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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  October 16, 2015 1:52am-4:30am CDT

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she's in hiding. how do you expect them to get the money to her? well, barb said she was safe. barb is a liar. barb needs to be e pt away from erica. oh. oh, you know what's best for her? yes, i do. there's a call for ms. wilkes. it's her office. oh, my god. tell them she's busy. they said it was important. they're holding call from an ericicwindemere. (sighs) uh, put it through in here. woman: christine? erica! yes, it's me. i'm here. hi. i'm so happy to hear your voice. i am too, erica. i'm here with the police right now. so, tell me how you're doing. all right, but i'm very scared. i am taking care of everything. you don't have to worry about anything. i'm not going to let...
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barb told me on the phone that he had insurance. don't understand ththe things. (quietly): he had a life policy that left erica $2illion. oh, that's incredible. that's a miracle. only now, i won't get it (voice breaking): because of barb d what she did to d dg. since erica's the trustee and she killed doug, the policy's void, and erica gets nothing. what's going to happen to me, christine? "the people i'm with can't afford to take care of me. "we don't have ny money. barb had it all." (erica sobbing) erica? listen to me, sweetheart. nothing bad is going to happen to you. (quietly)y) she has no healal insurance. i'm going to end up in a home. o, no, you're not. i'm going to make sure of that. (quietly): how? with what money?
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i mean... (aloud): erica's at the end of her rope. isn't that right, erica? i'm so sorry, christine. i try to be brave... (sobbing): but... but losing barb and tony... erica... it's just too much. you taught me so much about accepting loss and uncertainty and hardship and appreciating what is beautiful and hopeful in life. beauty won't help. her disease is going to get worse. that's what she has to look forward to. more hardship, loss and uncertainty. erica, you know that i would sacrifice everything for you. you better mean it, because she's got no one else. you're the only person i have left, christine. i know. (line disconnects) (dial tone droning) what? erica? erica? erica?
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erica? erica! erica! erica! what are you going to do, christine? that money could chchge everything fororer. it could save her life. whatever you did, you... you did to... defend your faith in her. your heart was pure. now it's time to take the final step
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you need to do this... or your faith in erica will have been... a lie. i did it. not barb. i killed doug. tell me what you did. i killed him in his garage. i used nail polish remover, and i set him on fire. he was goininto hurt erica. he kept saying she wasn't real, and i couldn't let him say that. and i just couldn't let him say that.
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barb: so now i get the insurance money, right? when do i get it? i'm sorry. whaha! erica isn't the only thing that doesn't exist. you lied? you lied to me? i helped you, and... yououuined everything. erica will be so disappointed in them. captioning sponsored by universal studios domestic television
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>> a key part of america's anti-terror security system crashes creating a travel nightmare. and, at the white house, the sound of w wming relations with h cuba. >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." the socialalecurity administration is telling nearly 65 million retirees they will not be getting a raise next year. because inflation is too low to trigger one. and the bad news gets worse. unless congress acts, many of the 55 million on medicare could 50%. with higher deductibles as well. here's major garrett. >> reporter: theheincrease in out of pocket medicare costs would supplies, walkers, wheelchairs.
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currently the monthly premium is $104. it could rise to $159. eight million could face the costs. a million are federal retirees. jessica clement -- of the national aive and retired federaemployees association. >> $55 a month makes a big big difference to individuals living on a fixed income. >> reporter: here is the problem. health care costs are rising fast by law 70% % people on medicare are protected from higher premiums if they don't get a social security cost of living raise. that's what is going to happen next year. which h aves only 30% of medicare patients to absorb all the higher health care costs. that 30% include the wealthy, seniors who recently signed up for medicare and fededal employees. congress can reverse the cost increase due to start january 1. something the white house supports. >> there seems to be bipartisan support in congress for preventing this.
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offset the costs, however, could complicate the issue. >> reporter: preventinged medicare premium increases is part of secret budget talks between the white house and congressional republicans, scott. that means seen seniors could be caught in a fit to avoid a government shutdown. >> you would imagine they would figure out how to make a deal in an election year. major garrett at the white house for us. major garrett, thank you. last night a computer system used tkeep terror suspects out of the country crashed. turning thousands of passengers into virtual prisoners. here is kris van cleave. reporter: the natioiol outage gridlocked the emirates check-in desk at jfk last night. some flights were delayed. long lines formed as custom check points across the country ground to a virtual halt, stranding thousands. >> the people up there were all cursing. there was people that couldn't walk. it was crazy. crazy. people in the wheelchair were
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like crying. waiting there for hours. >> reporter: cameron miller got stuck in lines in dallas. they told me the computer system was down. we needed to fill out some forms. old school style. >> reporter: old school is fitting description. for 90 minutes software customs officers used to access lists was offline requiring manually processing passports and doing passenger interviews. it w w described as tedious. sources familiar with the watch list said those needing additional screening would be sent to custom officers by other means, fax or e-mail. >> the question i am left with after last night why isn't there a backup system? >> we get what we invest in. with respect to government. >> watch list data are maintained by the fbi ron hosko, former assistant director. >> i d d't think our securititis enhanced when we go from an
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automated system to a paper and we are hand scanning names on a list. >> reporter: customs and border protection said the issue was a software air railroad that prevented information from flowing betweeeesystems. it was not malicious. a senior official said any passenger who needed to be checked against a list was fully vetted. >> kris van cleave our transportation specialist, kris, thank you. today, presidentntbama here last nighgh america's longest war, already 5,122 days old, will continue longer than he wanted. longer than he promised. he is keeping at least 5500 troops in afghanistatathrough the end of his presidency. and here is david martin. >> reporter: the talalan takeover of the capital of kunduz last month provided the explanation point. the handwriting was already on the wall for president obama to read. >> afghan forces are still not
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gains. and can still launch deadly kabul. american troops will be based in the capital of kabul, main airfield at bagram and locations in the east and south. one of the locations will allow the cia to continue to conduct drone hideouts in pakistan. >> these bases will give us the presence and reach our forces quire to achieve thehe mission. although the u.s. combat mission officially ended with much fanfare last december. american commandos continue to carry out raids and american war planes continue to conduct air strikes. just last week, u.s. and afghan forces killed an estimated 120 al qaeda f)ghters in one of the @ largest assault efforts ever against two training camps.
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gunship opened fire on a hospital near kunduz as u.s. green berets were helping afghan troops retake the city. how long the 5500 troops remain in afghanistan will be up to the next president. president obama suggested american troops will be needed until there is a peace treaty with the taliban. scott. >> david martin at the p ptagon. thank you. the cost o o14 years of war in afghanistan has been more than 2,200 american lives. and nearly 700 billion dollars. former u.s. speaker of the house, dennis hastert struck a deal with prosecutors. hastert charged with violating banking laws and lying to federal agents about it. hastert was reportedly paying hush money to a man who claimed that hastert sexually abused him decades before when hastert was a high school wrestling coach. hastert will change his plea to guilty, likely in return for a reduced sentence.
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right back. almost sixty million americans are affected by mental illness. together we can help them with three simple words. my name is chris noth
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from maine to maui, thousands of high school students across the country are getting in on the action by volunteering in their communities. chris young: action teams of high school students are joining volunteers of america and major league baseball players to help train and inspire ththnext generation of volunteers.s. carlosea: it's easy to start an action team at your school so you, too, can get in on the action. get in on the action at actionteam.org. 'cause you'll be in my heart yes, you'll be in my heart from this day on now and forevermore... narrator: if animals are our bebe friends, shouldn't we be theirs? visit your local shelter, adopt a pet. you'll be in my heart no matter what...
