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tv   ABC World News Now  ABC  December 10, 2014 1:42am-4:01am PST

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comedian tracy morgan is still recovering from the near fatal highway accident. it left him with broken bones and a brain injury. >> the accident blamed on a truck driver who had not gotten enough sleep. we're "up all nightline" with abc's ron claiborne. >> reporter: the accident caused a moment of recognition in our sleep deprived nation where experts say we now get two hours less sleep every night than we used to. it's a tragedy that ben howard and his daughter know all too well. >> right here on the side of the road, my family died. i lost my wife, my son and my daughter because someone was behind the wheel who had not had enough sleep. >> reporter: this accident is 1 of 100,000 reported automobile crashes attributed to sleep deprivation that occur every year. according to natgeo's "sleepless in america" which was published
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with the national institutes of health, 40% of american adults of sleep deprived. and the consequences that result from too little sleep can be catastrophic as the natgeo doc points out. experts believe sleep deprivation may have played a role in the exxon valdez oil spill, the staten island ferry crash and the nuclear meltdown and the derailing of a chicago train. according to the national traffic safety board, the conductor admitted to falling asleep. >> it's far from ideal for someone to be operating heavy machinery or driving a car or bus when they are sleep deprived. >> reporter: it's driving while sleeping is especially harrowing. some drowsy drivers experienced a phenomenon you've never heard of called micro sleep where you fall asleep for just a few seconds, sometimes without even realizing it. i volunteered to be the guinea pig and experiment how i'd be driving without enough sleep. before long i was experiencing micro sleep.
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i look like a normal awake driver. what you can't tell is my brain is actually asleep. about half an hour in it became more obvious. i had fallen asleep at the wheel and driven completely off the road. what was most shocking, i fell asleep. i micro slept 21 other times. >> you had dozens of times where your eyes began rolling around in their sockets. >> reporter: beyond this there are less obvious risks to your health that can be caused. alzheimer's, obesity, heart disease, cancer and death. >> tack a good look at your bedroom and really go on an all-out attack to pinpoint issues that may be disrupting your sleep environment. so this could be anything from noise to light to temperature. people need to unplug from all their electronic devices. ideally an hour before they
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close their eyes and go to sleep. >> reporter: with all the temptations, distractions and stress of modern life, that's easier said than done. for "nightline," i'm ron claiborne in new york. >> ron said the 21 times he fell asleep he has no memory that he did it. >> of it happening? >> yeah. >> that's scary. we tack about it and joke about it a lot with this shift and whatnot. it's nothing to play with. sometimes a badge of honor for some folks to say how much -- i can keep going. i've been up for this long. >> serious stuff. "sleepless in america" is available online at natgeotv.com. coming, new coupons necessary. the new way to get a deal while online shopping. just ask for one. how can you save big by cyberhaggling. and in our next half hour, hidden dangers. glass shattering inside your home. mirrors, doors, tables and all this stuff just randomly exploding? we'll take a look. you're watching "world news now." >> announcer: "world news now" continues after this from our abc stations. "world news now." >> announcer: "world news now"
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continues after this from our okay buddy, what's your favorite kind of cheerios? honey nut. but... chocolate is my other favorite... but apple cinnamon is my favorite too... and fruity... oh yeah, and frosted! okay, but...what's you're most favorite of all? hmm... the kind i have with you. me too.
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♪ ♪ now that there's less shopping being done in the stores you'd think the days of bargaining for a deal are behind us. that's not the case. >> the nation's largest retailer, amazon, is keeping alive the art of negotiation. abc's mara schiavocampo has the details. >> reporter: 'tis the season for competitive shopping. sales starting early. retailers slashing prices left and right. and now amazon introducing a bargaining feature so that shoppers can haggle. >> so every item has a price, but if you want to, you can make your own offer. amazon's make an offer feature is available on more than 150,000 items priced over $100. for now only fine art and collectibles. competitive bidding seen on ebay and priceline is becoming increasingly popular. experts say bargaining can work
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just about anywhere. from big retailers to smaller stores. >> if someone does want to ask for a discount, are there any things you think would work. >> we feel they are buying enough pieces, we try to do something for them. >> reporter: can't hurt to ask and could save you cash. experts say you can try to negotiate a better deal by looking for products with small flaws and offering to pay in cash. mara schiavocampo, abc news, new york. >> it's important to haggle down around the holidays. >> are you good at it? >> i love it. it's like a sporting event. i google the store and coupon to see if there's a coupon code. >> what if you are out somewhere and a flea market or something. are you good at that kind of negotiating? >> why but my dad taught me, a poor kid was selling little
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statues. you don't haggle with a kid trying to make a buck. don't do that. 't haggle with a kid trying to make a buck. don't do that.
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you're not doing anything hand, as fast as you used to. do you need help? what is that? swiffer dusters. i can extend it so i don't have to get on the step stool. it's like a dirt magnet just like my kids. i think swiffer definitely gave me some of that time back. the start of sneeze season.. and the wind-blown watery eyes. that's why puffs plus lotion is gentle on sensitive skin. so you can always
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put your best face forward. a face in need deserves puffs indeed. and try puffs softpack today. all right. you ev all right. you ever get nervous to leave your kids at home alone with your husband? >> not really, but sometimes. >> you wonder what happens? this is kind of what happens. i've been guilty of stuff like this with our 2-year-old. this is a dad. he posted this video. he's left at home with the little one and starts putting fake beards and mustaches on the kid. they just start cracking up. some of this foolishness ensues when you all leave us. >> leave a man alone with the baby. >> that's what he entitled it. what happens when my wife leaves me alone with the baby. hasn't been fed, diaper is not changed but he's smiling. >> yeah. there you go. well, what happens when you
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pull someone over in lowell, michigan -- an incredible scene. michigan. cops pulling people over for minor traffic violations and then they ask the drivers what their kid wants for christmas and then this happens. >> yep. they show up with the gift that the person tells them. >> on the spot? >> on the spot. they are wearing microphones. they wrap up the gift and race it out. it's a big surprising -- surprise. it's not a ticket, it's a gift their kid wants. >> that's fantast ic. i didn't know it worked like that. that's, elaborate. >> what if we can change a person's day in realtime and right now. all police everywhere should adopt that. >> even if it's minor if you get stopped by the cops you're usually having a bad day. it's never a good experience. to turn it into this. >> i've been stopped twice for traffic violations in recent months and it was not a pleasant
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experience. >> what did you do? you're stuttering. all right. let's show you a chic way to wear a sweater. this one was lost apparently wandering around omaha, nebraska. where in the world did it come from? they couldn't find the owner. the owner had dressed up, gage is the name. it's been reunited with the owner. this was a thing online. there's a lost sheep wearing a sweater. you know those fancy lights people put outdoors? there's a man who may have stolen the show. take a look. yeah, it sounds like the music of the wizards of winter. it's like the ultimate christmas tree. they used a drone to film the display in their neighborhood. they all banded together to do this synchronized christmas light show. incredible. this morning on "world news
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this morning on "world news now" -- extreme weather. the rain, ice and powerful winds on the east coast and the sand bagging on the west coast. get the latest on a stormy day from accuweather. explosive report. the senate reveals cia secrets about torturing terror suspects. lawmakers say it's worse than expected. why the spy agency is defending itself. safety alert. the glass in your home that can spontaneously crack and shatter. we've got a lot of complaints out there. the one thing about brad pitt's kids that horrifies him. parents, listen up. will you have the same opinion. it's wednesday, december 10th. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now." >> good morning on this
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wednesday. glad you could spend some time with us. i'm t.j. holmes. >> i'm reena ninan. it's cold, it's raining. it's a total mess. we have severe weather to talk about. that's why i wore these shoes today. >> it's necessary sometimes. >> yes. >> really, this is necessary. >> even underneath the anchor desk today, i feel frosty. my toes feel good because there's serious reason for this. weather that's taking aim on both coasts, right? >> west coast, you might need shoes like this. you like your uggs out there. remember the joke from jimmy kimmel. all of l.a. smelled like wet uggs for a reason. one of the most powerful storms. a powerful nor'easter is dumping heavy, wet snow across the northeast. some areas can expect a foot or more. linzie janis is on it for us. >> reporter: a deadly mix of rain, ice and snow pounding millions from delaware to the coast of massachusetts where nor'easter winds battered homes ripping off shingles.
