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tv   ABC World News Now  ABC  January 26, 2011 1:05am-4:00am PST

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my wife and i want to lowe our cholesterol, but finding healthy food that tastes good is torturous. your father is suffering. [ male announc ] honey nut cheerios tastes great and can help lower cholesterol. >> jimmy: i want to thank anthony hopkins and hailee steinfeld. apologize to matt damon, we ran out of time. "history from below" is their cd out now. playing us off the air with the song "bushwick blues," once again, delta spirit. good night! ♪ ♪ hold on to my hand
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pink. high school basketball fans in utah are crying foul after a trouncing that left one team more than 100 points in the dust. >> brutal. christian heritage high actually apologized for defeating west ridge academy, get this, final score, 108-3. but the coach of the winning team said it wasn't about bad sportsmanship. he just didn't want to insult the competition by slowing the ball down. >> yeah, right. he was probably like, slam on them. dunk on those girls. the losing team's coach said apology accepted. no hard feelings. so much for telling kids, give it your all. >> life can be brutal. we all have to grow up. >> 100 points. >> they'll get them next season,
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or ten years later. we'll be right back with more after this. 0 point. >> you'll get them next season. if your racing thoughts keep you awake...
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ask your doctor if lunesta is right for you. get lunesta for a $0 co-pay at lunesta.com. sleep well, on the wings of lunesta. welcome back, everybody. now we turn to anger over the happy meal. it's one of the longest running menu items at mcdonald's. >> one mother, though, is suing the burger chain over how it markets to kids. union i ♪ happy mcdonald's coming >> reporter: for three decades kids had a meal they could call their own at mcdonald's -- the happy meal. and what makes it, oh, so happy is what comes with those chicken mcnuggets and french fries -- a prize, a gift from ronald mcdonald himself. >> here i am. >> reporter: the toy has transformed with the times.
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it's an avalanche of colorful characters from every corner of childhood. mcdonald's puts a lot of time and money into those little pieces of plastic. everything from graphic artists to safety tests. they invest millions in marketing the trinkets. as a result, kids like this 6-year-old find them irresistible. >> well, this one, it has a mirror. >> reporter: but her mom says those toys draw her kids to unhealthy foods. >> they see commercials that say, oh, you know, there's these toys, they come with the happy meals. we have eight of them. so, even for my 6-year-old, the question is, will, can we go every week until we get them all? of course my answer is no. that's when the battle ensues. >> reporter: so she's suing mcdonald's. her ultimatum to the golden arches, make the meals healthier or stop including the toys. monet is the first mother to take this kind of drastic
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action, but her efforts are part of a larger movement. city of san francisco recently passed a law requiring meals with toys to meet certain nutritional standards. effectively, banning happy meals. the center for science and the public interest, the so-called food police, is backing monet's lawsuit. >> they dangle these little toys in front of little kids to get them to pester their parents to take them to mcdonald's. it's a trick that works. >> reporter: mcdonald's says the lawsuit may make for good headlines but not common sense. >> taking away the toy, we all know, will not have any impact on children's well-being or childhood obesity. >> reporter: opponents say mcdonald's is incentivizing unhealthy decisions. why not pair a toy with a salad? >> first and foremost, i disagree with the premise. there's nothing wrong with the toy. absolutely nothing with the food.
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i don't think there's anything wrong with pairing the toy with the food. our happy meals are healthy. the calorie ranges anywhere from 380 calories up to 700 calories. >> reporter: the idea that 700 calories for a 5-year-old is a healthy meal, i mean, that is debatable. >> if you go to the usda and look at the food pyramid, they will tell you that what a child needs changes based on whether that child is sedentary or whether that child is very active. so, the range of options gives the parents the choice. so, it's not mcdonald's place to tell a parent, here's what you can serve to your child. >> reporter: bill whitman points out that customers can buy the toys without the food. and to many customers -- >> did you get a toy? >> reporter: -- the toy defines the meal. would you still like the happy meal if there were no toys in it? >> no. >> reporter: professor daniel cook studies the effect of advertising on kids.
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he points out that little piece of plastic can be pretty powerful. >> the toy is so powerful and strong because it's sort of an emblem or icon for a child. what the toy also does is it keeps the meal current. it's the same fries and the same coke, but what happens with the toy is that it keeps the children coming back. >> reporter: the question is, can there be a happy meal that makes everyone happy? union i go >> well, it may sound like drastic action mom is taking but with you think we have the fattest kids in the world, nearly a third are considered overweight or obese, it's an epidemic. it's scary. >> i don't think it comes as a surprise to any parent, but american kids are also the most marketed. an average child sees 20 to 30,000 commercials, which is unbelievable considering. there's so much emphasis on placement of items in a aisle in a supermarket, what they can grab at, what they can't. coming up next, thousands of you have become our friends on facebook. and for all of you who have not
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friended us yet, we'll show you out on what you're missing. ccccc
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welcome back, everybody. we're up to almost 26,000 friends on facebook. if you're not one of them, you're missing out on a lot of good stuff. our producer is the man behind the curtain, keeping you up to date during the day and posting behind the scenes material from our show. he's joining us with some highlights from our big birthday week. thank you, peter. folks know, this is your baby. you started this way back when. >> this was, i want to say, late september of 2009. ever since then it's just skyrocketed to thousands and thousands of fans. and it's been a little project of mine, among all the other duties that i do over -- on my shift, so. >> you remember when there were zero fans. now there's 26,000. you've seen that explode, which is cool. >> yes.
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it definitely was out of a growing demand for digital content, videos and pictures, and really the behind the scenes footage we love to -- >> yes. speaking of, we have a little beef with you because you tend to put some things on there that are a little embarrassing of rob and i. you haven't been on our page, we have a lot of behind the scene stuff. people can log on that you find that people would laugh at us. >> you'll find slide shows. if i have time, you'll find forecasts from accuweather, if i can do that. >> all things from "the skinny," the papers, its all on there. >> everything you want to know will be up there about the show. >> very cool. actually, what we wanted to start about what's hot on facebook amongst our fans, what people are talking about. you picked out three things in the last couple of weeks. >> i wanted to bring up that rat that was loose in the new york city subway car. i'm sure you remember. cheri wrote into our page and i'm sure a lot of people would agree she's saying, i'm willing to bet that is someone's pet looking for its owner. poor little cutie.
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they aren't disgusting at all. >> okay, cheri. >> you see this video and you definitely kind of -- >> cringe again? >> cringe again. >> that video is so freaky. >> yeah. >> cheri liked the rat. we also -- a big story, too, was oprah winfrey. >> that's right. you remember this story. oprah revealing she had the half-sister. a lot of people chimed in on this one. one of the good comments from shirley. she said, it's a miracle for both oprah and her sister. my sister is one of the greatest gifts i have ever had. and i love her more every day. a lot of people like that story. >> comments flooded in. >> and people really liked the behind the scenes look we showed yesterday. and a woman, dina, wrote in with an interesting comment about how we get ready for our work day. she said something funny. one of the best new shows on tv. i love the mix of news and comedy. i'm beginning to think i wake up just for you guys. >> robin wrote in saying, congrats on 19 years. more than most marriages. >> sad but true.
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peter, do you a great job maintaining that page. folks, keep writing in. friend us on facebook.
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>> announcer: "world news now" delivers your "morning papers." >> well, this first paper comes to us from buffalo. if you're eating breakfast, now is the time to stop. >> uh-oh. we've been warned. >> it's not nice. there's a five-block radius in this neighborhood called snyder. all the residents started to notice something brown and yellow when it comes to their icicles. take a look. you'll see one of them. this is what it looked like outside the house where the gutter was. first they thought, that color seems a little odd. then they started to notice a smell. what they think is going on is basically that an airplane is discharging the rest room tank midflight. >> oh, no. >> because all of the houses in this five-block radius have the same ice. they're saying, as it thaws, the smell becomes more potent. inspectors have taken the
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samples. they took them a long time ago when this first started popping up. they said they found no evidence it was from warm-blooded animals, that the matter was that. but these residents are saying, if you smelled it yourself, you would know it's not fuel or anything else. imagine waking up to that. >> have you ever been in a plane and wondered where all that goes or whose job -- >> try not to think about that. >> you don't try to think about it? >> no. try to get out as fast as i can. do my business and go. >> that's probably best. here's another stomach-churning story here. apparently there's -- this is from "the telegraph" and they're trying to save money, reduce heating costs. so the sports center is using what to heat their pool? the heat from the neighboring crematorium. apparently the heat from the crematorium is lost into the atmosphere. they're like, wait, let's not waste that heat. the sports center wants to set up something to that lost heat now heats the swimming pool next door at this sports center,
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saving almost 15,000 pound a year in heating costs. a guy said, i don't know how people feel about being in the pool heated by the death of a loved one. if you're in that sports center -- >> >> at least it's environmentally friendly, for that. >> good energy, right. if you live in new york then you certainly know who liz cho is. rob knows who she is. let us show you a quick picture. she's undoubtedly a beauty. she used to anchor this show. rob, when we asked him who is one of his sexiest news anchor, he mentioned liz cho. turns out there's actually a study about sexy news anchors. the sexier the female, more likely men are to watch. the less likely they are to remember what the woman is actually saying. >> i'm shocked. >> they basically took a sexy woman and sort of a dowdy woman and they played a clip of the two of them reading the same news. gave guys a bunch of questions after. lo and behold, all of them said, i loved watching that hot one. had no idea what she was sayiwoo
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hey, your chicken odles ringing. ring ring. progresso. hi, may i speak to my oggy please? thank you. i'm sorry, who? my grandma. this is obviously her chicken noodle soup. only hers tastes like this. just put my oggy on the phone. thanks so much. hold one moment please. another person calling for her grandmother. she thinks it's her soup huh? i'm told she's in the garden picking herbs. she is so cute. okay well i'll hold. she's holding. wha? she's holding. tell her its karen. (announcer) progresso. you gotta taste this soup.
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today on "world news now" -- the state of our union. >> what president obama said to the country last night and where we go from here. it's wednesday, january 26th. good morning, and thanks for being with us on this wednesday. i'm vinita nair. >> and i'm rob nelson. interesting speech last night. very different atmosphere there in washington in light of the tucson shootings and the midterm elections. we'll break down the president's speech last night, find out more about what he said and like we said, where we go from here. i'm rob nelson. thanks for being with us again. >> that's right. as we've been talking about, it was the state of the union. we'll be discussing that. the 216th time the president has given a congressional state of the union. we also want to talk about the weather. why is it so cold? we've all been asking the same
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question as you. we probably don't have to tell you this. it was one of the nastiest winters on record and we still have two cringe-worthy months left to go. turns out there's a reason for the arctic. it's not some carmic retribution. sam champion will tell us what it is. >> we would like to know the secret to happiness and we have an interesting tidbit. there's a movement going on in the other part of the world about what makes us happy. something you do actually could make you a little bit happier. a simple little task but could go a long way in lifting your spirit. we'll tell about you that, too. >> i tried this one, so i can speak for it. it works well. but we begin this morning, of course, with the state of the union address. the state of the economy was the president's chief focus but he did not propose the usual laundry list of new programs. >> instead, he urged americans to out-innovate and out-educate the rest of the world as a way of winning the future. john hendren joins us now from washington with the latest. hi, john. >> reporter: good morning. that's right, as the president -- as the president gave his speech, republicans and democrats made a unique show of bipartisanship.
