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tv   ABC World News Now  ABC  August 16, 2011 2:05am-4:00am PDT

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oprah: do you think that--i have felt this for years--that this whole issue of molestation, sexual abuse, is so misunderstood? >> absolutely, absolutely. oprah: it's so misunderstood because everybody thinks that what you read in the paper is what is happening to every child, and they think that's what's happening. "you know, well, my child would tell me if somebody was torturing them or if it was a horrible experience." i think the unspoken shame is that for millions of us who were molested, it was not, at the time, horrible. it was not a horrific experience because if somebody is treating you horribly and causing you pain, you are going to tell, and every molester knows that. is that not true? do you feel that you've been "cured" by the th
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process, by your probation? >> i think i am being cured. i do not think i am there yet. oprah: would you trust yourself around children? >> i try not to be around children, ok, because--i do--i like children too much, and so i just won't be around them. oprah: is it like being an alcoholic where you have to work on it a day at a time, that every day, you're working on it, darren? >> yeah. i believe so because i can't say i'll never offend again because if i get back to that dark place i was before, i can possibly offend again. i think the difference is now, is that i recognize the pain i've caused. at the time of my offense, i was not recognizing the pain i was causing. i don't want to hurt anybody. oprah: will you offend again? >> no. i can honestly say i will not offend again. oprah: how do you know that? >> back then, i wasn't a happy person. i was using drugs. i was drinking. i didn't care who i hurt. it was like i didn't have
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any feelings toward anybody in the world, and now i've got these tools to help me with my triggers, to help me with my inner problems. i feel happy. oprah: if i put you in a room with a group of gorgeous 14-year-old girls, would you be a danger to them? >> no. oprah: you would not. >> no. oprah: will you ever offend again? >> probably not. i mean, it's not something i can ever say in absolutes. i've already crossed that line once, and being in therapy now, i've had a good, long look at a lot of really deep, horrible issues that i have with me, and i'm always gonna be a damaged person, but at least now i can see that, and i can work on it, and i can, you know, live my life being a
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better person. oprah: well, these are 4 guys who are willing to talk about it. there are, obviously, millions who would not, so i want to thank david and darren and lee and robert for being so candid and open and their therapist dawn horwitz-person for lending her support, and it is really my hope, having been talking about this for years and years, that this conversation opens a lot of eyes and minds and hearts. today we were only able to show you some of my two-hour interview that i spent with these men, so we're putting the whole thing up on oprah.com, and it will be there running for as long as you want it to. thank you for watching, and remember to make your car a no phone zone today. bye, everybody. [captioning made possible by king world] [captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org--] [ female announcer ] make after school even more fun with totino's pizza rolls. big pizza taste in a bite size roll that my kids can't resist.
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plus i get two box tops for their school. totino's pizza rolls. the pizza way to snack. and safeway's 10% back to schools program, now there are two ways to earn cash for your kids school. from august tenth through september thirteenth look for products marked with the yellow bus and earn even more by signing up for e-box tops at 2ways2earn.com. next year he -- oh, i just meant that because -- >> oh! >> because he had to bring back 200. i totally didn't mean it that way. >> what a cheap shot that was on that pizza-loving man. i'm surprised, pizza in massachusetts. new york is known for great pizza. chicago's known for great pizza. i'm surprised this place in massachusetts has inspired that kind of devotion. it's crazy. >> yeah. >> you feel bad what you said. > feel really bad. >> it's okay. >> you know what, you go on, you do your thing. >> we'll be right back, everybody, stay with us.
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natural instincts can prove it. and they did. it's the only hair color that's clinically proven to be less damaging. for a healthy look... look no further than natural instincts. it's all good. all right, so if you travel all the time this happens all the time. you lose, you forget something at the airport security check. so what happens to all your stuff? >> g gat question. lots of it goes on sale at steep discounts to boot. and in these tough times more and more americans are taking advantage of all of this as abc's s anna golodryga reports. >> reporter: looking for a new way to make extra cash? how about selling other peopop's stuff? rebecca huffman does it. >> i sell swiss army knives mainly. >> repororr: no, rebecca's not
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dealing in stolen goods. she resells items bought here. at the texas state surplus store. all of these items are from texas airports. either surrendered to tsa or plain forgotten by harried travelers. some of the millions of dollars of merchandise left behind at airports all across the country. later available for sale at stores like this one. >> anything that looks like a gun or anything that looks like a bullet, anything that looks like a knife, a baseball bat, softball bat, cricket bat. >> reporter: enterprising shoppers like rebecca are doing a brisk business reselling the goods. she shops here weekly, then resells the items on ebay. >> i clear about $1,000 a month. around christmas time, about $2,000 a month. >> reporter: an estimated 7 million items collected from airports every year, all available at big savings to you. >> everything's pretty much discounted 70%. >> i come here all the time for bargains. >> reporter: not just items with sharp edges either. designer sunglasses that
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regularly sell for $300, here 50 bucks. a custom watch that costs upwards of $1,000, $200. these tiffany earrings from airport lost and found? >> at tiffany's you'll pay $4,500. i would think here between $500, maybe $1,000. >> reporter: you don't have to go to texas to get the goods. other states post the deals online. >> coffee pots. kitchenware like knives. >> reporter: items at this pennsylvania surplus warehouse will be sold on a government auction website. it's a win-win. money made here goes back to state coffers. >> since 2004 since we began participating in the program, we've brought over $700,000 back into the state. >> that is fascinating to me. are you kidding me? you're leaving fancy watches and tiffany earrings? come on. >> i know where i'm going to do my christmas shopping now. >> start making that list. >> mommy, get ready, i'm getting you a watch. when we come back this morning why kate gosselin and
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her huge family will soon get a lot less exposure. >> and who's making a comeback to the hit sitcom "modern mily." stay tuned for "the skinny." d
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♪ skinny so skinny learning so much today. welcome back, everybody. time for "the skinny." i don't know that people will be completely upset about this news or not. kate gosselin, guess what, tlc is canceling the show. what was it called, "kate and jon plus 8." >> i'm heartbroken. >> yes, they're done. this thing lasted like 150 episodes. it went the distance for a while. of course their claim to fame was they had twins in 2000, then they had six more kids in 2004, and of course then the marriage all went to pot because he was cheating on her. >> does her hair count as a kid? >> does who? >> her new hair? >> she had that awful haircut to begin with. we watched her for years. she did tweet yesterday. she said while it's very sad for me and the kids, there were many tears at the breakfast table this morning, we are looking forward with great anticipation to our bright future. she parlayed this into a lot longer than what should have
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been 15 minutes of fame. the show is done. the last episode will air september the 12th. peace out, "kate and jon plus 8." >> speaking of the same kind of deal, "the real housewives" are hitting the road. i don't know if america's ready for this. check this. new york's countess luann anan jill. atlanta's nene and phaedra parks. kyle from beverly hills. and vicki from orange county. she's really one of the most popular ones. they're going to be hitting the road in select cities beginning october 1st in atlantic city, new jersey. i'm not entirely sure why they're hitting the road. >> touring what? to do what? >> they're probably just going to fight a lot on-camera. because that's all they tend to do. >> that's all they do. >> if you're a "real housewives" fan or if you're like me, it happens to be on and you happen to look that way and end up watching it, they're coming your way. >> going on tour. these women have parlayed this thing into a career. it is amazing, good for them. guess what, any "modern family"
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fans out here, you may appreciate this. i'm not just saying this because i work for abc. it really i think is t t best-written, funniest show on tv, it's so good. those of you who have been loyal viewers, benjamin bratt had the enviable role of playing sofia vergara's ex-husband, he's coming back to the show next season so make sure you stay tuned for that, he's coming back. >> guess what, charlie sheen is back. but he's not winning. get this. he was doing another stop on his violent torpedo of truth tour. he was very excited. and then the audience started pelting him with water bottles. he said, i feel like i'm back in detroit. where he had his meltdown. >> because he bombed at that performance. >> who would be so heartless to throw water bottles at anybody. >> that is so cruel and so mean for charlie sheen. he's had a rough time. i think some of the insane clown posse -- wait, wait. >> where are my goddesses? i need to be protected by my goddesses. >> i am telling diane sawyer on all of you people. you will not be here monday. >> terrible. >> good, aim for the head.
