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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  October 15, 2015 1:37am-4:30am CDT

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it has been more than 40 years since richard nixon became the only president in u.s. history to resign from office. watergate was his undoing. now all these years later, new details of the scandal are emerging. david martin reports for "sunday morning." >> subcommittee will come to order. >> reporter: it was the biggest bombshell of the biggest political scandal in american history. >> mr. butterfield are you aware of the installation of any listening devices in the oval office of the president? >> i was aware of listening devices, yes, sir. >> reporter: white house aide alexander butterfield revealing the existence of the white house taping system to the senate watergate committee. >> when butterfield gave that dramatic testimony in july,
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1973, it was a pivot point in watergate. >> reporter: reporter bob woodward along with carl bernstein famously exposed the machinations of the white house, tried and failed to interview butterfield. he passed the name on to the committee. >> do you think the tapes had ever been revealed had it not been for butterfield? >> probably would not have. >> reporter: turned out butterfield was sitting on a lot more secrets. 20 boxes full of them. >> this is the year, 1971. and each off these is a month. >> reporter: two years ago he turned over to woodward. >> reporter: did you ever, in your wildest dreams, think that you would one day collaborating with bob woodward of all people? >> no, not at all. >> reporter: what did you think when you walked into his apartment and you see the 20 boxes? >> i thought -- wow. let's start looking. >> reporter: the result is the
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published by simon and schuster, a division of cbs. in adiagnosis to the documents. woodward spent 40 hours interviewing butterfield who for three years occupied the office next to the president's. >> first one to see hem every day. last one to see him every night. attending to all the imneed. >> reporter: when butterfield left he took his files with him. >> some of the documents are classified top secret. how did you just walk away with them from the white house? >> it was easy. i just walked away with them. i did the wrong thing. no one is supposed to do that. but i felt to tell you the truth, that, those papers were safer with me than with anyone. i had been around classified. that's no excuse. i am saying i wasn't going to show these to the wrong person. i was going to take good care of them. >> reporter: one top secret document reveals nixon's candid
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bombing of vietnam. an angry scrawl across a report from henry kissinger. we have had ten years of total control of the air and laos and vietnam. the result zizih. and just the day before nextson told dan rather of cbs news, exactly the opposite. >> the results have been very, very effective. >> surely, nixon was not the first and won't be the last president to privately say things he would never say in public. >> yeah, the level of contradiction and the depth of the fraud. >> reporter: according to woodward's research nixon ordered the military to drop nearly 3 million tons tough bombs and would order another million dropped in the year after the zilch memo. >> it send you to, send you into your heart and soul about, you know what are we doing?
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how did this happen? how could we have been led this way? it takes the concept of military leadership by a president turns it on its head. >> reporter: another document, this one in butterfield's handwriting details nixon's reaction to the massacre in which 504 vietnamese sill vi-- civilianed were slaughtered. >> get background of all involved. almost be disclosed. does credit witnesses. >> diskrez it rings a bell. we went to great lengths. >> reporter: butterfield wrote a memo about left wing affiliations of the soldier who first blue the whistle. and another aboutsy more hearst the reporter who broke the story. according to the memo. hearst received a grant from the
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is clearly left wing and anti-administration. another vulnerable spot according to butterfield's notes, is the possible involvement of a lib jew. >> if the guy was a liberal jew, that was, material with which to, to discredit somebody. >> you are asking me things that are very difficult to explain about a very complicated man. >> reporter: a president who on a christmas eve tour of the old executive office building next to the white house, made a discovery that sparked a witch-hunt. >> some of the staff people, bureaucrats, civil servants had pictures of john f. kennene on their desks. or on the wall. nixon said we have to get rid of that infestation, as if it was some sort of disease that somebody would have a picture of
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>> what were you supposed to do about these pictures of other presidents on the walls? >> get them all take ebb down. >> get them all taken down? >> yes. he made that an express order. roy in particular, white house chief of staff told butterfield the president would like you to find out who the woman is who has the two kennedy pictures. adding he asked about it once a week at least. butterfield reported back the cia secret service and fbi and housuscommittee on american activities all found the woman, a civil servant named edna rosenberg was a completely royal american. >> what's surprised is you go through all of this, the amount of energy that was devoted to these kind of maneuvers. this was a subversion of what the job of the presidency is.
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>> all of it documenteden butterfield's files. >> that's to holdeman. this is to the treasury secretary. this is to the social secretary for the white house. >> they really are sort of a record of what the president is thinking about on -- on any given day. >> yeah. >> some of them at least 40 years after, seem very, very strange. >> yes, they do. >> did they? did they seem strange at the time? >> in this strange environment, no. >> nothing of course was stranger than the break in at democratic national committee headquarters in the watergate. that third rate burglary which brought down the president. butterfield was not in on it but knew about the taping system that could answer the question, what did the president know? when did he know it? >> listen, the last thing i wanted to do was be the person who gave away the secret. holdeman and i told the
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president we would never tell. >> reporter: then a retired fbi agent, donald sanders, a member of the watergate committee staff, wound up an otherwise routine interview by asking exactly the right question. >> do you remember the question? >> exactly. >> how did it go? >> was there ever any other listening device in the oval office? that was the, and i said, i think i said, my, i'm ser you asked that question. i'm sorry you asked that question. >> history flips right there. >> i knew what i was saying, getting into. i really knew what it meant. >> when you look back at at now. would you have done anything differently in the way you handled that explosive secret of the tapin system? >> no, i thought of that a lot. >> i bet. >> i regret nothing. i didn't do everything right. but i satisfied myself that -- that i didn't tell a lie. >> reporter: it was of course
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president had obstructed justice by ordering the cover-up of the water gaittergate break in. nixon resigned. butterfield faded into retirement in california. >> the meeting presidents have before they go up to the capital to -- be sworn in as the new president. >> reporter: now he is back to teach us all one of the basic lessons of journalism. there is always more to the story.
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an infant is one of the latest and youngest faces of the ep dem epidemic of gun violence. laid to rest one week after hit by a stray bullet riding in a car in cleveland. police have no suspect or motive. her fafaer spoke to us for our series "voices against violence." >> reporter: it was a crime so unimaginable it left cleveland police chief calvin williams at a loss for word. >> it's tough. this s suld not be happening. >> reporter: 5-month-old avielle wakefield is the third child killed by a gun in cleveland in
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charles wakefield is her father. >> never did i wake up thinking that was going to be my last day seeing her. >> reporter: what do you think that says about this city? >> i'mspeechless. i'm gogog to strivee for my baby's justice for cleveland and this nation. we need it. >> reporter: her death adds to a spiking gun homicide rate in cleveland up 22%. a dozen other cities have seen an increase in homicides including st. louis. jennifer joyce is the top prosecutor and says murders by guns are up 51%. this is a very complex problem. there is no, you know, silver bullet pardon the pun to solve gun violence not in st. louis not anywhere. >> reporter: her office launched this website to tell the stories of the victims and also the offenders. >> i think the mass shootings as
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concerning and troubling as they are they get a lot of the focus when we talk about gun violence opposed to the day-to-day shootings in our cities that are really piling up a lot more in terms of body count than the mass shootings are. >> do you think there will be other parents like you? >> i hate to say this, but yeah. yep. there is going to be somebody else. >> reporter: the other two children who were killed here in cleveland in the last month were ages 3 and5. scott, in the last four years, more than 500 children under the age of 12 were killed by guns in this country. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. embarrassed by a prostate exam? imagine how your doctor feels. as a urologist, i have performed 9,421 and a half prostate exams.
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so why do i do it? because i get paid. und... on this side of the glove i know prostate exams can save lives. so, if you are a man over 50, talk to you doctor to see if a prostate exam is right for you. if we can do it, so can you.
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the latest e craze in office furniture. the standing desk. companies are ordering them for ememoyees and the white house wants them for presidential staff. the trend is moving from the office to the classroom. maria villareal reports. >> down. >> reporter: at this elementary school in san rafael, california. >> our hand are here, my friend. >> reporter: motivating students to move is more than just their morning routine. it's an all-day commimient that starts with these standing desks. >> gets your legs working so you are not like i can't move. because you get stiff. >> reporter: their favorite feature is the aptly named fidgetbar. >> how does it help you focus? >> it burns off lots of my energy so i can concentrate without wiggling around in the chairs. >> reporter: 19 of the 22 classrooms have standing des ticks. the last three will be converted
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by the end of the year. >> i'm so excited for them and thrilled we found a way to make them more excited about school. >> reporter: principal tracy smith says initially students got tired from standing all day. within a few months they were focused, confident and productive in the classroom. studies show allowing kids to move during the day can improve grade up to 15% and helps kid burn 25% more calories. the doctor says there isn't data on the long term effects of kids using standing desks but the physical benefits are immediate. >> you increase the muscle tone in your legs. seems to be an improvement in actually circulation and arterial function and expending a few calories extra every hour cacalead to big changes. >> reporter: but those big changes can come with a big price tag. it can cost up to $6,000 to convert a single classroom. that's why some schools are
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experimenting with alternatives like yoga balls to increase core stability, exercise bikes for read/ride programs, or bands like these to keep kids active. >> my ultimate goal is to haveve the federal governmentake notice at a minimum when a new school is built, a given standing desks will be the norm. >> reporter: while it may take time to catch on around the country. these kids are proud to be taking a stand. >> and sitting for too long is the new smoking. >> reporter: for cbs this morning, maria villareal, california. >> that's the "cbs overnight news" for this thursday. for some of you the news continue thousands. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm jim axelrod.