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if you were e hippie in the ''60s, you need to know. it's the dawning of the age of aquarius. yeah, and somethg else that's cool. what? osteoporosis is preventable. all: osteo's preventable? right on! if you dig your bones, protect them. all: cbs cares! six members of a church have pleaded not guilty to charges of manslaughter and assault.
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were beaten by thehe parents, their sister, and other members of the secretive word of life one of the brothers died. michelle miller is there. >> reporter: today police were seen serving what they describe as court papers to members of the world of life church. the site of sunday's brutal assault. the viviim's parents, deborah and bruce leonard remain in jail on first degree manslaughter charges in the beating death of their 19-year-old son lucas. devin garimore represents the victim any mother. >> i donon think it was her idea. i think that this is something that she didn't foresee going this far. and i think she lost control of it. >> reporter: four other church members are accused of assaulting lucas' 17-year-old
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brother christopopr after church sunday. the district attorney says the beatings may have lasted more than ten hours. what did happen? >> what we understand there was an issue whether or not they brother wanted to stay in the church. thererwas a confrontation between the two boys and the parents about that. >> reporter:nvestigators believe church members home school their children inside the former public school compound, bought more than 30 years ago. several of the children werere taken away y yterday by child protective sererces. >> was the assault part of some religious ritual? >> it is not our allegation it was a religious ritual for anything of that nature. but for purposes of what we are dealing with right now, we a a looking at what i would aracterize as a formrmf a gang assault. >> authorities say several former church members are helping in their investigation. and scott, we are told, that the younger brother is conscious, cooperating and is expected to make a full recovery. >> michehee miller, reporting g
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thank you. tonight a 13-year-old boy is at the center of the never-ending battle between israelis and palestinians. to one side, he is a victim. to the other, a terrorist. jonathan vigliatti is in tel aviv. >> reporter: the 13-year-o lay bleeding badly on a jerusalem street. the palestinian authority said he was killed by israeli soldiers. but then the israelilireleased this video of the arar boy very much aliveecovering in a kospital. israel says that he stabbed two including a jewish teenager and the scene. it its the latest in a string of knife attacks against israelis that have spooked the country. palestinians mostly young men, armed with knives appear out of nowhere stabbing as many as they can. targets appear random. which has added to the fear.
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all of the suspects ha been arrested or fatally shot by israeli security forces. like this woman, gunned down at a bus station. now, for the first time since 2000, israeli security forces set up extra check points around the palestinian neighborhoods of east jerusalem. so far, it hasn't done much to reassureany one, like this resident. father of five. >> it is very, very dangerous place. we are, scared all of the time. >> reporter: meantime, both sides buried their dead this week. and another grim procession of death. palestinians are calling for a day of mass protest, following tomorrow's weekly muslim prayers. scott, the country its bracing itself for what could be a day of more violence. >> in tel aviv, thanks. ken taylor, the former canadian ambassador to iran has died. if you saw the oscar winning film "argo" you know his story. during the hostage crisis in
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americans and helped them escape with fake passports. for that he was awarded the u.s. congressional gold medal. ken taylor was 81. today a zimbabwean hunter said that he expects to be cleared of charges that he helped an american illegally kill a beloved lion called cecil. the american, walter palmer does not face charges. deborah patta was there as the the hunter came into the cross hairs of the court. >> reporter: hidinbehind dark glasses and a cap, hunting guide, theo bronkhearst sat in his car anxiously waiting for court to start. he insisted he did nothing wrong. he says he had a legal permi >> i guess i st a famous lion. >> reporter: cecil was a major attraction at the national park. the government says that he lured cecil off protected park land to a nearby farm where he was shot with a cross bow.
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we got the, the animal was on an elephant carcass. it is utter nonsense. we didn't have to lure him. he was there. >> reporter: he says he is being made a scapegoat. most of the $50,000 palmer paid for his hunting license goes to bronchearst. after a small cut to the farmer on whose land cecil was killed. but those days could be over. >> it's destroyed us, eh. it's destroyed the family. my business. >> reporter: it's been tgh? >> you know, we employ a lot of people. and -- they are on halftime now. i guess each family is supporting six, six or more dependents. >> reporter: illegal hunting is prosecuted in zimbabwe, but the researcher, studyiyi cecil was convinced because of the
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international outrage this time would be different. he believes the american dentist should have been charged. >> i really thought this was going to be e example to other people that have done this before who would do it in the future. so very disappointed we are not going to s%c justice. >> reporter: he told us if the american dentist isn't facing charge he's shouldn't either. his lawyers did not get a chance to argue the case in court today, scott, as the trial was postponed until next week. >> deberah patta reporting. thank you. a hollywood star puts a affecting many new mothers. employers, let us in on the most absurd excuses for calling in sick. > and, a new look at camelot. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. he said sure. but don't get just any one. get one inspired by dentists. with a round brush head. go pro with oral-b. oral-b's rououed brush head cups your teeth
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actress hayden pantiere has a lot going for her. 26, successful, engaged, last
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december became a momo this week she announced she is getting treatment for postpartum depression. hundred of thousand of other women are battling it too. dr. jon lapook has one woman's story. >> lauren saffron was 34 when she gave birth to lily. you looked so happy in the pictures. were you? >> no, i was very much the opposite. i was pretty certain i was not going to be able to handle being a mother. >> reporter: she was suffering postpartum depression. every year about 4 million women give birth. anywhere from 8 to 19% report having frequent symptoms of depression. that's more thanan00,000 women every year. dr. katherine burndoff of new york presbyterian treats women. >> the biggest myth about
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dodon't exist. there are poem that believe it isn't possibleo be depressed or upset or struggle around such a miraculous event as having a baby. >> reporter: saffron was treated with therapypynd antitiepressants and is a therapist for woken facing the same struggle she had. when you look at them now and think back to how you were feeling at the time you were born. what goes through your mind? >> it almost doesn't feel like it was me. you know? it feels so far away. >> the adjustment to motherhood. this is not easy. and, the idea that we want women to do it effortlessly and smoothly and with a smile on their face is an enormous problem. >> reporter: it is common for women to have sadness, irritability and changes in mood after giving birth. the symptoms usually resolve in two weeks. but if they're severe or persist longer it is important to seek help. it is estimated at least 50% of postpartum depression goes
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dr. jon lapook. thank you,u,oc. law makers scrambled when tear gas filled the halls of
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that's coming up. photos released by t t kennedy library. are giving us a peek into camelot. john kennedy relaxing on the presidential yacht "honey fitz", and daughter cararine, u.s. ambabaador to japan. f.k. jr. inherited h h dad's love of the sea. and a rare shot of the president enjoying ice cream. and a color photo of his interview with walter cronkite, 12 weeks before the assassination. you think debate gets heated in our congress. kosovo's congress emptied out when lawmakers set off tear gas to protest a deal with serbia. sovo declared independence from serbia seven years ago after a verb us war. old d udges die hard. >> careeebuilders out with its annual list ofbsurd excuses for calling in sick. one woman said she was going to the beach because she needed vitamin d from sun light. a man caught cheating on his
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wife, had to retrieve his belongings from the dumpster. and one guy said, grandma poisoned him with ham. but his boss thought it was baloney. a half century after the cuban missile crisis, cuban musicians in the white house. next. woman: what does it feel like when a woman is having a heart attack? chest pain, like there's a ton of weight on your chest. severe shortness of breath. unexplained nausus. cold sweats. there's an unusual tiredness and fatigue. there's unfamiliar dizziness or light-headedness.