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troublemakers here. very mean. oh, man. enjoying your time? >> this is what made charlie sheen insane. you think it's drugs? it's not, it's working with people like this. >> enjoying your time at "world news now"? is it going well for you? >> it's awesome. i love the interns here. especially when i hit them in the head with a water bottle. >> well-loved by the staff here. >> they're all lining up to hit us again. >> very serious network news. >> how'd you know i was thirsty? i caught that. boo-yah! we'll be right back with more news.
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here are some stories to watch today on abc news. elvis presley fans marked the anniversary of the icon's death last night in memphis. he died 34 years ago today. it's a part of a week of events
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celebrating presley's life. asian markets are mostly higher today after a round of corporate deals move wall street in a positive direction. the president's tour of the midwest continues today. he's announcing new plans to stimulate the economy and create jobs in hard-hit rural areas. finally this half hour, what could be a very expensive lesson about doing the right thing. it comes courtesy of a family in minnesota. >> at first it seemed they had beaten the slimmest of odds. but as abc's josh elliott tells us, it was a fleeting moment of victory. >> reporter: it was a lock. a sideshow. part of a charity fund-raiser for a southern minnesota schools. pay 10 bks for one shot at 50,000 of them. all he had to do was slap a puck through a hole barely big enough to fit it, from halflf a hockey rink away. 11-year-old nickck smith did ju that. letting the shot fly and watching in disbelief. as it disappeared through the hole.
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>> i was like, shocked. >> reporter: the only problem, that young fellow wasn't nick smith. nick was outside the rink when his name was actually called, so his father pat sent nick's identical twin brother nate to take the shot. for a while it seemed some quick thinking and genetic luck would soon swell a couple of college funds. at leaststuntil pat got home that night. >> honesty was the best policy. we wanted to set a good example for our kids. the next day i called back and i said, you know, it was really nate that t made the shot. >> reporter: perhaps in such lean times a father could be forgiven. but maybe that's the point. those two kids might have futures richer still. all because this time, their dad just couldn't forgive himself. the insurance company actually tasked with paying the amount hasn't yet said what it plans to do, though a spokesman did say that the rules clearly state that the person taking the shot must be the same person whose name is printed on the ticket.
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josh elliot, abc news, new york. >> oh, come on. >> give the kids the money. >> he made the shot, he made the shot. >> incredible shot, give him the money. you have any skill as a hockey player? >> sliding. drop the gloves and let's go. >> there you go, looking good out there. >> i am a tough little girl out there. >> one of the many jobs you had before joining us on "world news w." that's the news for this half hour. more news from abc coming right up, don't go far.
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this morning on "world news now," mean season. from flooding rainfall to relentless and record heat in all 50 states. >> this unforgettable and unforgiving g summer of extreme and the concerns about climate changes are far from over.
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it's tuesday, august 16th. >> from abc news, this is "world news now." >> good morning, i'm rob nelson. >> i'm diana alvear. absolutely that is the talk around this town, the weather craziness. >> wild summer. we'v'vhad everything. >> texasas seems to be especial hit hard. ranchers and farmers do not have the water to keep up their crops and herds and that could drive up prices at the supermarket. today it will be 15 days in a row of triple-digit heat in houston. another texas record. >> wow, unbelievable. also ahead this half hour, he looksksnd appears just like a candidate. but president obama insists these are official white house visits to the heartland of the country. today he unveils new economic plans really targeting rural communities and job-creation, which is going to be the defining issue of this campaign. >> it's all about the economy. later this half hour, moviemakers are turning the
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streets of glasgow, scotland, into the streets of philadelphia for a film starring brad pitt. >> i is it not cheaper just to film the movie in philadelphia? >> you know what, the genuine cheesesteak. you know? i got friends in philly, i know what i'm talking about. >> nothing beats the cheesesteak. i'm a south jersey kid, noththg beats a cheesesteak. we begin with the intense condions blowing away records from coast to coast. >> and the past couple of months americans have weathered way more than their fair share of historic heat, deadly winds and rainfalls like none other. abc's jim avila has more on the staggering summer extremes. >> reporter: from the mid-atlantic to new england, buckets of rain, a record 10 inches, fell on new york's long island. >> prey wicked. wee been trying to get around all day. you can't get nowhere. >> repororter: if this was januy that storm would have dumped 9 feet of snow. instead the northeast flooded. >> we've had rain, we've had flooding, but never anything that looks like this.
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>> reporter: never had anything like this heat either. triple digits across texas again. halfway through august, 5,000 heat records have been broken n croscoun every state in the u.s. set a heat record. all 50. waco hit 100 for the 63rd time this year. tying an all-time record. it was nature from another angle in indianapolis over the weekend. straight-line winds, unseen on radar, out of nowhere, hit 70 miles per hour. knocked down the state fair concert stage, killing five. >> that is a monster tornado. >> reporter: a summer of extremes. tornados in massachusetts. dust storms in phoenix. and this weekend, wellington, new zealand, of all places got its first snowfall in 35 years. what is going on? >> when you crank up the heat, when you globally warm the planet, you're going to see more extreme events. >> reporter: how's this for extreme? the arctic sea ice is at its smallest ever. globally, july was the seventh warmest ever. making the drought in texas easisier to explain.
