making a difference economically. but more than that, when it happens, it is going to be the single biggest showcase this country has had for -- for as long as anyone can remember. >> reporter: and plenty of opportunity for the unexpected, no doubt, as well. like london mayor boris johnson's decision to do his own lap at the velodrome. he was using the same bike as chris hoy. there, the similarity ended.
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james pierce, bbc news, at the olympic park. rl
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suspicious suspect. the 24-year-old woman under arrest. her capture and alleged links to russia. and then, passionate plea from a missing boy's mother. >> never give up hope. >> as the police search for kyron horman enters a new phase. and, day 100 of the gulf oil disaster. the struggling businesses and musicians eager to help. ♪ it's all bp's fault >> it's wednesday, july 28th. >> from abc news, this is world news now. >> good morning. i'm vinita nair. >> i'm rob nelson. we begin with breaking news.
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a fatal airline plane crash in pakistan. >> our reporter is joining us on the phone with the latest on the story. this should have been a routine, two-hour flight, now it has ended tragically. >> reporter: correct, vinita. this was a pakistani airline passenger plane en route from karachi to islamabad. it crashed into the margalla hills encircling islamabad. the plane was in descent, it had lowered its landing gear, and it was just about three miles from the airport when it, due to bad weather, aviation authorities say due to bad weather crashed into the margalla hills encircling islamabad. the minister said that five of the passengers have been recovered. we don't know about the fate of the rest of them. it's difficult terrain because there is no road going to these mountains. helicopter rescue is under way but that is being hampered by the bad weather. we are still into the early hours of the rescue and we still don't know about the fate of
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most of the 152 passengers and crew that was on board. >> you mentioned a second ago the weather is making things rough out there as well as difficult roads getting to that scene. any idea just yet how many rescue teams have made it to the crash site just yet? >> reporter: there are rescuers on their way by road but then they have to trek into the mountains where the plane crash happened. then they will in the morning, when the plane crash happened, there were helicopter rescue efforts but that was stopped due to bad weather. now what is happening at the moment, there are rescue teams rushing to the site but they have to go to a certain point then trek up to those areas. and the debris of the aircraft is spread over an area. it will not be an easy rescue. >> looking at this footage right now, it really is a frightening scene. we do know this was obviously an air blue airliner. what we've heard is that this flight might have lost contact
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with the control room as it was set to land? >> reporter: correct, vinita. just as the aircraft was in descent and lowered its landing gear, it lost control with the air tower. and that was when it crashed into the mountains. and the fate of the aircraft was unknown for some time. until the residents of islamabad heard a loud bang and smoke rising from the mountains. and it was still then difficult to make out whether they were clouds or smoke. then very soon it was known that unfortunately the plane had crashed into the mountains. >> as you mentioned this is still a developing news story. those tolls as you mention frighteningly could continue to be updated. thank you so much for that report and we hope that you will stay with abc news throughout the course of this morning. we will continue to bring you the very latest on this sad, tragic story. other news now, to the young, attractive suburban woman now under arrest. she's accused of trying to smuggle u.s. munitions into
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russia. >> just weeks after the biggest spy swap since the end of the cold war, the actions of a texas woman have federal officials taking an especially close look. wfaa's jason whitely reports. >> reporter: federal investigators have had their sights set on anna fermanova for months. a 24-year-old who lives in plano, now charged with attempting to export three expensive rifle scopes to russia. >> she's not russian. she's latvian. she came here as a political religious refugee, her family is jewish. they are very tight. there's no terrorism, there's no espionage, there's nothing. there's nothing like that. nor is the government saying there is. >> reporter: according to the arrest affidavit, fermanova got caught with three tactical rifle scopes in her luggage. they are night vision, expensive, up to $5,600 apiece. legal to buy in the united