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even your upper stomach, are signs you're having a heart attack. don't make excuses. make the call to 9-1-1 immediately. learn more at womenshealth.gov/heartattack. bipolar disorder is a brain condition that causes unusual or dramatic mood swings. it affects millions of americans and compromises their ability to function. when diagnosed, bipolar disorder can be effectively treated by mood stabilizers. but most people with bipolar disorder suffer for years without help because the symptoms are missed or confused with other illnesses, like depression. learn how easily you can help keep this from h hpening to a loved one.
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we end with the latest sign and sound of improving relations
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today cuban musicians performed time in 50 years. here is margaret brennan. >> reporter: the sound of cuban house was a remarkable moment for guitarist elandes ochoa. and singer omaro puertoando. they never thought they would make it here. what does that mean to you? >> translator: this represents her flag, her culture and her ideals. >> translator: the trip will be part of his artistic record forever.
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musicians were littltlknown outside cuba. until the 1990s when the buen vista social club album made them a worldwide sensation. that inspired an academy award nominated documentary. and soon many band members had found fame in their 70s and 80s. >> i look to sing. >> reporter: they see hope in the thaw between twowoold war foes. you think that relations between the u.s. and cuba are getting better? >> a day will come when everyone will be able to sit down and eat at the same table. that gets a laugh from omara who says her band mate speaks the truth and beautiful word. their final song was the spanish version of "perhaps, perhaps, perhaps" a song made popular by nat king cole. >> i knew nat king cole? >> you knew him? >> yes, in cuba. we sang with nat king cole and
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other singers. he sang in cuba "perhaps, perhaps, perhaps." perhaps, perhaps -- i can't hear you >> reporter: and perhaps has never been promisisi. perhaps, , rhaps margaret brennan, cbs news, washington. and that's the "overnight news" for this friday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and cbs "this morning." from the broadcast center in new yoyo city, i'm scott pelley. welcome to the "cbs overnight news." a woman charged with beater her
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upstate new york claims she was powerless to stop the attack. the lawyer for deborah leonard said it started as an intervention that soon spiraled out of control. six membmbs of the word of life christian church remaiaibehind bars. the mother and father charged with manslaughter. michelle miller reports from outside the church in chadwiks, new york. >> reporter: people around here say church members mostly kept to themselves, were secretive, and that some even lived inside this church building. well investigators say the sunday's deadly assault began when the two brothers met with other church members for what was described as a "counseling session." photos taken inside the church the day after the deadly beating offer a rare glimpse inside the guarded building. police say on sunday night,
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19-year-old lucas leonard and 17-year-old brother christopher sat down for a spiritual counseling session at the word of life christian church. at some point, the meeting became physical. >> both brothers were continually subjected to physical punishment over the course of several hours. in the hopes each would confess their prior sins and ask for forgiveness. >> reporter: monday, lucas' family drove him to the hospital when they realized he wasn't breathing. he died that afternoon. investigators later found his younger brother, still i iide the church. police say both brothers had injuries to their stomac, backs, thighs and genitals. during the church. investigators also found several other children who appear to be unharmed.
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faces charges of first degree manslaughter. four a aitional people inclulung the victims's'ister ear charged with second degreessault. devin garrimore is deborah leonard's attorney. >> apparently part of a church-related discipline being imposed on her two boys. i don't think it was her idea. >> reporter: what were they being disciplined for? >> that i can't say. >> you can't see in. only see lights on. all the windows are all boarded up. >> neighbors say church members tried to recruit them in the past. >> we always joked around and said they were a cult. which now we are believing that they probably were. >> reporter: litz lived in house next door for ten years. she says congregation members re nice but strange.e. the men wore long dark cloak and she would hear chanting. >> i don't know itch they were speaking in tongues. i'm not sure. it was not english. not any reconizable language that i could distinguish.
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raised eyebrows in the tight-knit community. >> no one was every loud in there. you just couldn't get. it was off limits. in zimbabwe, a postponement the hunt for cecil the lion. he could face ten years in prison for allegedly luring cecil out of a protected park where she was shot with a cross bow. cecil ran away, found the next day and was killed. deborah patta had the story. >> tourists flock to victoria falls. one man missing today at the magistrate court, walter palmer, and killed cecil the lion. all charges have been droppe against him. but the man who led the hunt is still being prosecuted. hiding behind dark glasses and a cap, theo arrived at the court and sat in his car anxiously turning his head from the camera wrong.
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he claims he had a legal permit and would be vindicated in court. >> weleli guess i shot a famous lion. >> reporter: the famous lion the iconic star attraction up the national park. the rare, black maned cecil. he believes he is the fall guy. >> there are many lions shot every year. as the far as my way, there were five shot this year alone. >> reporter: he broke down as he told us his life had been ruined. >> will it destroyed us, eh. it destroyed the family. my business. you know, we employ a lot of people. and they are all o ohalftime now. i guess each famamies say porting six or more dependents. >> reporter: zimbabwean officials insist it was unlawful. illegal hunting is not often prosecuted.
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but llared cecil as partf an oxford study. was convinced because of the international outrage surrounding the case it would be different this time. like many here, surprised charges were dropped against palmer. >> i really thought this was going to be an example to other pepele that have done thth before who would do o in the future. so very disappointed we are not going to see justice. >> reporter: he said that the charges were dropped against palmer proves his innocence. have his day in court. again until next week. former pro basketball player and reality tv star, lamar odom remains on life support in a nevada hospital. found unconscious in a brothel over the weekend. kevin frasier has the latest. >> reporter: according to a source inside the hospital close to the family that i spoke with yesterday, there were small improvements for lamar odom. he squeezed kim kardashian's haha. briefly opened his eyes.
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understand this he is a long way from being out of the wood and heap is fighting for his life. >> reporter: the first 911 call came in around 3:15 p.m. nevada time, tuesday. from a female employee of the love ranch. where lamar odom had been a guest since saturday. another male caller told operators about drugs he says odom had been taking. >> apparently had cocaine on him. pretty much, he did this on saturday. >> as far as you know there is no cocaine since saturday. >> that is correct. >> reporter: the caller said odom@was taking large amounts of reload, sexual enhancement drug, the fda warns could be dangerous if mixed with certain other medications. the owner of the love ranch.
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>> they said roll him on his left side. he started throwing up a lot. >> entertainment to night was allowed into the room at the brothel where odom was discovered. >> the police looked through this things. they didn't t ll us they found anything.. >> reporter: the nye county sheriff confirms a search warpt was executed for a sample of odom's blood. former lacquer teammates. kobe bryant and trevor ariza have visited odom's bedside. family and friend have kept a constant vigil and check on lamar. e thing they're hold. talk to him. he can hear you. the hopes he will hear a voice recognizable. come out of the coma. his two older children were expected last night. much more information on entertainment tonight.