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75% of america's second-largest state bone dry. kemp, texas, water tanks ran dry for days. farmers all across the southern tier are suffering. crops from corn to soybeans dying on the vine. and soon prices on vegetables and beef are expected to jump 10% to 20%. >> every farmer in the world will be affected by climate change in one way or another. >> reporter: commodity prices have already gone up. you can expect the increases to hit the supermarkets within six months. jim avila, abc news, new york. >> funny news about ththe new zealand snow. do you remember happy feet, the penguin who got lost? >> yeah, yeah, of course. >> he was loving life with all that snow. he's like, oh, that's my hometown of antarctica. >> didn't he make it back? >> no, he's still hanging out there. >> he's still there? oh, man. what a journey that guy had. here's your tuesday forecast. scattered showers in the new york city area. another day of heavy rain for much of new england. wet in south florida. severe storms and tornados
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around f fargo, minneapolis, de moines and omaha. thunderstorms in the southern and central rockies. >> 90 in albuquerque. 94 in colorado springs. mostly 80s across the midwest. 75 here in new york. 83 in baltimore. 91 in my hometown of miami. >> a miami girl. president obama will unveil his new plan later today to jump start the economy and create jobs. mr. obama wants to spend more on small businesses in rural areas and also encourage investment. under his plan the usda will allow people to search for jobs at its field offices. and the president also wants to help rural hospitals hire more doctors. he'll announce all of this on his tour through the midwest. abc's jake tapper is traveling with the president in iowa. >> reporter: we're here at the second stop of president obama's bus tour of the heartland. this is just a couple of days after the republicans finished up their straw poll in iowa. the white house insists that this is not a campaign trip, it is an official trip by the president. still, you do hear, even though he is not making partisan
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attacks, you do hear the preview of the campaign to come. he criticizes some in congress, not naming who they are or what party they belong to, but some in congress who would rather see their opponents lose than america win. he talks about how during the republican debate last week there was not one republican candidate who was willing to go for a deal to reduce the deficit that was 10-1 spending cuts to tax increases. he said if that is your position, you are putting politics ahead of common sense. the president is in these states, these are states that he won -- minnesota, iowa, illinois. they are states that are not experiencing unemployment as bad as the rest of the country. but they are places where even his supporters have serious concerns about the economy. perhaps the best t president can hope for is a worried and concerned electorate that does not hold him personally responsible. that's what i've been hearing from the voters who have turned out to this event, both here in iowa and in minnesota. the president will continue in iowa on tuesday and then wednesday he wraps up this trip of the heartland in illinois.
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jake tapper, abc news, travevelg with the president in iowa. >> seems right now the two candidates with all the buzz, michele bachmann and also governor perry, and bill clinton of course weighing in on the race. >> shocker. >> former president loves to chime in there. he says rick perry is a good-looking rascal but he calls his policies crazy. >> in your best arkansas accent. >> i try. an australian man's been arrested here in the u.s. in connection with that bizarre bomb hoax two wewes ago. doug peters was taken into custody at his ex-wife's home in a louisville, kentucky, suburb. police say he put a fake bomb around the neck of an australian teenager as part of an extortion attempt. it took ten hours for the bomb squad to free the girl and that bomb turned out to be a hoax. a chlorine leak at a california water park sent 20 people to the hospital. nine children were among those who were sickened. 400 people were evacuated from the raging waters papark while hazmat crews tracked down the problem which was near the wave
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pool. a fire department official says it appears a mechanical failure caused a pump to release a cloud of chlorine gas. >> scary. a maryland man will spend at least 16 more days in custody in aruba as police investigate the disappearance of his companion. >> prosecutors tell abc their decision to detain gary giordano is based on his past record here in the u.s. craig cropper is joining us here with the very latest. >> reporter: good morning, rob and diana. this case is eerily similar to the natalee holloway disappearance back in 2005. that case was never solved. this time authorities hope to get it right. gary giordano isn't going anywhere. siding with prosecutors, a judge has ordered him to remain behind bars for another 16 days as they continue to investigate the disappearance of robyn gardner. aruban authorities are reaching out to the fbi for help. agents searched giordano's maryland home for cell phones and laptop computers. >> they're looking for communication between the two of
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them because they're trying to determine how abnormal his relationship was with her. >> reporter: giordano claims gardner, a woman he met online, was swept out to sea while they were snorkeling nearly two weeks ago. investigators have their doubts and so do gardner's friends. >> my experience with robyn is knowing her since i've known her, is that she's not a swimmer. and that she's more of a lay by the pool, have a margarita kind of girl. >> reporter: turns out giordano may have a violent history with past girlfriends. two even sought restraining orders. in documents obtained exclusively by "gma," one ex-girlfriend alleges this assault. we argued about his past sexual lifestyle as a swinger. he started to choke me with both hands. he then shoved his fingers down my throat. i was struggling and gagging. as giordano's attorney continues to assert his client did nothing wrong, police have expanded their search, looking into an abandoned phosphate mine.
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they found clothing but nothing belonging to robyn gardner. in a statament aruba's solicitor general says he hopes an appeal to the public will yield more information. as the investigation continues. rob, diana? >> thanks, craig. google has shaken up the tech world with its plan to buy motorola's mobile division. google says it's not looking to make mobile phones or restrict other companies from using its android operating system, it's motorola's patents they want. motorola is also the biggest maker of cable tv boxes in the u.s. so the deal puts google in position to deliver advertising through television. a bit of good news for drivers and the economy. the energy department says the average price of a gallon of gas dropped 7 cents in the past week thanks to a recent 15% dip in oil prices. economists say the falling prices pretty much act like a tax cut by immediately putting money in consumers' wallets so that 7-cent drop equals $6 billion in consumer spending. i'll take it. we don't drive here in new york.
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you drive in l.a., right? >> i drive in l.a. a lot. >> traffic as bad as they say out there? >> yeah, yeah. >> you have a little road rage? >> kind of excited about this next story. it's a very rob story. >> oh, animal. >> among theany performers charming visitors at county fairs this summer, twiggy the waterskiing squirrel is a classic. she's appearing in michigan, pulled around a wading pool by a tiny r rote-controlled boat. wearing a shirt that says i heart rob nelson. >> she's actually twiggy number eight. the first twiggy was rescued after a hurricane in the '70s. and taught to waterski as a joke. the act caught on and twiggy has been performing now for 33 years. now she's partnering with progressive insurance company to promote water and boating safety. >> is she aware she's partnering with anybody? that makes me think of rob burgundy. i love that scene where he's like, look at that we're skiing squirrel. >> we would not be a legitimate news operation without a
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waterskiing squirrel. it's a classic tv news. >> stay classic. >> more "world news now," more waterskiing animals right after this. skiing animals right after this. [ vet ] your turn max. [ cat ] inside and out. and i'm not the only one who thinks so...right doc? [ female announcer ] vets agree, a healthy check up starts inside.
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♪ all i want to do is have some fun ♪ ♪ i got a feeling i'm not the only one ♪ ♪ all i wanna do is have some fun ♪ >> okay, love that song but i don't think it's what sheryl crow meant, this story coming up now. when it comes to kids going to the fast food restaurants, having that fun often means a visit to the play area.
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>> but attention, mom and dad, you may want to actually think twice before letting the little ones play in that area. abc's elisabeth leamy s the nasty facts. >> reporter: clumps of hair. rotting food. and gang graffiti. those are just some of the things mom erin jordan says she found when she followed her toddler into a fast food restaurant play tube. >> it was like getting hit with a brick. it was so disgusting. there was filth everywhere. it was black on the walls and it was sticky and there was grime inside the connecting tubes. >> reporter: with four kids of her own and a professional specialty in child development, she couldn't get the filthy scene out of her mind. so erin crawled into more play tubes. when she felt restaurant managers weren't responsive to her complaints, started taking her video camera with her, then posting what she found. >> just layers and layers and layers of dirt and old food everywhere that children touch. >> reporter: erin knew the play areas looked awful but she
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wanted proof they could make children sick. so she spent several thousand dollars of her own money. >> take this swab out of here, rub this way, go back and forth. >> reporter: she collected samples at nine restaurants in seven states. mcdonald's, burger king, chuck e. cheese, and more. erin shipped her swabs off to an accredited lab. and this is what grew. fecal matter. human waste. in eight of the nine play areas tested. any child who cos in contact sick if they touched their own mouth, nose or open wound. one restaurant play tube had more than 20 million fecal bacteria in a two-inch area. we asked new york university microbiologist dr. philip tierno to put erin's lab results in context. >> the areas where children play in those restaurants, they should be periodically sanitized. i don't know if some of these were sanitized in a more timely fashion, to have 20 million count. but they really should be.