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states, but illegal to take them out of the country. sensitive technology. that's what the 24-year-old is charged with. the arrest warrant revealed that fermanova tried to use a black marker to rub out the i.d. numbers on the scopes to "make them less noticeable." she told customs agents that she was taking the scopes to her husband who lives in russia. a family friend told us she was likely trying to make extra money. no one answered the door at her home tuesday. her attorney told us she and her family left latvia when anna was 9. she grew up in north texas, graduated high school here. but is out on bond now, facing the federal charge, passport revoked, and staying out of sight, believed to be in her parents' plano home. jason whitely for abc news, plano, texas. the jury in the rod blagojevich corruption trial is set to begin deliberations today in chicago. in closing arguments prosecutors
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described the former illinois governor as a crooked political schemer. they say he was caught on tape trying to sell or trade barack obama's former senate seat. blagojevich's lawyer argued his client is not sharp and not a criminal. protesters hit the streets of haiti's capital city demanding more help from the government. they say they're desperate, living in deplorable conditions following january's devastating earthquake there. many claim they have received no financial aid or government help to recover. crews are rushing to clean up an 800,000-gallon oil spill in southern mn. the oil poured into a creek and then flowed into the kalamazoo river. michigan's governor toured the spill. she called for more resources to be devoted to the cleanup. so far, about 20 homes have been evacuated. and in the gulf of mexico, it hanow e 10norire this morning's "washington post" reports that several u.s. government agencies are now preparing a criminal probe of at
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least three companies involved ini bp, transocean, and halliburton are the initial targets. investigators are looking into the relationship between the companies and the federal agency in charge of oil drilling. people whose livelihoods are being hurt by the spill are telling their stories to lawmakers on capitol hill. emily schmidt has that story from wash >> reporter falches from the coast -- >> it's impacted us greatly. >> do you solemnly swear to tell the truth -- >> reporter: to the capitol where two different congressional hearings focus on people hurt by the spill. >> i don't know a single business in our town that has not been directly affected by this oil. >> reporter: the head of alabama's gulf coast convention and visitors bureau says hotels that are usuall thi wneree io. >> and this is not a sustainable business model. >> reporter: the u.s. travel association wants bp to earmark $500 million for a tourism marketing campaign. and in a separate hearing,
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witnesses called on the obama administration to reverse a deep water drilling moratorium imposed after the spill. >> we want to work. we want to be able to do our jobs, support our families, and support our local economy. >> reporter: leslie bertucci's company suo she says she's taken a 75% pay cut, hoping to keep 14 employees. the man charged with handling claims says the problem is determining the proximity of who is hurt. >> how far from the beach does a steakhouse that's lost 30% of its business because of a downswing in tourism -- what constitutes an eligible tourist claim? >> reporter: ken feinberg said his blueprint for emergency payments should be complete by the end of the week. emily schmidt, abc news, washington. now here is a look at your wednesday weather. severe storms from iowa to western new york. gusty winds, hail and flooding from des moines to buffalo. thunderstorms along the gulf coast and in kentucky,
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tennessee, and arkansas. heavy rain in parts of the northern and central rockies. >> 87 in colorado springs. 88 in albuquerque. and 78 in seattle. it's 91 in kansas city. 86 in omaha. and 83 in minneapolis. boston heats up to 94. baltimore 92. and new orleans 95. now to a look at what could happen when "here, kitty, kitty" doesn't do the job. >> that was good. a kitten in vienna tried to seek refuge in several cars before finding a secret spot deep inside a police car. firefighters couldn't reach the cat so they were forced to totally dismantle that car. >> once rescued the kitten tried to make a run for it but was quickly captured. it looks like the feisty feline did have the last meow. it bit a firefighter's finger. the kitty is in a shelter and that little precious gem is up for adoption. we'll be right back. their diabetic supplies through liberty medical. and that begins with the one touch ultra 2 meter. easy to use, fast results...