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high winds along the jersey shore, too. >> i couldn't get out my front door. >> massive waves breaching sea walls. houses surrounded by water. up to four inches of rain stranding drivers, area schools canceling classes. away from the coast, freezing rain coating everything in a sheet of ice. from roofs to roads. hundreds of accidents. in upstate new york, the icy storm turning deadly. five tractor trailers and two passenger vehicles in this crash. at least one of those passengers killed. the messy conditions snarling air travel, too. over 2,000 flights delayed and nearly 1,000 flights canceled. back here on the massachusetts coast, residents going outdoors only when they have to. >> i'm a dog walker. i have the mailman's motto. >> reporter: wind gusts here
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have reached 61 miles per hour. we're in the middle of a storm that's pummeling the northeast. linzie janis, abc news, massachusetts. >> you could be certain my girl linzie janis has good footwear that's going to hold up. >> she better. she better have good head to toe wear in that mess. the west coast was bracing really for one of the strongest storms in years. >> more soaking rain and mountain snow on the way to california where they're stacking nearly 2,000 sandbags in berkeley. our coverage continues with jim dickey. good morning. >> good morning. still dealing with our nor'easter. hasn't moved that much in the past 24 hours, swirling off the coast of new jersey. rain, ice and snow and some snow in place across the region. where we see that mixing in plain rain that will keep accumulations down. interior sections of new england, back to upstate new york, a foot or more of snow by the time all is said and done. rain is returning to california
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here tonight. all the way south into l.a. by friday. likely bringing flooding and mud slides. back to you. >> jim dickey, thank you as always. to the protests in northern california. hundreds of people spilling into the streets of oakland and berkeley to rally against excessive force by police. extra police patrols clashed with protesters firing rubber bullets at the crowd. a train station was temporarily shut down again and amtrak suspended service in the area. new details on the cia interrogation methods for terror suspects. those methods included weeks of sleep deprivation, simulated drowning, slapping and slamming and threats to kill, harm or sexually abuse families of the captives. senator dianne feinstein was among the democrats who wanted the report made public. >> history will judge us by our commitment to a just society governed by law and the willingness to face an ugly truth and say never again. >> at least one republican stood with the democrats. senator john mccain who was tortured in vietnam.
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he welcomed the report and backed its findings. former heads of the spy agency are speaking out saying those extreme interrogation methods did save lives. here's now abc's jonathan karl. >> the tactics were harsh but the cia says it's flat out wrong to say they did not work. the brutal interrogations the cia director george brennan said did produce intelligence that helped thwart attack plans, capture terrorists and save lives. and in a fiery defense of the spy agency's honor, three former cia directors and their deputies say in "the wall street journal" the senate report is a partisan attack on the agency that has done the most to protect america after the 9/11 attacks. they've even launched their own website, cia saved lives.com. the report makes the cia sound like a rogue agency but the spy
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chiefs say the program was fully authorized by the justice department and the white house. the report says president bush didn't know all the specifics but just last week, he defended the cia. >> we're fortunate to have men and women who work hard at the cia. >> reporter: one key question, did the interrogations help get osama bin laden? the report says no. the cia says yes. that only through harsh interrogation did they discover bin laden the personal messenger and following the mess. >>er led to bin laden's hideout in pakistan. the report was done entirely by democrats and most republicans are trashing it, but not john mccain, who himself was tortured in vietnam. >> it's about who we were, who we are, and who we aspire to be. our enemies act without conscience. we must not. >> reporter: while president obama's cia director is saying the harsh interrogations saved lives and led to bin laden, the white house is not saying that. all they are saying is that even if the interrogation program
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worked, it wasn't worth it. jonathan karl, abc news, the white house. a 67-year-old sailor is expected back on land in ohio after surviving 12 days adrift at sea. a navy ship came to his rescue yesterday. he had been drifting since thanksgiving. that was when he made two mayday calls reporting his sailboat was taking on water. a coast guard search was started but was called off last monday. one final call -- mayday call came yesterday. it was heard and the navy destroyer arrived on the scene an hour later. he was weak, hungry, dehydrated but otherwise okay. the ntsb says there's no evidence that a bird strike or engine trouble caused the fatal plane crash in maryland. the aftermath of that crash captured in new video. three people on board the plane died and a mother and her two sons were killed in the house fire. their husband and father left a message on facebook saying in part words can't describe the enormity of our sadness and loss over the tragedy. a new predictions just in
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showing how busy this year's holiday travel season will be. analysts say 45 million passengers will fly on domestic airlines between next wednesday and january 4th. that's up 2% from last year. airlines are planning to use larger planes to accommodate 47,000 passengers a day. okay. if you fly delta you'll soon have more seating options to consider. delta airlines announced a new five-tier seating plan set to take effect in march. passengers get to choose from two premium options in first class. including bare bones, basic economy. those willing to pay more for the main cabin will be allowed seat selections and meals and drinks even. but delta is not yet saying how much more. probably a reason why. >> all right. well, here's a great story we can give you about a waitress in branson, missouri. calls it the best tip she's ever got. >> cindy grady needed a new car. look at the clunker. the hood being held down by a
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plastic strap. >> but look at this. a husband and wife found out she was driving that clunker. they bought her a new car. aye 2008 ford fusion but certainly an upgrade. she need something better to get around in. now she has it. that is another fantastic story. >> took place at the cracker barrel in branson, missouri. >> we've had some great holiday stories. >> you're right. i hope it continues into the new year. there have been some really great moments. >> i'm sorry to be cynical here but probably not. >> i'm going to hold out hope. >> just the holiday spirit. >> when we find those special stories i'm going to hold it over you. >> i love these. i love them. coming up in "the skinny," the music legend paying tribute to frank sinatra. wait until you see who is singing old blue eyes favorites. will and kate's first official visit to new york. a humble gala they won't soon forget. more on "world news now." >> announcer: "world news now" weather brought to you by lysol. gala to a
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humble performance. one they won't soon forget. more on "world news now." >> announcer: "world news now" weather brought to you by lysol. this is the time of the year when the flu starts to spread. before the first sneeze, help protect with a spray. before the first tissue, help defend with a wipe. and help prevent with lysol. to get ten times more protection and kill 99.9% of germs around the house. this season, help protect your family with lysol. start healthing. she loves to shop online with her debit card. and so does bill, an identity thief who stole mary's identity, took over her bank accounts, and stole her hard earned money. unfortunately, millions of americans just like you learn all it may take is a little misplaced information
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all right. imagine all right. imagine this. just stepping into your shower stall and the door disintegrates. you put your cup on a simple glass table and it shatters. >> of course glass will shatter with enough force. sometimes they happen spontaneously. mara schiavocampo has a warning for consumers. >> reporter: take a look at this man shattering his own shower
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door. after he says the glass spontaneously cracked and he's not alone. from glass tables -- >> out of nowhere our patio table exploded. >> reporter: to shower doors. some consumers are shocked by what they found. >> i heard an explosion and i came down to this. >> reporter: that's what duane brian of chicago says happened to him. >> right here was the leaf bowl. >> reporter: last summer he was awakened in the middle of the night to what he thought was someone breaking into his home. his glass sink had shattered into pieces. >> the power of it was so hard that it was also in the tub. >> reporter: the consumer product safety commission told us in the last two years there have been hundreds of reports of spontaneously shattering glass. the top three culprits, shower doors, tables and sinks. >> the reason tempered glass shatters is the glass might have an original flaw in the edge or scratch in the surface. the other reason is occasionally there's an impurity in the glass
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from when it was first melted from sand and it's called an inclusion. >> reporter: that inclusion, a tiny ball of metal made of nickel and sulfur growing over time. >> when it grows, sometimes it can pop the glass. >> reporter: they set up this demonstration to show us what can happen when tempered glass breaks. he says the cracks move at speeds up to 3,000 miles per hour. >> tempered glass is a specifically designed product that breaks into very small pieces to reduce lacerations and cuts. >> reporter: the industry representing glass manufacturers told us it takes extraordinary steps to minimize the potential for nickel sulfide inclusions a large glass furnaces may produce up to 800 tons of glass a day, total elimination of contaminants is not possible. mara schiavocampo, abc news, new york. >> in a lot of communities, glass is used in or near showers
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that have to be tempered. something to check for. >> something you'd never -- >> ooh! i have a headache. we should have used tempered glass. >> i don't know who is going to pay for that. >> abc. >> but we cannot afford it on the "wnn" budget. coming up, one pop singer has a mysterious illness. has some folks talking and concerned. and taylor swift admits somebody does dress better than she does. "the skinny" up next. >> announcer: "world news now" continues after this from our abc stations. continues after this from our abc stations.