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>> reporter: and that is precisely erin's point. after all, restaurant bathrooms and kitchens are required by law to be cleaned regularly. but there are no clear standards foforestaurant play areas. >> how nasty was that story. >> wait, little kids are grubby. they're grubby. >> it doesn't take that kind of money -- kids are nasty, everyone knows that. you don't have to spurned that kind of money. you know. germ-wise. feces-wise. you don't need that kind of money to know kids are making a mess, all that kind of stuff. > you're so freaked out righ now. >> i'm a germophobe. i can't get this thing out -- whatever. >> would you eat off of this? all right. moving along. coming up, movie magic for brad pitt's latestst film. >> that's right. turning a scottish city into the city of brotherly love. it is no easy task. >> do you vacuum as well?
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we're keeping you. >> you're watching "world news now." abababababababababababababp
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when we mention strange things in scotland you might think of the loch ness monster. >> this time it's the city o glasgow that's raising eyebrows. it's being transformed into an american city. >> lororna gordon of the bbc tes us why they're building their own version of philadelphia. >> reporter: it's glasgow. or is it? the signs are being changed. american cars are appearing on the streets. hollywood is coming. with part of the center of the city standing in for philadelphia, for a big-budget film where humans are battling to stop zombies taking over the world. the star of the movie, brad pitt, is already causing a stir with his visit to the uk. it's thought he's visited glasgow bere. but this is the first time he'll
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have filmed here. >> i think most people are chasing brad. >> what about you? >> oh, of course. of course. why wouldn't i be? >> reporter: there's plenty of speculation about what is to come. >> there's going to be a car crash scene filmed on the road. that's about it, really. just car crashes and things. and zombies apparently. >> reporter: the city has been used as a backdrop for films before. this upcoming movie starring ewan mcgregor one of the latest to be shot here. but "world war z" is the largest production ever seen in glasgow. its boost to the local economy estimated upwards of 2 million pounds. >> felt that we had a fighting chance because glasgow, the architecture and the grid system in glasgow has been compared to u.s. cities. also the location manager on the project had been in glasgow before so he was aware of this. >> reporter: with filming about to start, the city's getting plenty of help with its transformation. and what can't be physically
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changed is going to be altered through the use ofofomputers. a whole cityscape of skyscrapers is going to be generated through cgi. it will be a long wait, though, until we seeeeow these streets end up looking on the big screen. the film's not expected to be released until the end of next year. lorna gordon, bbc news, glasgow. >> the magic of movies, right? >> it's got to be fun for the people of scotland. >> it would be kind of a cool scene. are you a big brad pitt fan? are you obsessed like most women with mr. pitt? >> i liked him in, what was it, the girl movie? >> were you there that night? >> what? oh my gosh! hó
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"world news now" delivers your "morning papers." >> all right, this is going to be good. >> haven't done this in years. >> ready? >> one, two, three.
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>> oh, we do think alike. here's the deal with our first story. it's all about the fact that rock, paper, scissors is not random. >> there's a a strategy. >> here's what you need to know if you want to kick booty in this game. you want to eliminate your opponent's options. you want to force her to make a predictable move. because inexperience tends to leave with rock. >> we both did scissors. >> players often imitate their opponent's last moves. > that's a good one. >> you're going to -- if he goes with rock and he wins, you're like, i'm going to do rock too. and then your opponent will often come back from a loss or a tie by throwing the move that would have beaten his last one. >> let's do it till we win. >> one, two, three. oh! >> rock crushes scissors, what are you doing? you cheated. >> i'm a winner. >> you cheated. this study was making news yesterday, we thought it was interesting. i wanted to talk about it again. get this. basically, if you're mean, you do better in the workforce.
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nice guys finish last. apparently there's a study that has quantified all of that. a new study finds agreeable workers earn significantly lower incomes than less agreeable ones. the gap is especially wide for men. now they're saying the research examined agreeableness using self-reported survey data and found men who measured below averagon agreeableness earned 18% more, 10,000 bucks annually, than nicer guys. ruder women earned 5%, 1,800 bucks more than their agreeable counterparts. >> that's ridiculous. >> it pays to be mean, less so if you're a mean woman. >> i know. i love the gender difference in this. so it pays to be a bully. that's so terrible. >> confirms the worst stereotypes about a lot of things. let me go whoop somebody's whatever today. >> speaking of poo-poo. it's all about pigeon poo-poo. let me explain why. the opening of the city's first casinot aqueduct racetrack has been delayed because of massive amounts of pigeon doo-doo. pigeon droppings are on the
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floors, the ceilings, walls, every surface. they spent more than $15 million to remove lead paint, asbestos, and pigeon waste. so the poo has led to a delay. >> that is disgusting. if you need to be grossed out even more by animals this morning, the grand army plaza park here in new york in the shadow of the famous plaza hotel, they have a huge rat problem. rats people are saying as big as rabbits out there. huge, huge rats out there. they're blaming thhorse feed left behind on the streets as well as trash. theyeyeyeyeyeyeyeyeyeyeyeyeyeyeb
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this morning on "world news now," " ndidate obama. the president pushes his agenda to beef up the economy and create new jobs. >> today he announces new plans to help hard-hit communities and
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help out of work americans. it's tuesday, august 16th.h. >> from abc news, this is "world news now." >> good morning, everybody, i'm rob nelson. >> i'm dianalvear. though the white house is insisting these are official visits for president in the midwest it looks like these campaigning. as his gop opponents criticize him, he comes back with his own planan to help generate jobs. we're going to tell you what that is. >> a real focus on rural communities since he's touring the midwest. interesting. also ahead, the state fair tragy in indianapolis. what a fairgrounds manager tried to do to prevent the tragedy just moments before that awful stage collapse. >> terrible story. and later the high-tech trend at the cash register. instead of pulling out your wallet, reach for your smartphone. is this new form of payment as secure as a credit card or cash?