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he took advantage of that to tell them to unite and get the united states competing against its economic rivals in the rest of the world. in a chamber made somber by the absence of one member, the president acknowledged a few reality. >> governing will now be a shared responsibility between parties. >> reporter: divided government. >> we will move forward together or not at all. >> reporter: his second state of the union address focused on the number one issue on most americans minds, the economy. >> at stake is whether new jobs and industries take root in this country or somewhere else. that's the project the american people want us to work on together. >> reporter: it was a one-of-a-kind state of the union. there was the empty chair for arizona congresswoman gabrielle giffords, now recovering from a gunman's bullet. husband mark kelly watching the speech at her side. >> what comes of this moment will be determined not by whether we can sit together tonight but whether we can work together tomorrow. >> reporter: there was the spirit of unity that shooting brought on, prompting many
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republicans and democrats to sit side by side in pairs. paul ryan gave the official republican response. >> americans are skeptical of both political parties, and that skepticism is justified, especially when it comes to spending. >> reporter: then in another first there was another sharper-tongued response from tea party republicans. >> deficits were unacceptably high under president bush, but they exploded under president obama's direction. >> reporter: a sure sign that with the new civility will come new conflict. the president outlined a sweeping new agenda, reorganizing the federal government, spending more money on research and transportation, all the while cutting corporate income taxes and freezing some spending. the big challenge now, getting all those democrats and republicans who sat side by side to pass it. rob and vinita? >> and, john, in light of the mixed seating that we heard about and the tucson tragedy, what was the atmosphere like in that chamber last night during the address? >> reporter: it was something
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like i've never seen before, having watched many of these things. first of all, you had the date night where you had republicans and democrats sitting side by side. that made it unusual because you no longer had one side rising to applaud the president as the rest sat on their hands. you also had no surprises like you had last year. you didn't have a congressman yelling out, you lie, like last year, or supreme court members saying, not true, in the audience as the president spoke. it was very much to form. no huge surprises tonight, rob and vinita. >> well, john, i think it goes without saying we're both a l little envious to hear that live. a lot of people waiting since 8:30 to get a seat by the aisle. john hendren reporting from capitol hill this morning, thank you. well, congresswoman gabrielle giffords' family released this photo showing her watching the president's speech with her husband at her side. and shortly after the hospital announced great news. giffords' condition has been upgraded from serious to good. and she will now leave the hospital for the rehab center later this morning. we'll get all the details at a news conference scheduled for this afternoon.
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>> that amazing recovery continues. whether the president's or republicans' approach to the economy ultimately prevails, there are promising signs that the recovery is picking up some steam. >> unemployment is still way too high, but companies may finally be ready to hire. t.j. winick joins us now with the news and the numbers. >> reporter: good morning, rob and vinita. the u.s. labor department reports that the unemployment rate rose in 20 states last month and fell in 15. still, there are several indicators that suggest the u.s. economy is headed in the right direction. during the darkest days of gm's bankruptcy, there was talk this assembly plant in flint, michigan, would be closed. now they're adding a third shift and 750 workers. >> every autoworker job contributes to nine other jobs all across the united states. and no automaker does more than general motors for our country and our community. >> reporter: most economic analysts will tell you it's part of an encouraging trend, that
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hiring should improve over the next six months. >> i think the most important reason for optimism is that businesses are very profitable. >> reporter: in fact, corporate profits are at prerecession levels. google plans to hire more than 6,200 workers this year. and consumer confidence is up with major stock market indexes climbing to their highest levels since 2008. still, there are other factors working against a recovery. the case-shiller home price index showed that housing prices fell in november, down over 1% from october. >> year over year we've actually seen prices go down 1.6% in the 20 largest cities in the country. it is definitely a move in the wrong direction for the housing market. >> reporter: another anchor on the economy, state and local governments. there's talk of finding ways to allow states to declare bankruptcy and avoid paying pensions of former workers. one industry doing particularly well -- the airlines. the eight largest u.s. carriers are forecast to make over $5 billion this year.
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that would be their best numbers in a decade. rob and vinita? >> thanks, t.j. in other news, a string of dangerous storms left behind some pretty serious damage in central florida. the city of groveland near orlando appeared to be the worst hit. a suspected tornado damaged up to 20 homes there. and on the coast in pinellas county, wind gusts up to 60 miles an hour hit a gas station, briefly trapping a driver there. well, that same system is bringing snow up the eastern seaboard this morning. salt and sand trucks hit the streets of memphis where the city is expected to pick up about 3 inches by morning. the northeast, well, we'll get hit later today. the extreme cold weather sitting over much of the nation. sam champion says there's a reason it's colder than usual. >> reporter: three-quarters of the united states is frigid cold while the northern reaches of canada and greenland are experiencing temperatures 15 to 20 degrees above normal. scientists say it's the arctic air normally locked in place that's seeping down into america.
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>> it's a little bit like opening the refrigerator and the cold air comes out and moves into the rest of the room. >> reporter: it may have to do with the melting of the arctic ice sheets. the magenta line shows here where the ice was in the '70s. the white area, where the ice is now. it's the jet stream that acts as a border between the arctic air and the rest of the world. normally keeping the frigid air trapped near the north pole. some studies now suggest that melting arctic sea ice is making cold zones warmer, weakening the jet stream's grip, allowing colder air to spill down south. >> a recent hypothesis is that this heat coming out of the ocean is causing high pressure over the arctic during the winter, and that's what might be forcing that cold air down to the south. >> reporter: the result, scenes like these. five powerful winter storms in the eastern u.s. since december. that cold air colliding with warmer air, producing blizzards in the northeast, ice in normally mild areas like atlanta, and then there's the cold.
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temperatures since december 1st, 2010 have averaged below normal from boston to new york city to chicago and minneapolis. but even in new orleans, atlanta and miami. and there may be very little good weather news to look forward to. we're already looking into the possibility that these arctic intrusions may combine with other weather systems and make it an even tougher spring storm season, as well. sam champion, abc news. >> the news does not get any better, man. give us a break, mother nature, man. here's a look at your wednesday weather. several inches of snow in the morning hours across tennessee, northern alabama and mississippi. light afternoon rain and snow from washington, d.c. to boston, changing to heavy snow by later tonight. snow showers from fargo to northern minnesota. >> 20s in the twin cities, omaha and chicago. 38 here in new york. 45 in atlanta, and just shy of 80 in miami. seattle will get up to 52 degrees. phoenix is 69 degrees. well, you probably know this by now, of course, but this is a
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pretty special time for us here at "world news now." we have just turned 19 years old. we can almost drink. >> our big celebration is lasting all week long, including this entirely new set, and we have been enjoying birthday wishes from those who once kept you company in the middle of the night. so this morning heather cabot heads down memory lane. >> happy birthday, "world news now." my favorite memory was ron corning and i were anchoring the show, and i was probably about six or seven months pregnant and hugely uncomfortable and hormonal. and ron made, you know, sort of an off-color remark about something. i don't even remember what it was. he made fun of something i said, and i could not stop laughing. and it was -- it was such a moment. >> and you saw that yahoo! sign behind her, she's actually the lifestyle editor at yahoo! you may see her on the show on fridays. she's still with us, which is cool. >> we'll be back with more "world news now."
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in the wake of monday's suicide bombing at moscow's
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busiest airport, a question, can a similar attack be stopped here in the u.s.? >> they're using a program, screening passengers by observation technique. as brian ross reports, it's a program, though, that has its critics. >> reporter: blending into the crowds of more than 160 airports across the country, teams of what are called behavior detection officers patrol the areas outside of security. >> they are looking for suspicious behavior that might be indicative of terrorist intent. >> the eyebrows are pulled down and together in both of these angry expressions. >> reporter: it's an expensive controversial program in which the officers are trained over four days with videos like this one. >> probably saying something quite unpleasant on the left. >> reporter: and this series of photos to spot tiny facial microexpressions that supposedly show hidden emotions and terrorist intent according to tsa consultant dr. paul ekman. >> if you have one of those emotions, you're going to -- it's going to appear in your
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face, and if you're trying to conceal it, it may well leak out in a microexpression. >> reporter: 3,000 behavior detection officers have been trained in dr. ekman's methods. >> he's starting to really sweat now. >> reporter: at a cost of $200 million a year. even though critics say there's no scientific evidence of its reliability for use in counterterrorism. >> the simple answer is, no, there is no scientific support for this system as of now. >> reporter: in fact, a report last year by the general accountability office found that at least 17 people later arrested for terrorism, including the times square bomber, faisal shahzad, went through airports with the trained screeners and were never detected. >> the united states is spending incredible amounts of money on tsa personnel and a s.p.o.t. program that's supposed to detect bad behavior, and i don't think we're capable of detecting what took place in moscow. >> reporter: the tsa continues
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to defend dr. ekman and its s.p.o.t. program saying the method has led to more than 1,700 arrests, but of those 1,700, not a single one, other than one man found with some empty fuel tanks, has been charged with anything remotely connected to terrorism. brian ross, abc news, new york. when we return, do you want to be happier? >> of course so. well, it turns out, it may be easier than you think. we'll tell what you some experts are saying when we come back. you're watching "world news now." [ male announcer ] when sean was looking at mba programs, he wanted a curriculum designed to meet market needs, with faculty who brought real-world perspective on where the business world was headed and the practical experience to help him make an impact. my name is sean blankenship, i'm making the electric car more accessible, and i am a phoenix. [ male announcer ] imagine what a business degree can do for you. with six bay area locations, one is closer than you think.
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[ male ♪ nouncer ] imagine what a business degree can do for you. ♪ don't stop what you do ♪ i won't stop loving you ♪ because i love the things you do ♪ ♪ whatever you do, don't stop [ female announcer ] the laughing cow cheese. rich, creamy decadence, but with only 35 calories a wedge, feel free to laugh all you want. ♪ whatever you do, don't stop [ female announcer ] the laughing cow. have you laughed today? now, three delicious new flavors to love. ♪ ♪ don't stop and welcome back, everybody. another word for happy is jolly so it's fitting that we're off to jolly old england for our next story, where, believe it or not, there's a growing happiness movement. >> basically it's an effort to get people happier and healthier. and they say the secret is right there in your desk. david solito of the bbc reports.
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>> we're ready to start. my name is mark, mark williamson. i run an organization called action for happiness. >> reporter: the happiness challenge. we introduced a random group of people to some experts on happiness and -- >> we're going to be asking to try out some simple changes in their lives over the next week that we think could leave them feeling happier and more fulfilled. we shall see. who knows. >> reporter: well, one of those tasks was write a letter, a thank you letter, a letter to someone who really matters in your life. well, everyone did one, but one or two of them, we managed to be there with the camera when they actually took them around and read them out. i'm not going to say a great deal more than this. just watch for yourselves. this is tony and carol. >> probably thinks it's "you've
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been framed" or something. >> welcome. >> so come in. >> reporter: tony runs a butcher shop. >> and it's all around happiness -- >> reporter: carol's a medical secretary and belly dancer. >> this is to my dearest friend pat. >> we talked about people who maybe matter in your life. how would you feel if you were asked if you could write a letter to somebody and that person is you? >> reporter: so why a letter? it's one method of focusing on what we have. gratitude, it's claimed, is good for our well-being. >> to my dear friend and neighbor, pat. this note is to let you know how very happy and grateful i am to have you as a true friend in my life. >> dear max, yes, a letter to my best friend. >> i just knew you and i would be friends. >> oh, say -- >> thank you to you and your husband mel for all the help,
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support, encouragement and friendship have you given to me and my family. >> to simply say, thank you for the many good things you have helped me with. oh, tony. max, you've been an incredible influence on my life. >> i'm just so, so grateful i have you as my neighbor. but you i know, night or day, whatever time -- >> i'm always there for you. now stop crying. stop crying. >> in life you meet sometimes very sincere, genuine, lovely people, and he is way up at the top. >> well, it is quite emotional. i don't think i've ever written a letter like that. but i'm glad i've done it. >> i'm honored. i really am, tony. i shall keep that letter. i'm not going to frame it, but i shall keep it somewhere special. >> reporter: the message, be thankful. a source of happiness? well, it was here. david solleto, bbc news.