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death opens the doors ofof secretive church. parishioners are charged in the e savage beating of two teenagers to force them to confess their sins. also tonight. clinton, sanders, and the first democratic debate. >> the american people are sick and tired of hearing about your damn e-mails. >> products promoted as health supplements are sending tens of thousands to the emergency room. and they're just delivering the paper, so why are 15,000 people following them? >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." we begin the broadcast this morning with the death in the word of life church. police in upstate new york say that two teenagers were brutally beaten, one fatally, by members of the congregation including the victims' parents. as for the motive, michellll miller is following the investigation. >> reporter: 59-year-old deborah
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leonard and 65-year-old husband bruce were charged with manslaughter in the beating death of their 19-year-old son lucas. authorities say lucas and his 17-year-old brother christopher were brought to the word of life church sunday night as part of a spiritual counseling session. new hartford police chief michael enrra. >> both brothers were subjected to physical punishment over the course of several hours. and the hopes that each would confess their prior sins and ask for forgiveness. >> reporter: according to this new hartford police complaint, lucas sustained blunt force trauma with injuries to his stomach, genital, back and thigh areas. authorities say at one point, cas stopped breathing and was taken to the hospital monday afternoon. police later found christopher brutally beaten inside the church. he is in serious condition. the assault has left the central new york community stunned. tara litz lived next door to the
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church for ten years. >> we always joked around and said they were a cult. which now we are believing that they probably were. >> reporter: what made you think that? >> just the odd behavior. a gated community. you line up in a row. they've all go in together. the gates close. >> reporter: four others including the victim any sister have been charged with assault. scott, this investigation is on going and police do expect more arrests. >> the accused have not commented yet about the charges. michelle miller, thank you very much, michelle. last night we told you about a landmark verdict in milwaukee. a jury ordered badger guns to pay nenely $6 million to two police officers who were shot and grievously wounded by a gun purchased from that store. today both sides of the gun issue debated what this means. here is dean reynolds. >> reporter: when a milwaukee
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store and saw twtwpolicemen shot with the same weapon in the hand of an underaged gunman they found the store at fault. brad heaton is a juror. >> i was surprised how easy it is, if you are organized, a decent liar, pretty much anyone can. so it is incumbent upon gun dealers to do everything that they can to vet people when they come in. >> reporter: in 2005 congress passed a law barring most lawsuits against gun manufacturers and sellers for the way buyerses to their products. there were exceptions involving negligence. in the milwaukee case, the 1-year-old gunman had an older friend buy the gun for him which is illegal. the jury found that the gun store employees either knew or should have known that. >> they didn't care. i mean, the core part of their market was criminals buying
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>> reporter: edward flynn is milwaukee's chief of police. >> common sense american citizens said, wait a minute. stores are supplying criminals with firearms has to be something punished. >> this is a -- >> reporter: at this store in minneapolis, gun salesman said the jury verdict was chilling. >> we can't help, be held responsible for the actions of others with a legally acquired firearm or any other product. i think if there is an start doing a knee-jerk reaction. i'm sure that has possibility of putting out the business. >> reporter: the attorney for the gun store said the ruling will be appealed and, scott, he has until november 16th to file it. >> the shooter in the case got 80 years and the person who bought theheun two years. dean reynolds. thanks. so, what d ds all this mean, our cbs news legal analyst. rikki klieman. rikki, does this mean cases like this are going to be filed all over the country? >> it certainly means cases like
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this that are in the pipeline will go forward. they will go forward with more hope than they had a week ago. however, it does not mean they will succeed. as we know, there is an appellate process here. it will take years for this to become a real precedent. right w, it is simply a jury verdict under very unique circumstances, scott. >> what are the unique circumstances that made this case a slam dunk for the jury? >> you had video. the picture was worth a thousand wordrd the real purchaser and the straw purchaser the guy who was going to go in of legal age to buy for his friend. and you can see their shenanigans in the store. the straw purchaser checked off the wrong box. he checked off he was the purchaser. >> on the federal form. >> on the form. the clerk helped him correct it. now those circumstances are so unique to show that this store
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reasonable belief to know that this gun ultimately might be used for a criminal purpose. >> rikki klieman, thank you so much. today, israel deployed hundreds of soldiers to stop a wave of attacks by palestinians. in jerusalem, israeli police shot and killed a palestinian man they say was running towards them with a knife. since last month, eight israelis and 30 palestinians have been killed. the taliban's recent surge in afghanistan has apparently led president obama to change his mind about pulling nearly all american forces out. margaret brennan has learned the president's plans. margaret. >> scott, this is a tough call for the president who declared the american war in afghanistan
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there are currently 10,000 u.s. troops in afghanistan. and sources tell us that the u.s. is expected to leave around 6,000 after 2016. now, that's an increase from the 1,000 soldiers that the president originally planned to station in kabululy end of his term. just last month. taliban fofoes overran a major afghan city since 2001. u.s. military advisers are warning a more robust american military presence is needed to combat a resurgent taliban, as well as some growing threats from the islamic state and al qaeda. >> margaret, thank you. margaret brennan at the white house. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. almost sixty million americans are affected by mental illness. together we can help them with three simple words. my name is chris noth
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and i will listen. from maine to maui, thousands of high school students across the country are getting in on the action by volunteering in their communities. chris young: action teams of high school students are joining volunteers of america and major league baseball players to help train and inspire the next generation of volunteers. carlos pee it's easy to start an action team at your school so you, too, can get in on the action. get in on the action at actionteam.org. 'cause you'll be in my heart yes, you'll be in my heart from this day on now and forevermore... narrator: if animals are our r st friends, shouldn't we be theirs? visit your local shelter, adopt a pet.
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you'll be in my heart no matter what... cbs cares. if you were a hippie in the '60s, you need to know. it's the dawning of the age of aquarius. yeah, and something else that's cool. what? osteoporosis is preventable. all: osteo's preventable? right on! if you dig your bones, protect them.
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today, vice president joe biden said he is proud of last night's democratic presidential debate. but if he was looking for a reason to jump into the race he likely didn't find it. hillary clinton dominated. nancy cordes was there. >> reporter: clinton and sanders clashed from the start over gun control. >> is bernie sanders tough enough on guns? >> no, notott all. >> reporter: capitalism. >> i think we should look to countries like denmark. >> we are not denmark, we are the united states -- >> reporter: and huh to rein in big banks. >> i went to wall street in 2007 before the big crash we had. i basically said cut it out. quit foreclosing on homes. >> you do not, congress does not regulate wall street. wall street regulates congress.
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and we have got to break up these banks. >> reporter: clinton was ready when all four criticized her 2002 vote to go to war in iraq, which she now calls a mistake. >> i recall being on a debate stage, about 25 times, with then senator obama debating this issue. after the election he asked me to become secretary of state. >> reporter: sanders came to clinton's rescue on the issue that dogged her the most. >> that the american people are sick and tired of hearing about your damn, e-mails. >> thank you. me too. me too. >> some people are going to say you gave her a big gift. >> i don't know i gave her a big gift. what i said was true. let us talk about the real issues. >> reporter: of the three candidates polling near 0, former maryland governor martin o'malley had the strongest night. >> we passed comprehensive gun safety legislation. >> reporter: if vice president joe biden was hoping for a front
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runner to falter it didn't happen. and clinton's campaign manager said today it's time for him to make up his mind. all biden shared today was this, brief assessment of the night. >> i was proud of, i thought they all did well. >> biden's backers insist there is still room for him in this race even if the others exceeded expectations. one adviser told me today, scott, if he does jump in, voters will forget about the first debate and focus on the second one here at drake university in iowa next month. >> nancy cordes, thank you, nancy. tomorrow a zimbabwean hunter will go on trial for helping an american client kill a beloved lion. the american, walter palmer does not face charges. he paid a fortune for a hunting permit. that money is supposed to help conservation, but our correspondent discovered who is really bagging the blood money. >> cecil was a star attraction
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him said he had doneneothing wrong. he paid $55,000 for a legal hunting permit. >> cecil was an icon on our part of the industry. >> reporter: the safari operators in zimbabwe, he told us americans like palmer make up the majority of zimbabwe's trophy hunters. part of the huge hunting fees they pay is to go to conservation and community projects. he told us it rarely does. blaming corrupt government officials. >> it is a problem. it is a real menace. people are in dire straits. and people can do almost anything in terms of selling their souls for a bit of silver. >> reporter: one district council received $150,000 in hunting fees, eight times the average salary. but villagers saididhey haven't seen any of itit what do you live on?
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>> nothing. >> reporter: nothing. not one cent. >> nothing. >> reporter: he wants to sell his goats for food. for now he lives off the meager crops he grows. unlike the villagers, it has running water and he showed us his thriving sun flowers. we were there today, with the sun and everything, the crops aren't doing there so well. they're really battling. >> you need to water them. >> reporter: really? but they didn't have water? >> unfortunately. >> reporter: yeah. in addition to schools and clinics, he told us the hunting fees also go to buy food. so why does everybody say they didn have food? so are you saying they're lying to us? >> yeah, of course they are. >> reporter: they're lying to us? >> they are. because there's no one go hungry in this country. >> reporter: it is rare for illegal hunting to be prosecuted. this time the international
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outcry over cecil the lion resulted in not only a trial but partial ban of big game e nting on some of the farms bordering the national p pk. >> thank you, deborah. after a deadly outbreak of listeria, we have turned up more red flags about our food supply. and this church had
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right here on monday we reported former blue bell creamery workers complained about filthy condititis at a texas factory linked to an outbreak of listeria. turns out the outbreak had been going on for years. ten people got sick from the bacteria. three died. tonight, jim axelrod continues his investigation. >> reporter: richard porter and tina ettiger were patients at via christie saint francis hospital in wichita, kansas when they were both infected with listeria. they were treated by dr. tom moore and his colleagues. >> i think the public has an expectation, i think a reasonable expectation, that
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when they come to the hospital, th the food that's given to them is safe. >> reporter: they had been sickened by contaminated blue bell ice cream. porter survived the infection, ettiger did not. >> did our food safety system fail richard porter and tina ettiger? >> i believe it did. >> reporter: fda record show blue bell's own testing found listeria in its oklahoma plant as far back as 2013. the laws at the time did not require blue bell to share that information with regulators. michael taylor is the fda deputy commissioner for foods. do the current laws do enough to protect the most vulnerable americans. >> we don't think they do enough to protect all americans. that's why we have the 3,000 deaths annually from a wide range of pathogens.
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>> reporter: taylor says that will change with the implay men taegs of the food safety modernization act, the first overall of u.s. food safety laws in more than 70 years. the kind of practices we saw in the facility are what the new food safety law is intended to prevent. >> reporter: you are going from reactivity to prevention. >> exactly. that's the shift. >> reporter: the shift started this fall when the fda began implementing rules. with 1,000 inspectors for 100,000 facilities. taylor says they can't do it alone. >> the companies have to take responsibility for understanding the hazard in their facilities. >> reporter: you will never have the resources to be in every production facility every day. >> we have got to have a system that creates real accountability on the companies for doing the right thing for prevention every day. >> of course, the fda need money to make this all work. so far, congress has authorized just about 28% of what it's estimated they will need to fully implement the new law. >> we have learned so much in the series, jim.