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♪ skinny ♪ skinny so skinny ♪ topping "the skinny," a health scare for avril lavigne. suffering from an undisclosed illness, and she's reportedly asking fans to keep her in their prayers. >> she expressed her gratitude for the well wishes on twitter after a fan tweeted get well soon and pray for avril. the 30-year-old pop star has yet to specify what the health issue is or issue a statement. >> she's been keeping a pretty low profile in some recent months. and there's even been speck blagz her marriage to nickelback frontman could be on the rocks.
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don't exactly know what's going on with her but do wish her well. bob dylan has a new album coming out in early february. may not be what his fans expect from him. >> all ten songs are ones recorded by frank sinatra, which given dylan's vocal abilities may strike some as something stupid. well, dylan says the songs have been covered so much, they are buried and this album uncovers them. "autumn leaves," "some enchanted evening" and "full moon and empty arms." ♪ full moon and empty arms ♪ the moon is there for us to share but where are you ♪ >> sinatra is not that easy to do. it's hard to pull off, right? but dylan and his band recorded all the songs live with no more than a couple takes each.
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>> instead of the 30-plus orchestras, these are just dylan and his five-piece band. it's called "shadows in the night" and available for preorders online. we turn to the superstar rock star parents. angelina jolie, brad pitt being your mom and dad. they have a situation. they are revealing their kids are now interested in getting tattoos. and that's a bit troubling for them. jolie has over a dozen tattoos and told her 13-year-old son maddox he could get a tattoo. the actress told "radio times" magazine when 9-year-old zahara talked about them it caused brad so much anxiety saying for some reason, men get a little more sensitive when the daughter gets a tattoo. angelina says they are encouraging their brood of six not to follow mom and dad into acting hoping they'll become writers, politicians, activists, instead. >> isn't that interesting she wants something else for them. >> it looks all glamorous but she probably doesn't want her
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kids to deal with some of what she's dealt with. >> she's exposed them to a lot of international venues and vacations and experiences. maybe there will be some writers and politicians. taylor swift made headlines. "time" magazine announced her as a finalist for person of the year. >> could have to do with her records that she continues to break in the music business. probably has something to do with her social media prowess. on instagram swift posted this split screen. >> who wore it better? the paddington bear? taylor concedes to paddington. we ask what was her inspiration or just a coincidence? >> was she meaning to do this? >> where do you get that coat? i would like a paddington bear coat. celebrating their big day today, shakespearean actor kenneth branagh. >> 54 years old.
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>> chef bobby flay. >> number 37 for "entourage's" emmanuelle chriqui. and raven symone, 28 today. happy birthday, folks. >> and raven symone, 29 today. happy birthday, folks. you may think you can put off checking out your medicare options until you're sixty-five, but now is a good time to get the ball rolling. keep in mind, medicare only covers about eighty percent of part b medical costs. the rest is up to you. that's where aarp medicare supplement insurance plans insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company come in. like all standardized medicare supplement insurance plans, they could help pay some of what medicare doesn't, saving you in out-of-pocket medical costs. you've learned that taking informed steps along the way really makes a difference later. that's what it means to go long™. call now and request this free [decision guide].
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it removes the tough stains that bleach doesn't and it also disinfects. that's healthing. ♪ ♪ oh, the royal couple wrapping up their first official tour in the u.s. and one that involved america's biggest stars in sports, music and politics. >> they attended a gala at the metropolitan museum of art. >> reporter: we're told william and kate said their trip to new york city has been exciting but a bit exhausting. ten events in just three days and they saved the most glamorous for last. a regal night at the metropolitan museum of art. >> -- fortunately, we are not married. >> reporter: the fund-raiser capping off their whirlwind visit to the big apple which
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included visits to the most iconic landmarks. prince william taking in the view from the empire state building. earlier they dealt with the downpour to pay their respects at the september 11th memorial. leaving a card simply signed william and catherine. it was a performance at this center for disadvantaged kids. >> he promised he'd be there to take care for me. >> the prince said it almost brought him to tears. >> william offering his contact information to one of the children asking him to keep in touch. the royal couple's down to earth demeanor throughout their three-day tour so admired by the
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crowds who came out just to catch a glimpse. >> i think it's brought a lot of reality to the throne, and i think it's a breath of fresh air. >> reporter: william and kate have to fly back to london last night to see baby george and catch upon some sleep after what's been a very busy trip across the pond. >> certainly has been. >> they seem so down to earth. as royal and untouchable as all of that stuff is for all of us, to see them being just one of the -- just an average joe. >> take a look at their signatures they signed. pretty incredible. tweeted out by the 9/11. looks like will pressed down harder than kate did. >> they used different pens. >> could be. maybe. >> that's cool they tweeted it out. >> you get a cough drop. don't miss our facebook updates at wnnfans.com. >> announcer: this is abc's "world news now," informing insomniacs for two decades. "world news now," informing insomniacs for two decades.
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babies aren't fully developed until at least 39 weeks. a healthy baby is worth the wait.
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good wednesday morning. i'm t.j. holmes. >> i'm reena ninan. here are some of the top headlines on "world news now." former heads of the cia are defending the interrogation methods. this after the release of a senate report which detailed the often brutal tactics used on terror suspects. full details in a moment. a fourth night of protests in the bay area. police firing rubber bullets overnight as they block another highway in berkeley. they stopped amtrak service and forced officials to postpone a city council meeting. severe weather taking aim on both coasts. some 36 million americans are in the path of a powerful nor'easter from delaware to boston and california, oregon and washington, bracing for the strongest storm in years. the navy ship came to the rescue of a 67-year-old sailor
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who had been a drift since thanksgiving. the man was tired, hungry and dehydrated but otherwise okay. he's expected to be back on land today. those are some of our top stories on this wednesday, december 10th. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now." we begin with the cia on the defensive following the release of the scathing report on torture. former heads say those interrogation methods saved thousands of american lives. >> but the report says the use of waterboarding produced no worthwhile intelligence. here now abc's karen travers in washington. >> reporter: humiliating abuse. physical assaults. death threats. it's all detailed in a sweeping, damning indictment of the enhanced interrogation techniques secretly used by cia officials after 9/11. >> america is big enough to admit when it's wrong. >> reporter: the senate
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intelligence committee's so-called torture report looks at 20 specific detainee cases. it concludes the approved enhanced interrogation techniques were not effective. >> i know from personal experience that the abuse of prisoners will produce more bad than good intelligence. >> reporter: the abuse began with the cia's first detainee. al qaeda operative abu zubaydah who was subjected to approved waterboarding, seen her in a demonstration. in one session, zubaydah became completely unresponsive with bubbles rising through his open, full mouth. former cia officials, members of the bush administration and some senate republicans say the report doesn't tell the whole picture and can do more harm than good. >> it will endanger cia personnel, sources in future intelligence operations. >> reporter: president obama spoke about the report with jorge ramos, anchor of fusion, abc's sister network. >> part of what sets us apart is when we do something wrong, we
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action the gentleman. >> reporter: president obama banned many of the techniques details in this report. the president wanted it released for transparency and to show that america can learn from its mistakes. t.j., reena? >> karen travers, thank you. one more shocking finding from that cia report. two psychologists who designed the enhanced interrogation techniques were paid more than $80 million for the project. that's even though they themselves were never interrogators nor did they have any specialized knowledge about al qaeda. associates told abc news in 2009 that the pair bragged about making $1,000 a day. facing a fight deadline, republican and democratic lawmakers agreed on a trillion dollar spending bill to keep the government running. some conservative members of congress had threatened to hold up the bill over president obama's executive action on immigration. they decided to put the fight off until next year. investigators found no evidence of a bird strike or engine failure in the deadly plane crash in maryland.
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abc's jim avila on where the investigation might go next. >> just saw a jet hit a house. >> reporter: and this sudden inferno came next. captured in new video just moments after the twin engine private jet dove cockpit first a mile short of the runway. >> went straight down into that house. >> reporter: the man behind the home video arrived alongside police and before firefighters. explosions all around. and inside the crippled fuselage, three dead. >> one strapped in his seat and one right under the plane. >> reporter: scott knew from the flames more victims were likely. >> it was really hot. anybody in that house would have been in trouble. >> reporter: inside that burning house, marie gemmell and her two sons, all found in a windowless bathroom. the desperate mom still shielding her 3-year-old and her baby with her own body. no one survived. >> she was just the most amazing, sweetest, kindest
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woman. >> reporter: her bravery touching the nation. a donation website raising more than a quarter million dollars so far. marie's husband posting, "no words can describe the enormity of our loss and sadness. the outpouring of support has been overwhelming." the ntsb focused on possible pilot error. the plane just not moving fast enough to fly and there's no evidence of a bird strike in those engines. jim avila, abc news, gaithersburg, maryland. breaking news from south africa. a judge has ruled that prosecutors will be allowed to appeal the manslaughter conviction against oscar pistorius. he's serving a five-year sentence for reeva steenkamp's death. that could be changed to house arrest after ten months. prosecutors called this sentence shockingly inappropriate. they want to retry pistorius for murder. after months of criticism, roger goodell is expected to unveil a tough new code of conduct to.