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as if anybody carried cash anymore. >> i put tic-tacs on my debit cards. i am so bad about carrying cash. folks here use that program. it's kind scary to me but we'll get into it in a few minutes. we'll see. first we have new details overnight of the president's new plan to spur economic growth and create new jobs. he now wants $350 million to help small businesses in rural areas as well as conferences to help connect investors with rural startups. >> the plan also calls for the usda to allow citizens to access labor department job search information at its 2,800 field offices nationwide and rural hospitals to be given money to recruit more doctors. the president will unveil this new plan later today during a stop in iowa. abc's john hendren joins us from washington with more on the president's new message. john? >> reporter:r: good morning, ro and diana. the president started his three-day tour talking economics in minnesota reserve that's home to michele bachmann, who just happens to have a newly p prominent positi at the head of the republicacan 2012 pack. the president's midwestern bus tour, his first since the 2008
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race swept him into office, might look like a campaign swing. president obama might sound like a candidate. >> congress is not able to come up with the kinds of compromises to move this country forward. i don't know about you but i'm pretty frustrated about that. >> reporter: he might even act like a candidate. rolled-up sleeves, no tie, with several stops in the midwestern presidential battlegrounds of iowa, illinois, and minnesota. he might be taking pot shots from a new republican rival. >> go ask your veterans if they'd rather see somebody who's never served as the commander in chief. >> reporter: but there's no obama 2012 sign on the sleek black tour bus for a reason. this is an official white house visit. perry is in. former minnesota governor tim pawlenty is out. minnesota's michele bachmann is the late surging winner of the iowa straw poll. >> we just see this as the very first step. we don't see this as the ending. this is just the beginning. >> reporter: as the president rolls through the midwestern countryside his gop rivals will be taking shots from the sidelines. the president now heads to a rural economic forum in iowa
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before taking his bus tour to illinois. this trip is all economics, all the time. rob and diana? >> all right, john, thanks a lot. >> bill clinton's pretty bashful, he rarely speaks his mind. he's already chimed in on rick perry. he says he's a good-looking rascal but calls his policies crazy. >> that's a clintonism if i've ever heard one. you know, it's interesting, perry's already pulling out a lot of tea party references. he said if they print more money that's an act of treason. we haven't heard that word in a long time. >> he's swinging already at obama in a lot of things too there's also reports yesterday about all the numbers about his job creation, there's really underlying reasons and other stats about texas that will come out as his campaign progresses. it's not all as rosy, as you can imagine. >> a lot of votes in texas. they have to go with that. movi on, there's been an arrest here in the u.s. in connection with that bizarre bomb hoax in australia. a 50-year-old australian man was captured yesterday while staying with his ex-wife in kentucky.
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police say doug peters forced a teenaged girl to wear r bomb around her neck for ten hours in an attempt to extort money from her wealthy family. the bomb turned out to be fake. al qaeda's new top man has issued a call r revenge as the tenth anniversary of 9/11 gets closer. ayman al zawahiri who became the leader of the terrorist group after osama bin laden's death issued a new videotape urging his followers to contie the fight against the u.s. he reminded supporters the battle does not end with the death of its commander. safety investigators and families who lost loved ones are still looking for answers in the collapse of that stage at the indiana state fair. five people e died and 25 peopl are still in the hospital after the accident. abc's chris bury has more on those unanswered questions in indianapolis. >> reporter: the fair reopened on a somber note with a memorial service honoring the dead and injured. >> we come today with hearts that are broken. but also hearts that are full. >> reporter: a newly hired
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teacher, an activist, a 49-year-old father of two are among those who died in the accident, now raising so many questions. >> did that wind gust just take everybody by surprise? >> yes. it really did. >> reporter: cindy hoy, the fair's director, was backstage on her way to call off the concert because of approaching storms, when that sudden powerful gust smacked the stage. >> oh, my god! >> reporter: that night, fair officials spoke at least five times with national weather service forecasters. but violent wind gusts, something they called gustnados, swept up from the ground. strong gusts of wind that swirl like a tornado in advance of a storm front too quickly to be detected. that is what apparently happened here. the wind gusts here were so isolated they never hit this part of the park, where kids riding the ferris wheel were unscathed. only a few hundred feet away om the concert stage. but 15 miles away at another outdoor concert, officials did
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order a mandatory evacuation. just 30 minutes before the state fair tragedy. the wind gusts moved so quickly here, it was impossible for some to e eape. but with severe weather in the air, experts say it's smart to have a plan and know a safe structure where you can take shelter. chris bury, abc news, indianapolis. >> such a sad story. those questions aren't going to be answered any time soon. there's so much confusion about who was supposed to be doing safety inspections. there was some talk about it, then they retracted it. it's got to be hard for those poor victims' families. >> the city doesn't seem to be responsible because the fairgrounds is a state property. it's not the city of indianapolis, you'd think it would be the state. confusion about who was supposed to check what beforehand. those questions have to get answered, as you can imagine. switching gears now, a mamaland man must remain in custody now for 16 more days as police in aruba investigate the disappearance of his companion. robyn gardner, who was last seen
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two weeks ago. gary giordano is now being held as a suspect in the case. prosecutors tell abc their decision to detain giordano is based on his past record, especially the restraining orders against him filed by two maryland women. some very sad news out of missouri. the neighbor of a missing 3-year-old girl has confessed to her murder. leaving police to search for her body. sean morgan told police he suffocated breeann rodriguez with a plastic bag after finding her standing on the ladder of his backyard swimming pool. the 43-year-old, father of three, then admitted to throwing her tiny body into a ditch. residents of this tight-knit community are stunned. >> i was just shocked. i couldn't believe that somebody in this town, that i know practically everybody, could do something like that. >> breeann's a part of us. we've followed this story from the day she went missing. she'll always be a part of us. >> morgan has been charged with first degree murder and is being
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held without bond, and if convicted, he could face life in prison without parole. in des moines, two siblings are happy to be back down to earth after getting stuck 95 feet in the air. the ejection seat ride at the iowa state fair malfunctioned yesterday, leaving 23-year-old jenny scooter and her 17-year-old brother stranded for 2 1/2 hours. rescuers used a crane and a basket to lower the siblings one at a time. they were a bit sunburned but otherwise okay. rough time for state fairs. >> hanging tough up there. i don't know if i could have had e will power to stay up there. what do you do? rock, paper, scissors? >> i'll get to that later too. all right, here's your tuesday forecast. scattered showers in the northeast with heavy rain in new england and upstate new york. showers and thunderstorms in florida. severe weather around fargo, omaha, des moines and minneapolis. thunderstorms and flooding in the desert southwest. >> a scorching 106 in phoenix. 90 in albuquerque. 87 in boise. mostly 80s across the midwest. dallas still hot at 104. new orleanan94. near 90 in atlanta.
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75, doesn't sound bad at all, here in the big apple. let's talk a little sports now. there's a new member of one of baseball's most exclusive clubs this morning. jim thome of the minnesota twins. >> thome hit two home runs last night against detroit and those made him just the eighth big leaguer to ever hit 600 homers. >> the 40-year-old thome hit his first home run way back in 1991. are you ready for this? only babe ruth needed fewer at-bats to reach the 600 homer mark. that's quite an accomplishment, congratulations to him. i love those stat stories. >> oh, yeah, good one. congrats to him. i didn't think it was so rare to get 600. one of just a few that's done it, that's impressive. >> good company with babe ruth. >> '91, what were you doing in '91? i think i was in middle school. >> she loves to sing, i love it. more "world news now" coming up. ♪ money you go next if you had a
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♪ money all right, welcome back, everybody. when was the last time that you heard this headline? very rich american calls for higher taxes. >> yeah, no, haven't heard that. sounds extraordinary but basically that's what investor warren buffett said in an opinion piece in yesterday's "new york times." >> abc's bianna golodryga takes a look at his reasoning. >> reporter: warren buffett took aim at the nation's tax system, saying his $45 billion fortune had bought him access to an elite club that doesn't pay its fair share. the billionaire says, while most americans struggle to make ends meet, we mega-rich continue to get our extraordinary tax breaks. my friends and i have been coddled long enough. passionate about. e's long been >> i don't think our tax system is very equitable and i think it drifted dramatically in the last ten years toward favoring rich
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guys like me. so i pay a lower tax rate on much of my income than my cleaning lady does and i think that's crazy. >> reporter: just how crazy? while last year buffett paid $7 million in taxes. that sounds like a lot of money but it works out to a tax rate of just 17%. buffett points out on average hihiemployees pay about double that rate. he says his secretaries and receptionists pay a 33% rate. why is his r re so low? much of buffett's income comes from capital gains, profits resulting from investments. and they're taxed at only 15%. buffett's solution? rates should be raised for the 300,000 americans who make more than $1 million a year. left alone for everyone else. an additional 1% tax on the richest americans is estimated to raise $100 billion in extra revenue during the next decade. but tax experts say it's not enough for just the super-rich to pay more. >> the bottom line is that the
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fiscal hole that we face is so large that everybodydy going to have to be prepared to pay more in revenues in the end. >> reporter: while experts agree $100 billion over the next decade isn't enough to even make a dent in the deficit, it could make a difference in other ways. for example, it could build 7,000 new elementary schools, or 2,000 new high schools. bianna golodryga, abc news, new york. >> buffett had a lot to say. also kind of said that whole debt ceiling debate and debacle in washington hurt the faith in government and they needed to take steps to restore people's faith, that government can do something. >> there's a reason people call him the oracle of omaha, people listen. this is our facebook question of the day. do you agree with warren buffett, the wealthiest americans should be taxed more? as soon as we put that online, you all had a lot to say there. >> lots of people are vocal about this one. can you tell it's political season? everybody wants to chime in. >> it's leaning towards yes, they should be taxed more. >> big-time.