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thank you very much. >> there was a close call at los angeles international airport. an airport worker drove onto a runway just as a jetliner carrying 78 people was cleared for takeoff. an alarm sounded in the tower, the pilot hit the brakes. nobody was hurt. a new warning about the
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supplements coming next. today the government blamed dietary supplements for sending 23,000 people to the emergency room each year, and putting more than 2,000 of them in the hospital. dr. jon lapook is looking into this. >> reporter: two years ago when chris herrera was 15, he lost 56
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extract build as a fat burner. his mom, lourdes gonzalez. >> him seeing the difference what one pill was doing, he probably decided to take more on his own without letting me know. >> but then his eyes turned yellow. medical tests showed his liver was failing. doctors blame the green tea extract. >> having to hear the doctor tell me every day that christopher had a 50% chance of dying and not making it was hurtful. >> reporter: herrera recovered. half of american adults use at least one supplement, so 23,000 emergency visits a year reflects a relatively low complication rate. but since these product don't need fda approval, the cdc says it is important to monitor their safety. weight loss and energy product accounted for 50% of visits. 5 to 34. most typical patients young adults. most common symptoms were cardiac. chest pain. elevated heart rate. dr. andrew geller of the cdc its
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the report's lead author. >> some dietary supplements may have benefits. but there are risks. we encourage patients to tell their physicians that they're taking dietary supplements and which ones. >> reporter: scott, patients don't tell doctors they're taking supplements they don't kid them real medications. supplements can have interact actions with med. one idea is to bring your medicines to the doctor's office. throw them on the table. one by one go over what you are taking. >> dr. jon lapook, thanks, doc. in london they asked not for whom the bell tolled, they asked if anyone could stop it. a technical glitch caused the bell at saint george to ring nonstop for 24 hours. the residents went nuts. one chimed in, have you tried turning it off and then on again. we don't know who finally fixed it. but he is our candidate for the nobel prize. and we'll be right back. woman: what does it feel like when a woman is having a heart attack? chest pain, like there's a ton of weight on your chest. severe shortness of breath.
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cold sweats. there's an unusual tiredness and fatigue. there's unfamiliar dizziness or light-headedness. unusual pain in your back, neck, jaw, one or both arms, even your upper stomach, are signs you're having a heart attack. don't make excuses. make the call to 9-1-1 immediately. learn more at womenshealth.gov/heartattack. bipolar disorder is a brain condition that causes unusual or dramatic mood swings. it affects millions of americans and compromises their ability to function. when diagnosed, bipolar disorder can be effectively treated by mood stabilizers. but most people with bipolar disorder suffer for years without help because the symptoms are missed or confused with other illnesses, like depression. learn how easily you can help keep this from happening to a loved one.
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we end it we power couple
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here's chip reid. >> reporter: it is 4:30 a.m. when the first boat docks at martha's vineyard. every morning jan and his wife, moira load 2,000 pounds of newspapers into two beat up vans and hit the road. >> good morning. >> reporter: after losing their six-figure incomes in architecture and software during the recession, it was a way to make just enough money to stay on the island they loved. their friend on the mainland thought they had gone mad. >> i said, you know what, you should see the science, this place, in the morning. it's fantastic. i said you know what i will take a picture every day. send it to you. >> reporter: that's how it started. today they have 2,000 e-mail
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followers and 13,000 on facebook. >> the way the light strikes something. you think, i have to stop right now. take that picture. >> reporter: you are preoccupied. not even thinking about the paper route? >> no. sometimes, 25 minutes go by. i think maybe i should deliver some papers now. >> reporter: demand for their photos is so great they expanded into cards, calendars, even art exhibits. still they earn a fraction of what they used to make in their high pressure corporate jobs. >> 20%. >> you make 20% now. >> yeah. >> maybe. >> reporter: are you happier now? >> yeah. >> here. take this out. >> reporter: wow. beautiful. you were worried it would be too gray to get a photograph. >> there's always something. >> reporter: in the morning light here there is always something. >> i love that little boat. >> reporter: to brighten the day for thousand of their closest friends. chip reid, cbs news, martha's vineyard, massachusetts. and that's the "cbs overnight news" for this thursday. for some of you the news
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for others, check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new
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york city, i'm scott pelley. >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the overnight news. i'm jim axelrod. the nation of zimbabwe has decided not to bring charges against the dentist from minnesota who killed cecil the lion earlier this year on a big game hunt. cecil was the star attraction at a game park and was fitted with an electronic collar. walter palmer paid $55,000 for the hunt. the paperwork was in order. but the lion was illegally lured out of the park. the commercial hunter in charge of the safari will be in court today facing up to ten years in jail. the incident has triggered a fierce debate over trophy hunting in zimbabwe. deborah patta is there. >> reporter: behind me victoria falls together with zimbabwe's game reserves are major tourist attractions here. the riches are not shared, after 35 years of oppressive rule, the
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government is broke and the economy in ruins. the national park, former home to cecil the lion is being ravaged by zimbabwe's dire conditions. as a result conservation relies primarily on hunting. we spoke to a man who oversees the industry. how much money does the government give to the parks? >> nothing. zero. >> reporter: the parks turn to hunting. when the dentist was on a private hunt. 30% of fees for private hunts are supposed to be paid to the national parks. >> in most cases you find because of the bureaucratic natures of organization, most money may be consumed to a large extent through administration costs directly to conservation.
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land owned by indigenous communities the community is to receive 100% of trophy hunting fees. this money administered by rural district council. we met its ceo near his thriving sunflower crops. >> we were there today with the sun and everything the crops aren't doing so well. they're battling. >> you need to water them. >> reporter: really. >> yeah. >> reporter: but they're out of water. >> unfortunately. >> reporter: yeah, uh-huh. unlike the rural poor, he has running water. his council made over $600,000 in trophy fees over the past year. he claims that money is used to provide infrastructure and feeding schemes for local communities. but the villagers we spoke to say they haven't received a cent from the council. like this man who has not had a job for decades and does not have one dollar to his name. so where do you get your food from?
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>> reporter: by agriculture he means the few meager crops he is able to grow in a country that is facing a drought. why does everybody say they don't have food? are you saying they're look to us? >> yeah, of course they tar. >> reporter: they're lying to us? >> they are. they are. yes. >> reporter: it is rare for illegal hunting to be prosecuted in zimbabwe. this time the international outcry over the shooting of cecil the lion resulted not only in a trial but a partial ban of big game hunting on some of the farms bordering the national park. sheriff in nevada want to court seeking a warrant to get a blood sample from lamar odom, former basketball player and reality tv star was found unconscious in a local brothel. he is hospitalized on life support. authority want to know what drugs he was taking. michelle miller has the story. >> reporter: according to the
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partying for days. he said odom was looking to get away from everybody and having a good time. >> flipped it up. odom comes in. >> reporter: former los angeles laker star, lamar odom found unconscious at a brothel tuesday. rushed to sunrise hospital in las vegas. his nearly 7 foot frame too tall to be air lifted by helicopter. saturday, odom checked in at dennis hoff's love ranch south in crystal, nevada, dennis hoff is the brothel's owner. hoff says odom was drinking cognac and had taken herbal viagra like supplement, discovered unresponsive in his room by two women. off awe he was throwing up, terrible. the girls of course, were traumatized. >> odom, the winner of two of nba championships with the los angeles lakers, last played in
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his off the court struggles included an arrest in 2013 for driving under the influence. >> lamar, you do have to go to the dentist, baby. >> reporter: odom featured on reality tv show "keeping up with the kardashians" throughout his four year marriage to khloe. the two filed for divorce in 2013. several nba players have turned to social media to show their support. miami heat star dwayne wade tweeted, prayers all the way up for my brother. odom's representatives have not responded to cbs this morning's request for comment. the nye county sheriff in nevada is investigating. deadly listeria outbreak linked to blue bell ice cream revealed the company may have been selling tainted product for years. the question now -- why did it take so long for the fda to discover this. >> reporter: richard porter and
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via christie saint francis hospital in wichita, kansas when they were both infected with listeria. they were treated by dr. tom moore and his colleagues. >> i think the public has an expectation, i think a reasonable expectation, that when they come to the hospital, that the food that's given to them is safe. >> reporter: they had been sickened by contaminated blue bell ice cream. porter survived the infection, ettiger did not. >> did our food safety system fail richard porter and tina ettiger? >> i believe it did. >> reporter: fda record show blue bell's own testing found listeria in its oklahoma plant as far back as 2013. the laws at the time did not require blue bell to share that information with regulators. michael taylor is the fda deputy commissioner for foods. do the current laws do enough to protect the most vulnerable americans. >> we don't think they do enough
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to protect all americans. that's why we have the 3,000 deaths annually from a wide range of pathogens. >> reporter: taylor says that will change with the implementation of the food safety modernization act, the first overall of u.s. food safety laws in more than 70 years. the kind of practices we saw in the facility are what the new food safety law is intended to prevent. >> reporter: you are going from reactivity to prevention. >> exactly. that's the shift. >> reporter: the shift started this fall when the fda began implementing rules. with 1,000 inspectors for 100,000 facilities. taylor says they can't do it alone. >> the companies have to take responsibility for understanding the hazard in their facilities. >> reporter: you will never have the resources to be in every production facility every day. >> we have got to have a system that creates real accountability on the companies for doing the right thing for prevention every day. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. it has been more than 40
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it has been more than 40 years since richard nixon became the only president in u.s. history to resign from office. watergate was his undoing. now all these years later, new details of the scandal are emerging. david martin reports for "sunday morning." >> subcommittee will come to order. >> reporter: it was the biggest bombshell of the biggest political scandal in american history. >> mr. butterfield are you aware of the installation of any listening devices in the oval office of the president? >> i was aware of listening devices, yes, sir. >> reporter: white house aide alexander butterfield revealing the existence of the white house taping system to the senate watergate committee. >> when butterfield gave that
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dramatic testimony in july, 1973, it was a pivot point in watergate. >> reporter: reporter bob woodward along with carl bernstein famously exposed the machinations of the white house, tried and failed to interview butterfield. he passed the name on to the committee. >> do you think the tapes had ever been revealed had it not been for butterfield? >> probably would not have. >> reporter: turned out butterfield was sitting on a lot more secrets. 20 boxes full of them. >> this is the year, 1971. and each of these is a month. >> reporter: two years ago he turned over to woodward. >> reporter: did you ever, in your wildest dreams, think that you would one day collaborating with bob woodward of all people? >> no, not at all. >> reporter: what did you think when you walked into his apartment and you see the 20
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boxes? >> i thought -- wow. let's start looking. >> reporter: the result is the last of the president's men, published by simon and schuster, a division of cbs. in addition to the documents, woodward spent 40 hours interviewing butterfield who for three years occupied the office next to the president's. >> first one to see hem every day. last one to see him every night. attending to all the need. >> reporter: when butterfield left he took his files with him. >> some of the documents are classified top secret. how did you just walk away with them from the white house? >> it was easy. i just walked away with them. i did the wrong thing. no one is supposed to do that. but i felt to tell you the truth, that, those papers were safer with me than with anyone. i had been around classified. that's no excuse. i am saying i wasn't going to show these to the wrong person. i was going to take good care of them.