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right backck it's the final countdown! the final countdown! if you're the band europe, you love a final countdown. it's what you do. if you want to save fifteen percent or more on c insurance, you switch to geico. it's what you do. there is new video tonight
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break in modern times. notorious drug kingpin el chapo joaquin g of the -- guzman. escaped in july from a tunnel under his cell. the new video shows guzman turning up the sound on his tv before loud jack hammers heard in the background i was his men chiseling away through the floor of his shower. none of the guard paid any attention. minutes later, guzman was gone. bill whitaker r ok a look at the escape for "60 minutes." >> gets arrested for the second time. knowing he escaped once before. goes to prison and is able to escape a second time.. that's something like, no other criminal in history you will be able to find. >> reporter: until he retired last year, jim dinkins was head of homeland security investigations. part of the international
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decade. >> he was literally in a well-fortified, constructed prison, designed to prevent such an escape. >> maximum security prison in mexico. >> desesned to penetrate people from coming frumg air or land. they didn't anticipate underground. >> reporter: that's exactly what almost from the moment he was delivered here to altiplano prison in february, 2014. a construction crew from his cartel began digging a tunnel to free him. the wall here are as much as 3 feet thick. the airspace above is restricted. cell phones, prison officials say they're jammed for miles around. but none of that made a difference. from all most a mile away, inside this hastily built, cinder block structure in a farmer's field, chapo'men dug down three stories. and then they burrowed 4,921 feet straight toward altiplano. a massive construction project right outside the prison, might have masked the is not of the underground activityty
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wall and beneath the plumbing and with pinpoint accuracy, it emerged directly into the shower stall of guzman's ground level cell. >> very difficult totoavigate underground. point a to point b with minor deviations if any. and that is an engineering marvel. >> how difficult? >> very, very difficult. when the boss is behind prison. put t ur best team and foooo forward. they did. >> at 8:52, saturday july 11th. he ducks into a shower cell behind the privacy wall. the only place hidden from security cameras. and then he disappears. he climbed down into the tunnel, and climbed atop ape motorcycle. especially rigged on rail tracks to speed him to freedom. by the time the alarm sounded and a search began, guzman had
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vanished into the night. whwh mexican agents located the cinder block structure where the escape tunnel began. the construction crew was also long gone. leaving behind tools. jen rater, oxygen tanks. jig saw and car batteries. >> what was your reaction when you heard el chappo escaped? >> disappointed not shocked. >> chuck rosen becker is head of the u.s. drug enforcement ministration. >> he was in a maximim security prison? >> escaped previously in 2001. it had happened before. we knew, we knew, he had intended to dupe it again. >> you knew he was planning to do it again? >e knewe and his folks wanted to break h out we had general chatter, a year before he broke out a second time. what they hoped to do.
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information we had. about tunnnns. >> he is a notorious tunnel manufacturer. >> tunnel king. >> the tunnel king. >> he is responsible for more sophisticated tunnels. any body in the history of drug traffickckg in mexico. some what ironic he was able to escape using one of the techniques he perfected over the last decade plus. >> reporter: ironic, but not terribly surprising. during the last manhunt for el chapo, pursuers discscered this. >> the tub. look at this. >> tunnel entrance in the plumbing. in this case beneath the tub. >> that's amazing.g.
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smuggling methods. he packed drugs into fake cucumbers and bananas and mixed them wititreal shipments of produce. the thing he worked hardest on was making sure he could always get away. guzman was the first mexican drug trafficker to hierarch tekts and mining engineers to build elaborate super tunnelel complele with vent lax system. electricity and railways to ferry drugs under the u.s./mexico border. mexican authorities led us to a tunnel thehefound unfinished and just short of the border fence in tijuana. this tunnel was discovered just a couple weeks after the great escape. his cartel wasn't just focused on building his escape tunnel. continued building the drug tunnels at the same time. the border between san diego and tijuana is one of the busiest international commercial jones in the world. you've will see ate ststtd streams papaing north and south.h. what you can't see is that beneath one four mile stretch of
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thisorder it is crisscrossed with dozens of smuggling tunnels. why? because this industrial part of tijuana is across the fence of acres of warehouses in the u.s. drug smugglers, dig down in a building over here. pop up i ia warehouse inthe u.u. couple of hundred yard away. this is where el chapo's cartel, honed its tunnelling technique. >> when did el chapo first start digging tunnels here in the area. on record the fifit tunnel in 2010. >> gentlemen dimigglio., chief of the san diego task forcing, made up of agents from homeland security. border patrol. and dea. the task force was established to what the government deems a threat to nationalalecurity. down this road, thehe has been multiple tunnels found in warehouses here. >> how far is this? >> 1,400 feet.
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length. >> what makes the area so appealing to them? >> just the infrastructure on beth side of the border. you u ow, and, in tijuana. you have all theheommercial busisisses there. import. export. just the warehouses there doing legitimate business. it is easy to conceal an illegitimate business within the warehouses. like looking for a needle in a hey stack. >> how much does it cost them off to build one of the tunnels? >> eststate the it costs the cartel $1 million to $2 million. if they have one sucucssful push through of narcotics they y id for the tunnel and then some. >> one load gets throu. >> one load. not just one kilo. talking tons of narcrcics going through. >> led of marijuana for example could de worth as much as $5 million to $6 million.
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smugglers use the tunnels to move ware na, because it is too bulky, smelly, easy to protect. to transport over land. >> there you go. >> the team took us down into one of el chapo's closed subterranean passage ways. dug through the clay-like soil with picks, shovels and power tools. >> you can see bill's full report at cbsnews.com.
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feel and it just makes them... rawr... dare to feel more with new k-y love. phillipe petit, redefined the high wire act in 1974 in the s s above new yorkrkity.
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his death defying stroll betweenen the world trade centererowers is dramatized in the new movie the walk. phillipe petit sat down to discuss the day with anthony mason. >> welcome to new york. anything to declare. >> i will hang a high wire between the two towers of the world trade center and walk on it. >> good luck. >> reporter: but that is exactly what felipe petite did on an otherwise ordinary day in 1974. >> there is somebody out there on a tightrope between the towers of the world trade center at the tippy top. >> reporter: for nearly an hour, quarter mile above manhattan, the 24-year-old frenchman, walked, even danced on a steel cable, strung between the twin towers of the newly constructete world trade centnt. >> please tell me for a moment you were nervous that morning? >> i am never nervous before a performance. first i cannot afford to be the
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i always put myself on the wire, departure, with a feeling that is both mental and physical. the feeling of -- >> petite planned the caper more thananix years and made a a ial walk some e ars before. sneaking a cable between the spiers of the cathedral of notre dame in paris. but the tower walk was such an audacious feat that even the police who triri to coax him off the wire, were captivated. >> i personally figured i was watching something that somebody would never see again in the world. >> reporter: a consultant on the movie, he helped train joseph gordon leavitt in the art of wire walking the film's achievement is re-creating through 3-d and cgi an event only captured in still images that day. the viewer in the f fm gets to look at everything around them.
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>> no, no. and there is a beautiful scene, beautiful treatment of the moment. by the director just as i am step on the wire. the whole world does not exist. only a wire was there in my mind. he managed to show that by having fog invade the screen then we see a wire, walking into infinity, when i step on it, the fog dimininies and we wake up in new york on the wire. in the beginning it was simplistic, block the world and concentrate on the wire. so this is a lifetime of trying to fininwhat i call the openen focus that is completely closed and completely open. >> that's very interesting. you sort of have to be both in a way. >> i have to be both.