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>> from their happiness to actors' happiness. coming up, we'll tell about you the oscar nominations. take a look. >> dear willis. if your racing thoughts keep you awake...
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sleep is here, on the wings of lunesta. and if you wake up often in the middle of the night... rest is here, on the wings of lunesta. lunesta helps you fall asleep and stay asleep, so you can wake up feeling rested. when taking lunesta, don't drive or operate machinery until you feel fully awake. walking, eating, driving, or engaging in other activities while asleep, without remembering it the next day, have been reported. abnormal behaviors may include aggressiveness, agitation, hallucinations or confusion. in depressed patients, worsening of depression, including risk of suicide, may occur. alcohol may increase these risks. allergic reactions, such as tongue or throat swelling, occur rarely and may be fatal. side effects may include unpleasant taste, headache, dizziness and morning drowsiness. ask your doctor if lunesta is right for you. get lunesta for a $0 co-pay at lunesta.com.
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sleep well, on the wings of lunesta. ♪ mark your calendars because hollywood's biggest night is just around the corner. you can catch the oscars on sunday, february 27th right here on abc. >> and yesterday the nominations were announced, and there were some pretty big surprises. with all the details now, we're joined from los angeles by diana alvear. good morning, diana. >> reporter: vinita and rob, it is time to roll out the red carpet. hollywood super bowl is finally here. and this year, it seems members of the academy have gone mad for the monarchy and the millennials. >> i don't know if you heard about this new website i
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launched. >> no. >> reporter: when it comes to best picture, will it be the king of social media or the king that stammered? >> i have a voice! >> reporter: "the king's speech" certainly spoke to the academy. its members crowned it with 12 nominations. >> they're idiots. they've all been knighted. >> makes it official then. >> reporter: "true grit" nabbed ten nominations. boxing dramaer "the fighter" earned seven, including front-runner for best supporting actor christian bale. and not one but two nods for best supporting actress, amy adams and melissa leo. on "good morning america," leo had a message for her real-life counterpart. >> alice, we're going to the oscars! >> reporter: moving on, will "black swan's" natalie portman dance away with best actress or will the third nomination be the charm for annette benning in "the kids are all right"? >> you were really pretty. >> reporter: he didn't win last year, but colin firth's favored to win best actor for
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"the king's speech," so long as he outfriends jesse eisenberg and surprise nominee john hawks for "winter's bone." >> you can hear it all over the city? john who? oh, yeah, he was great in "winter's bone." >> reporter: then the surprising snubs. julianne moore, mark wahlberg in "the fighter" and ryan gosling in "blue valentine." and don't rule out an oscar for oscar host james franco. his role as a hiker faced with a horrible choice in the movie "127 hours" has earned him a best actor nomination. vinita, rob. >> two other snubs too, mila kunis no supporting nod for "black swan.". >> fascinating that they have ten best pick nominees. when you look at that list, it's a practice that they started last year. i didn't remember it from last year. it's a really long list. they say you can immediately tell which are the real top five but to hear ten is a lot. >> "the king's speech" has a lot of momentum. n n n n n n n n n n
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this morning on "world news now," a complete wrap of president obama's state of the union address. >> what the president says he wants to do first and how he plans to do it. it's wednesday, january 26th. good morning, and thanks for being with us on this busy wednesday. i'm vinita nair. >> and i'm rob nelson. the president spoke for one hour and one minute, but it took just about one second for the critics, of course, to start weighing in. we have complete reaction to the state of the union coming up. also, bad traffic. we all love to complain it, but get this, could bad traffic actually be bad for your health? while living in a city with a lot of noisy commuters could increase your risk of stroke. not good news if you live here in new york now, is it? >> that is for sure.
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later in the show today, the woman who stole fashion from the french. how they stormed the runways and in the process changed a little bit of history. very cool story there. >> yes, that's right. but we begin with the president's speech to congress. there were 45 instances of bipartisan applause, which is a record. >> mr. obama laid out a pretty ambitious economic agenda while also calling for some deep cuts in spending, as well. john hendren is joining us now from capitol hill with more details. >> reporter: good morning, rob and vinita. democrats and republicans united in a show of bipartisanship, and president obama asked them to unite, and out-innovate, out-educate and outbuild the rest of the world. >> what comes of this moment will be determined not by whether we can sit together tonight, but whether we can work together tomorrow. >> reporter: it was really a one-of-a-kind state of the union. first of all, there was that empty seat for gabrielle giffords, the congresswoman still recovering in a hospital after being shot in tucson. her husband watched that with her from her hospital bed. then, of course, you had the unusual seating arrangement with
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republicans and democrats, instead of sitting on either side of the aisle, actually sitting side by side, mixing it up a bit. so you no longer had one side rising while the other side sat on its hands. the president focused on the economy, arguing that the united states needed not to compete with itself among political parties but to unite and compete against countries like china around the globe. >> at stake is whether new jobs and industries take root in this country or somewhere else. that's the project the american people want us to work on together. >> reporter: he said, because democrats and republicans were elected now to a mixed congress, we move forward together or not at all. the president outlined a sweeping new agenda, reorganizing the federal government, spending more on education and transportation, all the while freezing some spending and cutting corporate income taxes. the challenge now is getting those democrats and republicans who sat side by side to pass it. rob and vinita? >> now time for the grading. the president is getting fairly
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high marks for both style and substance. >> now the hard part, of course, gets under way. mr. obama now has to sell his ideas to the voters on main street. senior washington reporter rick klein is joining us this morning from capitol hill with more on that part of the story. rick? >> reporter: rob and vinita, a different tone though not a chastened tone. he tried to connect the dots for the american people by bringing a broad vision on board. the challenge now will be to sell that. he hits the road in wisconsin. he has his cabinet fanning out across the country to try to make the case that he understands their problems, that he is hard at work trying to solve the problems of the american people, that he understands that this is a new political environment and also an environment he can understand and that he can tackle for americans. >> our thanks to abc's rick klein on capitol hill. well, just hours after congresswoman gabrielle giffords watched the president's speech with her husband at her bedside, we learned doctors have now upgraded her condition from serious to good. even better, she will be leaving the hospital for the rehab center come morning time. we'll learn more at a news conference in the afternoon.
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the president is also keeping an eye on increasingly violent anti-government protest in egypt. a white house statement late last night urged the authorities to respond peacefully though to those protests. so far, though, two demonstrators and a police officer have been killed. alexander marquardt reports now from cairo. >> reporter: tens of thousands of egyptians have taken to the streets, emboldened and inspired by the recent overthrow of tunisia's president. they have clashed with police, rubber bullets and tear gas have been fired. protesters here on the square in central cairo say they won't leave until their demands are met. their first demand, president mubarak step down. they're also angry about corruption, unemployment, and poverty. >> the president doesn't know about anything what we're doing. everything is corrupted, everything is polluted. we cannot live anymore like this. >> reporter: this protest has been organized largely on facebook and twitter, though down here on the square, there isn't any cell phone coverage so it's impossible to get the word
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out. there's no doubt that tunisia and other protests in the region have given a big jolt to egypt, but it's still too early to tell whether this really is the beginning of a change. alex marquardt, abc news, cairo. chicago politics have taken another strange turn. the illinois supreme court ordered election officials to keep rahm emanuel's name on the ballot for the mayor's race while they decide if he can run. absentee and early voting begin over the next few days. if the supreme court agrees with a lower court that emanuel is out, anyone who has already voted for him will lose their vote. a government investigation has found that the bush administration illegally used federal money to help republican candidates during the 2006 midterm elections. the activity was organized by a special white house office run by karl rove. that violates a law called the hatch amendment. but since the principals have all left office, it is unlikely anyone will be punished. as we all know, we live in a very noisy world, and there's
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proof now it can actually be a health hazard. researchers found chances of having a stroke were higher in people exposed to road traffic noise higher than 60 decibels. that's the equivalent of the sound made by a clothes dryer, even a dishwasher. the higher the noise, the higher the risk. that does not bode well for us here in the big apple, to say the least. well, you have probably never been to a piano bar like this one in biscayne bay. it is a piano on a sand bar, and no one is really sure how it got there. one morning people woke up, it was there. the baby grand weighs at least 650 pounds, enough to survive the tide. local officials say they don't have any reason to move it, and the seagulls actually seem to really like it. >> all right. here's a look at your forecast on this wednesday morning. a snowy morning from northern mississippi to memphis and lexington, kentucky. that snow mixes with light rain as it moves into d.c., philly, new york and beantown. it gets much heavier, though, later on tonight leaving up to 8 inches on the ground by thursday morning. light snow in the upper midwest. >> 27 degrees in fargo.
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and 31 in kansas city. 40s from boise to albuquerque. 54 in sacramento. 30s from boston to baltimore. 50s in dallas and new orleans. talk about some sore losers. a car salesman in the chicago area was literally fired for wearing a packers tie to work the day after green bay beat the bears to get to the big super bowl. >> john stone says the tie was meant to honor his late grandmother who was a big packers fan, but his boss said he didn't want to alienate chicago customers, especially after doing promotions involving the bears. the boss eventually offered stone his job back, but he then said, no. he also has an offer from another dealership. >> good to know folks don't take their sports too seriously. >> one word on that one -- lawsuit. >> yeah, there you go. >> well, we'll be right back. stay with us. i'm sorry, as you know, we're celebrating a milestone this week. it's our 19th birthday here at "world news now." >> some people who have sat in our chairs now over the years are sending us birthday wishes. here's one now from
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our very own juju chang. >> i miss my nates on "world news now." i remember we went to h&h bagels one time. we were doing a series on people who work all night. we decided to go live with night shift workers. we had taste tests of arguably the best bagels in new york and, the lights went out. and i think on the outside, i remained calm, but on the inside, it was sheer pandemonium. >> all right. let's not panic. >> but i think that ultimately, my favorite moment from "world news now" lives on in youtube when anderson cooper and i boarded a tour bus, and, of course, barry mitchell was there with his polka and the fabulous tony orlando sang "tie a yellow ribbon" and i think we all took part. it was just a great example of how whacky and crazy and full of good cheer we always are on "world news now." happy birthday, "world news now." just think, you can serve your country, you could vote, but you still can't drink. >> people keep saying that. it shows you a little bit about
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the media. juju, another one of our alum, going on to do so well. now the anchor at "good morning america." >> in case you are watching, sandy, our director, that bus moment, that's still his favorite moment. we haven't topped that. we'll be right back with more "world news now." hó
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bill's mornings have never been good'er 'cause new gain with freshlock helps keep his stuff smelling more like it's straight from the dryer. the cows aren't going to milk themselves. (sniffing) ♪ heaven new gain with freshlock. sleep is here, on the wings of lunesta. and if you wake up often in the middle of the night... rest is here, on the wings of lunesta. lunesta helps you fall asleep and stay asleep, so you can wake up feeling rested. when taking lunesta, don't drive or operate machinery until you feel fully awake. walking, eating, driving, or engaging in other activities while asleep, without remembering it the next day, have been reported. abnormal behaviors may include aggressiveness, agitation, hallucinations or confusion. in depressed patients, worsening of depression, including risk of suicide, may occur. alcohol may increase these risks.