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we are following a breaking news story this morning. a tragic plane crash, a plane carrying 152 people has crashed in pakistan. it was en route from karachi to islamabad, which should have been a routine two-hour flight, when it appears bad weather may have affected contact with the control tower. at last word, ten people have
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been reported dead. but again, this is a developing news story and with 152 people on board, the biggest fears are that that death toll could continue to climb. >> we'll follow this story throughout the morning and bring you the very latest. keep it here on abc. now to other news this morning, kyron horman, the missing oregon boy, has not been seen now for 54 days. still no suspects in that case. >> but there are developments from the police, the family, and the grand jury. don guevara is following the investigation. good morning, don. >> reporter: rob and vinita, this is the largest search in oregon's history. there are more than 3,500 leads that have come in and the reward is now up to $50,000. a tearful message from kyron horman's biological mother, desiree young, as police continue to search for her missing son. >> we love you, kyron. never give up hope. we are all coming to get you to bring you home. >> reporter: we believe that kyron's disappearance involves
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criminal behavior because his parents have been deprived of their son for 53 days. >> reporter: the grand jury is now trying to do what investigators haven't been able to. find out who's responsible for kyron horman's disappearance. dede spicher, terry horman's close friend and one of the women police seem to have narrowed in on, appeared before the grand jury but it was not questioned by them monday. >> a grand jury can be impaneled to further and enhance an investigation that has been stalled. >> reporter: while spicher has been avoiding reporters her attorneys say she has been cooperating with investigators. her family isn't giving any details. >> can anybody speak for her? people are saying some pretty harsh things about her. >> i can't comment. >> reporter: kyron has been missing since june 4th and since then, police have still not named any suspects in this case. in los angeles, don guevara, abc news. rob, vinita, back to you. >> and there is somewhat
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encouraging news i guess, they say significant progress is being made in the search. we are inching toward some kind of closure, at least an arrest in the case. >> it's interesting to watch this play out, in the sense initially you'd never have thought the stepmother had any role in any of this. now we've heard continuous allegations frfrfrfrfrfrfrfrfrfr
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today marks the 100th day since the chain of events began leading to the worst environmental disaster in american history. and while the cleanup and the struggles continue, the music industry and recording artists are doing their part to help out. joining me now from miami via skype is music and media consultant bruno del granado. good morning to you, bruno. >> good morning, greetings, rob. >> thank you very much. tell us what the music industry
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has done so far to help out the gulf these last few months. >> well, rob, considering that the summer months are the busiest time for the music industry and the artists because they're always touring and because of the spill taking place starting in may, the efforts have been a little bit muted compared to katrina or haiti. but you had jimmy buffet, lenny kravitz, mos def, a bunch of artists rallying. they've come up with interesting things that have happened the last three months. >> so often you see this after a big natural disaster. after katrina, after the gulf oil spill, the country gets together and hosts a telethon. larry king took part in the most recent one. >> yeah, larry king hosted a telethon a couple of weeks ago. keep in mind he did a big one in january around haiti. and that one raised $10 million. the one he did for the gulf only raised $1.8 million. the reason why i think it only raised less than $2 million was because this is not a natural disaster, this is manmade.
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from all the blogs i've read and all the comments, people are blaming bp and they say bp is one of the wealthiest companies in the world and they're the ones who should be footing the bill. >> we know new orleans is one of the country's great musical cities. coming from there to here, to new york, it is an incredible city. the musical talent coming out of there. the city itself got together to help itself out with another kind of concert. >> yes, this was spearheaded by lenny kravitz, now a resident of new orleans. lenny kravitz in the last three months has been so visible. he's as visible with this cause as harry connick was during katrina. he's done the larry king telethon, he's done this benefit concert that raised $350,000, was joined on stage by mos def, anita frankel, dr. john. he's been making the rounds globally, doing interviews, just trying to bring more light to the plight of what's happening to the fishermen and the marshlands around the gulf area. so a lot of kudos to lenny kravitz for what he's done.
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>> another big name act that's gotten involved, jimmy buffet, certainly he's a fan of the beach and a fan of the entire gulf coast, he put on a concert as well. >> oh, yes. jimmy buffet is actually -- to the gulf he is what wyclef jean is to haiti, a native son who's done so much for that region. jimmy buffet, born in mississippi, lives between alabama and florida. major concert in gulf shores, alabama,a couple weeks ago attracted 35,000 people. attended by the governors of alabama and florida. basically jimmy buffet's message was, everybody come on down, don't forget us, don't forget the merchants and the people here in the gulf coast. and it was a tremendous boost, shot in the arm for the residents in alabama and around the gulf coast. you know, jimmy buffet, he doesn't mince his words. he changed the lyrics of "margaritaville." at the end he basically puts the blame on bp. ♪ some people claim that there's a woman to blame ♪ ♪ but i know it's all bp's fault ♪
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>> "it's all bp's fault," that's the line. he didn't mince words, he let his opinion be known on that issue. some didn't do benefit concerts directly but still try to do their part. any examples of that? >> dave matthews has recorded an amazing psa with sandra bullock and the girl from "gossip girl." there's talk there's going to be another major event sometime before the summer's over. once again, we go back to people saying bp is a company that's worth over -- it is worth over $116 billion. they should certainly be footing the bill. the artists who feel a connection to the land, the people, the region are the ones spearheading all the efforts. i think we're going to see a lot more in the next few months. >> bruno, we certainly appreciate you being with us this morning. it's great to see so many folks helping out at this critical time in the area of the country. thank you so much. >> you're welcome. >> you're watching "world news now." be back with more right after
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we have been following a developing news story out of pakistan. a tragic plane crash. what we do know was that the plane was en route from karachi to islamabad with 152 aboard. an airblue flight, airbus jet. what we can tell you at this time is as this flight was making its landing into the islamabad airport it lost contact with the control room and basically found itself in a very mountainous region, very close to islamabad. you can see it as very mountainous region. what we do know is that weather played some role in this crash. we're being told that it was raining at the time.