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continue to perform, above the ground and on it. here, juggling for tips back in 1984. now 66, petite occasionally walks the wire. he is a performer in residence at new york's cathedral of st. john the divine. he holds frequent creativity workshops for kids. >> i iant to try to share with you an imama, a flash of the in n possible. d is a popular motivivional speaker.r. >> improvization is empowering. it welcomes the unknown. >> his legacy will forever be linked to that one bold act. made all the more resonant by the absence of his partners in crime, the twin towers. >y life, when i look k er my shououer, though i am not t the end of the line. 66 years old. not in the middle either the i am an old man who refused to grow old. when i look over my shoulder to my life, i see one thread, one line, pun intended of course, the tightrope of passion.
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be right back. when the engines failed on the plane i was flying, i knew what to do to save my passengers. but when my father sank into depression, i didn't know how to help him. when he ultimately shot himself, he left our family devastatad. don't let this happen to you. if you or a loved one is suicidal, call the national suicide prevention lifeline. no matter how hopeless or helpless you feel, with the right help, you can get well. (fnklin d. roosevelt) the inherent right to work is one of the elemental privileges of a free people. endowed, as our nation is, with abundant physical resources... ...and inspired as it should be to make those resources
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...we approach reemployment with real hope of finding a better answer than we have now. narrator: donate to goodwill where your donations help fund job placement and training for people in your community. some businesses in an upscale washington, d.c. neighborhood are accused of
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mobile app. shop keepers using a messaging service to alert each other and the police about people who are but the vast majity of the customers. the report from georgetown. >> reporter: in trendy georgetown, store owners will tell you shoplifting is part of the cost of doing businessss keisha green w wks at elite. >> the people that are like a shoplifter they come in all the time. go to the same item. get the feel of the e ore. >> reporter: in 60 day as loan, police recorded more than 120 theft in the heart of georgetown. to counter crime businesses are using an app, grououe. works lookok private chat room. 380 members include merchants,
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on duty police officers send descriptions and pictures of customers acting suspiciously. recent posts include african-american female, late 20. just stole from lacoste, need some one asap. person walking out, black male. >> we are all pretty alarmed by it. >> reporter: peter murray, reporter for the georgetowner newspaper was unsettled by what he saw. >> a glance at the app you see rashl bias. >> reporter: murray foununfrom march 1 to july 5 of this year, 330 people were identified in messages warning of suspicious or criminal activity. of those, 72% were described as african-americans. >> not only was there this jump to conclusion somebody has committed a crime because they're e spicious or wearing a certain thing or have a certain hair style. but also the people who are texting eachther are sort of reveling in this game of following people around and saying they're suspicious. >> any ia what percentage of those identified as african-american are arrested? >> i would say very small percentage. less than 5%. >> reporter: joe sternly runs georgetown business improvement district which started the neighborhood groupme. he pushes back at the notion it is profiling. >> somebody posts something that is inappropriate, the grouou our staff goes out, meets withhe
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person, retrains them, makes sure they're comfortable with the rules and can abide. if they don't. we kick them off. >> one or two people have been kicked out of the group for racial profiling. originally, police here endorsed the use of the app. but yesterday when we asked metropolitan, pd, would not comment. groupme wouldn't comment either. that's the "cbs overnight news" for this friday. for some of you, the news continues. for others chehe back with us a little later for the morning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city. senior slam, no social security raise, millions could see medicaid premiums soar. tonight the president delays
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>> it's the right thing to do. >> a key part of america's anti-terror security system crashes creating a travel nightmare. and, at the white house, the sound of warming relations with cuba. >>nnouncer: this is the "cbs overnight news." the social security administration is telling nearly 65 million retirees they will not be getting a raise next year. because e flation is toooo lowo trigigr one. and the bad news gets worse. unless congress acts, many of the 55 million on medicare could see premiums rise as much as 50%. with higher deductibles as well. here's major garrett. roipt >> reporter: the increase would affect surgery, supplies,
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currently the monthly premium is $104. it could rise to $159. # eight million couldldace the costs. a million are federal retirees. jessica clement -- >> $55 a month makes a big difference to individuals living on a fixed income. >> reporter: here is the problem. healal care costs are rising fast by law % of pple on medicare are protected from higher premiums if they don't get a social security cost of living raise. that's what is going to happen next year. which leaves only 30% of medicare patients to absorb all the higher health care costs. that 30% include the wealthy, seniors who recently signed up for medicare and federal emplyoy ployee employees. congress can reverse the cost increase due to start january 1. supports. >> there seems to be bipartisan support in congress for preventing this. how you do that if you havav to offset the costs, however, could
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complicate the issue. >> reporter:reventinged medicare premium increases is part of secret budget talks between the white house and congressional republicans, scott. that means seen yuzseniors could be caught in a fit to a aid a gogornment shutdown. >> you would imagine they would figure out how to make a deal in an election year. major garrett, thank you. last night a computer system used to keep terror suspects out of the country crashed. turning thousands of passengers into virtual prisoners. here is kris van cleave. >> reporter: the national outage gridlocked the check in desk at jfk last night. some flights were delayed. long lines formed as custom check points across the country ground to a virtual halt, stranding thousands. >> the people u u there w we all cursing. there was people that couldn't walk. it was azy. crazy. people in the wheelchair were like crying. waiting there for hours. >> reporter: cameron miller got
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>> they told me the computer cyst temperature was down. forms. old school style. >> reporter: old school is fitting description. for 90 minutes software customs officers used to access lists was offline requiring alternative procedures including manually processing passports and doing passeseer terviews. it was desesibed as tedious. sources familiar with the watch list said those needing additional screening would be sent to custom officers by other means, fax or e-mail. >> the" i am left with after last night why isn't there a backup system? >> we get what w ininst in. with respect to government. >> watch list data are maintained by the fbi ron hosko, former assistant director. >> i don't think our security is enhanced when we go from an automated system to a paper system. and we are hand scanning names on a list.%
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protection said the issue was a software air railroad that prevented information from flowing between systems. it was not malicious. any passenger who needed to be checked agagast a list was fully vetted. >> kris van cleave, thank you. today, president obama confirmed what we reported right here last night. america's longest war, already 5,122 days old, will continue longer thaha he wanted. longer than hepromised. he is keeping at least 5500 troops in afghanistan through the end of his presidency. and here is david martin. >> reporter: the taliban takeover of the capital of kunduz last monon provided the explanation point. the handwriting was already on the wall for president obama to read. >> afghan forces are still not as string as they need to be. meanwhile the taliban has made gains. particularly in rural areas.
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attacks inin citiesncluding kabul. >> reporter: under his new plan. american troops will be based in the capital of kabul, main airfield at bagram and locations in the east and south. one of the locations wail lou the cia to -- will allow the cia to continue to conduct drone striris against terrorist hideouts in pakistan. >> these bases will give us the presence and reach our forces require to achieve their mission. although the u.s. combat mission officially ended with much fanfare last december. american commandos continue to carry ouou raidsnd american war planes continue to conduct air strikes. just last week, u.s. and afghan forces killed an estimated 120 al qaeda firtzghters in one of the largest assault efforts ever against two training camps. earlier this month an american gunship opened fire on a
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hospital near kunduz as u.s. green berets were helping afghan troops retake the city. how long the 5500 troops remain in afghanistan will be up to the xt esident. president obama suggested american troops will be needed untithere is a peace treaty with the taliban. scott. >> david martin at the pentagon. thank you. the cost of 14 years of war in afghanistan has been more than 2,2000 americaca lives. and nearly 700 billion dollars. former u.s. speaker of the house, dennis hastert struck a deal with prosecutors. hastert charged with violating banking laws and lying to federal agents about it. hastert wasas reportedly paying hush money to a man who claimed that hastert sexually abused him decade before when hastert was a high school wrestling coach. hastert will change his plea to guilty, likely in return for a reduced sentence.