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allergic reactions, such as tongue or throat swelling, occur rarely and may be fatal. side effects may include unpleasant taste, headache, dizziness and morning drowsiness. ask your doctor if lunesta is right for you. get lunesta for a $0 co-pay at lunesta.com. sleep well, on the wings of lunesta. well, we have already reported on the president's speech last night. but this story is all about what happens before the speech. >> and it has nothing to do with writing it or even practicing it. we're talking about the lawmakers who go out of their way to make the most of it. here's john donvan. >> reporter: think back on that speech, the atmospherics, the familiar faces, the prez and new speaker and secretary of state and the justices and dale
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kildee from michigan. say who? yeah, dale kildee. he looks like this. an 18-term democrat. you remember. >> mr. speaker, the president of the united states. >> reporter: back at the start when the president entered by the center aisle, there he is, dale kildee. let's slow it down now -- oops, in a flash, the president's moved down the aisle. kildee is somewhere back there. but you know, last year, too, this is 2010 now, dale kildee got nearly those same two seconds in the center aisle. and the year before that. and the one before that. and back and back and back and, you know what salon.com says that makes him and a few other house members -- >> the term we came up for for people like this is aisle hogs. >> reporter: aisle hogs, that's not very nice, especially if you're one of the democrats that salon is labeling the top five aisle hogs like, say, dennis kucinich who shows up in the aisle in 2006, 2007, 2009 and 2010. or jesse jackson jr. salon found him in 2004, '06,
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'07 and '08. but once salon reporter steve conracki started spotting patterns -- >> dale, not only is he in year, the exact same spot he is in every year. it did raise an interesting question. in a chamber with this many seats, how do you get those few seats on the center aisle where the spotlight may shine? >> get there early. if you want to get a seat there, you have to get there early. >> reporter: that's right. it is open seating for the state of the union. >> and by early i mean, you know, more than ten hours early. and then ten hours later, when the president finally comes in, maybe you're on tv for three seconds. >> reporter: ten hours for three seconds? what's that calculation? say, new york's eliot engel, another top fiver on salon's list, visible in 2003, '04, '05, '06, '08 and '10. here's what engel was doing at 8:30 this morning. >> he had found the place on the aisle where he wants to be tonight.
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and he's camping out there for the day. this is like people waiting all night to get concert tickets or something. >> reporter: except being in the audience is being in the show, as it was once again for congressman engel. and what about houston's sheila jackson lee? ubiquitous in these moments, including when it was george bush walking down the aisle. not a political friend by any means. look at 2008. >> she greets him by saying, hey brother, and then she tries to say something to him, and it becomes immediately clear that bush has absolutely no interest getting caught in a conversation with her. >> reporter: but somehow it is worth it because -- >> if you're really lucky, if you hit the jackpot, he'll shake your hand, maybe he'll take a joke, maybe you'll say something to him and all your constituents back home, i guess, are going to see you and say, wow, that's my congressman. >> reporter: my congressman? heck, dale kildee after 18 terms has been at it so long he's almost a state institution and who's to say, maybe he's here because he can be, because it's
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an honor and a thrill and has nothing to do with who's watching, as he flashes into frame and once again out. i'm john donvan in washington. >> such an interesting phenomenon. and the guy who wrote the article in salon.com actually said the first time he noticed it was someone from the third district in colorado during the clinton administration. he noticed the guy and thought, gosh, i've seen him before. the irony was he wasn't the same party as president clinton. they just want to be on tv. we know what that's like. >> interesting too tonight, it really it was a subdued crowd from years past, because of the mixed seating, but political theater as always. when we come back, time for your "skinny." time for "the skinny." fdfdfdfdfdfdfdfdfdd
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♪ skinny so skinny welcome back, everybody. this, of course, is going to be all the talk in hollywood, the oscar nominations came out yesterday morning. now starts the big rat race and political campaign, almost for all these actors and actresses. let's run through the big categories here. best picture, actually ten here, which seems like a lot. first year they expanded from
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five to ten. "black swan," "the fighter," "inception," "the kids are all right," "king's speech," "127 hours," "the social network," "toy story 3," "true grit" and "winter's bone," which i hadn't heard of yet but it was apparently acclaimed. but apparently the real rat race is between "king's speech" and the facebook movie for the big prize. we'll see who nabs it. also leading actress, annette benning in "the kids are all right," nicole kidman, natalie portman for "black swan," the favorite, and michele williams "blue valentine." lead actor, jeff bridges in "true grit," jesse eisenberg, "the social network" colin firth "the king's speech" and james franco for "127 hours." coming up february 27th i think is the big date. >> should be interesting if they let james franco introduce james franco. maybe they'll let anne hathaway do that. james franco, a very interesting
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admission from him. he made a sex tape when he was 19 years old and he's talking about it. he's doing a roundtable discussion for "newsweek" with fellow oscar nominees and he basically is being asked a question about how to film a good kiss. of course, if you haven't followed, we just said he's up for nomination in "127 hours." he says something along the lines for anybody that's made a home sex tape what feels best doesn't look best. then he goes on to say, well, i remember when i was 19 doing that and, of course, all the jaws dropped but at least he's the one admitting it. now i'm sure the world will be searching for where this tape is, how to get your hands on it. but he's got one too. he joins the ranks. >> at least we know franco loves the movies. we know that for sure. as always we've seen reports of so many divorces and breakups. two more reports from hollywood. troy aikman, former quarterback for the dallas cowboys, your hometown, he is getting split from his wife after ten years of marriage. they married back in 2000. she was a publicist for the cowboy, rhonda aikman. they have two daughters together. seems like the marriage may have been rocky for a little while now.
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she actually purchased a home close to the family residence back in november. so kind of this has been brewing. and then also actress jaime pressly apparently is having a very rough 2011. she was busted for suspicion of dui and now she's getting split from her hubby less than two years. he's an entertainment lawyer and apparently that marriage is down the tubes, as well. >> that always makes me sad. >> yeah. >> well, you know, the "jersey shore" didn't want the cast of the jersey shore and now italy doesn't want them either. you might have heard about this because it's getting a lot of buzz. apparently, the "jersey shore" cast wants to take them to italy. they're scouting locations. as we speak. they want to do it similar to the way they actually did it in miami to find the rile locale. it's funny, they even say vinny's italian residents are offering to host an authentic dinner for the cast and crew. of course, as you would imagine, one italian-american interest group is speaking out saying, we don't want them in italy. but interestingly enough, the embassy is trying to take some strikes at them saying we're going to block you guys getting visas.
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they're pointing to ronnie because he's facing one count of third degree assaults and they shouldn't be allowed in here. >> americana. third-degree assault.
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watch today on abc news -- president obama heads to wisconsin to visit a renewable energy company while they hope to push competitiveness and job creation. two themes he stressed last night in the state of the union. also, struggling economies and stock markets around the world will be keeping an eye on the world economic forum that gets started today in switzerland. and the east coast is preparing for yet another winter storm. snow is forecast from washington, d.c., to new york city and up to new england where they're expected to get the worst of the storm. well, finally this half hour, what's known in the fashion world as the battle of versailles. it was a landmark show held in france back in 1973 that finally put american designers on the map. >> on one side
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was the long establish ed french designers and on the other, americans with a secret weapon as vicki mabrey reports. >> reporter: you might think this was just a fashion show unless you knew what was at stake. the unavailable french were the kings of fashion. they had no time for american upstarts. the french with their elaborate show and stuffy models were certain a victory. through a series of mishaps, the americans had a bare stage, but they had a secret weapon in the wings. as the music of the love unlimited orchestra began to play, eight african-american girls stepped onto the stage with a head-to-toe fierceness never seen before. >> we were over there to storm the gates. >> i was a part of a fairytale. >> reporter: shocking for the french, show-stopping for the americans. these young women had just put fashion designers like oscar de la renta and halston on the map. >> they start to stomp and they
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started to cheer. they started to throw the programs in the air, and they start saying, bravo, bravo. >> and we came out with all that sass and pizazz and that just floored everybody. >> reporter: that fairy tale night led to more catwalks and fashion spreads and magazine covers. black was beautiful at last. at the metropolitan museum of art this week, the women and men who tasted victory that night reunited for the first time in decades. there was alva and pat and billy. >> billy. >> so wonderful to see you. she was the start of my show. >> reporter: and of course, oscar and his girls. >> it was divine. i was part of a beautiful group. and it was like we planted our flag, the flag of american fashion. >> reporter: it was a night that changed the face and color of fashion the world over forever. vicki mabrey, abc news, new york. >> still looking good all those years later. >> and some of those women are still holding symposiums on why
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there's not enough brlrlrlrlrlrú >>
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this morning on "world news now" -- a look back at the state of the union. the challenges the president says now face the nation. and the republicans' response. it's wednesday, january 26th. and good morning, everybody. i'm rob nelson. >> and i'm vinita nair. of course, we're talking about the state of the union this morning. hard to believe when you look at this by the numbers, in terms of just applause, the president was interrupted 79 times during that speech, 25 standing ovations, but believe it or not, that still does not mean he won over the republicans. we'll tell you exactly what they're saying, the counterpoint to this speech this morning. >> 45 times it was bipartisan
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applause which was a new record. on top of that, google is hiring. do you think you could get a job there? you're not going to believe the tests they make you take when you apply. >> can you google that test? can you google the google test? also this morning, if you've gone to the grocery store any time recently, you've seen those reusable bags. there's something pretty important that you're going to want to know about those bags. they might not be as good for you as you think. so stick around because we want to tell you what's lurking in those bags. and this one is kind of shocking. >> one step forward, two steps back. we begin with the state of the union address last night and the president's call to, quote, win the future. >> president obama used his speech to not only focus on the economy but to urge americans to tap into their creative power. >> for more now we turn to our jake tapper on capitol hill. good morning, jake. >> reporter: rob and vinita, president obama came to congress to del hi he was hoping to deliver an overall theme for his presidency
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to explain in a way he has not yet before why he is doing what he is doing and where he intends to lead the country. he talked specifically about education, infrastructure and innovation. >> tonight i challenge you to join me to set a new goal, by 2035, 80% of america's electricity will come from clean energy sources. >> reporter: even while president obama was talking about new spending or investments, as he called them, he was also talking about the need to rein in the federal deficit proposing a five-year spending freeze on nonsecurity related discretionary spending. >> now, this would reduce the deficit by more than $400 billion over the next decade and will bring discretionary spending to the lowest share of our economy since dwight eisenhower was president. >> reporter: with a new republican congress and a new spirit after the tucson tragedy, president obama said that now was the time for cooperation to work in a bipartisan fashion, and he noted that while some members of congress were sitting together in a bipartisan fashion as opposed to democrats on one side and republicans on the other, sitting together was not enough.
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>> what comes of this moment will be determined not by whether we can sit together tonight but whether we can work together tomorrow. >> reporter: later today president obama will fly to wisconsin where he will flesh out even further the theme of the speech he gave at the state of the union address, how to win the future. rob and vinita? >> and shortly after that state of the union some good news for congresswoman giffords. her status has been upgraded. she is now going to be allowed to be released from that hospital. of course, we heard about some fluid in the brain. it's looking better. she's going to the rehab facility. >> an amazing recovery. we have a photo. they sent out a picture of mark kelly, the congresswoman's husband, watching in her hospital room the state of the union. still by her side. still holding her hand. >> that ribbon you can see on his shoulder is in memory of the tucson shootings. >> many of the lawmakers had it on. we turn to the growing crisis in egypt. one of our key allies in the middle east, violent anti-government protests have
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now left at least three people dead. >> the u.s. is calling for an end to the violence, but that does not appear likely. alex marquardt is joining us by the phone this morning from cairo where protests have stretched into the night. hi, alex. >> reporter: good morning, rob and vinita. today is the day we'll get a clear sense of whether this protest has legs. the question everyone is asking is whether tuesday's protest will be able to keep up its momentum and continue today or whether the security services will manage to keep them down as they have in the past. things this morning are quiet, but the tens of thousands who took to the streets yesterday took everyone by surprise. egypt hasn't seen anything like this for decades. and what started it off as a peaceful protest turned violent in the afternoon with rubber bullet, tear gas and water cannons being used against the protesters. now, tahir square in central cairo has become ground zero for this protest. thousands were on the square last night for a sit-in, refusing to leave until president hosni mubarak steps down.