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again, at this hour, the death toll continues to change. the very latest has been ten people are dead, three wounded. as you can imagine right now, in this country, in this area, people are grieving, not knowing much, not being able to get much information. >> it's very early in this -- obviously it's going to be a growing tragedy throughout the day, apparently according to the latest reports we're getting, people are in the airport screening the tvs, waiting for more news about this. as you can imagine, a frightening scene out there. frantic hours for those folks ahead of them throughout the day. getting reports that bodies are literally everywhere. some are being helicoptered out. reports the military are sending personnel in, troops and helicopters to that area, as well as rescue, if there is rescue to be done, it's under way at this hour as people sort throug thege a rnaat cthege a >> earlier today we did hav chance to speak with a producer from abc news. again he basically told us this area heres plrash haps1 o
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he told us this route from he t, iery this route from flight. it took off at about 7:45 a their time. like we said, this crash happened just before they were set to land at islamabad national airport. i mentioned the notion of weather and what role it played in this accident. it's worthy of noting there had been heavy monsoon rains in the area for at least a couple of days. and so what we do know is as they were making that initial conversation with the control tower, basically trying to get more information about where to land, somehow that communication was cut off and essentially these pilots may or may not have been flying without any guidance. >> according to a passenger now in the airport in islamabad saying he's actually not surprised this tragedy happened, he said it was simply the weather was too rough to fly. obviously weather did play a huge role in this, at least that's the preliminary report coming out. 152 people were on plane, simber passengers, and obviously there
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are many confirmed dead at this point. n n n n n n n n n n n n n
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day 100 of the gulf oil disaster. the lingering frustrations and sweeping changes at bp. then, defensive democrats. >> we have to take a different approach here. >> how leaked war secrets led to a bitter battle on capitol hill. and, sleep secrets. our polkameister gets expert advice on insomnia. it's wednesday, july 28th. >> from abc news, this is "world news now." >> good morning. i'm vinita nair. >> i'm rob nelson. we begin with breaking news this wednesday morning. authorities say that a passenger plane crashed into the hills above islamabad. several fatalities are reported
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and rescue crews are having difficulty reaching the crash site, which is in a mountainous area. >> 152 passengers and the crew were on board. the airbus 320 jet crashed as it was approaching islamabad's airport after a flight from karachi. the initial reports are that it lost contact with the control tower. the plane crashed in rainy weather and wet conditions are making the rescue effort very difficult. we'll continue to follow the story. in other news now, it has been 100 days since the nation's worst environmental disaster began to unfold and the new head of bp is hoping now to turn the page. >> but the oil company faces a number of major challenges, including criminal investigations and mounting lawsuits. diana alvear is joining us from buras, louisiana. diana? >> reporter: vinita and rob, good morning. today marks the 100th day since the initial explosion. but the new man in charge of bp is wasting no time in laying out his plan of attack.