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he came under intense scrutiny for his handling of the ray rice domestic violence case. the players union is outraged. -- outraged that the policy contract revisions were not negotiated with the union. goodell hopes to have the new policy in place by the super bowl. a korean airline executive resigned amid a storm of public outrage after she ordered a senior crew member off the plane. why? the crew member served her nuts in a bag versus on a plate. first class. high standards here. the flight from jfk to south korea was forced to return to the gate after the executive argued over the nut crime. south korea's government is now investigating whether she violated aviation safety law by abusing her status. is part of her job to check on standards but at the time she was just a passenger, not operating in the capacity as an executive. you can't turn a plane around because you didn't like how your nuts were served. >> no. >> south koreans do not like this story. they saw it as an example of heavy-handed behavior by the children of the nation's moneyed elite.
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>> she's the daughter of the senior exec of the company and now out of her job. >> okay. moving on to more helpful airline story. a baby being delivered on board a southwest airlines flight. the plane made an emergency landing in los angeles. the pilot summing it up perfectly telling passengers they started out with 109 people on board and finished with 110. those nearby were -- the extra one, the pregnant woman gave birth to a child. they had no idea it happened. >> they needed to clean up the plane. you imagine that part of it needed cleaning. >> the smell, of course. you're like -- >> yes it was a baby boy who made a dramatic entrance into the world. as far as we know, the child and his parents are doing fine. >> i'm sure the airline charged a fee for it. >> you're probably right. here's a look -- >> lap child. halfway through. a lap child.
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>> here's a look at the nation's weather. phase two of the nor'easter chasing a band of snow showers up into upstate new york. showers across central texas. west coast bracing for eight inches of rain. up to three feet of mountain snow and mountain wind gusts near 100 miles an hour. seasonably cold in the northeast and ohio valley. 30s and 40s. 50s and 60s across the south and 70s in the southwest. a high altitude penthouse apartment in chicago fetched a record high price. >> it's the entire 89th floor of the trump tower. 14,000 square feet. 360-degree views. looking down on the windy city. the asking price? $32 million. but 46-year-old software tycoon talked them down to $17 million and handed it over to them in cash. >> cash, huh? the apartment is still raw space. they estimate the build-out will take more than a year and it will be another $15 million. by the way, the family also has homes in germany and his home country of india.
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hello. we'll take one of those. >> that same space, can you imagine in new york? $17 million there. what could you pay for that in new york? >> $77 million. >> exactly. >> and i don't even have my real estate license. how a fashion a-lister is breaking ground research into one of the biggest medical mysteries ever. instant money on instagram. how to cash in using social media just in time for the holidays. and from innovative night lights to unique phone chargers, our gizwiz is here with gadgets to put on your shopping list. you're watching "world news now." >> announcer: "world news now" weather brought to you by mucinex fast-max. >> announcer: "world news now" weather brought to you by mucinex fast-max. nt that one. yea, actually i do. it's mucinex fast-max night time and it's got a nasal decongestant.
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is that really a thing? it sounds made up. i can't sleep when i'm all stuffy. i take offense to that. i'm not going to argue with a talking ball of mucus. i think you're being a little hasty... he's not with me. mucinex fast max night time. multi-symptom relief plus nasal decongestant. breathe easy. sleep easy. start the relief. ditch the misery. let's end this. but a lot of us leave our identities unprotected.
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there's new hope for the parents of autistic children. google is using its technology and know-how to analyze genetic information to find out why so many children have the developmental disorder. abc's george stephanopoulos reports it's the latest effort to put their expertise to good use. >> reporter: these are collide scopic images of dna, the building blocks of life. a project decoding them may unlock one of our great medical mysteries. >> what we know about autism isn't enough. we don't know what causes it, we don't have a cure for it. >> reporter: no one knows that more than the families affected. fashion icon tommy hilfiger is the parent of a child with autism. >> i think when you first find out about it, you begin to question yourself and say, why us? >> reporter: now some of those questions on the verge of being
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answered. through the missing project. an unprecedented collaboration between autism speaks and web giant google. >> this is the most promising autism research that's ever been done. >> we plan to sequence 10,000 genomes in the first phase of this program. >> but where to put all that information. the amount of data is so large it's the equivalent of watching more than 13 years of continuous streaming tv. so mastiff would take ship loads of servers to store it all. >> we're going to use the same tools and technology we use every day to search the internet to look into the genome to find these missing answers. >> reporter: the database will be completely open. scientists from all over the world having access to this giant pool of information. >> what we're saying here is, here's our treasure trove of dna. have at it. come, find the answers for the 70 million people around the world who are live with autism. >> google is also doing this data mining where they'll
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connect patients with doctors to help them make that connection. >> that's a huge statement. one of the most promising research involving autism ever? that's huge. google has the power to do all kinds of things. you never really connect them to a health, a medical breakthrough like this. that's fascinating. >> autism speaks has been collecting genetic data for more than a decade. they feel this gives them the tools to move forward. you're doing your holiday shopping and looking for stocking stuffers. >> whether you're finishing your gift list or just getting started, our giz wiz has the latest and greatest. you're watching "world news now." >> announcer: "world news now" now continues after this from our abc stations. >> announcer: "world news now" now continues after this from our abc stations.
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♪ if you are making your list and checking it twice, there's a good chance you've still got some work to do. even if you are thinking you're done, our giz wiz dick debartolo is here. good morning. so glad you're here. >> we have some fun stuff. everything is $25 and under. we have wacky-tivities kinetic
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sand. >> i hate sandboxes. they are so messy. >> i'm going to give you this to play with in your hands. you can play with it, but it does not stick to you. already she's making -- she made a fish. >> whoa. >> that's what the fish looks like. as you notice, it sticks to itself, but not to your hands. >> i love this. this whole kit is under 20 bucks and you get the four little molds. and that's kinetic sand kit. >> that's so great especially for the winter. >> and now i need your help on this, and i need to turn my phone on. these are called jingle balls. we'll call then ornaments. they are bluetooth enabled holiday instruments. let me push this in until we hear a chime. okay. hold that up. now you can hang it on the tree. that little tone told me that it just --
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>> it plays music. >> it plays music. but isn't that pretty neat? >> power to it. i like it. >> under $20. >> that's great. >> okay. you like country, huh? >> you know, it's a giz wiz theme song i use so we don't have to worry about copyrights. comes in three colors. >> great idea. i love that. this is really neat. egg head l.e.d. light. looks like an egg. doesn't fall over. it will rock but doesn't fall over. get out of bed, tap it, if you forget it's on after six minutes. if you want to keep it on, tap it again. or just shake it and it goes off. >> i never have enough lights in my guest bedroom. >> under $8. >> this is great to give at christmas and use at new year's
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eve. l.e.d. disco bulb. i'm going to turn it on. we'll dim the lights just a touch. just to see what your ceiling would look like. so you don't need the mirror ball, the motor, the spotlights. everything is built in. and they range from about $8 to $12 on amazon. >> but you'll need your bellbottoms and donna summer -- >> and a vinyl jacket and go like that. this is kind of a guy thing. it's "back to the future" called the flux capacitor from "back to the future." it's usb charger. what's fun about this is it looks like the flux capacitor from the movie. and this is -- think geek invented it. an april fools' day they put several gadgets up that are not real. so many people tried to order it -- >> they thought it was real.