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right backck six members of a church have pleaded not guilty to charges of manslaughter and assault.
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police say two teenage brothers were beaten by their parents, eir sister, and other members of the secretive word of life church in upstate new york. one of the brothers died. michelle miller is there. >> reporter: today police were seen serving what they describe as court papers to members of the world of life church. the sisi of sunday's brutata assault. the victim's parents, deborgh and bruce leonard remain in jail on first degree manslaughter charges in the beating death of their 19-year-old son lucas. devin garimore represents the victim any mother. >> i don't think it was her idea. i thinkhat thihi is something that she didn't foresee going this far. and i think she lost control of it. >> reporter: four other church members are accused of assaulting lucas' 17-year-old brother christopher after church sundayay the district attorory says t t beatings may have lasted more than ten hours.
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what did happen? >> what we understand there was an issue whether or not they wanted to stay, the oldest brother wanted to stay in the church. there was a confrontation between the two boyoyand the parents about at. >> reporter: investigators believe church members home school their children inside the former public school compound, bought more than 30 years ago. several of the children were taken away yesterday by child protective services. >> was the assault part of some religious ritual? >> it is not our allegation it was a religious ritual for anything of that nature. but for purposes of what we are dealing with right now, we are looking at what i would characterize as a form of a gang assault. >> authorities say several former church members are helping in thehe investigation.n. and scott, we are told, that the younger brother is conscious, cooperating and is expected to make a full recovery. tonight. thank you.
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tonight a 13-year-old boy is at the center of the never-ending battltl betweenen raelis and palestinians. to one side, he is a ctim. to the other, a terrorist. jonathan vigliatti is in tel aviv. >> reporter: the 13-year-old lay bleeding badly on a jerusalem street. the palestinian authority said he was killed by israeli soldiers. but then the israelis released this video of the arab boy very much aliverecovering in a hospital. israel says that he stabbed two including a jewish teenager and the scene. it its the latest in a string of knife attacksks agagast israelis that have spooked the country. palestinians mostly young men, armed with knives appear out of can. targets appear random. which has added to the fear. all of the suspects have been arrested or fatally shoho by israeli secucuty fofoes.
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a bus station. now, for the first time since 2000, israeli security forces set up extra check points around the palestinian neighborhoods of east jerusalem. so far, it hasn't done much to reassure any onon like this resident. father of five. >> it is very, very dangerous place. we are, scared all of the time. >> reporter: meantime, both sides buried their dead this week. death. palestinians are calling for a day of mass protect, following prayers. scott, the country its bracing itself for what could be a day of more violence. >> in tel aviv, thanks. ken tayloror the fororr died. if you saw the oscar winning film "argo" you know his story.
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1979, taylor sheltered six americans and helped them escape with fakee passports. congressional gold medal. ken taylor was 81. today a zimbabwean hunter expects to be cleared of charges that he helped an american illegally kill a beloved lion called cecil. the american, walter palmer ds not face charges. deborah patta was there as the the hunter came into the cross hairs of the court. >> reporter: hiding behind dark glasses and a cap, hunting guide, theo bronkhearst sat in his car waiting for court to start. he says he had a legal permit. >> i guess i shot a famous lion. >> reporter: cecil was a major attract, at the national park. the government says that he lured cecil off protected park land to a nearby farm where he was shot with a a cross bow.
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we got the, the animal w on an elephant carcass. it is utter nonsense. we didn't have to lure him. he was there. >> reporter: he says he is being made a scapegoat. most of the $50,000 palmer paid for his hunting license goes to bronchearst. but those days could be over. >> it's destroyed us, eh. it's destroyed the mily. my business. >> reporter: it's been tough? >> you know, we employ a lot of people. and -- they are on halftime now. i guess each family is supporting six, six or more dependents. >> reporter: illegal hunting is prosecuted in zimbabwe, but the researcher, studying cecil was convinced because of the
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international outrage this time would be different. he believes the american dentist should have been charged. >> i reall thought this was going to be an example to other people that have done this before who would do it in the future. so very disappointed we are not going to see justice. >> reporter: he told us if the american dentist isn't facing charge he's shohodn't eithth. his lawyers did not get a chance to argue the case in court today, scott, as the trial was postponed until next week. >> deborah patta reporting. thank you. a hollywood star puts a spotlight on a disorder affecting many new mothers. employers, let us in on theost absurd excuses for calling in sick.
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geico motorcycle, great rates for great rides. jiji and kate ususthe same dishwasher. same detergent. but only jill ends up with wet, spotty glasses. kate adds finish jet-dry with five power actions that dry dishes and prevent spots and film, so all that's left is the shine.
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actress hayden pantiere has
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26, successful, engaged, last december became a mom. this week she announced she is getting treatment for postpartumm depression. hundred of thousand of other women are battling it too. dr. jon lapook has one woman's story. >> lauren saffron was 34 when she gave birth to lily. u looked so happy i i the pictures. were you? >no, i was very much the opposite. i was pretty certain i was not going to be able to handle being a mother. >> reporter: she was suffering postpartum depression. every year about 4 million women give birth. anywhere from 8 to 19% report having frequent symptomom of depression. that's more than 300,000 women every year. dr. katherine burndoff of new york presbyterian treats women. >> the biggest myth about post postpartum depression is it doesn't exist.
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thererare poem that belve it isn't possible to be depressed or upset or struggle around such a miraculous event as having a baby. >> reporter: saffron was treated with therapy and anti-depressants and is a therapist for women facing the same struggle she had. when you look at them now and think back to how you were feeling at the time you were born. what goes through your mind? >> it almost doesn't feel like it was me. you know? it feels so far away. >> the adjustment to motherhood. this is not easy. and, the idea that we want women to do it effortlessly and smoothly and with a smile on their face is an enormous problem. >> reporter: it is common for women to have sadness, irritability and changes in mood after giving birth. the symptoms usually resolve in two weeks. but if they're severe or persist longer it is important to seek help.
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unrecognized. dr. jon lapook. thank you, doc. law makers scrambled when
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that's c cing up. photos released by the kennedy library. a peek into camelot. john kennedy relaxing on the yacht. and daughter caroline, u.s. ambassador to japan. j.f.k. jr. inherited his dad's love of the sea. and a rare shot of the president enjoying ice cream. and a color photo of his interview with walter cronkite, 12 weeks before the assassination. you think debate gets heated in our congress. kosovo's congress emptied out when lawmakers set off tear gas to protest a deal with serbia. kosovo declared independence from serbia after a vicious war. old grudges die hard. >> career builders out with its annual list of absurd excuses for calling in sick. one woman said she was goioi to the beach because she needed vitamin d from sun light.