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>> we clean up the beaches, we restore the gulf. we'll be doing that for a long time. and that is my number one focus. >> reporter: bob dudley says he is committed to managing the crisis he inherited. now that the damaged well is close to being completely sealed the incoming ceo of bp is facing an increasingly tough task. finding the 180 million barrels of oil that have gushed into the gulf. aerial views of the spill zone reveal little oil on the surface. the vast majority of it has sunk. >> there's a lot of dispersed oil in the water and that stuff could end up in the food web. >> reporter: ask the men who fish these waters and they'll show you why they believe fishing bans should be lifted. no visible oil in these oysters. >> we have to be sure when we put these out there that they're safe for the consumer. >> reporter: the oil has kept fishermen and others who depend on the gulf to make a living no way to do so. on capitol hill, the man in charge of handling claims promised to speed up the process. >> i am working as fast as i
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can, as diligently as i can, full-time, to get the gulf coast claims facility up and running, to get it funded, so that these emergency claims can be made as soon as possible. >> reporter: once again, the white house promised bp will pick up the tab. >> american taxpayers will not be responsible for any costs related to the spill. >> reporter: and oil has begun to leak back into the gulf again. this after a tow boat ran into a wellhead near the spill zone. vinita, rob? >> thanks, diana. the pentagon has now identified the sailor who is believed to be a hostage of the taliban in afghanistan. petty officer jarod newlove, 25 years old, from renton, washington. the taliban claims newlove is held in a safe place. newlove and another sailor, justin mcneley, are believed to have come under attack in a taliban-held area on friday. mcneley was killed. political news now. many democrats are in revolt against president obama over the war in afghanistan. a significant number of them
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voted no to his latest war funding request. >> it follows that huge leak of secret military documents on the war. t.j. winick joins us with the latest from washington this morning. hi, t.j. >> reporter: good morning, rob and vinita. abc news has learned the department of justice is offering its assistance to the department of defense in prosecuting the leak case. president obama spoke publicly for the first time about the biggest intelligence leak in u.s. history. those 92,000 classified reports concerning the afghan war. >> while i'm concerned about the disclosure of sensitive information from the battlefield that could po operations, the fact is these documents don't reveal any issues that haven't already informed our public debate on afghanistan. >> reporter: the documents posted on the whistleblower website wikileaks has details about missions gone horribly wrong, civilian deaths, and
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being double-crossed by the isi, the intelligence service of u.s. ally pakistan, who was fed the information from a source believed to be this man, army specialist brad manning, now behind bars in kuwait, accused of document theft. >> i really am appalled by the leak, condemn the leak, and i believe that there is potential there to put american lives at risk. >> reporter: it was with these new revelations that the house passed a $33 billion bill to pay for the wars in afghanistan and iraq and debated a measure to remove u.s. troops from pakistan. >> we have to take a different approach here. >> we cannot see these other entities within the isi empowered without having civilian oversight. >> reporter: an organization that represents conscientious objectors and military deserters has set up a legal defense fund to assist private manning. rob and vinita? a suspected serial killer was indicted for the murders of a mother and daughter last year. police say former u.p.s. worker jason thomas scott is linked to at least one other
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mother-daughter killing. the killings took place in the washington, d.c. area. now investigators suspect scott is responsible for other unsolved crimes elsewhere. investigators have doubled the reward in the case of kyron horman. oregon police are now offering $50,000 for information leading to the whereabouts of the 7-year-old. he's been missing since june 4th. a grand jury is hearing testimony in the case. kyron's mother also made a plea for his safe return. >> we love you, kyron. never give up hope. we are all coming to get you, to bring you home. >> we believe that kyron's disappearance involves criminal behavior, because his parents have been deprived of their son for 53 days. >> the investigation has centered around kyron's stepmother, terri horman. a close friend of hers has been called to testify before that grand jury. a fast-moving brush fire is burning out of control this morning. it is spreading across a remote area of the mojave desert 70 miles north of l.a.
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flames have charred hundreds of acres. as many as 40 homes have been destroyed. dozens more are threatened and evacuations are under way. firefighters are not close to containing the flames and they are battling windy conditions. a severe storm that tore across south dakota may have left a tiny town with big bragging rights. as hail smashed through roofs and windshields in the town of vivian last friday, one huge hailstone may have shattered a world record. the huge chunk of ice weighs almost two pounds. it's 8 inches in diameter and nearly 19 inches around. the record still has to be confirmed by national weather experts. look at that. now here's a look at your wednesday weather. severe storms from the midwest to the northeast. gusty winds, large hail and flash flooding in des moines, chicago, detroit, and western new york. thunderstorms in the southeast, mississippi valley, over to texas. heavy rain in the northern and central rockies.