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>> -- they thought it was real. finally when hit "buy," it says, "sorry, april fools." they had so many hits they said we're going to make this. now you can buy the flux capacitor. >> how much is this? >> $24.99. the highest priced thing we have. and this is from kinivo. this is a non-bluetooth speaker. the wire is built into the bottom. charge it up. it runs for six hours. you open this up and it is an added base. >> really has a good -- >> very decent sound for under 20 bucks. >> i love these are so affordable. >> and unique. >> i love it. you'll need more details. if you need them, they are on the website, gizwiz.biz or on wnnfans.com. thanks, dick. >> you're welcome. >> we'll be right back. we'll be right back. ♪
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wnnfans.com. thanks, dick. >> you're welcome. we'll be right back. [ rob ] we weren't always the most adventurous couple. once we kept the lights on. but then we started using k-y yours & mine. yeah, we were nervous to try it. there's an amazing sensation for her. amazing. this one feels fantastic for me. and combined... ohh, it's a completely new sensation for us both. it's opened a whole new door for us. i've come to clean your pool. but we don't have a pool. i'll come in anyway. next week i'm going to be a maid. [ female announcer ] k-y yours & mine. his excites. hers delights. together feel them ignite. keep life sexy. together feel them ignite. she loves to shop online with her debit card. and so does bill, an identity thief who stole mary's identity, took over her bank accounts, and stole her hard earned money. unfortunately, millions of americans just like you learn all it may take is a little misplaced information to wreak havoc on your life. this is identity theft, and no one helps stop it better than lifelock.
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lifelock has the most comprehensive identity theft protection available. hd-5 hd-5 crification service lifelock's is on the job 24/7. as soon as they detect a threat to your identity within their network, they will alert you helping protect you before damage can be done to your identity. lifelock has the most comprehensive identify theft protection available, helping guard your social security number, your money, your credit, even the equity in your home. my years as a prosecutor taught me that we all need to protect ourselves from crime, in today's world that includes identity theft. it's a serious problem. we all have to protect ourselves. [ male announcer ] while identity theft can't be completely stopped, no one works harder to help protect you than lifelock. you even get a $1 million service guarantee. that's security no one can beat. you have so much to protect and nothing to lose when you call lifelock right now
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and get 60 days of identity theft protection risk free. that's right. 60 days risk free! use promo code: notme. order now, and get this document shredder to help keep sensitive documents out of the wrong hands... a $29 value, free! don't wait until you become the next victim! call the number on your screen for 60 days of lifelock identity theft protection risk free and get a document shredder free. use promo code: notme. call the number on your screen now. kids smore than homework. like cold symptoms. stuffy nose... a cough... chest congestion! fast acting mucinex multi-symptom cold breaks up mucus and relieves your child's worst cold symptoms. let's end this. started using gain flings,fe their laundry smells more amazing than ever. (sniff) honey, isn't that the dog's towel? (dog noise) hey, mi towel, su towel.
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more scent plus oxi boost and febreze. it's our best gain ever! ♪ that time of year. everybody is looking for a deal. a great way to save money through social media. >> #yesplease. instagram super users know about the secret now revealed. mara schiavocampo has more. >> reporter: instagram. it isn't just for selfies and food fun anymore. search instashop, shop my closet or instasale and you'll find over 5 million posts selling
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everything from designer shoes and bags to vintage couture. >> this is really the 2014 version of a garage sale. >> reporter: alyssa says she's made $300 in just a month. just from clearing out items she no longer even wanted. >> my name is bethany. i'm an instagram seller. >> reporter: bethany from dallas -- >> here's where the magic happens. >> reporter: turned it into a full-time business making up to $5,000 a month. she bought items from thrift stores and resells them on instagram. how does it all work? search a hashtag like instasale and go shopping. when you like an item, comment on it letting the seller know you want it. the transaction happens through services like paypal. i decided to see for myself. >> this is what we're working with. >> reporter: i invited alyssa over to shop my closet. >> tell me what you think would work here? what could i sell? >> i really like this polka dot top.
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>> that's funny because i hate it. maybe i should sell it. >> i'd post it, maybe $20, 25 bucks. >> to do it right, curating is key. items need to stand out and be unique. and taking a good photo is everything. it sold in just over a day. one more insta success. mara schiavocampo, abc news, new york. >> good tips. you have anything to sell? you have a lot of suits and ties. >> i have a lot of stuff to sell but that seems like a lot of work. >> maybe we should instagram many of your ties that i've been asking you for many months not to wear. >> the ties stay. i donate a lot of my ties. >> do you? >> i do. where is that? i'd like to go pick up some for my husband for christmas. >> i donate them to other news anchors starting out across the country. >> how do other news anchors get a tie? >> i send a bag out to my folks in california where i used to work. i give them old ties. in california where i used to work. i give them old ties.
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this morning on "world news now" -- the senate's explosive report on the cia's interrogation of terror suspects. the agency's secrets are revealed as law marks demand answers. >> the interrogations of cia detainees were absolutely brutal. >> american outposts across the muslim world now bracing for possible retaliation. a sleepless in america. public safety concerns as exhausted drivers get behind the wheel putting lives at risk. >> i lost my wife, my son and my daughter because someone was behind the wheel who had not had enough sleep. >> how your sleeplessness could put others at risk in the blink of an eye. big apple memories for the royal couple wrapping their american visit. how a humble new york performer
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got will and kate's phone number. it's wednesday, december 10th. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now." >> good morning. i'm reena ninan. >> i'm t.j. holmes. intense reaction that continues to the senate report on torture methods used by the cia. a former head of the spy agency says those methods saved thousands of american lives. >> critics counter the tactics were brutal and they gathered little or no useful information. here's abc's martha raddatz. >> reporter: the details of what american interrogators did to detainees in the dark days after 9/11 are vivid and gruesome. stripped naked and diapered. one detainee chained to a wall for 17 straight days in a standing position. another threatened with a drill. one left to die in a cell from hypothermia. at least five detainees were hydrated or fed through a tube inserted into the colon to give the interrogator, quote, total control over the detainee.
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>> the interrogations of cia detainees were absolutely brutal. far worse than the cia represented them to policymakers and others. >> reporter: the first terrorist detained, abu zubaydah, believed to be a key al qaeda operative, was waterboarded 83 times at a cia black site. after convulsing and vomiting in one session, he became completely unresponsive with bubbles rising through his open, full mouth. kept in a coffin sized box for 11 days, he was told the only way he'd leave the facility was in a coffin. the report concluded that despite the extreme interrogation, zubaydah had no new information about future plots. eventually, even the cia team begin to fall apart. it seems the collective opinion that we should not go much further. several on the team profoundly affected.
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some to the point of tears and choking up. cia officers were operating at black sites from afghanistan to thailand to poland. interrogating 119 detainees and some of the interrogators themselves, the report says, included individuals with workplace anger management issues and had reportedly admitted to sexual assault. >> history will judge us by our commitment to a just society governed by law and the willingness to face an ugly truth and say never again. >> reporter: two of the detainees shackled for 24 hours in a standing position were later found to be informants for the cia who had been trying to share intelligence with the agency. and another stunning revelation? the report concludes that torture did not lead to useful information in any of the 20 cases that were investigated. the cia, of course, disputes that. martha raddatz, abc news, washington.
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u.s. embassies in high risk countries and americans living in those countries have been told to be on alert following the release of the cia report. during an interview with our sister new york fusion, president obama was asked if americans are in danger because of the new torture details. >> we've taken precautionary measures in our embassies and around the world. there's never a perfect time to release a report like this. but it was important for us to recognize that part of what sets us apart is when we do something wrong, we acknowledge it. >> the president, anyone using those torture methods today would be held accountable for breaking the law. the northeast is in for another day of powerful weather as it brings downpours and dangerous rains from delaware to boston. in allentown, icy roads on a bridge are to blame for a 17 car pileup. ugly and messy as this appears to be, only six people suffered
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minor injuries. this chain reaction crash, a similar pile-up in upstate new york, however, killed at least one person. the storm brought a mix of precipitation to new hampshire as well, arriving in southern parts of that state as light snow but quickly accumulating on the roads. by the end of the day today, northern and western areas could see a foot or more of heavy, wet snow. deja vu for seabright, new jersey, hit badly by hurricane sandy. coastal flooding inundated entire neighborhoods with water high enough to float heavy dumpsters. residents were warned to move their cars off the streets and move their belongings to higher floors. two drivers had to be rescued after they got stuck trying to drive through feet of water. on the west coast, a powerful pacific storm is moving in forcing flood weary residents of berkeley, california, to stack as many as 1800 sandbags. crews are doing preventative tree pruning, even cutting down trees that may pose a danger of falling. accuweather's jim dickey tracking the storms on both coasts.