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document reveals nixon's candid handwritten opinion of the bombing of vietnam. an angry scrawl across a report from henry kissinger. we have had ten years of total control of the air and laos and vietnam. the result zilch. and just the day before nextson told dan rather of cbs news, exactly the opposite. >> the results have been very, very effective. >> surely, nixon was not the first and won't be the last president to privately say things he would never say public. >> yeah, the level of contradiction and the depth of the fraud. >> reporter: according to woodward's research nixon ordered the military to drop nearly 3 million tons tough bombs and would order another million dropped in the year after the zilch memo. >> it send you to, send you into your heart and soul about, you know what are we doing?
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how did this happen? how could we have been led this way? it takes the concept of military leadership by a president turns it on its head. >> reporter: another document, this one in butterfield's handwriting details nixon's reaction to the massacre in which 504 vietnamese sill -- civilianed were slaughtered. >> get background of all involved. almost be disclosed. does credit witnesses. >> diskrez it rings a bell. we went to great lengths. >> reporter: butterfield wrote a memo about left wing affiliations of the soldier who first blue the whistle. and another aboutsy more hearst the reporter who broke the story.
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hearst received a grant from the edgar b. stern family fund which is clearly left wing and anti-administration. another vulnerable spot according to butterfield's notes, is the possible involvement of a lib jew. >> if the guy was a liberal jew, that was, material with which to, to discredit somebody. >> you are asking me things that are very difficult to explain about a very complicated man. >> reporter: a president who on a christmas eve tour of the old executive office building next to the white house, made a discovery that sparked a witch-hunt. >> some of the staff people, bureaucrats, civil servants had pictures of john f. kennedy on their desks. or on the wall. nixon said we have to get rid of that infestation, as if it was
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somebody would have a picture of j.f.k. in their office. >> what were you supposed to do about these pictures of other presidents on the walls? >> get them all take ebb down. >> get them all taken down? >> yes. he made that an express order. roy in particular, white house chief of staff told butterfield the president would like you to find out who the woman is who has the two kennedy pictures. adding he asked about it once a week at least. butterfield reported back the cia secret service and fbi and house committee on unamerican activities all found the woman, a civil servant named edna rosenberg was a completely royal american. >> what's surprised is you go through all of this, the amount of energy that was devoted to these kind of maneuvers. this was a subversion of what
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the job of the presidency is. >> all of it documented in butterfield's files. >> that's to holdeman. this is to the treasury secretary. this is to the social secretary for the white house. >> they really are sort of a record of what the president is thinking about on -- on any given day. >> yeah. >> some of them at least 40 years after, seem very, very strange. >> yes, they do. >> did they? did they seem strange at the time? >> in this strange environment, no. >> nothing of course was stranger than the break in at democratic national committee headquarters in the watergate. that third rate burglary which brought down the president. butterfield was not in on it but knew about the taping system that could answer the question, what did the president know? when did he know it? >> listen, the last thing i
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who gave away the secret. holdeman and i told the president we would never tell. >> reporter: then a retired fbi agent, donald sanders, a member of the watergate committee staff, wound up an otherwise routine interview by asking exactly the right question. >> do you remember the question? >> exactly. >> how did it go? >> was there ever any other listening device in the oval office? that was the, and i said, i think i said, my, i'm ser you asked that question. i'm sorry you asked that question. >> history flips right there. >> i knew what i was saying, getting into. i really knew what it meant. >> when you look back at at now. would you have done anything differently in the way you handled that explosive secret of the taping system? >> no, i thought of that a lot. >> i bet. >> i regret nothing. i didn't do everything right.
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>> reporter: it was of course the tapes that revealed the president had obstructed justice by ordering the cover-up of the watergate break in. nixon resigned. butterfield faded into retirement in california. >> the meeting presidents have before they go up to the capital to -- be sworn in as the new president. >> reporter: now he is back to teach us all one of the basic lessons of journalism. there is always more to the story. >> there is the president waving good-bye. as you hear the applause. we've been changing things up with k-y love. oh yeah. it's a pleasure gel that magnifies both our sensations. it gives us chills in places we've never gotten chills before. yeah, it makes us feel like...
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an infant is one of the latest and youngest faces of the epidemic of gun violence. laid to rest one week after hit by a stray bullet riding in a car in cleveland. police have no suspect or motive. her father spoke to us for our series "voices against violence." >> reporter: it was a crime so unimaginable it left cleveland police chief calvin williams at a loss for word. >> it's tough. this should not be happening. >> reporter: 5-month-old avielle wakefield is the third child killed by a gun in cleveland in
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charles wakefield is her father. >> never did i wake up thinking that was going to be my last day seeing her. >> reporter: what do you think that says about this city? >> i'm speechless. i'm going to strive for my baby's justice for cleveland and this nation. we need it. >> reporter: her death adds to a spiking gun homicide rate in cleveland up 22%. a dozen other cities have seen an increase in homicides including st. louis. jennifer joyce is the top prosecutor and says murders by guns are up 51%. this is a very complex problem. there is no, you know, silver bullet pardon the pun to solve gun violence not in st. louis not anywhere. >> reporter: her office launched this website to tell the stories
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of the victims and also the offenders. >> i think the mass shootings as concerning and troubling as they are they get a lot of the focus when we talk about gun violence opposed to the day-to-day shootings in our cities that are really piling up a lot more in terms of body count than the mass shootings are. >> do you think there will be other parents like you? >> i hate to say this, but yeah. yep. there is going to be somebody else. >> reporter: the other two children who were killed here in cleveland in the last month were ages 3 and 5. scott, in the last four years, more than 500 children under the age of 12 were killed by guns in this country. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.ng pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1
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abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc- cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 678 it's ryan's cell phone. gibbs: isolate calls from psy-ops, government-issued lines. there's five or six different numbers here. cross-reference with incoming calls to banks over the past month. when the engines failed on the plane i was flying, i knew what to do to save my passengers. but when my father sank into depression,
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i didn't know how to help him. when he ultimately shot himself, he left our family devastated. don't let this happen to you. if you or a loved one is suicidal, call the national suicide prevention lifeline. no matter how hopeless or helpless you feel, with the right help, you can get well. (franklin d. roosevelt) the inherent right to work is one of the elemental privileges of a free people. endowed, as our nation is, with abundant physical resources... ...and inspired as it should be to make those resources and opportunities available for the enjoyment of all... ...we approach reemployment with real hope of finding a better answer than we have now. narrator: donate to goodwill where your donations help fund job placement and training for people in your community. the latest craze in office furniture.
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companies are ordering them for employees and the white house wants them for presidential staff. the trend is moving from the office to the classroom. maria villareal reports. >> down. >> reporter: at this elementary school in san rafael, california. >> our hand are here, my friend. >> reporter: motivating students to move is more than just their morning routine. it's an all-day commitment that starts with these standing desks. >> gets your legs working so you are not like i can't move. because you get stiff. >> reporter: their favorite feature is the aptly named fidget bar. >> how does it help you focus? >> it burns off lots of my energy so i can concentrate without wiggling around in the chairs.
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>> reporter: 19 of the 22 classrooms have standing desks. the last three will be converted by the end of the year. >> i'm so excited for them and thrilled we found a way to make them more excited about school. >> reporter: principal tracy smith says initially students got tired from standing all day. within a few months they were focused, confident and productive in the classroom. studies show allowing kids to move during the day can improve grade up to 15% and helps kids burn 25% more calories. the doctor says there isn't data on the long term effects of kids using standing desks but the physical benefits are immediate. >> you increase the muscle tone in your legs. seems to be an improvement in actually circulation and arterial function and expending a few calories extra every hour can lead to big changes. >> reporter: but those big changes can come with a big price tag. it can cost up to $6,000 to convert a single classroom. that's why some schools are experimenting with alternatives
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like yoga balls to increase core stability, exercise bikes for read/ride programs, or bands like these to keep kids active. >> my ultimate goal is to have the federal government take notice at a minimum when a new school is built, a given standing desks will be the norm. >> reporter: while it may take time to catch on around the country. these kids are proud to be taking a stand. >> and sitting for too long is the new smoking. >> reporter: for cbs this morning, maria villareal, california. >> that's the "cbs overnight news" for this thursday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm jim axelrod. death opens the doors of a
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secretive church. parishioners are charged in the savage beating of two teenagers to force them to confess their sins. also tonight. clinton, sanders, and the first democratic debate. >> the american people are sick and tired of hearing about your damne-mails. >> products promoted as health supplements are sending tens of thousands to the emergency room. and they're just delivering the paper, so why are 15,000 people following them. . >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." we begin the broadcast this morning with the death in the word of life church. police in upstate new york say that two teenagers were brutally beaten, one fatally, by members of the congregation including the victims' parents. as for the motive, michelle miller is following the investigation.
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>> reporter: 59-year-old deborah leonard and 65-year-old husband bruce were charged with manslaughter in the beating death of their 19-year-old son lucas. authorities say lucas and his 17-year-old brother christopher were brought to the word of life church sunday night as part of a spiritual counseling session. new hartford police chief -- for frz. >> both brothers were subjected to physical punishment over the course of several hours. and the hopes that each would confess their prior sins and ask for forgiveness. >> reporter: according to this new hartford police complaint, lucas sustained blunt force trauma with injuries to his stomach, genital, back and thigh areas. authorities say at one point, lucas stopped breathing and was taken to the hospital monday afternoon. police later found christopher brutally beaten inside the church. he is in serious condition. the assault has left the central new york community stunned. tara litz lived next door to the
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>> we always joked around and said they were a cult. which now we are believing that they probably were. >> reporter: what made you think that? >> just the odd behavior. a gated community. you line up in a row. they've all go in together. the gates close. >> reporter: four others including the victim any sister have been charged with assault. scott, this investigation is on going and police do expect more arrests. >> the accused have not commented yet about the charges. michelle miller, thank you very much, michelle. last night we told you about a landmark verdict in milwaukee. a jury ordered badger guns to pay nearly $6 million to two police officers who were shot and grievously wounded by a gun purchased from that store. today bethoth sides of the gun issue debated what this means. here is dean reynolds. >> reporter: when a milwaukee jury saw the gun sale at a local
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with the same weapon in the hand of an underaged gunman they found the store at fault. brad heaton is a juror. >> i was surprised how easy it is, if you are organized, a decent liar, pretty much anyone can. so it is incumbent upon gun dealers to do everything that they can to vet people when they come in. >> reporter: in 2005 congress passed a law barring most lawsuits against gun manufacturers and sellers for the way buyerses to their products. there were exceptions involving negligence. in the milwaukee case, the 1-year-old gunman had an older friend buy the gun for him which is illegal. the jury found that the gun store employees either knew or should have known that. >> they didn't care. i mean, the core part of their market was criminals buying guns. >> reporter: edward flynn is milwaukee's chief of police. >> common sense american citizens said, wait a minute. reckless behavior where gun
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stores are supplying criminals with firearms has to be something punished. >> this is a -- >> reporter: at this store in minneapolis, gun salesman said the jury verdict was chilling. >> we can't help, be held responsible for the actions of others with a legally acquired firearm or any other product. i think if there is an unreasonable hysteria people start doing a knee-jerk reaction. i'm sure that has possibility of putting out the business. >> reporter: the attorney for the gun store said the ruling will be appealed and, scott, he has until november 16th to file it. >> the shooter in the case got 80 years and the person who bought the gun two years. dean reynolds. thanks. so, what does all this mean, our cbs news legal analyst. rikki, does this mean cases like this are going to be filed all over the country? >> it certainly means cases like this that are in the pipeline will go forward.