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>> upper 90s in boise and salt lake city. 80s in fargo, omaha, and the twin cities. boston hits 94. new york 89. and atlanta 92. okay, rob, we have to go on a field trip. >> another one. >> yes. this is on the list. lady luck is apparently hanging out in an upstate new york grocery store. >> get this. etta vier just won a million bucks. she purchased her lottery ticket at the same syracuse store where a $26 million ticket was bought less than a month ago. etta, who is 82 years old, says she just happened to be at the store when the earlier winners were getting their check. >> and their luck must have rubbed off on etta. she is the first winner of the state's newest instant millionaire game. a retired teacher, she says she plans to use some of the money to start a scholarship fund. nice lady. >> a good cause. good for her. we'll be back with more world news right after this. if you fight to sleep in the middle of the night,
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we are following a developing news story this morning. a plane carrying 152 passengers has crashed in the mountainous regions of islamabad, pakistan. as you can see, smoke is still billowing into the air. what we do know, it was an air blue flight going from karachi to islamabad. again, 152 people on board. this is what we can show you now. again, a developing and breaking news story at this hour. >> certainly stick with abc, we'll bring you the latest details on that tragedy as they become available. good morning, everybody, welcome back. cleanup crews in michigan are trying to contain 800,000 gallons of oil now leaking into the kalamazoo river. >> that's after a pipeline broke and posed an environmental threat there. here now is "american landscape" coverage from wzzm in grand rapids. >> governor jennifer granholm
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has declared a state of disaster. and says the response to the oil spill on the kalamazoo river is "anemic" and much more must be done quickly. >> more than 800,000 gallons of crude leaked into a river tributary from an underground pipeline near marshall and it is moving quickly downstream. >> phil dawson is live in battle creek with big story coverage of the governor's response to the oil spill. >> reporter: the governor spoke here at what they're calling the emergency command center after flying over the kalamazoo river in a helicopter. she says the spill is now 12 miles long and in several vulnerable spots on the river there is no equipment, no effort to capture and clean up the oil. the governor says the stakes are enormous. keeping the oil from reaching lake michigan. >> the last thing any of us want to see is a smaller version of what has happened in the gulf. we have got to stop the spread of the crude right now. >> reporter: a leak in a pipeline owned by enbridge energy partners, carrying crude
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from canadian oil fields to midwest refineries, spilled thousands of gallons from a creek leading into the kalamazoo river. >> i believe around 840,000 gallons. >> reporter: the oil has traveled miles down the river and now enbridge and government agencies are scrambling to clean up the mess. >> this is our responsibility, it's our mess, we're going to clean it up. >> i'm a layperson but from my perspective the response has been anemic. they need to have more. there's miles with nothing. >> reporter: at ten locations on the river, enbridge is trying to capture and suck up the oil. at pristine morrow lake they're taking a last stand, trying to channel any oil that makes it this far into ocean booms. >> we hope it will not reach lake morrow. >> it's closer to morrow lake than previously reported. if we do not get containment near morrow lake, then there
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will be far worse consequences. >> reporter: enbridge estimates 840,000 gallons of oil spilled into the river. other estimates are higher. >> governor, do you trust this company? >> i'll say this, i have great knowledge that companies will do what they can to protect their reputation, their interests, and their shareholders. >> it will be months before total cleanup but we are absolutely going to do that. >> president obama is pledging a fast response to requests for help with the oil spill. here's what the kalamazoo river looks like from above. you can see the dark oil coating the top of the river. the oil spill dumped from 800,000 to some estimates of 1 million gallons of oil into the waters in calhoun county. the company that runs the pipeline, enbridge, says they first found out ab problem because of a read hundreds of miles away. >> our control center located up in edmonton noticed a drop in
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pressure on our line 6b. they contacted our local pipeline maintenance crew and asked them to do a visual inspection of the line to find out what was going on. upon that visual inspection, they noticed that there was oil released. >> according to enbridge, the line was shut down immediately after crews saw oil. isolation valves are on either side of where that leak actually occurred. the severe storms that hit west michigan last week are now playing a role in how quickly the oil could reach lake michigan. wzzm 13 joins us from the weather center with a look at where the oil is going. >> the national weather service says it could be three to four days before the oil gets to the lake. the kalamazoo river is moving quickly. you can easily see those oil slicks. they are heading west toward lake michigan. booms placed in the river are catching some oil but much of it is getting through. the national weather service says because of thunderstorms last week, river levels are higher than normal.