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hey, jim. good morning. >> good morning. still feeling the effects of our nor'easter across the northeast and new england. we'll see soaking rainfall. coast of new england, especially in main. rain heavy at times. flooding an issue here. and a mix in place. interior new england up through vermont with snow in upstate new york through northern pennsylvania and gusty winds across the board. as far as snow totals, 3 to 6 inches. some spots as much as a foot. in western maine and portions of new york by the time all is said and done. meanwhile, rain returns to california tonight. heads southward all the way to l.a. by friday. too much of a good thing going to lead to flooding. we're talking multiple inches of rainfall by the time this rain ends on friday. reena and t.j., back to you. another night of unrest in berkeley, california, over the grand jury decisions in ferguson and new york. police forced protesters from a highway after they blocked traffic. they fired rubber bullets when they tried to get back on that
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highway. the crowds forced amtrak to suspend service and officials in berkeley postponed the city council meeting because demonstrators threatened to disrupt it. carolina panthers quarterback cam newton is expected to be released from the hospital in charlotte today following a frightening traffic accident. somehow this happened. newton's pickup truck overturned on a road near the panthers stadium. he was taken away on a stretcher having suffered two fractures in his lower back. not clear if he'll be able to play. why it's -- yes, it's still possible he could still play in the team's next game on sunday. former miss america mary ann mobley has died. she was the first pageant winner from mississippi. she co-starred in two movies with elvis presley and appeared in several popular tv shows. she was married to gary collins. she died in beverly hills after a battle with breast cancer. she was 75. we've learned new details about joan rivers' will.
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she left a portion of her fortune to several charities close to her heart including one called god's love, we deliver. she often delivered meals herself for that. she was worth $150 million. she died in september during what was supposed to be a routine medical procedure. the young british royals have flown home after a whirlwind final day of their american visit. will and kate braved cold rain to leave flowers and a handwritten note at the 9/11 memorial. then toured the museum seeing artifacts from the terror attack and left virtual signatures projected on to one of the museum's walls. then last night they attended a black tie fund-raiser for their alma mater, st. andrews university. she wore a jenny packham evening gown. we understand she's worn it before, and how could anyone ignore the earrings. there you go. some observers commenting she saved the best outfit for last. maybe the most impactful event was at a youth development center.
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they listened closely at 22-year-old steven prescot did his one-man performance about growing up in tough circumstances. can you believe it? william even gave prescot his number. his phone number. and offered to support his career moving forward. they really seem genuinely moved by this. it was sort of a real genuine moment. they do a lot of the pomp and circumstances they have to do, right? this was -- they seemed to really have enjoyed his performance. >> that's why everybody seems to love these royals. these young royals. it's princess di's kid, first of all. still the people's princess. now kate is picking up that mantra. a moment like that. here's my phone number. gives a guy he just met in new york his phone number. that's good stuff. >> look forward to more from them. plenty of attention online given to the victoria's secret fashion show. >> this been going on for 20 years now they're doing this. first year they taped the show in london.
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48 models doing their thing on the catwalk. and ed sheeran performing. >> you love him, don't you? >> i love this guy. >> you really do. >> you have two models standing there and i'm paying attention to the guy on the side playing the guitar. >> only after you came to "world news now" did you fall in love with him. >> this is lingerie, really? >> the so-called fantasy bra. they are made of $2 million worth of jewels. i thought my bra was expensive today. >> what is an expensive bra today? >> you know, i would say $2 million takes the cake. >> but, you know, a woman going into a store -- >> are you trying to ask how much women pay for bras? >> i am. we're talking about a $2 million bra. what's generally -- i have no idea. >> can range anywhere from $9.99 to $150. >> you pay 150 bucks for -- >> i'm not saying i pay that much, but -- >> i had no idea they cost that much. >> some women pay a lot of money to get the girls up. >> okay. now that we've gotten that established.
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okay, coming up next in "the mix," police stopping drivers, but not to give them traffic tickets. you have to see this. >> bras? no. later, let's take a deal. the new trend toward haggling. how to save a buck or two on your holiday shopping. you're watching "world news now." >> announcer: "world news now" weather brought to you by delsym. n adimrmula for all day or all night relief. up to twice as long as other cough liquids. so the only sounds you'll hear are the ones you want to hear. bianca! (cheering) delsym. silence is relief. and now for a limited time try delsym for free, with mail in rebate.
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comedian tracy morgan is still recovering from the near fatal highway accident. it left him with broken bones and a brain injury. >> the accident blamed on a truck driver who had not gotten enough sleep. we're "up all nightline" with abc's ron claiborne. >> reporter: the accident caused a moment of recognition in our sleep deprived nation where experts say we now get two hours less sleep every night than we used to. it's a tragedy that ben howard and his daughter know all too well. >> right here on the side of the road, my family died. i lost my wife, my son and my daughter because someone was behind the wheel who had not had enough sleep. >> reporter: this accident is 1 of 100,000 reported automobile crashes attributed to sleep deprivation that occur every year. according to natgeo's "sleepless in america" which was published
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with the national institutes of health, 40% of american adults of sleep deprived. and the consequences that result from too little sleep can be catastrophic as the natgeo doc points out. experts believe sleep deprivation may have played a role in the exxon valdez oil spill, the staten island ferry crash and the nuclear meltdown and the derailing of a chicago train. according to the national traffic safety board, the conductor admitted to falling asleep. >> it's far from ideal for someone to be operating heavy machinery or driving a car or bus when they are sleep deprived. >> reporter: it's driving while sleeping is especially harrowing. some drowsy drivers experienced a phenomenon you've never heard of called micro sleep where you fall asleep for just a few seconds, sometimes without even realizing it. i volunteered to be the guinea pig and experiment how i'd be driving without enough sleep. before long i was experiencing micro sleep.
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i look like a normal awake driver. what you can't tell is my brain is actually asleep. about half an hour in it became more obvious. i had fallen asleep at the wheel and driven completely off the road. what was most shocking, i fell asleep. i micro slept 21 other times. >> you had dozens of times where your eyes began rolling around in their sockets. >> reporter: beyond this there are less obvious risks to your health that can be caused. alzheimer's, obesity, heart disease, cancer and death. >> take a good look at your bedroom, and really go on an all-out attack to pinpoint issues that may be disrupting your sleep environment. so this could be anything from noise to light to temperature. people need to unplug from all their electronic devices. ideally an hour before they close their eyes and go to sleep.
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>> reporter: with all the temptations, distractions and stress of modern life, that's easier said than done. for "nightline," i'm ron claiborne in new york. >> ron said the 21 times he fell asleep he has no memory that he did it. >> of it happening? >> yeah. >> that's scary. this is dangerous. we talk about it and joke about it a lot with this shift and whatnot. it's nothing to play with. sometimes a badge of honor for some folks to say how much -- i can keep going. i've been up for this long. >> serious stuff. "sleepless in america" is available online at natgeotv.com. coming up, no coupons necessary. the new way to get a deal while online shopping. just ask for one. how can you save big by cyberhaggling. and in our next half hour, hidden dangers. glass shattering inside your home. mirrors, doors, tables and all this stuff just randomly exploding? we'll take a look. you're watching "world news now." >> announcer: "world news now" continues after this from our abc stations. "world news now." >> announcer: "world news now"
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continues after this from our
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♪ ♪ now that there's less shopping being done in the stores you'd think the days of bargaining for a deal are behind us. that's not the case. >> the nation's largest retailer, amazon, is keeping alive the art of negotiation. abc's mara schiavocampo has the details. >> reporter: 'tis the season for competitive shopping. sales starting early. retailers slashing prices left and right. and now amazon introducing a bargaining feature so that shoppers can haggle. >> so every item has a price, but if you want to, you can make your own offer. amazon's make an offer feature is available on more than 150,000 items priced over $100. for now only fine art and collectibles. competitive bidding seen on ebay and priceline is becoming
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increasingly popular. experts say bargaining can work just about anywhere. from big retailers to smaller stores. >> if someone does want to ask for a discount, are there any things you think would work. >> we feel they are buying enough pieces, we try to do something for them. >> reporter: can't hurt to ask and could save you cash. experts say you can try to negotiate a better deal by looking for products with small flaws and offering to pay in cash. mara schiavocampo, abc news, new york. >> it's important to haggle down around the holidays. >> are you good at it? >> i love it. it's like a sporting event. i google the store and coupon to see if there's a coupon code. >> what if you are out somewhere and a flea market or something. are you good at that kind of negotiating? >> yes, but my dad taught me,
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poor kid was selling little statues. you don't haggle with a kid trying to make a buck. don't do that. buck. don't do that.
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you're not doing anything hand, as fast as you used to. do you need help? what is that? swiffer dusters. i can extend it so i don't have to get on the step stool. it's like a dirt magnet just like my kids. i think swiffer definitely gave me some of that time back. the start of sneeze season.. and the wind-blown watery eyes. that's why puffs plus lotion is gentle on sensitive skin.