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the protesters we spoke to told us they think this is the beginning of something new in egypt and will stay on the streets until this regime is brought down. around 1 a.m. the police had had enough and attacked protesters with tear gas and rubber bullets and managed to clear the square. we'll have to wait and see what happens today. >> thanks to alex marquardt reporting from egypt. in other news, the first guantanamo detainee tried in a civilian court will now spend the rest of his life behind bars. ahmed ghailani got the maximum punishment for his part of al qaeda's bombing of two embassies in africa. the trial caused an uproar after the jury acquitted him of 200 counts of murder but they did vick him of conspiring to destroy government buildings and that's what earned him a life sentence. the civilian trial for another terrorism suspect has been set for october. the nigerian man known as the underwear bomber is accused of trying to blow up a detroit-bound passenger jet on christmas day in 2009. he faces eight charges including attempted conspiracy and
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attempted murder and could get a life sentence. still he is insisting on acting as his own lawyer. our eating and smoking habits are putting americans behind other countries when it comes to living a longer life. new government figures show that women in the u.s. can expect to live 80.8 years. the life expectancy for men is 75.6 years. that's less than the french and less than the japanese. smoking is a key factor, but obesity may account for up to a third of the life expectancy shortfall. well, speaking of unhealthy habits, what about texting while walking. it may seem obvious, but looking down while you are strolling along can be downright dangerous, but is it dangerous enough to pass a law? here's juju chang. >> reporter: remember the woman who fell in a mall fountain while texting? she told "gma" she'd learned her lesson. >> do not text and walk. >> reporter: but there may be a bigger lesson in her digital dunk. new york state senator carl krueger says two people died recently in his brooklyn district because they were
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distracted by electronic devices on the street. >> the gentleman is standing on the corner, ready to cross the street, wired into his ipod, crosses over, walks right into a new york city bus. >> reporter: new york and arkansas are proposing legislation trying to ban the use of ipods and cell phones, especially at crosswalks. if caught, violators could be fined 100 bucks. so just how distracted are walkers? excuse me. i took to the streets to find out. >> you were just texting walking across the street. >> yes, yes. >> reporter: do you do that a lot? >> sometimes. >> reporter: do you feel like you're a little distracted when you do it? >> definitely. >> reporter: and is it because you're not looking or because you're not hearing? >> i'm not looking, and i'm not hearing. i'm somewhere else. >> reporter: in an extreme example, a jogger died when a glider plane crash-landed on this beach in hilton head. investigators believe he never heard it approaching because of his ipod. you see what we're doing?
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this would be illegal. >> that's ridiculous. >> reporter: why? >> i can still hear you perfectly. >> reporter: right. >> like it's not that loud. >> reporter: i just saw you looking at it. but i don't want to be that lady that fell if the fountain. - somy ri?r: are you on the and now a story on google. it is set for its biggfexpa yet the internet's most protabl company has now announced plans to hire more than 6,200 people this year. that's about a 25% increase after a 23% rise last year. wall street, though, is a little nervous about the explosion, but the company says it needs to aggressively recruit the smartest and best people in order to keep its edge. very interesting. >> of course, we've heard, because they've been on all the "forbes" list. people love working at googles. they get meals and snacks and drinks are free. i mean, google -- >> that ain't bad. >> yeah. should you ever need someone, and this doesn't work out for me. >> and it's not easy. they look at s.a.t., gpa, they give you performance, mind questions. it's a pretty stringent test to get in there. >> we tried to get a question, we couldn't get them. >> that's why we're still here. here's a look at your wednesday morning. early morning snow from alabama and mississippi into
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tennessee and kentucky. a mix of rain and snow from the mid-atlantic to new england. heavier by late evening. snow showers in the dakotas. >> 23 in minneapolis. and 31 in detroit. 32 in boston. and 38 here in new york. miami, still hot spot, 79 degrees today. 40s across much of the rockies. 52 in seattle. >> i know i'm not allowed to call this my favorite story of the day, but i think when you hear what happened here, you'll be tickled a little pink. high school basketball fans in utah are crying foul after a trouncing that left one team more than 100 points in the dust. >> brutal. christian heritage high actually apologized for defeating west ridge academy, get this, final score, 108-3. but the coach of the winning team said it wasn't about bad sportsmanship. he just didn't want to insult the competition by slowing the ball down. >> yeah, right. he was probably like, slam on them. dunk on those girls. the losing team's coach said apology accepted. no hard feelings. so much for telling kids to give it your all. >> life can be brutal sometimes. we all have to grow up.
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>> 100 points. >> you'll get them next season or ten years later. we'll be right back after this. 0 point. >> you'll get them next season. if your racing thoughts keep you awake...
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ask your doctor if lunesta is right for you. get lunesta for a $0 co-pay at lunesta.com. sleep well, on the wings of lunesta. welcome back, everybody. and now we turn to anger over the happy meal. it's one of the longest running menu items at mcdonald's. >> one mother, though, is suing the burger chain over how it markets to kids. yunji de nies has the details. ♪ happy meal is coming on mcdonaldland express ♪ >> reporter: for three decades kids had a meal they could call their own at mcdonald's -- the happy meal. and what makes it, oh, so happy is what comes with those chicken mcnuggets and french fries -- a prize, a gift from ronald mcdonald himself. >> here i am. >> reporter: the toy has transformed with the times.
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it's an avalanche of colorful characters from every corner of childhood. mcdonald's puts a lot of time and money into those little pieces of plastic. everything from graphic artists to safety tests. they invest millions in marketing the trinkets. and as a result, kids like 6-year-old mya parham find them irresistible. >> well, this one, it has a mirror. >> reporter: but mya's mom monet says those toys draw her kids to unhealthy foods. >> they see commercials that say, oh, you know, there's these toys, they come with the happy meals. we have eight of them. so even for my 6-year-old, the question is, well, can we go every week until we get them all, mom? of course my answer is no. that's when the battle ensues. can you read that to me? >> reporter: so she's suing mcdonald's. her ultimatum to the golden arches, make the meals healthier or stop including the toys. monet is the first mother to take this kind of drastic action, but her efforts are part
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of a larger movement. the city of san francisco recently passed a law requiring meals with toys to meet certain nutritional standards effectively banning happy meals. the center for science and the public interest, the so-called food police, is backing monet's lawsuit. >> they dangle these little toys in front of little kids to get them to pester their parents to take them to mcdonald's. it's a trick that works. >> reporter: mcdonald's says the lawsuit may make for good headlines but not common sense. >> taking away the toy, we all know, will not have any impact on children's well-being or certainly childhood obesity. >> reporter: you know, opponents say that mcdonald's is incentivizing unhealthy choices. why not get ahead of this? why not pair a toy with a salad? >> first and foremost, i disagree with the premise. there's nothing wrong with the toy. absolutely nothing with the food. and i don't think there's
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anything wrong with pairing the toy with the food. our happy meals are healthy. so the calorie ranges anywhere from 380 calories up to around 700 calories. >> reporter: the idea that 700 calories for a 5-year-old is a healthy meal, i mean, that is debatable. >> well, if you go to the usda and look at the food pier rid, they will tell you that what a child needs changes based on whether that child is sedentary or whether that child is very active. so the range of options gives the parents the choice. so, it's not mcdonald's place to tell a parent, here's what you can serve to your child. >> reporter: bill whitman points out that customers can buy the toys without the food. and to many customers -- >> did you get a toy? >> reporter: -- the toy defines the meal. would you still like the happy meal if there were no toys in it? >> no. >> reporter: professor daniel cook studies the effect of advertising on kids.
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he points out that that little piece of plastic can be pretty powerful. >> the toy is so powerful and strong because it's sort of an emblem or an icon for a child. what the toy also does is it keeps the meal current. it's the same fries and the same coke, but what happens with the toy is that it keeps the children coming back. >> reporter: the question is, can there be a happy meal that makes everyone happy? i'm yunji de nies in sacramento. >> well, it may sound like drastic action that mom is taking but when you think we have the fattest kids in the world, nearly a third are considered overweight or obese, it's an epidemic. it's scary. >> i don't think this surprises any parents out there. american kids are also the most marketed. an average child sees 20,000 to 30,000 commercials, which is unbelievable considering. there's so much emphasis on placement of items in an aisle, in a supermarket, what they can grab at, what they can't. coming up next, thousands of you have become our friends on facebook. and for all of you who have not
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friended us yet, we're going to show you out on what you're missing. >> you're watching "world news now."
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well, welcome back, everybody. we're up to almost 26,000 friends on facebook. if you're not one of them, you're missing out on a lot of good stuff. our producer, peter martinez is the man behind the curtain, keeping you up to date during the day and posting behind the scenes material from our show. he's joining us now with some of the highlights from our big birthday week. thank you, peter. folks know, this is your baby. you started this way back when. >> this was, i want to say, late september of 2009. and ever since then, it's just skyrocketed to thousands and thousands of fans. and it's been a little project of mine, among all the other duties, you know that, i do over -- on my shift. >> you remember when there were zero fans and now 26,000.
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you've seen that thing explode, which is cool. >> yes. it definitely was out of a growing demand for digital content, videos and pictures, and really the behind-the-scenes footage we love to -- >> yes. we have a little beef with you because you tend to put some things on there that a little embarrassing of rob and i. it's because it's cool and if you haven't been on our page, we have a lot of behind the scene stuff. people with that would want to find that people would laugh at us. >> you'll find slide shows. you'll find forecasts from accuweather, if i can do that. >> all things from "the skinny," the papers, its all on there. >> everything you want to know will be up there about the show. >> very cool. actually, what we wanted to start what is hot on facebook, what people are talking about. so you picked out three things in the last couple of weeks. >> i wanted to bring up that rat that was loose in the new york city subway car. i'm sure you remember. cheri wrote in to our page and i'm sure a lot of people would agree she's saying, i'm willing to bet that is someone's pet looking for its owner. poor little cutie.
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they aren't disgusting at all. >> okay, cheri. >> you see this video and you definitely kind of cringe again. >> that video is so freaky. >> yeah. >> cheri liked the rat. we also -- a big story or two was oprah winfrey. >> that's right. you remember this story. oprah revealing she had the half-sister. >> exactly. >> a lot of people chimed in on this one. one of the good comments we got from shirley. she said, it's a miracle for oprah and her sister. my sister is one of the greatest gifts i have ever had. and i love her more every day. a lot of people liked that story. >> posted that story this week, and comments flooded in. >> and people like the behind-the-scenes look of a woman dina wrote in, with an interesting comment, about how we get ready for our work day. she said something funny. one of the best new shows on tv. i love the mix of news and comedy. i'm beginning to think i wake up just for you guys. high praise from dina. >> robin wrote in saying, congrats on 19 years. more than most marriages. >> sad but true. peter, you do a great job
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maintaining that page. folks, keep writing in. friend us on facebook. trust me. k.