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hope than they had a week ago. however, it does not mean they will succeed. aas we know there is an appellate process here. it will take years for this to become a real precedent. right now, it is simply a jury verdict under very unique circumstances, scott. >> what are the unique circumstances that made this case a slam dung for thek for the jury? >> you had video. the picture was worth a thousand word. the real purchaser and the straw purchaser the guy who was going to go in of legal age to buy for his friend. and you can see their shen shenanigans in the store. the straw purchaser checked off the wrong box. he checked off he was the purchaser. >> on the federal form. >> on the form. the clerk helped him correct it. now those circumstances are so unique to show that this store
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reasonable belief to know that this gun ultimately might be used for a criminal purpose. >> rikki klieman, thank you so much. today, israel deployed hundreds of soldiers to stop a wave off takes by palestinians. in jerusalem, israeli police shot and killed a palestinian man they say was running towards them with a knife. since last month, eight israelis and 30 palestinians have been killed. the taliban's recent surge in afghanistan has apparently led president obama to change his mind about pulling nearly all american forces out. margaret brennan has learned the president's plans. margaret. >> scott, this is a tough call for the president who declared the american war in afghanistan to be over. there are currently 10,000 u.s. troops in afghanistan. and sources tell us that the u.s. is expected to leave around
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now, that's an increase from the 1,000 soldiers that the president originally planned to station in kabul by end of his term. just last month. taliban forces overran a major afghan city since 2001. u.s. military advisers are warning a more robust american military presence is needed to combat a resurgent taliban, as well as some growing threats from the islamic state and al qaeda. >> margaret, thank you. margaret brennan at the white house.
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right back. today, vice president joe biden said he is proud of last night's democratic presidential debate. but if he was looking for a roone to reason to jump into the race he likely didn't find it. hillary clinton dominated. nancy cordes was there. >> reporter: clinton and sanders clashed from the start over gun control. >> is bernie sanders tough enough on guns? >> no, not at all. >> reporter: capitalism. >> i think we shoe look to countries like denmark. >> reporter: and huh to rein in big banks. >> i went to wall street in 2007 before the big crash we had. i basically said cut it out. quit foreclosing on homes. >> you do not, congress does not
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wall street regulates congress. and we have got to break up these bangks. >> reporter: clinton was ready when they criticized her vet to go to war in iraq. which she now calls a mistake. >> i recall being on a debate stage, about 25 times, with then senator obama debating this issue. after the election he asked me to become secretary of state. >> reporter: sanders came to clinton's rescue on the issue that dogged her the most. >> that the american people are sick and tired of hearing about your damn, e-mails. >> thank you. me too. me too. >> some people are going to say you gave her a big gift. >> i don't know i gave her a big gift. what i said was true. let us talk about the real, use. >> reporter: of the three candidates polling near 0, former maryland governor martin o'malley had the strongest night. >> we passed comprehensive gun safety legislation. >> reporter: if vice president joe biden was hoping for a front
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and clinton's campaign manager said today it's time for him to make up his mind. all biden shared today was this, brief assessment of the night. >> i was proud of, i thought they all did well. >> biden's backers insist there is still room for him in this race even if the others exceeded expectations. one adviser told me today, scott, if he does jump in, voters will forget about the first debate and focus on the second one here at drake university in iowa next month. >> nancy cordes, thank you, nancy. tomorrow a zimbabwean hunter will go on trial for helping an american client kill a beloved lion. the american, walter palmer does not face charges. he paid a fortune for a hunting permit. that money is supposed to help conservation, but our correspondent discovered who is really bagging the blood money. >> cecil was a star attraction
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at the national park. the minnesota dentist who killed him said he had done nothing wrong. he paid $55,000 for a legal hunting permit. >> cecil was an icon on our part of the industry. >> reporter: the safari operators in zimbabwe, he told us americans like palmer make up the majority of zimbabwe's trophy honers. part of the huge hunting fees they pay is to go to conservation and community projects. he told us it rarely does. blaming corrupt government officials. >> it is a problem. it is a real menace. people are in dire straits. and people can do almost anything in terms of selling their souls for a bit of silver. rancheros . >> reporter: one district council received $150,000 in hunting fees, eight times the average salary. but villagers said they haven't seen any of it. what do you live on?
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how many dollars? >> nothing. >> reporter: nothing. not one cent. >> nothing. >> reporter: he wants to sell his goats for food. for now he lives off the meager crops he grows. unlike the villagers, it has running water and he showed us his thriving sun flowers. we were there today, with the sun and everything, the crops aren't doing there so well. they're really battling. >> you need to water them. >> reporter: really? but they didn't have water? >> unfortunately. >> reporter: yeah. in addition to schools and clinics, he told us the hunting fees also go to buy food. so why does everybody say they didn't have food? so are you saying they're lying to us? >> yeah, of course they are. >> reporter: they're lying to us? >> they are. because there's no one go hungry in this country. >> reporter: it is rare for illegal hunting to be prosecuted. this time the international
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resulted in not only a trial but partial ban of big game hunting on some of the farms bordering the national park. >> thank you, deborah. after a deadly outbreak of listeria, we have turned up more red flags about our food supply.
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right here on monday we reported former blue bell creamery workers complained about filthy conditions at a texas factory linked to an outbreak of listeria. turns out the outbreak had been going on for years. ten people got sick from the bacteria. three died. tonight, jim axelrod continues his investigation. >> reporter: richard porter and tina ettiger were patients at via christie saint francis hospital in wichita, kansas when they were both infected with listeria. they were treated by dr. tom moore and his colleagues. >> i think the public has an expectation, i think a reasonable expectation, that when they come to the hospital, that the food that's given to them is safe.
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>> reporter: they had been sickened by contaminated blue bell ice cream. porter survived the infection, ettiger did not. >> did our food safety system fail richard porter and tina ettiger? >> i believe it did. >> reporter: fda record show blue bell's own testing found listeria in its oklahoma plant as far back as 2013. the laws at the time did not require blue bell to share that information with regulators. michael taylor is the fda deputy commissioner for foods. do the current laws do enough to protect the most vulnerable americans. >> we don't think they do enough to protect all americans. that's why we have the 3,000 deaths annually from a wide range of pathogens. >> reporter: taylor says that will change with the implay men taegs of the food safety modernization act, the first overall of u.s. food safety laws in more than 70 years.
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the facility are what the new food safety law is intended to prevent. >> reporter: you are going from reactivity to prevention. >> exactly. that's the shift. >> reporter: the shift started this fall when the fda began implementing rules. with 1,000 inspectors for 100,000 facilities. taylor says they can't do it alone. >> the companies have to take responsibility for understanding the hazard in their facilities. >> reporter: you will never have the resources to be in every production facility every day. >> we have got to have a system that creates real accountability on the companies for doing the right thing for prevention every day. >> of course, the fda need money to make this all work. so far, congress has authorized just about 28% of what it's estimated they will need to fully implement the new law. >> we have learned so much in thank you very much. >> there was a close call at los
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angeles international airport. an airport worker drove onto a runway just as a jetliner carrying 78 people was cleared for takeoff. an alarm sounded in the tower, the pilot hit the brakes. nobody was hurt. a new warning about the
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supplements coming next. today the government blamed dietary supplements for sending 23,000 people to the emergency room each year, and putting more than 2,000 of them in the hospital. dr. jon lapook is looking into this. >> reporter: two years ago when chris herrera was 15, he lost 56 pound while taking a green tea extract build as a fat burner. his mom, lourdes gonzalez. >> him seeing the difference what one pill was doing, he
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probably decided to take more on his own without letting me know. >> but then his eyes turned yellow. medical tests showed his liver was failing. doctors blame the green tea extract. >> having to hear the doctor tell me every day that christopher had a 50% chance of dying and not making it was hurtful. >> reporter: herrera recovered. half of american adults use at least one supplement, so 23,000 emergency visits a year reflects a relatively low complication rate. but since these product don't need fda approval, the cdc says it is important to monitor their safety. weight loss and energy product accounted for 50% of visits. 5 to 34. most typical patients young adults. most common symptoms were cardiac. chest pain. elevated heart rate. dr. andrew geller of the cdc its the report's lead author. >> some dietary supplements may have benefits. but there are risks.
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we encourage patients to tell their physicians that they're taking dietary supplements and which ones. >> reporter: scott, patients don't tell doctors they're taking supplements they don't kid them real medications. supplements can have interact actions with med. bring your medicines to the doctor's office. throw them on the table. one by one go over what you are taking. >> thanks, doc. in london they asked not for whom the bell tolled, they asked if anyone could stop it. a technical glitch caused the bell at saint george to ring nonstop for 24 hours. the residents went nuts. one chimed in, have you tried turning it off and then on again. it.
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miss, your bag. when we travel from city to city, we pay attention to our surroundings. [ cheering ] everyone plays a role in keeping our community safe. whether you're traveveng for business or pleasure, be aware of your surroundings. if you see something suspicious, say something to local authorities. [ vocalizing ] [ buzzing ] [ tree crashes ] [ wind howowng ] visit worldwildlife.org.