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so you can always put your best face forward. a face in need deserves puffs indeed. and try puffs softpack today. all right. you ever get nervous to leave your kids at home alone with your husband? >> not really, but sometimes. >> you wonder what happens? this is kind of what happens. i've been guilty of stuff like this with our 2-year-old. this is a dad. he posted this video. he's left at home with the little one and starts putting fake beards and mustaches on the kid. they just start cracking up. some of this foolishness ensues when you all leave us. >> leave a man alone with the baby. >> that's what he entitled it. what happens when my wife leaves me alone with the baby. hasn't been fed, diaper is not changed but he's smiling. >> yeah. there you go. well, what happens when you pull someone over in lowell, michigan -- an incredible scene. michigan. cops pulling people over for minor traffic violations and
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then they ask the drivers what their kid wants for christmas and then this happens. >> yep. they show up with the gift that the person tells them. >> on the spot? >> on the spot. they are wearing microphones. they wrap up the gift and race it out. it's a big surprise. it's not a ticket, it's a gift their kid wants. >> that's fantast ic. i didn't know it worked like that. that's, elaborate. >> what if we can change a person's day in realtime and right now. all police everywhere should adopt that. >> even if it's minor if you get stopped by the cops you're
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usually having a bad day. it's never a good experience. to turn it into this. >> i've been stopped twice for traffic violations in recent months and it was not a pleasant experience. >> what did you do? you're stuttering. all right. let's show you a chic way to wear a sweater. this one was lost apparently wandering around omaha, nebraska. where in the world did it come from? they couldn't find the owner. the owner had dressed up, gage is the name. it's been reunited with the owner. this was a thing online. there's a lost sheep wearing a sweater. you know those fancy lights people put outdoors? there's a man who may have stolen the show. take a look. yeah, it sounds like the music of the wizards of winter. it's like the ultimate christmas tree. they used a drone to film the display in their neighborhood. they all banded together to do this synchronized christmas light show. incredible.
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this this morning on "world news now" -- extreme weather. the rain, ice and powerful winds on the east coast and the sand bagging on the west coast. get the latest on a stormy day from accuweather. explosive report. the senate reveals cia secrets about torturing terror suspects. lawmakers say it's worse than expected. why the spy agency is defending itself. safety alert. the glass in your home that can spontaneously crack and shatter. it's a frightening trend, and we've got a lot of complaints out there. the one thing about brad pitt's kids that horrifies him. parents, listen up. will you have the same opinion. it's wednesday, december 10th. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now." >> good morning on this wednesday. glad you could spend some time
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with us. i'm t.j. holmes. >> i'm reena ninan. it's cold, it's raining. it's a total mess. we have severe weather to talk about. that's why i wore these shoes today. >> it's necessary sometimes. >> yes. >> really, this is necessary. >> even underneath the anchor desk today, i feel frosty. my toes feel good because there's serious reason for this. weather that's taking aim on both coasts, right? >> west coast, you might need shoes like this. you like your uggs out there. remember the joke from jimmy kimmel. all of l.a. smelled like wet uggs for a reason. one of the most powerful storms. a powerful nor'easter is dumping heavy, wet snow across the northeast. some areas can expect a foot or more. linzie janis is on it for us. >> reporter: a deadly mix of rain, ice and snow pounding millions from delaware to the coast of massachusetts where nor'easter winds battered homes ripping off shingles.
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high winds along the jersey shore, too. >> i couldn't get out my front door. >> massive waves breaching sea walls. houses surrounded by water. up to four inches of rain stranding drivers, area schools canceling classes. away from the coast, freezing rain coating everything in a sheet of ice. from roofs to roads. hundreds of accidents. in upstate new york, the icy storm turning deadly. five tractor trailers and two passenger vehicles in this crash. at least one of those passengers killed. the messy conditions snarling air travel, too. over 2,000 flights delayed and nearly 1,000 flights canceled. back here on the massachusetts coast, residents going outdoors only when they have to. >> i'm a dog walker. i have the mailman's motto. >> reporter: wind gusts here have reached 61 miles per hour. we're in the middle of a storm that's pummeling the northeast. linzie janis, abc news, massachusetts. >> you could be certain my girl linzie janis has good footwear
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that's going to hold up. >> she better. she better have good head to toe wear in that mess. the west coast was bracing really for one of the strongest storms in years. >> more soaking rain and mountain snow on the way to california where they're stacking nearly 2,000 sandbags in berkeley. our coverage continues with jim dickey. good morning. >> good morning. still dealing with our nor'easter. hasn't moved that much in the past 24 hours, swirling off the coast of new jersey. rain, ice and snow and some snow in place across the region. where we see that mixing in plain rain that will keep accumulations down. interior sections of new england, back to upstate new york, a foot or more of snow by the time all is said and done. rain is returning to california here tonight.
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all the way south into l.a. by friday. likely bringing flooding and mud slides. back to you. >> jim dickey, thank you as always. to the protests in northern california. hundreds of people spilling into the streets of oakland and berkeley to rally against excessive force by police. extra police patrols clashed with protesters firing rubber bullets at the crowd. a train station was temporarily shut down again and amtrak suspended service in the area. new details on the cia interrogation methods for terror suspects. those methods included weeks of sleep deprivation, simulated drowning, slapping and slamming and threats to kill, harm or sexually abuse families of the captives. senator dianne feinstein was among the democrats who wanted the report made public. >> history will judge us by our commitment to a just society governed by law and the willingness to face an ugly truth and say never again. >> at least one republican stood
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with the democrats. senator john mccain who was tortured in vietnam. he welcomed the report and backed its findings. former heads of the spy agency are speaking out saying those extreme interrogation methods did save lives. here's now abc's jonathan karl. >> the tactics were harsh but the cia says it's flat out wrong to say they did not work. the brutal interrogations the cia director george brennan said did produce intelligence that helped thwart attack plans, capture terrorists and save lives. and in a fiery defense of the spy agency's honor, three former cia directors and their deputies say in "the wall street journal" the senate report is a partisan attack on the agency that has done the most to protect america after the 9/11 attacks. they've even launched their own website, cia saved lives.com. the report makes the cia sound like a rogue agency but the spy chiefs say the program was fully authorized by the justice department and the white house. the report says president bush didn't know all the specifics
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but just last week, he defended the cia. >> we're fortunate to have men and women who work hard at the cia. >> reporter: one key question, did the interrogations help get osama bin laden? the report says no. the cia says yes. that only through harsh interrogation did they discover bin laden the personal messenger and following the mess. >>er led to bin laden's hideout in pakistan. the report was done entirely by democrats and most republicans are trashing it, but not john mccain, who himself was tortured in vietnam. >> it's about who we were, who we are, and who we aspire to be. our enemies act without conscience. we must not. >> reporter: while president obama's cia director is saying the harsh interrogations saved lives and led to bin laden, the white house is not saying that. all they are saying is that even
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if the interrogation program worked, it wasn't worth it. jonathan karl, abc news, the white house. a 67-year-old sailor is expected back on land in ohio -- in hawaii to at sea. a navy ship came to his rescue yesterday. he had been drifting since thanksgiving. that was when he made two mayday calls reporting his sailboat was taking on water. a coast guard search was started but was called off last monday. one final call -- mayday call came yesterday. it was heard and the navy destroyer arrived on the scene an hour later. he was weak, hungry, dehydrated but otherwise okay. the ntsb says there's no evidence that a bird strike or engine trouble caused the fatal plane crash in maryland. the aftermath of that crash captured in new video. three people on board the plane died and a mother and her two sons were killed in the house fire. their husband and father left a message on facebook saying in part words can't describe the enormity of our sadness and loss over the tragedy. a new predictions just in
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showing how busy this year's holiday travel season will be. analysts say 45 million passengers will fly on domestic airlines between next wednesday and january 4th. that's up 2% from last year. airlines are planning to use larger planes to accommodate 47,000 passengers a day. okay. if you fly delta you'll soon have more seating options to consider. delta airlines announced a new five-tier seating plan set to take effect in march. passengers get to choose from two premium options in first class. including bare bones, basic economy. those willing to pay more for the main cabin will be allowed seat selections and meals and drinks even. but delta is not yet saying how much more. probably a reason why. >> all right. well, here's a great story we can give you about a waitress in branson, missouri. calls it the best tip she's ever
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got. >> cindy grady needed a new car. look at the clunker. the hood being held down by a plastic strap. >> but look at this. a husband and wife found out she was driving that clunker. they bought her a new car. aye 2008 ford fusion but certainly an upgrade. she need something better to get around in. now she has it. that is another fantastic story. >> took place at the cracker barrel in branson, missouri. >> we've had some great holiday stories. >> you're right. i hope it continues into the new year. there have been some really great moments. >> i'm sorry to be cynical here but probably not. >> i'm going to hold out hope. >> just the holiday spirit. >> when we find those special stories i'm going to hold it over you. >> i love these. i love them. coming up in "the skinny," the music legend paying tribute to frank sinatra. wait until you see who is singing old blue eyes favorites. will and kate's first official visit to new york. a humble gala they won't soon forget. more on "world news now." >> announcer: "world news now" weather brought to you by lysol. gala to a
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humble performance. one they won't soon forget. more on "world news now." >> announcer: "world news now" weather brought to you by lysol. this is the time of the year when the flu starts to spread. before the first sneeze, help protect with a spray. before the first tissue, help defend with a wipe. and help prevent with lysol. to get ten times more protection and kill 99.9% of germs around the house. this season, help protect your family with lysol. start healthing. she loves to shop online with her debit card. and so does bill, an identity thief who stole mary's identity, took over her bank accounts, and stole her hard earned money. unfortunately, millions of americans just like you learn all it may take
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all right. imagine all right. imagine this. just stepping into your sh all right. imagine this. just stepping into your shower stall and the door disintegrates. you put your cup on a simple glass table and it shatters. >> of course glass will shatter with enough force. sometimes they happen spontaneously. mara schiavocampo has a warning for consumers. >> reporter: take a look at this man shattering his own shower door. after he says the glass
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spontaneously cracked and he's not alone. from glass tables -- >> out of nowhere our patio table exploded. >> reporter: to shower doors. some consumers are shocked by what they found. >> i heard an explosion and i came down to this. >> reporter: that's what duane brian of chicago says happened to him. >> right here was the leaf bowl. >> reporter: last summer he was awakened in the middle of the night to what he thought was someone breaking into his home. his glass sink had shattered into pieces. >> the power of it was so hard that it was also in the tub. >> reporter: the consumer product safety commission told us in the last two years there have been hundreds of reports of spontaneously shattering glass.