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a man caught cheating on his wife, had to retrieve his belongings from the dumpster. and one guy said, grandma poisoned him with ham. baloney. a halflf centutu after the cuban missile crisis, cuban musicians
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next. every day it's getting closer going faster than a roller coastete a love like yours will surely come my way hey, hey, hey babies aren't fully developed until at least 39 weeks. if your pregnancy is healthy, wait for labab to begininn its own. a a althy baby is worth the wait. o0 c1 travel is part of the american way of life. when we're on vacation, we keep an eye out for anything that looks out of place. [ indistinct conversations ] miss, your bag. when we travel from city to city, we pay attentionon to our surroundings.
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everyone plays a role in keeping our community safe. whether you're traveling for business or pleasure, be aware of your surroundings. if you see something suspicious, say something to local authorities. [ vovolizing ] [ buzzing ] [ tree crashes ] [ wind howling ] visit worldwildlife.org. we end with the latest sign and sound of improving relations with cuba. today cuban musicians performed at the white house for the first
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here is margaret brennan. >> reporter: the sound of cuban music blasting through thehe white house was a remarkable moment for guitarist elandes ochoa. and singer omaro puertoando. they never thought they would make i here. what does that mean to you? >> translator: this represents her flag, her culture and her ideals. >> translator: the trip will be part of his artistic record forever. >> reporter:r:or decade the musicians were little known outside cuba. until the 1990s when the buena vista social club album made them a worldwide sensation.
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that inspired an academy award nominated documentary. and soon many band members had found fame in their 70s and 80s. >> i look to sing. >> reporter: they see hope in the thaw between two cold war foes. do you think that relations between the u.s. and scuba are getting better? >> a day will come when eveone will be able to sit down and eat at the same table. that gets a laugh from omara who says her band mate speaks the truth and beautiful word. their final sonon was the spanish version ofof "perhaps, perhaps, perhaps" a song made popular by nat king cole. >> i knew nat king cole? >> you knew him? >> yes, in cuba. we sang with nat king cole and other singers. heheang in cuba "perhapap
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perhaps, perhaps." perhaps, perhaps -- i can't hear you >> reporter: and perhaps has never been promising. perhaps, perhaps margaret brennan, cbs ws, washington. and that's the "overnight news" for this friday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and cbs "this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm scott pelley. welcome to the "cbs overnight news."
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a woman charged with beater her son to death inside a church in upstate new york claims she was powerless to stop the attack. the lawyer for deborah leonard said it started as an intervention that soon spiraled t of control. six members of the word of life christian church remain behind bars. the mother and father charged with manslaughter. michelle miller reports from outside the church in chadwikz, new york. >> reporter: people around here say church members mostly kept to themselves, were cretive, and that some evenivedinside this church building. well investigators say the sunday's deadly assltegan when the two brothers met with other church members for what was described as a "counseling session." photos taken inside the church the day after the deadly beating offer a rare glimpmp inside the guarded building. police say on sunday night, 19-year-old lucas leonard and 17-year-old brother christopher sat down for a spiritual
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of life christian church. at some point, the meeting became physical. >> both brhers were continually subjected to physical punishment over the course of several hours. in the hopes each would confess their prior sins and ask for forgiveness. >> reporter: monday, lucas' family drove him to the hospital breaththg. he died that afternoon. investigators later found his younger brother, still inside the church. he was taken to the hospital. police say both brothers suffered blunt force trauma and had injuries to their stomachs, backs, thighs and genitals. during the church. investigators also found several other chililen who appear to be unharmed. the boys' parents. bruce and deborah leopard are faces charges of first degree manslaughter. four additional people including the victims' sister ear charged
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devin garrimore is deborah leonard's attorney. >> apparently part of a church-related discipline being imposed on her two boys. i don't think it was her idea. >> reporter: what were they being disciplined for? >> that i can't say. >> you can't see in.. only see lightson.. all thth windows are all boarded up. >> neighbors say church members tried to recruit them in the past. >> we always joked around and said they were a cult. which now we are believing that they probably were. >> reporter: litz lived in house next door for ten years. she says c cgregation members were nice but strange. the men wore long dark cloak and she would hear chanting. >> i don't know itch they were speaking in tongues. i'm not sure. it was not english. not any recognizable language that i could distinguish. >> reporter: the group's secrecy raised eyebrows in the tight-knit commununy. >> no one was every loud in there. you just couldn't get.
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it was off limits. in zimbabwe, a postponement in the trial of the man who led the hunt for cecil the lion. he could face ten years in prison for allegedly luring cecil out of a protected park bow. cecil ran away, found the next day and was killed. deborah patta had the story. >> tourists flk to ss flock to victoria falls. one man missing today at the gistrate court,alter palmer, theinnesota dentist who shot and killed cecil the lion. all charges have been dropped against him. but the man who led the hunt is still being prosecuted. hiding behind dark glasses and a cap, theo arrived at the court and d t in his car anxiously awaiting for proceedings to begin. turning his head from the camera he told use had done nothing wrong. he claims he had a legal permit and would be vindicated in court.
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>> well i guess i shot a famous lion. >> reporter: the famous lion the iconic star attttction up the natitial park. the rare, black maned cecil. he believes he is the fall guy. >> there are many lions shot every year. as the far as my way, there were five shot this year alone. >> reporter: he broke down as he told us his life had been ruined. >> will it destroyed , eh. it destroyed the family. my business. you know, we employ a lot of people. and they are all on halftime now. i guess each families say porting six or more dependents. >> reporter: zimbabwean officials insist it was unlawful. illegal hunting is not often prosecuted. but collared cecil as part of an ox fard study.
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was convincedecause of the international outrage surrounding the case it would be different this time. like many here4 surprised charges were dropped against >> i really thought this was going to be an example to other before who would do it in the future. so very disappointed we are not gogog to see justice. >> reporter: he said that the charges were dropped against palmer proves hissen innocence. he will have to wait longer to have his day in court. his case has been postponed yet again until next week. former pro basketball player and reality tv star, lamar odom nevada hospital. found unconscious in a brothel over the weekend. kevin frasier has the latest. >> reporter: according to a source inside the hospital close to the family that i spoke with yesterday, there were small improvements for lamar odom. he sququzed kim kardashian's hand. briefly opened his eyes. understand this he is a long way
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heap is fighting for his life. >> reporter: the first 911 call came in around 3:15 p.m. nevada time, tuesday. from a female employee of the love ranch. whwhe lamar odom hadad been a guest since saturday. another male caller told operators about drugs he says odom had been takiki. >> apparentlyad cocaine on him. pretty much, he did this on saturday. >> as far as you know there is no cocaine since saturday. >> that is correct. >> reporter: the caller said odom was taking large amounts of reload, sexual enhancement drug, the fda warns could be dangerous if mixed with ser ton other medications. the owner of the love ranch. >> they said roll him on his left side. he started throwing up a lot.
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>> entertainment to night was allowed into the room at the brothel where odom was discovered. >> the police looked thrhrgh this ththgs. they didn't tell us they found anything. >> reporter: the nye county sheriff conrms a search warpt was executed for a sample of odom's blood. former lacquer teammates. kobe bryant and trevor ariza have visited odom's bebeide. family and friend have kept a lamar. one thijng they're hold. talk to him. he can hear you. the hopes he will hear a voice recognizable. come out of the coma. his two older children were
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much more informationn well, things in the bedroom have always been pretty good. yeah, no complaints. we've always had a lot of fun, but i wanted to try something new. and i'm into that. so we're using k-y love. it's a pleasure gel that magnifies both of our sensations. right, i mean, for both of us, just... yeah, it just takes all those awesome feelings you usually feel and it just makes them... rawr...