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into new media and old. here's chip reid. >> reporter: it is 4:30 a.m. when the first boat docks at martha's vineyard. every morning jan and his wife, moira l ld 000 pounds of wspapers into two beat up vans and hit the road. >> good morning. >> reporter: after losing their six-figure incomes in architecture and software during the recession, it was a way to make just enough money to stay on the island they loved. their friend on the mainland thought theyeyad gone mad. >> i said, younow at, you should see the science, this place, in the morning. it's fantastic. i said you know what i will take a picture every day. send it to you. >> reporter: that's how it started. today they have 2,000 e-mail followers and 13,000 on facebook. >> the way the light strikes something. you think, i have to stop right now.
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>> reporter: you are preoccupied. not even thinking about the paper route? >> no. sometimes, 25 minutes go by. i think maybe i should deliver some papers now. >> reporter: demand for their photos is so great they expanded into cards, calendars, even art exhibits. still they earn a fraction of what they used to make in their high pressure corporate jobs. >> 20%. >> you make 20% now. >> yeah. >> maybe. >> reporter: are you happier now? >> yeah. >> here. take this out. >> reporter: wow. beautiful. you were worried it would be too ay to get a photograph. >> there's always something. >> reporter: in the morning light here there is always something. >> i love that little boat. >> reporter: to brighten the day for thousand of their closest friends. chip reid, cbs news, martha's vineyard, massachusetts. and that's t t "cbs overnight news" for this
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thursday. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning."
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york city, i'm scott pelley. welcome to the overnight news. i'm jim axelrod. zimbabwe has decided not to bring charges against the dentist from minnesota who killed cecil the lion earlier this year on a big game hunt. cecil was the star attraction at a game park and was fitted with an electronini collar. walter palmer paid $55,000 for the hunt. the paperwork was in order. but the lion was illegally lured out of the park. the commercial hunter in charge of the safari will be in court today facing up to ten years in jail. the incident has triggered a fierce debate over trophy hunting in zimbmbwe. deborah patta is there. >> reporter: behind me victoria fall together with zimbabwe's game reserves are major tourist attractions here.
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35 years of oppressive rule, the government i ibroke and the onomy in ruins. the national park, former home to cecil the lion is being ravaged by zimbabwe's dire conditions. as a result conservation relies primarily on hunting. we spoke to a man who oversees the industry. how much money does thehe government give t t the parks?s? >> nothing. zeier zero. >> reporter: the parks turn to hunting. when the dentist was on a private hunt. 30% of fees for private hunts are supposed to be paid to the national parks. >> in most cases you find because of the bureaucratic natures of organization, momo money may be consumed to a a large extent through administration costs dectly to conservation. >> reporter: if a hunt is on land owned by indigenous communities the community is to
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receive 100% of trophy hunting fees. this money administered by rural district council. we met its ceo n nr his thriving sunflower crops. >> we were there today with the sun and everything the crops aren't doing so well. they're battling. >> you need to water them. >> reporter: really. >> yeah. >> reporter: but they're out of walter. >> unfortunately. >> reporter: yeah, uh-huh. unlike the rural poor, he has runnnng water. his council made over $600,000 in trophy fees over the past year. he claims that money is used to provide infrastructure and feeding schemes for local communities. but the villagers we spoke to say they haven't received a aent from the council. like t ts man who has not had a job for decades and does not have one dom larllar to his name. so where do you get your food from? >> from agriculture.
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>> reporter: by agriculture he means the few meager crops he is able to grow in a country that is facing a drought. why does everybody say they don't hatch food? are you saying they're look to us? >> yeah, of course they tar. >> reporter: they're league to us? >> they are. they are. yes. >> reporter: it is rare for illegal hunting to be prosecuted in zimbabwe. this time the international outcry over thee shooting o o cecicithe lion resulted not only in a trial but a partial ban of big game hunting on some of the farms bordering the national park. sheriff in nevada want to court seeking a warrant to get a blood sample from lamar odom, former basketball player and reality tv star was found unconscious in a localbrothel. he is hospitalized on life support. authority want to know what drugs he was taking. michelle miller has the story. >> reporter: according to the brothel's owner, odom had been partying for days.
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away from everybody and having a good time. >> flipped it . odom comesin. >> reporter: former los angeles laker star, lamar odom found unconscious at a brothel tuesday. rushed to sunrise hospital in las vegas. his nearly 7 foot frame too tall to be air lifted by helicopter. saturday, odom checked in at dennis hoff's love ranch south in crystal, nevada, dennis hoff is the brothel's owner. hoff says odom was drinking cognac and had taken herbal viagra like supplement, discovered unresponsive in his room by two women. off awe he was throwing up, terrible. the girls of course, were traumatized. >> odom, the winner of two of nba championships with the los angeles lakers, last played in the nba two years ago.
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included an arrest in 2013 for driving under the influence. >> lamar, you do have to go to the dentist, baby. >> reporter: odom featured on reality tv show "keeping up with the kardashians" throughout his four year marriage to khloe. the two filed for divorce in 2013. several nba players have turned to socialed me y to show their support. miami heat star r ayne wade tweeted, prayers all the way up for my brother. odom's representatives have not responded to cbs this morning's request for comment. the nye county sheriff in nevada is investigating. our investigation into the deadly listeria outbreak linked to blue bell ice cream revealed the company may have been selling tainted p pduct for years. the question now -- why did it
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discover this. reporter: richard porter and tina e eiger were patients at via christie s snt francis hospital in wichita, kansas when they were both infected with listeria. they were treated by dr. tom moore and his colleagues. >> i think the public has an expectation, i think a reasonable expectation, that when they come to the hospital, that the food that's given to them is safe. >> reporter: they had been sickened by contaminated blue bell ice cream. porter survived the infection, ettiger did not. >> did our food safety system fail richard porter and tina ettiger? >> i believe it did. >> reporter: fdadaecord show blue bell's own testing found listeria in its oklahoma plant as far back as 2013. the laws at the time did not require blue bell to share that information with regulators. michael taylor is the fda deputy commissioner for foods. do the currere laws do enough to protect the most vulnerable americans. >> we don't think they do enough to protect all americans. that's why we have the 3,000 deaths annually from a wide
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>> reporter: taylor says that will changng with the implementation of the food safety modernization act, the first overall of u.s. food safety laws in more than 70 years. the kind of practices we saw in the facility are what the new food safety law is intended to prevent. >> reporter: you are going from reactivity to prevention. >> exactly. that's the shift. >> reporter: the shift stataed thisisall when the fda began implementing rules. with 1,000 inspectors for 100,000 facilities. taylor says they can't do it alone. >> the companies have to take responsibility for understanding the hazardrdn their facilities.. >> reporter: you will never have the resources to be in every production facility every day. >> we have got to have a system that creates real accountability on the companies for doing the right thing for prevention we've got trouble in tummy town. peptocopter! when cold cuts give your belly thunder,
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it has been more than 40 years since richard nixon became the only president in u.s. history to resign from office. watergate was his undoing. now all these years later, new details of the scandal are emerging. david martin reports for "sunday morning." >> subcommittee will come to order. >> reporter: it was the biggest bombshell of the biggest political scandal in american history. >> mr. butterfield are you aware of the installation of any listening devices in the oval office of the president? >> i was aware of listening devices, yes, sir. >> reporter: white house aide alexander butterfield revealing the existence of the white house taping system to the senate watergate cocoittee. >> when butterfield gave that dramatic testimony in july, 1973, it was a pivot point in
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watergate. >> reporter: reporter bob woodward along with carl bernstein famously exposed the machinations of the white house, tried and failed to interview butterfield. he passed the name on to the committee. >> do you think the tapes had ever been revealed had it not been for butterfield? >> probably would not have. >> reporter: turned out butterfield was sitting on a lot more secrets. 20 boxes full of them. >> this is the year, 1971. and each of these is a a month. >> reporter: two years ago he turned over to woodward. >> reporter: did you ever, in your wildest dreams, think that you would one day collaborating with bob woodward of all people? >> no, not at all. >> reporter: what did you think when you walked into his apartment and you see the 2 2 boxes? >> i thought -- wow. let's start looking. >> reporter: the result is the
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published by simon and schuster, a division of cbs. in adiagnosis to the documents. woodward spent 40 hours interviewing butterfield whoor three years occupied the office next to the president's. >> first one to see hem every day. last one to see him every night. attending to all the imneed. >> reporter: when butterfield left he took his files with him. >> some of the documents are classified top secret. how did you just walk away with them from the white house? >> it was easy. i just walked away with them. i did the wrong thing. no one is supposed to do that. but i felt to tell you the truth, that, those papers were safer with me than with anyone. i had been around classified. that's no excusese i am saying i wasn'tt going to show these to the wrong person. i was going to take good care of them. >> reporter: one top secret document reveals nixon's candid
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bombing of vietnam. an angry scrawl across a report from henry kissinger. we have had ten years of total control ofhe air and laos a a vietnam. the result zilch. and just the day before nextson told dan rather of cbs news, exactly the opposite. >> the results have been very, very effective. >> surely, nixon was not the first and won't be the last president to privately say things he would never say in public. >> yeah, the level of contradiction and the depth of the fraud. >> reporter: according to woodward's research nixon ordered the military to drop nearly 3 million tons tough bombs and d uld order another llion dropped in t t year after the zilch memo. >> it send you to, send you into your heart and soul about, you know what are we doing?