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inclusion. >> reporter: that inclusion, a tiny ball of metal made of nickel and sulfur growing over time. >> when it grows, sometimes it can pop the glass. >> reporter: they set up this demonstration to show us what can happen when tempered glass breaks. he says the cracks move at speeds up to 3,000 miles per hour. >> tempered glass is a specifically designed product that breaks into very small pieces to reduce lacerations and cuts. >> reporter: the industry representing glass manufacturers told us it takes extraordinary steps to minimize the potential for nickel sulfide inclusions a large glass furnaces may produce up to 800 tons of glass a day, total elimination of contaminants is not possible.
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mara schiavocampo, abc news, new york. >> in a lot of communities, glass is used in or near showers that have to be tempered. something to check for. >> something you'd never -- >> ooh! i have a headache. we should have used tempered glass. >> i don't know who is going to pay for that. >> abc. >> but we cannot afford it on the "wnn" budget. coming up, one pop singer has a mysterious illness. has some folks talking and concerned. and taylor swift admits somebody does dress better than she does. "the skinny" up next. >> announcer: "world news now" continues after this from our abc stations. continues after this from our abc stations.
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♪ skinny ♪ skinny so skinny ♪ ♪ skinny so skinny ♪ topping "the skinny," a health scare for avril lavigne. suffering from an undisclosed illness, and she's reportedly asking fans to keep her in their prayers. >> she expressed her gratitude for the well wishes on twitter after a fan tweeted get well soon and pray for avril. the 30-year-old pop star has yet to specify what the health issue is or issue a statement. >> she's been keeping a pretty low profile in some recent months. and there's even been speculation about her marriage to nickelback front man could be on the rocks. don't exactly know what's going on with her but do wish
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her well. bob dylan has a new album coming out in early february. may not be what his fans expect from him. >> all ten songs are ones recorded by frank sinatra, which given dylan's vocal abilities may strike some as something stupid. well, dylan says the songs have been covered so much, they are buried and this album uncovers them. "autumn leaves," "some enchanted evening" and "full moon and empty arms." ♪ full moon and empty arms ♪ the moon is there for us to share but where are you ♪ >> sinatra is not that easy to do. it's hard to pull off, right? but dylan and his band recorded all the songs live with no more
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than a couple takes each. >> instead of the 30-plus orchestras, these are just dylan and his five-piece band. it's called "shadows in the night" and available for preorders online. we turn to the superstar rock star parents. angelina jolie, brad pitt being your mom and dad. they have a situation. they are revealing their kids are now interested in getting tattoos. and that's a bit troubling for them. jolie has over a dozen tattoos and told her 13-year-old son maddox he could get a tattoo. the actress told "radio times" magazine when 9-year-old zahara talked about them it caused brad so much anxiety saying for some reason, men get a little more sensitive when the daughter gets a tattoo. angelina says they are encouraging their brood of six not to follow mom and dad into acting hoping they'll become writers, politicians, activists, instead. >> isn't that interesting she wants something else for them.
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>> it looks all glamorous but she probably doesn't want her kids to deal with some of what she's dealt with. >> she's exposed them to a lot of international venues and vacations and experiences. maybe there will be some writers and politicians. taylor swift made headlines. "time" magazine announced her as a finalist for person of the year. >> could have to do with her records that she continues to break in the music business. probably has something to do with her social media prowess. on instagram swift posted this split screen. >> who wore it better? the paddington bear? taylor concedes to paddington. we ask what was her inspiration or just a coincidence? >> was she meaning to do this? >> where do you get that coat? i would like a paddington bear coat. celebrating their big day today, shakespearean actor kenneth branagh. >> 54 years old. >> chef bobby flay. >> number 37 for "entourage's" emmanuelle chriqui. and raven symone, 28 today. happy birthday, folks.
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♪ oh, the royal couple wrapping up their first official >> and raven symone, 29 today. happy birthday, folks. you may think you can put off checking out your medicare options until you're sixty-five, but now is a good time to get the ball rolling. keep in mind, medicare only covers about eighty percent of part b medical costs. the rest is up to you. that's where aarp medicare supplement insurance plans insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company come in. like all standardized medicare supplement insurance plans, they could help pay some of what medicare doesn't, saving you in out-of-pocket medical costs. you've learned that taking informed steps along the way really makes a difference later. that's what it means to go long™. call now and request this free [decision guide].
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it removes the tough stains that bleach doesn't and it also disinfects. that's healthing. ♪ ♪ oh, the royal couple wrapping up their first official tour in the u.s. and one that involved america's biggest stars in sports, music and politics. >> they attended a gala at the metropolitan museum of art. >> reporter: we're told william and kate said their trip to new york city has been exciting but a bit exhausting. ten events in just three days and they saved the most glamorous for last. a regal night at the metropolitan museum of art. >> -- fortunately, we are not married.
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>> reporter: the fund-raiser capping off their whirlwind visit to the big apple which included visits to the most iconic landmarks. prince william taking in the view from the empire state building. earlier they dealt with the downpour to pay their respects at the september 11th memorial. leaving a card simply signed william and catherine. it was a performance at this center for disadvantaged kids. >> he promised he'd be there to take care for me. >> the prince said it almost brought him to tears. >> william offering his contact information to one of the children asking him to keep in touch. the royal couple's down to earth demeanor throughout their three-day tour so admired by the
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crowds who came out just to catch a glimpse. >> i think it's brought a lot of reality to the throne, and i think it's a breath of fresh air. >> reporter: william and kate have to fly back to london last night to see baby george and catch upon some sleep after what's been a very busy trip across the pond. >> certainly has been. >> they seem so down to earth. as royal and untouchable as all of that stuff is for all of us, to see them being just one of the -- just an average joe. >> take a look at their signatures they signed. pretty incredible. tweeted out by the 9/11. looks like will pressed down harder than kate did. >> they used different pens. >> could be. maybe. >> that's cool they tweeted it out. >> you get a cough drop. don't miss our facebook updates at wnnfans.com. >> announcer: this is abc's "world news now," informing insomniacs for two decades.
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. making news in america this morning -- torture report. disturbing allegations aimed at cia. accused of harsh interrogation methods and secret prisons. we're live in washington with the details. breaking overnight, protesters arrested, rubber bullets fired. new video just in showing another round of unrest in the bay area. survival story. presumed death and all hope lost. a sailor lost at sea finally found after two weeks. the mayday that said his life. and crystal clear, the viral video showing two hikers walking on water. and good w

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