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several folks around here are very cutting-edge. they're paying for their starbucks cocoee, which is super-important around here, using their smartphones. >> that's right. more and more people are doing it. as our friend daniel sieberg tells us, there's a lot of money at stake in all this. tech it out. >> reporter: what could the consumer of the future experience? let's start with defining a virtual wallet. >> so basically it's like leaving your wallet and all those plastic credit cards aside and using some other device to pay, some other device like your phone that can contain like virtual credit cards and you can just tap your phone on something and you'll be able to pay. >> reporter: on the surface it certainly sounds convenient. albeit a little scary for some. but there are plenty of major
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hurdles preventing it from becoming in the palm of your hand for now. >> there's too many moving pi now to know which way it's going to go. you've got big, big giants gearing up for a big fight. and of course there's billions of dollars at stake. i think the downside is that between the credit card t right companies. whose service you're going to go with google introduced, oddly enough, google introduced what might be considered to be a closed system. it works with their phones, their device, their platform. google wallet. and they're working with mastercard. then you have visa and thehether guys on the other side and they're working with different providers. so that could impede the delivery of this platform to the world. >> reporter:r:nd making money is ultimately what this is all about. make no mistake, while it might be about making life easier for consumers, this is a high-stakes game of battling for the billions of dollars up for grabs. you know, the money
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flowing through their systems, it's a money they of course make on interest. if everybody's paying that way -- who pays with cash anymore? very few people. you know, it's fewer and fewer people, unless you're getting a cup of coffee. but for most purchases of significance, anything maybe over $10, you're probably using your credit card. so that's a way for all those other businesses, your credit card companies, your banks, and the people who are maybe enabling them to get paid. >> reporter: l l's lay out the companies looking to capitalize here. you have the banks, credit card companies, tech giants like google, maybe apple, countless merchants. and there's a company like paypal, the online money service which says, welcome to the party. >> in n lot of ways paypal's been a digital wallet since it was created. we are a way people can safely secure the payments people use to shop online. >> reporter: it's getting messy. pay pal has sued google saying the company misappropriated trade secrets with google wallet after hiring away a key executive. >> each time google steps into a business and starts doing
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something it can threaten another business. >> reporter: where does all this leave the consumer, who may have to buy a new phone, trust a new technology, and rethink how they buy things? >> it's much sooner than i thought it would be. i actually -- i used to think it was going to be awhile. i didn't think that credit cards were going to allow this, companies were going to allow this to happen. now i see credit cards see this big upside. they want to do this as well. >> this is the app here. you basically load it with money. when you tap it it automatically reduces from your balance. how many other things are they going to get from me? my weight and my 401(k) amount? >> a lot of hackers out there, be careful. let me tell you about a very important phone call i made.
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i found out diana was a park ranger in the everglades in a former career and i have not gotten over that fact yet. we'll talk about that later. >> i can tell you all about alligators. >> you had the hat too? i'm loving it. finally this half hour, the film that could bounce those apes from the top spot at the box office. ranger, your turn. >> i don't have my hat. it's the big screen adaptation of the smash hit book "one day" starring anne hathaway. >> she's an american playing british woman, and as rebecca jones of the bbc reports, some critics, though, ain't buying the accent. >> reporter: meet emma and dexter. if you don't know them already, you haven't read "one day." >> we've never actually met. >> actually, we have. several times. >> oh, have we? >> you gate crashed my birthday
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party, called me julie, spilled red wine down my top. >> reporter: we revisit their lives on the samamday each year over two decades. their story has struck a chord with readers around the world. the writer of the book, now the screenplay, explains why. >> i think people make a very strong connection between the book and their own lives. i think most of the messages are received, say things like, i am emma. or i know a dexter. they make a connection between themselves and the characters in the novel. and i think that's quite rare. >> reporter: the book has enjoyed enormous success. it was first published two years ago. and since then it sold more than 1 million copies in the uk alone. it's also been translated into 40 languages including arabic, greek, and chinese. the question now is whether that success can be matched at the multiplexes. fans of the novel won't necessarily love the film. especially with an american actress adopting a yorkshire accent to play emma. >> it was a big learning experience for me to do the accent. there were pleley of times that i didn't think i could do it.
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i'm sure there were plenty of times other people thought i couldn't do it. once i got into emma, once i got into who she was, the accent became less importrtt. i basically put my best accent out there and hoped it was up to snuff. >> absolutely no skinny tipping. >> reporter: but it will still be a tall order for "one day" to have the impact at the box office that it's made in the book shops. rebecca jones, bbc news. >> that is the same problem renee zellweger faced and i thought she delivered brilliantly. >> i'm more interested in the ;ppbpbpbpbpbpbpbqqqqqqqqqqqqqqq$
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this morning on "world news now", busted. the suspect accused in the australian hostage and bomb hoax involving a wealthy teen is arrested. >> police tracked him down far away from home in a quiet town in kentucky. it's tuesday, august 16th.
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>> from abc news, this is "world news now." >> good morning, i'm diana alvear. >> i'm rob nelson. the suspect in this hoax is accused of strapping a fake bomb around the australian teen's neck. investigators are revealing much more about what exactly happened in all this after a manhunt that has gone on for weeks now and actually started halfway around the world. weird string of events here. >> very bizarre. also ahead, the latest threats from america's most wanted man. the new head of al qaeda. hear what he's saying to his followers now and why the u.s. is on full alert. we can all relate to this story coming up this half hour. your items seized by the security agents at the airport. guess what, they're going on sale. we'll tell you who's profiting and who's taking advantage of all those bargains. >> very interesting story. >> oh, yeah. first, the australian man arrested in connection with that bomb hoax is due in a kentucky courtroom this morning.