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how did this happen? how could we have been led this way? it takes t t concept of military leadership by a president turns it on its head. >> reporter: another document, this one in butterfield's handwriting details nixon's reaction to the massacre in which 504 vietnamese sill vi-- civilianed were slaughtered. >> get background of all involved. almost be disclosed. does credit witnesses. >> diskrez it rings a bell. we went to great lengths. >> reporter: butterfield wroro a memo about left wing affiliations of the soldier who first blue the whistle. ana another aboutsy more hearst the reporter who broke the story. according to the memo. hearst received a grant from the
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is clearly left wing and antitidministration. another vulnerable spot according to butterfield's notes, is the possible involvement of a lib jew. >> if the guy was a liberal jew, that was, material with which to, to discredit somebody. >> you are asking me things that are veryry difficult to explain about a very complicated man. >> reporter: a president who on a christmas eve tour of the old executive office building next to the white house, made a discovery that sparked a witch-hunt. >> some of the staff people, bureaucrats, civil servants had pictures of john f.. kennedy on their desks. or on the wall. nixon said we have to get rid of that infestation, as if it was some sort of disease that somebody would have a picture of
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>> what were you supposed to do about these pictures of other presidents on the walls? >> get them all take ebb down. >> get them all taken down? >> yes. he made that an express order. roy in particular, white house chief of staff told butterfield the president wouou like you to find out who the woman iss who has the two kennedy pictures. adding he asked about it once a week at least. butterfield reported back the cia secret service and fbi and house committee on unamerican activities all found the woman, a civil servant named edna rosenberg was a completely royal american. >> what's surprised is you go through all of this, the amount of energy that was devoted to these kind of maneuvers. this was a subversion of what the job of the presidency is. >> all oft documenteden
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butterfield's files. >> that's to holdeman. this is to the treasury secretary. this is to the social secretary for the white house. >> they really are sort of a record of what the president is thinking about on -- on any giveveday. >> yeah. some of them at least 40 years after, seem very, very strange. >> yes, they do. >> did they? did they seem strange at the time? >> in this strange environment, no. >> nothing of course was stranger than the break in at democratic national c cmittee headquarters i ithe watergate. that third rate burglary which brought down the president. butterfield was not in on it but knew about the taping system that could answer the question, what did the president know? when did he know it? >> listen, the last thing i wantededo do was be the person who gaveway the secret. holdeman and i told the
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president we would never tell. >> reporter: then a retired fbi agent, donald sanders, a member of the watergate committee staff, wound up an otherwise routine interview by asking exactly the right question. >> do you remember the question? >> exactltl >> how did it go? >> was there ever any other listening device in the oval office? that was the, and i said, i think i said, my, i'm ser you asked that question. i'm sorry you asked that question. >> history flips right there. >> i knew what i was saying, getting into. i really knew what it meant. >> when you look back at at now. would you have done anything dierently in the way you handled that explosive secret of the taping system? >> no, i thought of that a lot. >> i bet. >> i regret nothing. i didn't do everything right. but i satisfied myself that -- that i didn't tell a lie. >> reporter: it was of course the tapes that revealed the
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president had obstructed justice by ordering the cover-up of the water gaittergate break in. nixon resigned. butterfifid faded into rererement in cacafornia. >> the meeting presidents have before they go up to the capital to -- be sworn in as the new president. >> reporter: now he is back to teach us all one of the basic lessons of journalism. there is always more to the
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an infant is one of the latest and youngest faces of the ep dem epidemic of gun violence. laid to rest one w wk after hit by a stray bullet riding in a car in cleveland. police have no suspect or motive. her father spoke to us for our series "voices against violence." >> reporter: it was a crime so unimaginable it left cleveland police chief calvin williams a a a loss for word. >> it's tough. this should not be happening. >> reporter: 5-month-old avielle wakefield is the third childld killed by a gun in cleveland in
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charles wakefield is her father. >> never did i wake up thinking that was going to be my last day seeing her. >> reporter: what do you think that says about this city? >> i'm speeeeless. i'i'going to striviv for my baby's justice for cleveland and this nation. we need it. >> reporter: her dth adds to a spiking gun homicide rate in cleveland up 22%. a dozen other cities have seen an increase in homicides inclcling st. louis. jennifer joyce i i the top prosecutor and says murders by guns are up 51%. this is a very complex problem. there is no, you know, silver bullet pardon the pun to solve gun violence not in st. louis not anywhere. >> reporter: her office launchehe this website to tell the stories of the victims and also the offenders. >> i think the mass shootings as
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concerning and troubling as they are they get a lot of the focus when we talk about gun violence opposed to the day-to-day shootings in our cities that are reallylyiling up a lot more in terms of bodod count than the mass shootings are. >> do you think there will be other parents like you? >> i hate to say this, but yeah. yep. there is going to be somebody else. >> reporter: the other two children who were killed here in cleveland in the last month were ages 3 and 5. scott, in the last four years, more than 500 children under the age of 12 were killed by guns in this country. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. embarrassed by a prostate exam? imagine how your doctor feels. as a urologist, i have performed 9,421 and a half prostate exams.
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thth latest e craze in ofce
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furniture. the standing desk. companies are ordering them for employees and the white house wants them for presidential staff. the trend is moving from the office to the classroom. maria villareal reports. >> down. >> reporter: at this elementary school in san rafael, california. >> our hand are here, my friend. >> reporter: motivating students to move is more than just their morning routine. it's an all-day commitment that starts with these standing desks. >> gets your legs working so you are nono like i can't move. because you get stiff. >> reporter: their favorite feature is the aptly named fidget bar. >> how does it help you focus? >> it burns off lots of my energy so i can concentrate without wiggling around in the chairs. >> reporter: 19 of the 22 classrooms have standing des ticks. the last three will be converted
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by the end of the year. >> i'm so excited for them and thrilled we found a way to make them more excited about school. >> reporter: principal tracy smith says initially students got titid from standing all day. within a few months they were focused, confident and productive in the classroom. studies show allowing kids to move during the day can improve grade up to 15% and helps kids burn 25% more calories. the doctor says there isn't data on the long term effects of kids using standing desks but the physical benefits are immediate. >> you increase the muscle tone in your legs. seems to be an improvement in actually circulation and arterial function and expending a few calories extra every hour can lele to big changes. >> reporter: but those big changes can come with a big price tag. it can cost up to $6,000 to convert a single classroom. that's why some schools are
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like yoga balls to increase core stability, exercise bikes for read/ride programs, or bands like these to keep kids active. >> my ultimate goal is to have the federal government take notice at a minimum when a new school is built, a given standing desks will be the norm. >> reporter: while it may take time to catch on around the country. these kids are proud to be taking a stand. >> and sitting for too long is the new smoking. >> reporter: for cbs this morning, maria villareal, california. >> that's the "cbs overnight news" for this thursday. for some of you the news continue thousands. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm jim axelrod.
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death opens the doors of a secretive church. parishioners are charged in the savage beating of two teenagers to force them to confess their sins. also tonight. clinton, sanders, and the first democratic debate. >> the american people are sick and tired of hearing about your damn e-mails. >> products promoted as health supplements are sending tens of thousands to the emergency room. and they're just delivering the paper, so why are 15,000 people following them? >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." we begin the broadcast this morning with the death in the word of life church. police in upstate new york say that two teenagers were brutally beaten, one fatally, by members of the congregation including the victims' parents. as for the motive, michelle miller is following the investigation. >> reporter: 59-year-old deborah
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leonard and 65-year-old husband bruce were charged with manslaughter in the beating death of their 19-year-old son lucas. authorities say lucas and his 17-year-old brother christopher were brought to the word of life church sunday night as part of a spiritual counseling session. new hartford police chief michael encerra. >> both brothers were subjected to physical punishment over the course of several hours. and the hopes that each would confess their prior sins and ask for forgiveness. >> reporter: according to this new hartford police complaint, lucas sustained blunt force trauma with injuries to his stomach, genital, back and thigh areas. authorities say at one point, lucas stopped breathing and was taken to the hospital monday afternoon. police later found christopher brutally beaten inside the church. he is in serious condition. the assault has left the central new york community stunned. tara litz lived next door to the
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church for ten years. >> we always joked around and said they were a cult. which now we are believing that they probably were. >> reporter: what made you think that? >> just the odd behavior. a gated community. you line up in a row. they've all go in together. the gates close. >> reporter: four others including the victim any sister have been charged with assault. scott, this investigation is on going and police do expect more arrests. >> the accused have not commented yet about the charges. michelle miller, thank you very much, michelle. last night we told you about a landmark verdict in milwaukee. a jury ordered badger guns to pay nearly $6 million to two police officers who were shot and grievously wounded by a gun purchased from that store. today both sides of the gun issue debated what this means. here is dean reynolds. >> reporter: when a milwaukee
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store and saw two policemen shot with the same weapon in the hand of an underaged gunman they found the store at fault. brad heaton is a juror. >> i was surprised how easy it is, if you are organized, a decent liar, pretty much anyone can. so it is incumbent upon gun dealers to do everything that they can to vet people when they come in. >> reporter: in 2005 congress passed a law barring most lawsuits against gun manufacturers and sellers for the way buyerses to their products. there were exceptions involving negligence. in the milwaukee case, the 1-year-old gunman had an older friend buy the gun for him which is illegal. the jury found that the gun store employees either knew or should have known that. >> they didn't care. i mean, the core part of their market was criminals buying
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>> reporter: edward flynn is milwaukee's chief of police. >> common sense american citizens said, wait a minute. reckless behavior where gun stores are supplying criminals with firearms has to be something punished. >> this is a -- >> reporter: at this store in minneapolis, gun salesman said the jury verdict was chilling. >> we can't help, be held responsible for the actions of others with a legally acquired firearm or any other product. i think if there is an unreasonable hysteria people start doing a knee-jerk reaction. i'm sure that has possibility of putting out the business. >> reporter: the attorney for the gun store said the ruling will be appealed and, scott, he has until november 16th to file it. >> the shooter in the case got 80 years and the person who bought the gun two years. dean reynolds. thanks. so, what does all this mean, our cbs news legal analyst. rikki klieman. rikki, does this mean cases like this are going to be filed all over the country? >> it certainly means cases like
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this that are in the pipeline will go forward. they will go forward with more hope than they had a week ago. however, it does not mean they will succeed. as we know, there is an appellate process here. it will take years for this to become a real precedent. right now, it is simply a jury verdict under very unique circumstances, scott. >> what are the unique circumstances that made this case a slam dunk for the jury? >> you had video. the picture was worth a thousand word. the real purchaser and the straw purchaser the guy who was going to go in of legal age to buy for his friend. and you can see their shenanigans in the store. the straw purchaser checked off the wrong box. he checked off he was the purchaser. >> on the federal form. >> on the form. the clerk helped him correct it. now those circumstances are so unique to show that this store
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reasonable belief to know that this gun ultimately might be used for a criminal purpose. >> rikki klieman, thank you so much. today, israel deployed hundreds of soldiers to stop a wave of attacks by palestinians. in jerusalem, israeli police shot and killed a palestinian man they say was running towards them with a knife. since last month, eight israelis and 30 palestinians have been killed. the taliban's recent surge in afghanistan has apparently led president obama to change his mind about pulling nearly all american forces out. margaret brennan has learned the president's plans. margaret. >> scott, this is a tough call for the president who declared the american war in afghanistan
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there are currently 10,000 u.s. troops in afghanistan. and sources tell us that the u.s. is expected to leave around 6,000 after 2016. now, that's an increase from the 1,000 soldiers that the president originally planned to station in kabul by end of his term. just last month. taliban forces overran a major afghan city since 2001. u.s. military advisers are warning a more robust american military presence is needed to combat a resurgent taliban, as well as some growing threats from the islamic state and al qaeda. >> margaret, thank you. margaret brennan at the white house. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. almost sixty million americans are affected by mental illness. together we can help them with three simple words. my name is chris noth
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from maine to maui, thousands of high school students across the country are getting in on the action by volunteering in their communities. chris young: action teams of high school students are joining volunteers of america and major league baseball players to help train and inspire the next generation of volunteers. carlos pea: it's easy to start an action team at your school so you, too, can get in on the action. get in on the action at actionteam.org. 'cause you'll be in my heart yes, you'll be in my heart from this day on now and forevermore... narrator: if animals are our best friends, shouldn't we be theirs? visit your local shelter, adopt a pet.