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>> announcer: "world news now" delivers your "morning papers." well, this first paper comes to us from buffalo. and if you're eating breakfast, now it's the time to stop. >> uh-oh. uh-oh. we've been warned. >> it's not nice. there's a five-block radius in this neighborhood called snyder. and all of the residents started to notice something like brown and yellow when it comes to their icicles. you'll see one of them. this is what it looked like outside the house where the gutter was. they thought that color seems a little odd. then they started to notice a smell. what they think is going on is basically that an airplane is discharging the rest room tank midflight. >> oh, no. >> because all of the houses in this five-block radius have the same ice. and they're saying, as it thaws, the smell becomes more potent,
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so inspectors have taken samples. they took them a long time ago when this first started popping itself up. they said they found no evidence it was from warm-blooded animals, that the matter was that, but these residents are saying if you smelled it yourself, you would know it's not fuel or anything else. imagine waking up to that. >> have you ever been in a plane and been in the bathroom and wondered where all that goes or whose job -- >> try not to think about that. try to get out as fast as i can. do my business and go. >> do your business. that's probably best. here's another stomach-churning story here. apparently there is -- this is from "the telegraph" this morning and trying -- like most people, trying to save money, so to reduce heating costs so the sports center is using what? the heat from the neighboring crematorium. apparently the heat from the crematorium is lost into the atmosphere. they're like, let's not waste that heat. the sports center wants to set up something so that
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that lost heat now heats the swimming pool next door at this sports center saving almost 15,000 pounds a year in heating costs. a guy said, i don't know how people feel about being in the pool heated by the death of a loved one. so if you're in that sports center, a lot of -- >> at least it's environmentally friendly, i will say it for that. if you live in new york then you certainly know who liz cho is. >> uh-huh. >> rob certainly knows who she is. let's show you a quick picture of who she is. she's undoubtedly a beauty. she used to anchor this show. rob, when we asked him who is one of his sexiest news anchors, who does he like to watch? he mentioned liz cho. there's a study about sexy news anchor. and the study basically tells you the sexier the female, more likely men are to watch. the least likely -- the less likely they are to remember what the woman is actually saying. >> i'm shocked. >> they basically took a sexy woman and sort of a dowdy woman and they played a clip of the two of them reading the same news. gave guys a bunch of questions after. lo and behold all of them said, i love watching that hot one. have no idea what she was saying. >> what were you talking about?
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today onworld today on "world news now" -- the state of our union. >> what president obama said to the country last night and where we go from here. it's wednesday, january 26th. good morning, and thanks for being with us on this wednesday. i'm vinita nair. >> and i'm rob nelson. interesting speech last night. a very different atmosphere there in washington in light of the tucson shootings and the midterm elections. we'll break down the president's speech last night, find out more about what he said and like we said, where we go from here. and i'm rob nelson. thanks for being with us again. >> that's right. as we've been talking about, it was the state of the union. we'll be discussing that. the 216th time the president has given a congressional state of the union. we also want to talk about the weather. why is it so cold? we've all been asking the same question as you. we probably don't have to tell
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you this. it was one of the nastiest winters on record, and we still have two cringe-worthy months left to go. turns out there's actually a reason for the arctic. it's not some karmic retribution. sam champion will tell us what it is. >> we would like to know the secret to happiness, and we have an interesting tidbit. there's a movement going on in the other part of the world about what makes us happy. something you do actually could make you a little bit happier. a simple little task but could go a long way in lifting your spirit. we'll tell about you that, too. >> you know i tried this one, so i can speak for it. it works well. but we begin this morning, of course, with the state of the union address. the state of the economy was the president's chief focus, but he did not propose the usual laundry list of new programs. >> instead, he urged americans to out-innovate and out-educate the rest of the world as a way of winning the future. john hendren joins us now from washington with the latest. hi, john. >> reporter: hi, rob. good morning. good morning, vinita. that's right, as the president -- as the president gave his speech, republicans and democrats made a unique show of bipartisanship.
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he took advantage of that to tell them to unite and get the united states competing against its economic rivals in the rest of the world. in a chamber made somber by the absence of one member, the president acknowledged a new reality. >> governing will now be a shared responsibility between parties. >> reporter: divided government. >> we will move forward together or not at all. >> reporter: his second state of the union address focused on the number one issue on most americans' minds, the economy. >> at stake is whether new jobs and industries take root in this country or somewhere else. that's the project the american people want us to work on together. >> reporter: it was a one-of-a-kind state of the union. there was the empty chair for arizona congresswoman gabrielle giffords, now recovering from a gunman's bullet. husband mark kelly watching the speech at her side. >> what comes of this moment will be determined not by whether we can sit together tonight but whether we can work together tomorrow. >> reporter: there was the spirit of unity that shooting brought on, prompting many
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republicans and democrats to sit side by side in pairs. paul ryan gave the official republican response. >> americans are skeptical of both political parties, and that skepticism is justified, especially when it comes to spending. >> reporter: then in another first, there was another sharper-tongued response from tea party republicans. >> deficits were unacceptably high under president bush, but they exploded under president obama's direction. >> reporter: a sure sign that with the new civility will come new conflict. the president outlined a sweeping new agenda, reorganizing the federal government, spending more money on research and transportation, all the while cutting corporate income taxes and freezing some spending. the big challenge now, getting all those democrats and republicans who sat side by side to pass it. rob and vinita? >> and, john, in light of the mixed seating that we heard so much about and, of course, the tucson tragedy, what was the atmosphere like in that chamber last night during the address?
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>> reporter: it was something like i've never seen before, having watched many of these things. first of all, you had the date night where you had republicans and democrats sitting side by side. that made it unusual because you no longer had one side rising to applaud the president as the rest sat on their hands. you also had no surprises like you had last year. you didn't have a congressman yelling out, you lie, like last year, or supreme court members saying, not true, in the audience as the president spoke. it was very much to form. no huge surprises tonight, rob and vinita. >> well, john, i think it goes without saying we're both a little envious that you got to be there and hear that thing live. a lot of people waiting since 8:30 to get a seat by the aisle. john hendren reporting from capitol hill this morning, thank you. well, congresswoman gabrielle giffords' family released this photo showing her watching the president's speech with her husband at her side. and shortly after the hospital announced great news. giffords' condition has been upgraded from serious to good. and she will now leave the hospital for the rehab center later this morning. we will get all the details at a news conference scheduled for this afternoon.
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>> that amazing recovery continues. well, whether the president's or republicans' approach to the economy ultimately prevails, there are promising signs that the recovery is picking up some steam. >> unemployment is still way too high, but companies may finally be ready to hire. t.j. winick joins us now with the news and the numbers. >> reporter: good morning, rob and vinita. the u.s. labor department reports that the unemployment rate rose in 20 states last month and fell in 15. still, there are several indicators that suggest the u.s. economy is headed in the right direction. during the darkest days of gm's bankruptcy, there was talk this assembly plant in flint, michigan, would be closed. now they're adding a third shift and 750 workers. >> every autoworker job contributes to nine other jobs all across the united states. and no automaker does more than general motors for our country and our community. >> reporter: most economic analysts will tell you it's part of an encouraging trend, that
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hiring should improve over the next six months. >> i think the most important reason for optimism is that businesses are very profitable. >> reporter: in fact, corporate profits are at prerecession levels. google plans to hire more than 6,200 workers this year. and consumer confidence is up with major stock market indexes climbing to their highest levels since 2008. still, there are other factors working against a recovery. the case-shiller home price index showed that housing prices fell in november, down over 1% from october. >> year over year we've actually seen prices go down 1.6% in the 20 largest cities in the country. it is definitely a move in the wrong direction for the housing market. >> reporter: another anchor on the economy, state and local governments. there's talk of finding ways to allow states to declare bankruptcy and avoid paying pensions of former workers. one industry doing particularly well, the airlines. the eight largest u.s. carriers are forecast to make over $5 billion this year.
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that would be their best numbers in a decade. rob and vinita? >> thanks, t.j. in other news this morning, a string of dangerous storms left behind some pretty serious damage in central florida. the city of groveland near orlando appeared to be the worst hit. a suspected tornado damaged up to 20 homes there. and on the coast in pinellas county, wind gusts of up to 60 miles an hour hit a gas station, briefly trapping a driver there. well, that same system is bringing snow up the eastern seaboard this morning. salt and sand trucks hit the streets of memphis where the city is expected to pick up about 3 inches by morning. the northeast, well, we will get hit later today, and then there is the extreme cold weather sitting over much of the nation. sam champion says there's a reason it's colder than usual. >> reporter: three-quarters of the united states is frigid cold while the northern reaches of canada and greenland are experiencing temperatures 15 to 20 degrees above normal. scientists say it's the arctic air normally locked in place that's seeping down into america. >> it's a little bit like
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opening the refrigerator and the cold air comes out and moves into the rest of the room. >> reporter: it may have to do with the melting of the arctic ice sheets. the magenta line shows here where the ice was in the '70s. the white area, where the ice is now. it's the jet stream that acts as a border between the arctic air and the rest of the world. normally keeping the frigid air trapped near the north pole. some studies now suggest that melting arctic sea ice is making cold zones warmer, weakening the jet stream's grip, allowing colder air to spill down south. >> a recent hypothesis is that this heat coming out of the ocean is causing high pressure over the arctic during the winter, and that's what might be forcing that cold air down to the south. >> reporter: the result, scenes like these. five powerful winter storms in the eastern u.s. since december. that cold air colliding with warmer air, producing blizzards in the northeast, ice in normally mild areas like atlanta, and then there's the cold.
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temperatures since december 1st, 2010 have averaged below normal from boston to new york city to chicago and minneapolis. but even in new orleans, atlanta and miami. and there may be very little good weather news to look forward to. we're already looking into the possibility that these arctic intrusions may combine with other weather systems and make it an even tougher spring storm season, as well. sam champion, abc news. >> the news does not get any better, man. give us a break, mother nature, man. here's a look now at your wednesday weather. several inches of snow in the morning hours across tennessee, northern alabama and mississippi. light afternoon rain and snow from washington, d.c., to boston, changing to heavy snow by later tonight. snow showers from fargo to northern minnesota. >> 20s in the twin cities, omaha and chicago. 38 here in new york. 45 in atlanta, and just shy of 80 in miami. seattle will get up to 52 degrees. boise, 43, and phoenix is 69 degrees. well, you probably know this by now, of course, but this is a
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pretty special time for us here at "world news now." we have just turned 19 years old. we can almost drink. >> our big celebration is lasting all week long, including this entirely new set, and we have been enjoying birthday wishes from those who once kept you company in the middle of the night. so this morning heather cabot heads down memory lane. >> happy birthday, "world news now." my favorite memory was ron corning and i were anchoring the show, and i was probably about six or seven months pregnant and hugely uncomfortable and hormonal. and ron made, you know, sort of an off-color remark about something. i don't even remember what it was. he made fun of something that i said, and i could not stop laughing. and it was -- it was such a moment. >> and the reason you saw that yahoo! sign behind her, she's actually the lifestyle editor at yahoo! you may see her on the show on fridays. she's still with us, which is cool. >> we'll be back with more "world news now."
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in the wake of monday's in the wake of monday's suicide bombing at moscow's busiest airport, a question, can
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a similar attack be prevented here in the u.s.? >> they're using a program, called s.p.o.t., screening passengers by observation technique. as brian ross reports, it's a program, though, that has its critics. >> reporter: blending into the crowds at more than 160 airports across the country, teams of what are called behavior detection officers patrol the areas outside of security. >> they are looking for suspicious behavior that might be indicative of terrorist intent. >> the eyebrows are pulled down and together in both of these angry expressions. >> reporter: it's an expensive controversial program in which the officers are trained over four days with videos like this one. >> probably saying something quite unpleasant on the left. >> reporter: and this series of photos to spot tiny facial microexpressions that supposedly show hidden emotions and terrorist intent according to tsa consultant dr. paul ekman. >> if you have one of those emotions, you're going to -- it's going to appear in your
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face, and if you're trying to conceal it, it may well leak out in a microexpression. >> reporter: 3,000 behavior detection officers have been trained in dr. ekman's methods. >> he's starting to really sweat now. >> reporter: at a cost of $200 million a year. even though critics say there's no scientific evidence of its reliability for use in counterterrorism. >> the simple answer is, no, there is no scientific support for this system as of now. >> reporter: in fact, a report last year by the general accountability office found that at least 17 people later arrested for terrorism, including the times square bomber, faisal shahzad, went through airports with the trained screeners and were never detected. >> the united states is spending incredible amounts of money on tsa personnel and a s.p.o.t. program that's supposed to detect bad behavior, and i don't think we're capable of detecting what took place in moscow. >> reporter: the tsa continues
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to defend dr. ekman and its s.p.o.t. program saying the method has led to more than 1,700 arrests, but of those 1,700, not a single one, other than one man found with some empty fuel tanks, has been charged with anything remotely connected to terrorism. brian ross, abc news, new york. when we return, do you want to be happier? >> of course so. well, it turns out, it may be easier than you think. we'll tell what you some experts are saying when we come back. you're watching "world news now." you're watching "world news now."