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>> as whas reporter adriana hopkins tells us, the arrest took place in a louisville suburbrballed la grarae. >> reporter: it's another twist in an already bizarre case. when the search for an international fugitive ended here near lagrange, kentucky. fbi agents searched this house most of the afternoon and into the night monday after arresting 50-year-old australian native paul douglas peters. we're told peters was living here with his american ex-wife. but this manhunt started thousands of miles away on another continent, australia, at the house of william pulver, a wealthy businessman who's the ceo of an information technology company. australian police alleged on august 3rd peters broke into pulver's house. and while pulver's 18-year-old daughter madeline was studying for final exams, peters strapped a fake bomb to her neck with a list of financial demands and then peters disappeared. it took ten hours for bomb specialists to determine that bomb was a phoney and remove it. according to police peters flew out of sidney on august 8th. final destination, kentucky. authorities say peters was
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living in australia for a couple of months. before the collar bomb hoax. they say he's lived in the u.s. in the past. >> we are enormously relieved that an arrest has been made in the united states overnight. these past two weeks have been a very difficult time for us and we are hopeful that this development marks the beginning the end of this traumatic ordeal fororur family. >> reporter: they expect to find out a lot more about the case and the arrest of paul douglas peters once the criminal complaint is unsealed after this morning's initial hearing. adriana hopkins for abc news in louisville, kentucky. >> i feel so bad for her parents and for that young girl. how is she going to get over something so traumatic? >> the psychological toll, ten hours with a bomb around her neck, not knowing how things were going to play out. it was crazy. he actually was in his ex-wife's home, like you heard, when they found him. it's not even clear whether she knew he was in the house. just a bizarre story from every angle.
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>> and kentucky. >> not the natural choice you'd think of from australia. interesting story all the way around. switching gears this morning to other news. u.s. military officials say libya has launched a scud missile for the first time in that six-month war. it reportedly fell in the desert and did not cause any damage. nato forces had targeted libya's scud supplies early in the war. and strong man moammar gadhafi gave what was said to be a live speech on tv though only his voice was heard. he urged libyans to fight the rebels who have in recent weeks been making some advances. al qaeda's new leader is calling for fresh attacks against america. it comes as u.s. officials have lost track of young men who may have been called to the fight and as the tenth anniversary of 9/11 gets closer. abc's chief investigative correspondent brian ross has the details. >> reporter: ayman al zawahiri is america's new most wanted man. and with the 9/11 anniversary approaching he had the full attention of u.s. officials with calls for attacks on the united states to avenge the death of osama bin laden. my brothers, the mujahadin, hunt
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her down wherever you may encounter, he said, referring to the u.s., calling it a murderous country. the new calls for attacks add weight to the concerns about the unknown whereabouts of dozens of young men from somali and yemeni neighborhoods in minneapolis and detroit. u.s. officials say many ended up in terror training camps overseas and the u.s. has lost track of them. a 2008 recruitment tape for an al qaeda-connected group in somalia features an anonymous young man speaking with what seems to be an american accent and phrasing. >> we have a global mission -- >> reporter: in minneapolis another suspected terror recruiter, mahmoud saed omar, made his initial appearance in federal court, charged with steering young men from the twin cities to terror camps in somalia. u.s. officials are now being described as on full alert given the approaching 9/11 anniversary. so far there's been very little of the so-called terrorist chatter, which means either there's nothing going on, or perhaps as was the case ten
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years ago before 9/11, the plotters are operating in silence. brian ross, abc news, new york. the cdc has confirmed that a killer amoeba is to blame for the death of a 16-year-old girl in florida. courtney nash died saturday ten days after she went swimming in a river. experts say the organism found in fresh water typically enters through a person's nose then invades the brain. nash's mom says her daughter had begged her to become an organ donor when she was just 14. her organs have now saved the lilis of seven people. incredible story. >> that is incredible, wow. investigators in indiana are still looking into whether anything could have been done to prevent that stage collapse which killed five people. the state fair has reopened with a solemn remembrance of those who died. abc's scott goldberg reports. >> reporter: we come with hearts broken but full, governor mitch daniels said at a memorial service as the indiana state fair reopened.
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>> i cannot tell you how proud i am. >> reporter: he said there was a hero every ten feet. the fair had been closed since saturday night when a deadly gust of wind tore down the scaffolding at the main stage minutes before the country group sugarland was supposed to play. >> people were crushed. they were just laying on the ground. little girls being carried out because they were crushed from being in the front row. >> chaos. it was chaos. >> reporter: david wood is one of the many who rushed in, trying to free people pinned underneath. >> after i climbed back in there, people hollering "i'm a doctor, i'm a rn, i'm a emt." it was astonishing. >> reporter: the national weather service had bebe tracking the storm and at 8:39 issued a severe thunderstorm warning. at 8:45 an announcer said storms are coming but there's no order to evacucue. at 8:49, winds moving faster than 60 miles an hour r p into the rigging.
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five people died, 40 injured. >> what's remarkable about this is virtually throughout the rest of the fairgrounds, the midway particularly, there were no damages to structures there. >> reporter: several state agencies are investigating to see if anything could have prevented this or if governor mcdaniel's claims, the tragedy was a freakish accident. the indiana state police is leading the investigation but says it will take likely weeks or months before they have answers. scott goldberg, abc news, new york. >> a very sad postscript to this story, the state fair manager was moments away from canceling the concert when that stage collapsed. it's just so sad. she saididhe was arriving there and then the tragedy happened. >> life can be a game of seconds, literally. unbelievable. all right, swarms of jellyfish are invading south florida's beaches in near record numbers. so many jellyfish are in the shallow waters there's almost no way to avoid them. despite warning flags and the high risk of getting stung, people though are still venturing into the water in droves. >> you ever been stung? >> i've never been stung.
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i like the beach but the water freaks me out. give me a pool and chlorine and i'm good. swim-up bar, i'm happy. >> nothing is keeping me from swimming. >> have you been stung? >> yeah, but you know. >> you just keep on. you're a park ranger, things don't bother you. here's a look at your weather. hail, gusty winds, isolated storms from fargo to wisconsin. thunderstorms in new mexico and utah. lingering showers in the northeast with another day of downpours around albany, boston and burlington. showers in florida. >> miami 91. baltimore 83. bean town 73. 80s from kansas city to detroit. a mild 73 in seattle. 85 in salt lake city. and 94 in colorado springs. if you weren't hungry you're going to be hungry now. >> ready? it's our -- >> our favorite story of the day. >> there it is. >> how far would you go for your favorite pizza? >> this is a great story. a mississippi man will only eat pizza from his favorite place even though it's 1,400 miles away in masssshusetts.
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so david schuler drives 24 hours across 16 states to town sva pizza in massachusetts and picks them up himself. his last takeout order, a mere 150 pies. >> get this, schuler gets them half-baked, vacuum seals them in plastic, stacks them in coolers until he gets home and can put them in the deep freezer. last year he ordered 100. clearly he went through them. next year he -- oh, i just meant that because -- >> oh! >> because he had to bring back 200. i totally didn't mean it that way. >> what a cheap shot that wawaon that pizza-loving man. i'm surprised, pizza in massachusetts. new york is known for great pizza. chicago's known for great pizza. i'm surprised this place in massachusetts has inspired that kind of devotion. it's crazy. >> yeah. >> you feel bad what you said. >> i feel really bad. >> it's okay. >> you know what, you go on, you do your thing. >> we'll be right back, everybody, stay with us.