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no matter what... cbs cares. if you were a hippie in the '60s, you need to know. it's the dawning of the age of aquarius. yeah, and something else that's cool. what? osteoporosis is preventable. all: osteo's preventable? right on! if you dig your bones, protect them.
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today, vice president joe biden said he is proud of last night's democratic presidential debate. but if he was looking for a reason to jump into the race he likely didn't find it. hillary clinton dominated. nancy cordes was there. >> reporter: clinton and sanders clashed from the start over gun control. >> is bernie sanders tough enough on guns? >> no, not at all. >> reporter: capitalism. >> i think we should look to countries like denmark. >> we are not denmark, we are the united states -- >> reporter: and huh to rein in big banks. >> i went to wall street in 2007 before the big crash we had. i basically said cut it out. quit foreclosing on homes. >> you do not, congress does not regulate wall street. wall street regulates congress.
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and we have got to break up these banks. >> reporter: clinton was ready when all four criticized her 2002 vote to go to war in iraq, which she now calls a mistake. >> i recall being on a debate stage, about 25 times, with then senator obama debating this issue. after the election he asked me to become secretary of state. >> reporter: sanders came to clinton's rescue on the issue that dogged her the most. >> that the american people are your damn, e-mails. me too. me too. >> some people are going to say you gave her a big gift. >> i don't know i gave her a big gift. what i said was true. let us talk about the real issues. candidates polling near 0, former maryland governor martin >> we passed comprehensive gun safety legislation. >> reporter: if vice president joe biden was hoping for a front
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runner to falter it didn't happen. and clinton's campaign manager said today it's time for him to make up his mind. all biden shared today was this, brief assessment of the night. >> i was proud of, i thought they all did well. >> biden's backers insist there is still room for him in this race even if the others exceeded expectations. one adviser told me today, scott, if he does jump in, voters will forget about the first debate and focus on the second one here at drake university in iowa next month. >> nancy cordes, thank you, nancy. tomorrow a zimbabwean hunter will go on trial for helping an american client kill a beloved lion. the american, walter palmer does not face charges. he paid a fortune for a hunting permit. that money is supposed to help conservation, but our correspondent discovered who is really bagging the blood money. >> cecil was a star attraction at the national park. the minnesota dentist who killed
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him said he had done nothing wrong. he paid $55,000 for a legal hunting permit. >> cecil was an icon on our part of the industry. >> reporter: the safari operators in zimbabwe, he told us americans like palmer make up the majority of zimbabwe's trophy hunters. part of the huge hunting fees they pay is to go to conservation and community projects. he told us it rarely does. blaming corrupt government officials. >> it is a problem. it is a real menace. people are in dire straits. and people can do almost anything in terms of selling their souls for a bit of silver. >> reporter: one district council received $150,000 in hunting fees, eight times the average salary. but villagers said they haven't seen any of it. what do you live on?
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>> nothing. >> reporter: nothing. not one cent. >> nothing. >> reporter: he wants to sell his goats for food. for now he lives off the meager crops he grows. unlike the villagers, it has running water and he showed us his thriving sun flowers. we were there today, with the sun and everything, the crops aren't doing there so well. they're really battling. >> you need to water them. >> reporter: really? but they didn't have water? >> unfortunately. >> reporter: yeah. in addition to schools and clinics, he told us the hunting fees also go to buy food. so why does everybody say they didn't have food? so are you saying they're lying to us? >> yeah, of course they are. >> reporter: they're lying to us? >> they are. because there's no one go hungry in this country. >> reporter: it is rare for illegal hunting to be prosecuted. this time the international
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outcry over cecil the lion resulted in not only a trial but partial ban of big game hunting on some of the farms bordering the national park. >> thank you, deborah. after a deadly outbreak of listeria, we have turned up more red flags about our food supply. and this church had
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to kill more types of germs than clorox. to help keep your family healthy, lysol that. it's the final countdown! the final countdown! if you're the band europe, you love a final countdown. it's what you do. if you want to save fifteen percent or more on car insurance, you switch to geico.
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right here on monday we reported former blue bell creamery workers complained about filthy conditions at a texas factory linked to an outbreak of listeria. turns out the outbreak had been going on for years. ten people got sick from the bacteria. three died. tonight, jim axelrod continues his investigation. >> reporter: richard porter and tina ettiger were patients at via christie saint francis hospital in wichita, kansas when they were both infected with listeria. they were treated by dr. tom moore and his colleagues. >> i think the public has an expectation, i think a reasonable expectation, that
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that the food that's given to them is safe. >> reporter: they had been sickened by contaminated blue bell ice cream. porter survived the infection, ettiger did not. >> did our food safety system fail richard porter and tina ettiger? >> i believe it did. >> reporter: fda record show blue bell's own testing found listeria in its oklahoma plant as far back as 2013. the laws at the time did not require blue bell to share that information with regulators. michael taylor is the fda deputy commissioner for foods. do the current laws do enough to protect the most vulnerable americans. >> we don't think they do enough to protect all americans. that's why we have the 3,000 deaths annually from a wide range of pathogens.
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>> reporter: taylor says that will change with the implay men taegs of the food safety modernization act, the first overall of u.s. food safety laws in more than 70 years. the kind of practices we saw in the facility are what the new food safety law is intended to prevent. >> reporter: you are going from reactivity to prevention. >> exactly. that's the shift. >> reporter: the shift started this fall when the fda began implementing rules. with 1,000 inspectors for 100,000 facilities. taylor says they can't do it alone. >> the companies have to take responsibility for understanding the hazard in their facilities. >> reporter: you will never have the resources to be in every production facility every day. >> we have got to have a system that creates real accountability on the companies for doing the right thing for prevention every day. >> of course, the fda need money to make this all work. so far, congress has authorized just about 28% of what it's estimated they will need to fully implement the new law. >> we have learned so much in the series, jim.
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>> there was a close call at los angeles international airport. an airport worker drove onto a runway just as a jetliner carrying 78 people was cleared for takeoff. an alarm sounded in the tower, the pilot hit the brakes. nobody was hurt. a new warning about the
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supplements coming next. today the government blamed dietary supplements for sending 23,000 people to the emergency room each year, and putting more than 2,000 of them in the hospital. dr. jon lapook is looking into this. >> reporter: two years ago when chris herrera was 15, he lost 56
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extract build as a fat burner. his mom, lourdes gonzalez. >> him seeing the difference what one pill was doing, he probably decided to take more on his own without letting me know. >> but then his eyes turned yellow. medical tests showed his liver was failing. doctors blame the green tea extract. >> having to hear the doctor tell me every day that christopher had a 50% chance of dying and not making it was hurtful. >> reporter: herrera recovered. half of american adults use at least one supplement, so 23,000 emergency visits a year reflects a relatively low complication rate. but since these product don't need fda approval, the cdc says it is important to monitor their safety. weight loss and energy product accounted for 50% of visits. 5 to 34. most typical patients young adults. most common symptoms were cardiac. chest pain. elevated heart rate. dr. andrew geller of the cdc its the report's lead author.
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>> some dietary supplements may have benefits. but there are risks. we encourage patients to tell their physicians that they're taking dietary supplements and which ones. >> reporter: scott, patients don't tell doctors they're taking supplements they don't kid them real medications. supplements can have interact actions with med. one idea is to bring your medicines to the doctor's office. throw them on the table. one by one go over what you are taking. >> dr. jon lapook, thanks, doc. in london they asked not for whom the bell tolled, they asked if anyone could stop it. a technical glitch caused the bell at saint george to ring nonstop for 24 hours. the residents went nuts. one chimed in, have you tried turning it off and then on again. we don't know who finally fixed it. but he is our candidate for the nobel prize. and we'll be right back. woman: what does it feel like when a woman is having a heart attack? chest pain, like there's a ton of weight on your chest. severe shortness of breath. unexplained nausea.
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cold sweats. there's an unusual tiredness and fatigue. there's unfamiliar dizziness or light-headedness. unusual pain in your back, neck, jaw, one or both arms, even your upper stomach, are signs you're having a heart attack. don't make excuses. make the call to 9-1-1 immediately. learn more at womenshealth.gov/heartattack. bipolar disorder is a brain condition that causes unusual or dramatic mood swings. it affects millions of americans and compromises their ability to function. when diagnosed, bipolar disorder can be effectively treated by mood stabilizers. but most people with bipolar disorder suffer for years without help because the symptoms are missed or confused with other illnesses, like depression. learn how easily you can help keep this from happening to a loved one.
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we end it we power couple
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here's chip reid. >> reporter: it is 4:30 a.m. when the first boat docks at martha's vineyard. every morning jan and his wife, moira load 2,000 pounds of newspapers into two beat up vans and hit the road. >> good morning. >> reporter: after losing their six-figure incomes in architecture and software during the recession, it was a way to make just enough money to stay on the island they loved. their friend on the mainland thought they had gone mad. >> i said, you know what, you should see the science, this place, in the morning. it's fantastic. i said you know what i will take a picture every day. send it to you. >> reporter: that's how it started. today they have 2,000 e-mail
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followers and 13,000 on facebook. >> the way the light strikes something. you think, i have to stop right now. take that picture. >> reporter: you are preoccupied. not even thinking about the paper route? >> no. sometimes, 25 minutes go by. i think maybe i should deliver some papers now. >> reporter: demand for their photos is so great they expanded into cards, calendars, even art exhibits. still they earn a fraction of what they used to make in their high pressure corporate jobs. >> 20%. >> you make 20% now. >> yeah. >> maybe. >> reporter: are you happier now? >> yeah. >> here. take this out. >> reporter: wow. beautiful. you were worried it would be too gray to get a photograph. >> there's always something. >> reporter: in the morning light here there is always something. >> i love that little boat. >> reporter: to brighten the day for thousand of their closest friends. chip reid, cbs news, martha's vineyard, massachusetts. and that's the "cbs overnight news" for this thursday. for some of you the news
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for others, check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm scott pelley. captioning funded by cbs
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