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and welcome back, everybody. another word for happy is jolly so it's fitting that we're off to jolly old england for our next story. that's where, believe it or not, there's a growing happiness movement. >> basically it's an effort to get people happier and healthier. and they say the secret is right there in your desk. david sollito of the bbc reports.
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>> we're ready to start if you'd like to come into the room. my name is mark, mark williamson. i run an organization called action for happiness. and i think you probably gathered by now that the topic we're going to talk about today is happiness. >> reporter: the happiness challenge. we introduced a random group of people to some experts on happiness and -- >> we're going to be asking to try out some simple changes in their lives over the next week that we think could leave them feeling happier and more fulfilled. we shall see. who knows. >> reporter: well, one of those tasks was write a letter, a thank you letter, a letter to someone who really matters in your life. well, everyone did one, but one or two of them, we managed to be there with the camera when they actually took them around and read them out. i'm not going to say a great deal more than this. just watch for yourselves. this is tony and carol. >> probably thinks it's "you've been framed" or something. >> come on in.
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welcome. >> reporter: tony runs a butcher shop. >> hello. >> and it's all sort of around happiness. >> reporter: carol's a medical secretary and belly dancer. >> this is to my dear friend pat. >> we talked about people who maybe matter in your life and how would you feel if you were asked if you could write a letter to somebody and that person is you? >> reporter: so why a letter? it's one method of focusing on what we have. gratitude, it's claimed, is good for our well-being. >> to my dear friend and neighbor, pat. this note is to let you know how very happy and grateful i am to have you as a true friend in my life. >> dear max, yes, a letter to my best friend. >> i just knew you and i would be friends. >> oh, say -- >> thank you to you and your dear husband m oh l for all your help, advice, support, encouragement and
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friendship you have given to me and my family. >> to simply say thank you for the many good things you have helped me with. oh, tony. max, you've been an incredible influence on my life. >> i'm just so, so grateful i came and i have you as my neighbor, but you i know, night or day, whatever time -- >> i'm always there for you. now stop crying. stop crying. >> in life you meet sometimes very sincere, genuine, lovely people, and he is way up at the top. >> well, it is quite emotional. i don't think i've ever written a letter like that. but i'm glad i've done it. >> i'm honored. i really am, tony. i shall keep that letter. i'm not going to frame it, but i shall keep it somewhere special. >> reporter: the message, be thankful. a source of happiness? well, it was here.
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david sollito, bbc news, scarborough. >> from their happiness to actors' happiness. coming up, we'll tell about you the oscar nominations. take a look. >> dear willis. if your racing thoughts keep you awake...
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sleep is here, on the wings of lunesta. and if you wake up often in the middle of the night... rest is here, on the wings of lunesta. lunesta helps you fall asleep and stay asleep, so you can wake up feeling rested. when taking lunesta, don't drive or operate machinery until you feel fully awake. walking, eating, driving, or engaging in other activities while asleep, without remembering it the next day, have been reported. abnormal behaviors may include aggressiveness, agitation, hallucinations or confusion. in depressed patients, worsening of depression, including risk of suicide, may occur. alcohol may increase these risks. allergic reactions, such as tongue or throat swelling, occur rarely and may be fatal. side effects may include unpleasant taste, headache, dizziness and morning drowsiness. ask your doctor if lunesta is right for you. get lunesta for a $0 co-pay at lunesta.com.
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sleep well, on the wings of lunesta. ♪ mark your calendars because hollywood's biggest night is just around the corner. you can catch the oscars on sunday, february 27th right here on abc. >> and yesterday the nominations were announced, and there were some pretty big surprises. with all the details now, we're joined from los angeles by diana alvear. good morning, diana. >> reporter: vinita and rob, it is time to roll out the red carpet. hollywood super bowl is finally here. and this year, it seems members of the academy have gone mad for the monarchy and the millennials. >> i don't know if you heard about this new website i launched. >> no. >> reporter: when it comes to
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best picture, will it be the king of social media or the king who stammered? >> i have a voice! >> reporter: "the king's speech" certainly spoke to the academy. its members crowned it with 12 nominations. >> they're idiots. we've all been knighted. >> makes it official then. >> reporter: "true grit" nabbed ten nominations. boxing drama "the fighter" earned seven, including front-runner for best supporting actor christian bale. and not one but two nods for best supporting actress, amy adams and melissa leo. on "good morning america," leo had a message for her real-life counterpart. >> alice, we're going to the oscars! >> reporter: moving on, will "black swan's" natalie portman dance away with best actress or will the third nomination be the charm for annette benning in "the kids are all right"? >> you were really pretty. >> reporter: he didn't win last year, but colin firth's favored to win best actor for "the king's speech," so long as he outfriends
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"the social network's" jesse eisenberg and surprise nominee john hawks for "winter's bone." >> you can hear it all over the city. john who? oh, yeah, he was great in "winter's bone." >> reporter: then there are the surprising snubs. julianne moore, in "the kids are all right" mark wahlberg in "the fighter" and ryan gosling in "blue valentine." and don't rule out an oscar for oscar host james franco. his role as a hiker faced with a horrible choice in the movie "127 hours" has earned him a best actor nomination. vinita, rob. >> two other snubs too, mila kunis no supporting nod for "black swan." and no nod for the director of inception" which got a best picture nomination. >> fascinating that they have ten best pick nominees. i think when you look at that list, it's a practice that they started last year. i didn't remember it from last year. it's a really long list. and they say you can immediately tell which are the real top five but to hear ten is a lot. >> "the king's speech" has a lot
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of momentum.owowowowowowowowowow
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this morning on "world news now," a complete wrap of president obama's state of the union address. >> what the president says he wants to do first and how he plans to do it. it's wednesday, january 26th. good morning, and thanks for being with us on this busy wednesday. i'm vinita nair. >> and i'm rob nelson. the president spoke for one hour and one minute, but it took just about one second for the critics, of course, to start weighing in. we have complete reaction to the state of the union coming up. also, bad traffic. we all love to complain about it, but get this, could bad traffic actually be bad for your health? while living in a city with a lot of noisy commuters could increase your risk of stroke. not good news if you live here in new york now, is it? >> that is for sure.
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man. later in the show today, the woman who stole fashion from the french. how they stormed the runways and in the process changed a little bit of history. very cool story there. >> yes, that's right. but we begin this morning with the president 's speech to congress. there were 45 instances of bipartisan applause, which is a record. >> mr. obama laid out a pretty ambitious economic agenda while also calling for some deep cuts in spending, as well. john hendren is joining us now from capitol hill with more details. hi, john. >> reporter: good morning, rob and vinita. democrats and republicans united in a show of bipartisanship, and president obama asked them to unite and out-innovate, out-educate and outbuild the rest of the world. >> what comes of this moment will be determined not by whether we can sit together tonight, but whether we can work together tomorrow. >> reporter: it was really a one-of-a-kind state of the union. first of all, there was that empty seat for gabrielle giffords, the congresswoman still recovering in a hospital after being shot in tucson. her husband watched that with her from her hospital bed. then, of course, you had the unusual seating arrangement with
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republicans and democrats, instead of sitting on either side of the aisle, actually sitting side by side, mixing it up a bit. so you no longer had one side rising while the other side sat on its hands. the president focused on the economy, arguing that the united states needed not to compete with itself among political parties but to unite and compete against countries like china around the globe. >> at stake is whether new jobs and industries take root in this country or somewhere else. that's the project the american people want us to work on together. >> reporter: he said, because democrats and republicans were elected now to a mixed congress, we move forward together or not at all. the president outlined a sweeping new agenda, reorganizing the federal government, spending more on education and transportation, all the while freezing some spending and cutting corporate income taxes. the challenge now is getting those democrats and republicans who sat side by side to pass it. rob and vinita? and now time for the grading.
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the president is getting fairly high marks for both style and substance. >> but now the hard part, of course, gets under way. mr. obama now has to sell his ideas to the voters on main street. senior washington reporter rick klein is joining us this morning from capitol hill with more on that part of the story. rick? >> reporter: rob and vinita, a different tone though not a chastened tone from president obama tonight. he tried to connect the dots for the american people by bringing a broad vision on board. the challenge now will be to sell that. he hits the road in wisconsin. he has his cabinet fanning out across the country to try to make the case that he understands their problems, that he is hard at work trying to solve the problems of the american people, that he understands that this is a new political environment and also that it's an environment he can understand and that he can tackle for americans. >> our thanks to abc's rick klein on capitol hill. well, just hours after congresswoman gabrielle giffords watched the president's speech with her husband at her bedside, we learned doctors have now upgraded her condition from serious to good. even better, she will be leaving the hospital for the rehab center come morning time. we will learn more at a news conference in the afternoon. the president is also keeping an eye on increasingly
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violent anti-government protests in egypt. a white house statement late last night urged the authorities to respond peacefully though to those protests. so far, though, two demonstrators and a police officer have been killed. alexander marquardt reports now from cairo. >> reporter: tens of thousands of egyptians have taken to the streets, emboldened and inspired by the recent overthrow of tunisia's president. protesters have clashed with rye pot police. rubber bullets and tear gas have been fired. protesters here on tahrir square in central cairo are saying they won't leave until their demands are met. their first demand, president mubarak who has ruled egypt for 30 years, step down. they're also angry about corruption, unemployment, and poverty. >> the president doesn't know about anything else, what we're doing. everything is corrupted, everything is polluted. we cannot live anymore like this. >> reporter: this protest has been organized largely on facebook and twitter, though down here on the square, there isn't any cell phone coverage so it's impossible to get the word out.
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there's no doubt that tunisia and other protests in the region have given a big jolt to egypt, but it's still too early to tell whether this really is the beginning of a change. alex marquardt, abc news, cairo. chicago politics have taken another strange turn. the illinois supreme court ordered election officials to keep rahm emanuel's name on the ballot for the mayor's race while they decide if he can run. absentee and early voting begin over the next few days. if the supreme court agrees with a lower court that emanuel is out, anyone who has already voted for him will lose their vote. a government investigation has found that the bush administration illegally used federal money to help republican candidates during the 2006 midterm elections. the activity was organized by a special white house office run by karl rove. that violates a law called the hatch amendment. but since the principals have all left office, it is unlikely anyone will be punished. as we all know, we live in a very noisy world, and there's proof now it can actually be a
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health hazard. researchers found that chances of having a stroke were higher in people exposed to road traffic noise higher than 60 decibels. that's the equivalent of about the sound made by a clothes dryer, even a dishwasher, and the higher the noise, the higher the risk. that does not bode well for us here in the big apple, to say the least. well, you have probably never been to a piano bar like this one in biscayne bay. it is a piano on a sand bar, and no one is really sure how it got there. one morning people woke up, it was just there. the baby grand weighs at least 650 pounds, enough to survive the tide. local officials say they don't have any reason to move it, and the seagulls actually seem to really like it. >> all right. well, here's a look at your forecast now on this wednesday morning. a snowy morning from northern mississippi to memphis and lexington, kentucky. that snow mixes with light rain as it moves into d.c., philly, new york and beantown. it gets much heavier, though, later on tonight leaving up to 8 inches on the ground by thursday morning. light snow in the upper midwest. >> 27 degrees in fargo. and 31 in kansas city.