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so there are currently flood advisories and more water means the flow is faster. >> the national transportation safety board is getting involved in the calhoun county oil spill. the agency is spending three pipeline investigators to the source of the leak in marshall. another investigator will go to enbridge's pipeline control center in edmonton, alberta,
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this is news for all you insomniacs. we assume there's a lot watching at this hour. we're going to introduce you to a fourth-generation insomniac who went searching for the cure for her sleep disorder. >> patricia morrisroe is the author of the book fittingly entitled "wide awake," something we know very well. our barry mitchell set down his accordion to get some advice on sleep. >> from the city that never sleeps, the journalist that never sleeps. patricia morrisroe, author of "wide awake." a memoir of insomnia. tell us some of the stranger places your research took you. >> i went to the ice hotel beyond the arctic circle. where i tried to sleep in the hotel made completely of ice and then went to interview a reindeer herder about sleeping patterns there.
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and learned that sleep is not, you know, the idea of just getting into bed and sleeping for eight hours, is not necessarily the norm. >> your research shows that sleep in america is big business. over a $20 billion industry. pills, mattresses. >> but for all the money we're spending, we're sleeping -- we seem to be sleeping less than we've ever slept before. or that's what we're being told. >> you mention in your book sleeping pills really only help you maybe sleep an extra 11 minutes a night. >> yeah, according to a 2007 study by the national institutes of health. in addition, they interfere with memory formation. so you may think you're sleeping when you may not be. >> what you need is a bed that will support and mold to you and hug you and relax you. will it cure insomnia? no. it will just make you as comfortable as you can possibly be and allow you to get the most restful quality per hour a night sleep you could possibly get. >> after all is said and done
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how did you learn to manage your insomnia? >> i walked around the corner and took a meditation course. and i found that doing the breathing really helped. ♪ >> soooo -- aaahhh -- >> our thanks to long's bedding on west 72nd street. the main reason people can't sleep at night? >> pillow fight! >> our new reporter. >> my biggest fear is that we are the cure for some people's insomnia, that we put them to sleep. >> we hope not. >> never the goal. morrisroe, she's an insomniac that has never seen ou n honking.
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rushing real liquid relief to ease you to sleep fast. for nighttime pain, make advil pm your #1 choice. >> never the goal. welcome back, everybody. finally this half hour, the story of a young woman who gave up a romance and changed her life to save lives. >> she is helping strangers thousands of miles away from her hometown of oregon. deborah roberts reports. >> reporter: lisa shannon is running and doesn't plan to stop. a middle class woman from portland, oregon, she looked up one day and saw a tv program on the war in congo. the faces were strangers. but lisa was shaken to the core. >> i was shocked. i couldn't believe that the deadliest war since world war ii was going on and i had never
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even heard of it. >> reporter: hundreds of thousands of women and children raped, tortured, killed. >> there was one woman's story in particular that really struck me. she was told, you're like an animal. even if i killed you, you would not be missed. so i felt like i needed to find some simple way to just send the opposite message. >> reporter: so lisa organized run for congo women, raising thousands for her african sisters, for job training and education. in 2007, she went to meet them. >> oh my god! >> reporter: and discovered how much it meant that someone cared. >> they would carry around the letters that we had sent them like it was their most prized possession. >> reporter: one was this mother of five. >> jenna rose, my sister whose village was attacked, her husband was killed in front of her, her child was killed, and
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they cut off her leg. she has a prosthetic leg now. >> reporter: suddenly lisa's priorities had changed. you walked away from your business and your fiance for the women of the congo. >> absolutely. i don't have a fiance but i have more than 1,000 women in congo who consider me their sister and i consider them my sister. >> reporter: soon there were more sisters all over the world joining lisa's run. from snowy central park to her first run in congo with the survivors themselves. >> i was running next to jenna rosen. after everything a militia had taken from her, she showed up in a red suit and pearls. >> reporter: so far, lisa's raised more than $700,000. and she's just written a book about her journey, which has brought hope to some 35,000 women in congo determined to rebuild their shattered lives. deborah roberts, abc news, new york. >> never doubt that one person really can make a difference. that's incredible, that level of selflessness. >> the nice thing about this
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also that is these running groups are really pickin
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