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natural instincts can prove it. and they did. it's the only hair color that's clinically proven to be less damaging. for a healthy look... look no further than natural instincts. it's all good. all right, so if you travel all the time this happens all the time. you lose, you forget something at the airport security check. so what happens to all your stuff? >> great question. lots of it goes on sale at steep discounts to boot. and in these tough times more and more americans are taking advantage of all of this as abc's bianna golodryga reports. >> reporter: looking for a new way to make extra cash? how about selling other people's stuff? rebecca huffman does it. >> i sell swiss army knives mainly. >> reporter: no, rebecca's not dealing in stolen goods.
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she resells items bought here. at the texas state surplus store. all of these items are from texas airports. either surrendered to tsa or plain forgotten by harried travelers. some of the millions of dollars of merchandise left behind at airports all acrcrs the country. later available for sale at stores like this one. >> anything that looks like a gun or anything that looks like a bullet, anything that looks like a knife, a baseball bat, softball bat, cricket bat. >> reporter: enterprising shoppers like rebecca are doing a brisk business reselling the goods. she shops here weekly, then resellllthe items on ebay. >> i clear about $1,000 a month. around christmas time, about $2,000 a month. >> reporter: an estimated 7 million items collected from airports every year, all available at big savings to you. >> everything's pretty much discounted 70%. >> i come here all the time for bargains. >> reporter: not just itememwith
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sharp edges either. designer sunglasses that regularly sell for $300, here 50 bucks. a custom watch that costs upwards of $1,000, $200. these tiffany earrings from airport lost and found? >> at tiffany's you'll pay $4,500. i would think here between $500, maybe $1,000. >> reporter: you don't have to go to texas to get the goods. other states post the deals online. >> coffee pots. kitchenware like knives. >> reporter: items at this pennsylvania surplus warehouse will be sold on a government auction website. it's a win-win. money made here goes back to state coffers. >> since 2004 since we began participating in the program, we've brought over $700,000 back into the state. >> that is fascinating to me. are you kidding me? you're leaving fancy watches and tiffany earrings? come on. >> i know where i'm going to do my christmas shopping now. >> start making that list. >> mommy, get ready, i'm getting
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you a watch. when we come back this morning why kate gosselin and her huge family will soon get a lot less exposure. >> and who's making a comeback to the hit sitcom "modern family." stay tuned for "the skinny."
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♪ skinny so skinny learning so much today. welcome back, everybody. time for "the skinny." i don't know that people will be completely upset about this news or not. kate gosselin, guess what, tlc is canceling the show. what was it called, "kate and jon plus 8." >> i'm heartbroken. >> yes, they're done. this thing lasted like 150 episodes. it went the distance for a while. of course their claim to fame was they had twins in 2000, then they had six more kids in 2004, and of course then the mararria all went to pot because he was cheating on her. >> does her hair count as a kid? >> does who? >> her new hair? >> she had that awful haircut to begin with. we watched her for years. she did tweet yesterday. she said while it's very sad for me and the kids, there were many tears at the breakfast table this morning, we are looking forward with great anticipation to our bright future. she parlayed this into a lot
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longer than what should have been 15 minutes of fame. the show is done. the last episode will air september the 12th. peace out, "kate and jon plus 8." >> speaking of the same kind of deal, "the real housewives" are hitting the road. i don't know if america's ready for this. check this. new york's countess luann and jill. atlanta's nene and phaedra parks. kyle from beverly hills. and vicki from orange county. she's really one of the most popular ones. they're going to be hitting the road in select cities beginning october 1st in atlantic city, new jersey. i'm not entirely sure why they're hitting the road. >> touring what? to do what? >> they're probably just going to fight a lot on-camera. because that's all they tend to do. >> that's all they do. >> if you're a "real housewives" fan or if you're like me, it happens to be on and you happen to look that way and end up watching it, they're coming your way. >> going on tour. these women have parlayed this thing into a career. it is amazing, good for them. guess what, any "modern family" fans out here, you may appreciate this.
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i'm not just saying this because i work for abc. it really i think is the best-written, funniest show on tv, it's so good. those of you who have been loyal viewers, benjamin bratt had the enviable role of playing sofia vergara's ex-husband, he's coming back to the show next season so make sure you stay tuned for that, he's coming back. >> guess what, charlie sheen is back. but he's not winning. get this. he was doing another stop on his violent torpedo of truth tour. he was very excited. and then the audience started pelting him with water bottles. he said, i feel like i'm back in detroit. talking about his meltdown. >> because he bombed at that performance. >> who would be so heartless to throw water bottles at anybody. >> that is so cruel and so mean for charlie sheen. he's had a rough time. i think some of the insane clown posse -- waiai wait. >> where are my goddesses? i need to be protected by my goddesses. >> i am telling diane sawyer on all of you people. you will not be here monday. >> terrible. >> good, aim for the head.
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troublemakers here. very mean. oh, man. enjoying your time? >> this is what made charlie sheen insane. you think it's drugs? it's not, it's working with people like this. >> enjoying your time at "worlrl news now"? is it going well for you? >> it's awesome. i love the interns here. especially when i hit them in the head with a water bottle. >> well-loved by the staff here. >> they're all lining up to hit us again. >> very serious network news. >> how'd you know i was thirsty? i caught that. boo-yah! we'll be right back with more news.
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here are some stories to watch today on abc news. elvis presley fans marked the anniversary of the icon's death last night in memphis. he died 34 years ago today. it's a part of a week of events celebrating presley's life.
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asian markets are mostly higher today after a aound of corporate deals move wall street in a positive direction. the president's tour of the midwest continues today. he's announcing new plans to stimulate the economy and create jobs in hard-hit rural areas. finally this half hour, what could be a very expensive lesson about doing the right thing. it comes courtesy of a family in minnesota. >> at first it seemed they had beaten the slimmest of odds. but as abc's josh elliott tells us, it was a fleeting moment of victory. >> reporter: it was a lock. a sideshow. part of a charity fund-raiser for a southern minnesota schools. pay 10 bucks for one shot at 50,000 of them. all you had to do was slap a puck through a hole barely big enough to fit it, from half a hockey rink away. 11-year-old nick smith did just that. letting the shot fly and watching in disbelief.
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as it disappeared through the hole. >> i was like, shocked. >> reporter: the only problem, that young fellow wasn't nick smith. nick was outside the rink when his name was actually called, so his father pat sent nick's identical twin brother nate to take the shot. for a while it seemed some quick thinking and genetetic luck wou soon swell a couple of college funds. at least, until pat got home that night. >> honesty was the best policy. we wanted to set a good example for our kids. the next day i called back and i said, you know, it was really nate that made the shot. >> reporter: perhaps in such lean times a father could be forgiven. but maybe that's the point. those two kids might have futures richer still. all because this time, their dad just couldn't forgive himself. the insurance company actually tasked with paying the amount hasn't yet said what it plans to do, though a spokesman did say that the rules clearly state that the person taking the shot must be the same person whose name is printed on the ticket.
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josh elliot, abc news, new york. >> oh, come on. >> give the kids the money. >> he made the shot, he made the shot. >> incredible shot, give him the money. you have any skill as a hockey player? >> fighting. drop the gloves and let's go. >> there you go, looooking good out there. >> i am a tough little girl out there. >> one of the many jobs you had before joining us on "world news now." that's the news for this half hour. more news from abc coming right up, don't go far. rl
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making news in america this morning, a call to action. as the race for the white house heats up, president obama announces a new plan to create jobs and spur the economy. then break in the case. authorities arrest a man in

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