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40s from boise to albuquerque. and 54 in sacramento. 30s from boston to baltimore. 50s in dallas and in new orleans. talk about some sore losers. a car salesman in the chicago area was literally fired for wearing a packers tie to work the day after green bay beat the bears to get to the big super bowl. >> john stone says the tie was meant to honor his late grandmother who was a big packers fan, but his boss said he didn't want to alienate chicago customers, especially after doing promotions involving the bears. the boss eventually offered stone his job back, but he then said no. he also has an offer from another dealership. >> good to know folks don't take their sports too seriously. >> one word on that one -- lawsuit. >> yeah, there you go. >> well, we'll be right back. stay with us. i'm sorry. as you know, we're celebrating a milestone this week. it's our 19th birthday here at "world news now." and some of the people who have sat in our chairs now over the years are sending us birthday wishes. here's one now from our very own juju chang.
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>> i miss my nights on "world news now." i remember we went to h&h bagels one time. we were doing a series on people who work all night long, and we decided to go live with night shift workers. we had taste tests of arguably the best bagels in new york, and the lights went out. and i think on the outside, i remained calm, but on the inside it was sheer pandemonium. >> all right. let's not panic. >> but i think that ultimately, my favorite moment from "world news now" lives on in youtube when anderson cooper and i boarded a tour bus, and, of course, barry mitchell was there with his polka, and the fabulous tony orlando sang "tie a yellow ribbon," and i think we all took part. but it was such a great example of how wacky and crazy and full of good cheer we always are on "world news now." happy birthday, "world news now." just think, you can serve your country, you could vote, but you still can't drink. >> people keep saying that. it shows you a little bit about
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the media there. juju, another one of our alum, has gone on to do so well. now she's the news anchor at "good morning america." >> in case you are watching, sandy, our director, that bus moment, that's still his favorite moment. we haven't topped that. >> exactly. we'll be right back with more "world news now." hó
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bill's mornings have never been good'er 'cause new gain with freshlock helps keep his stuff smelling more like it's straight from the dryer. the cows aren't going to milk themselves. (sniffing) ♪ heaven new gain with freshlock. sleep is here, on the wings of lunesta. and if you wake up often in the middle of the night... rest is here, on the wings of lunesta. lunesta helps you fall asleep and stay asleep, so you can wake up feeling rested. when taking lunesta, don't drive or operate machinery until you feel fully awake. walking, eating, driving, or engaging in other activities while asleep, without remembering it the next day, have been reported. abnormal behaviors may include aggressiveness, agitation, hallucinations or confusion. in depressed patients, worsening of depression, including risk of suicide, may occur. alcohol may increase these risks.
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allergic reactions, such as tongue or throat swelling, occur rarely and may be fatal. side effects may include unpleasant taste, headache, dizziness and morning drowsiness. ask your doctor if lunesta is right for you. get lunesta for a $0 co-pay at lunesta.com. sleep well, on the wings of lunesta. well, we have alrey well, we have already reported on the president's speech last night. but this story is all about what happens before the speech. >> and it has nothing to do with writing it or even practicing it. we're talking about the lawmakers who go out of their way to make the most of it. here's john donvan. >> reporter: think back on that speech, the atmospherics, the familiar faces, the prez and the
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new speaker and the secretary of state and the justices and dale kildee from michigan. say who? yeah, dale kildee. he looks like this. an 18-term democrat. you remember. >> mr. speaker, the president of the united states. >> reporter: back at the start when the president entered by the center aisle, there he is, dale kildee. let's slow it down now -- and, whoops, in a flash, the president's moved down the aisle. kildee is somewhere back there. but you know, last year, too, this is 2010 now, dale kildee got nearly those same two seconds in the center aisle. and the year before that. and the one before that. and back and back and back, and you know what salon.com says that makes him and a few other house members -- >> the term we came up for for people like this is aisle hogs. >> reporter: aisle hogs. that's not very nice, especially if you're one of the democrats that salon is labeling the top five aisle hogs like, say, dennis kucinich who shows up in the aisle in 2006, 2007, 2009 and 2010. or jesse jackson jr. salon found him in 2004, '06,
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'07 and '08. but once salon reporter steve conracki started spotting patterns -- >> here's dale kildee. not only is he in it every year, this is the exact same spot he is in every year. >> reporter: it did raise an interesting question. in a chamber with this many seats, how do you get those few seats on the center aisle where the spotlight may shine? >> get there early. if you want to get a seat there, you have to get there early. >> reporter: that's right. it is open seating for the state of the union. >> and by early i mean, you know, more than ten hours early. and then ten hours later when the president finally comes in, maybe you're on tv for three seconds. >> reporter: ten hours for three seconds? what's that calculation? um, say, new york's eliot engel, another top fiver on salon's list, visible in 2003, '04, '05, '06, '08 and '10. here's what engel was doing at 8:30 this morning. >> he had found the place on the aisle where he wants to be
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tonight, and he's camping out there for the day. this is like people waiting all night to get concert tickets or something. >> reporter: except being in the audience is being in the show, as it was once again for congressman engel. and what about houston's sheila jackson lee? ubiquitous in these moments, including when it was george bush walking down the aisle. not a political friend by any means. look at 2008. >> she greets him by saying, hey, brother, and then she tries to say something to him, and it becomes immediately clear that bush had absolutely no interest getting caught in a conversation with her. >> reporter: but somehow it is worth it because -- >> if you're really lucky, if you really hit the jackpot, he's going to shake your hand, maybe he'll tell you a joke, maybe you'll say something to him and all your constituents back home, i guess, are going to see you and say, wow, that's my congressman. >> reporter: my congressman? heck, dale kildee after 18 terms has been at it so long he's practically a state of the union institution and who's to say, maybe he's here because he can be, because it's an honor and a thrill and has nothing to do with who's
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watching as he flashes into frame and once again out. i'm john donvan in washington. >> such an interesting phenomenon. and the guy who wrote the article in salon.com actually said the first time he noticed it was someone from the third district in colorado during the clinton administration. he noticed the guy and thought, gosh, i've seen him before. and the irony on that one, he was not even in the same party as president clinton. they just want to be on tv. we know what that's like. >> of course, interesting thing too last night, it really was a subdued crowd from years past, because of the mixed seating, but political theater as always. when we come back, time for your "skinny." >> we'll be right back. don't go far. time for "the skinny."
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♪ skinny so skinny welcome back, everybody. this, of course, is going to be all the talk in hollywood, the oscar nominations came out yesterday morning. and, of course, now starts the big rat race and political campaign almost for all these actors and actresses in movies. let's run through the big categories here. for best picture actually ten here, which seems like a lot.
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first year they expanded from ten to five. "black swan," "the fighter," "inception," "the kids are all right," "the king's speech," "127 hours," "the social network," "toy story 3," "true grit" and "winter's bone," which i hadn't heard of yet but it was apparently acclaimed. but apparently the real rat race here is between "the king's speech" the facebook movie for the big prize. we'll see who nabs it. also leading actress, annette benning in "the kids are all right," nicole kidman in "rabbit hole," jennifer lawrence in "the winter's bone," natalie portman for "black swan," the favorite, and michele williams "blue valentine." lead actor, jeff bridges in "true grit," jesse eisenberg in "the social network ," colin firth in "the king's speech" and james franco for "127 hours." should be a hallowed race this year. coming up february 27th i think is the big date. >> should be interesting if they let james franco introduce james franco. maybe they'll let anne hathaway do that. >> because they're hosting this year, yeah. well, speaking of james franco, a very interesting admission from him. he made a sex tape when he was
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19 years old and he's talking about it. he's doing a roundtable discussion for "newsweek" with fellow oscar nominees and he basically is being asked a question about how to film a good kiss. now, of course, if you haven't followed, we just said he's up for nomination in "127 hours." but he says something along the lines, i think for anybody who has made a home sex tape what feels best doesn't look best. then he goes on to say, well, i remember when i was 19 doing that and, of course, all the jaws dropped, but at least he's the one that's admitting it. now i'm sure the world will be searching for where this tape is, how to get your hands on it. but he's got one too. he joins the ranks. >> at least we know franco loves the movies. we know that for sure. as always we've seen reports of so many divorces and breakups here, and two more reports from hollywood. troy aikman, former quarterback for the dallas cowboys, your hometown, he is getting split from his wife after ten years of marriage. they married back in 2000. she was a publicist for the cowboys, rhonda aikman. they have two daughters together. but it seems like the marriage may have been rocky for a little while now. she actually purchased a home
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close to the family's residence back in november. so kind of this has been brewing. and then also actress jaime pressly apparently is having a really rough 2011. she got busted for suspicion of a dui a few weeks beak and now she's getting split from her hubby less than two years. he's an entertainment lawyer and apparently that marriage is down the tubes, as well. >> that always makes me sad. >> yeah. >> well, you know, the "jersey shore" didn't want the cast of "the jersey shore" and now italy doesn't want them either. you might have heard about this because it's getting a lot of buzz. but apparently the "jersey shore" cast wants to take them to italy. they're scouting locations. as we speak. they want to do it similar to the way they actually did it in miami to find the right locale. it's funny, they even say vinny's italian residents are offering to host an authentic dinner for the cast and crew. of course, as you would imagine, one italian-american interest group is speaking out saying, we don't want them in italy. but interestingly enough, the embassy is trying to take some strikes at them saying we're
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going to block you guys getting visas. they're pointing to ronnie because he's facing one count of third degree assault and saying maybe she is kids shouldn't be allowed in here. maybe we can block their visas to prevent them from coming. >> americana.
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and here are some stories to watch today on abc news -- president obama heads to wisconsin to visit a renewable energy company while they hope to push competitiveness and job creation. two themes he stressed last night in the state of the union. also, struggling economies and stock markets around the world will be keeping an eye on the world economic forum that gets started today in switzerland. and the east coast is preparing for yet another winter storm. snow is forecast from washington, d.c., to new york city and up to new england where they're expected to get the worst of the storm. well, finally this half hour, what's known in the fashion world as the battle of versailles. it was a landmark show held in france back in 1973 that finally put american designers on the map. >> on one side was the long
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established french designers and on the other, americans with a secret weapon as vicki mabrey reports. >> reporter: you might think this was just a fashion show unless you knew what was at stake. the unassailable french were the kings of fashion. they had no time for american upstarts. the french with their elaborate show and stuffy models were certain a victory. through a series of mishaps, the americans had a bare stage, but they had a secret weapon in the wings. as the music of the love unlimited orchestra began to play, eight african-american girls stepped onto the stage with a head-to-toe fierceness never seen before. >> we were over there to storm the gates. >> i was a part of a fairy tale. >> reporter: shocking for the french, show-stopping for the americans. these young women had just put fashion designers like oscar de la renta and halston on the map. >> they start to stomp, and they
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start to cheer. they start to throw the programs in the air, and they start saying, bravo, bravo. >> and we came out with all that sass and pizazz, and that just floored everybody. >> reporter: that fairy tale night led to more catwalks and fashion spreads and magazine covers. black was beautiful at last. at the metropolitan museum of art this week, the women and men who tasted victory that night reunited for the first time in decades. there was alva and pat and billy. >> billy. >> so wonderful to see you. she was the star of my show. >> reporter: and of course, oscar and his girls. >> it was divine. i was part of a beautiful group. and it was like we planted our flag, the flag of american fashion. >> reporter: it was a night that changed the face and color of fashion the world over forever. vicki mabrey, abc news, new york. >> still looking good all those years later. >> and some of those women are still holding symposiums on why
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there's not enough black images in fashion. so the battle continues. >> nice work. nenenenenenenenenee
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