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there is new video tonight of perhaps the greatest prison
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break in modern times. notorious drug kingpin el chapo escaped in july from a tunnel under his cell. the new video shows guzman turning up the sound on his tv before loud jack hammers heard in the background i was his men chiseling away through the floor of his shower. none of the guard paid any attention. minutes later, guzman was gone. bill whitakeke took a look at the escape for "60 minutes." >> gets arrested for the second time. knowing he escaped once before. goes to prison and is able to escape a second time. that's something like, no other criminal in history you will be able to find. >> reporter: until he retired last year, jim dinkins was head of homeland security investigations. part of the international manhunt for el chapo more than a decade. >> he was literally in a well-fortified, constructed prison, designed to prevent shuch ansuch
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an escape. >> maximum securititrison in mexico. >> designed to penetrate people from coming frumg air or land. they didn't anticipate underground. >> reporter: that's exactly what he did. almost from the moment he was delivered here to altiplano prison in february, 2014. a construction crew from his cartel began digging a tunnel to free him. the wa here are as much as 3 feet thick. the airspace above is restricted. cell phones, prison officials say they're jammed for miles around. but none of that made a difference. from all most a mile away, inside this hastily built, cinder block structure in a farmer's field, chapo's men dug down three stories. and then they burrowed 4,921 feet straight toward altiplano. a massive construction project right outsidee the prison, m mht
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underground activity. the tunnel went under the prison wall and beneath the plumbing and with pinpoint accuracy, it emerged directly into the shower stall of guzman's ground level cell. >> very difficult to navigate underground. point a to point b with minor deviations if any. and that is an engineering marvel. >> how difficult? >> very, very difficult. when the boss is behind prison. put your best team and foot forward. they did. >> at 8:52, saturday july 11th. he ducks into a shower cell behind the privacy wall. the only place hidden from security cameras. and then he disappears. he climbed down into the tunnel, and climbed atop ape motorcycle. especially rigged on rail tracks to speed him to freedom. by the time the alarm sounded
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vanished into the night. when mexican agents located the cinder block structure where the escape tunnel be gavenlt the construction crew was autzlso long gone. leaving behind tools. jen rater, oxygen tanks. jig saw and car batteries. >> what was your reaction when you heard el chappo escaped? >> disappointed not shocked. >> chuck rosen becker is head of the u.s. drug enforcement administration. >> he was in a maximum security prison? >> escaped previously in 2001. it had happened before. we knew, we knew, he had intended to dupe it again. >> you knew he was planning to do it again? >> weep knew he and his folks, want to barack him out. we had jen ram chattergeneral chatter, a year before he broke out a second time. what they hoped to do.
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there was nothing in that information we had. about tunnels. >> he is a notorious tunnel manufacturer. >> tunnel king. >> the tunnel king. >> he is responsible for more sophisticated tunnels. any body in the history of drug trafficking in mexico. some what ironic he was able to escape using one of the techniques he perfected over the last decade plus. >> reporter: ironic, but not terribly surprising. during the last manhunt for el chapo, pursuers discovered this. >> the tub. look at this. plumbing. in this case beneath the tub. >> that's amazing. >> reporter: chapo devised smuggling methods. he packed drugs into fake cucumbers and bananas and mixed them with real shipments of produce. the thing he worked hardest on was making sure he could always
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guzman was the first mexican drug trafficker to hierarch tekts and mining engineers to build elaborate super tunnels. complete with vent lax system. electricity and railways to ferry drugs under the u.s./mexico border. mexican authorities led us to a tunnel they found unfinished and just short of the border fence in tijuana. this tunnel was discovered just a couple weeks after the great escape. his cartel wasn't just focused on building his escape tunnel. continued building the drug tunnels at the same time. the border between san diego and tijuana is one of the busiest international commercial jones in the world. you've will see ate staetd streams passing north and south. what you can't see is that bep neath one four mile stretch of this border it is crisscrossed with dozens of smuggling tunnels. why?
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because this industrial partijuana is across the fence of acres of warehouses in the u.s. drug smugglers, dig down in a building over here. pop up in a warehouse inthe u.s. couple of hundred yard away. this is where el chapo's cartel, honed its tunnelling technique. >> when did el chapo first start digging tunnels here in the area. on record the first tunnel in 2010. >> gentlemen dimigglio., chief of the san diego task forcing, homeland security. border patrol. and dea. the task force was established to what the government deems a threat to national security. >> down this road, there has been multiple tunnels found in warehouses here. >> how far is this? >> 1,400 feet. >> most tunnels are twice that length. >> what makes the area so appealing to them? >> just the infrastructure on
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you know, and, in tijuana. you have all the commercial export. just the warehouses there doing legitimate businessss it is easy to conceal an ill warehouses. hey stack. >> how much does it cost them off to build one of the tunnels? >> estimate the it costs the cartel $1 million to $2 million. if they have one successful push through of narcotics they paid for the tunnel and then some. >> one load. not just one kilo. talking tons of narcotics going through. >> led of marijuana for example could be worth as much as $5 million to $6 million. smugglers use the tunnels to moveveare na, becausese it is too bulky, smelly, easy to protect. to transport over land. >> there you go. >> the team took us down into
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one of el chapo's closed subterranean passage ways. dug through the clay-like soil with picks, shovels and power tools. >> you can see bill's full report a your clever moves won't stop the cold and flu. but disinfecting with lysol can. lysol wipes and spray are approved to kill more types of germs than clorox. to help keep your family healthy, lysol that. i know blowdrying fries my hair, but i'm never gonna stop. because now i've got pantene shampoo and conditioner ththpro-v formula locks moisture inside my hair and the damage from 100 blow-dries is gone.
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the world trade center towers is dramatized in the new movie the walk. felipe petite sat down to discuss the day with anthony mason. >> welcome to new york. anything to declare. >> i will hang a high wire between the two towers of the world trade cenenr and walk on itit >> good luck. >> reporter: but that is exactly what felipe petite did on an otherwise ordinary day in 1974. >> there is somebody out there on a tightrope between the towers of the world trade center at the tippy top. >> reporter: for nearly an hour, quarter milee above manhattan, the -year-old frenchman, walked, even danced on a steel cable, strung between the twin towers of the newly constructed world trade center. >> please tell me for a moment you were nervous that morning? >> i am never nervous before a performance. first i cannot afford toe the i always put myselel on thehe wire, departure, with a feeling that is both mental and physical.
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the feeling of -- >> petite planned the caper more than six years and made a trial walk some years before. sneaking a cable between the spiers of the cathedral of notre dame in paris. but the towerer walk was such an audacious feat that even the police who tried to coax him off the wire, were captivated. >> i personally figured i was watching something that somebody world. >> reporter: a consultant on the movie, he helped train jososh gordon leavitt in the art of wire walking the film's achievement is re-creating through 3-d and cgi an event only captured in still images that day. >> the viewer in the film gets them. were you seeing all of that? >> no,no. and there is a a beautiful scene, beautiful treatment of the moment. by the director just as i am
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the whole world does not exist. only a wire was there in my mind. he managed to show that by having fog invade the screeee thevenlt then we see a wire, walking into infinity, when i step on it, the fog diminishes and we weakake up in new york on the wire. in the beginning it was simplistic, block the world and concentrate on the wire. so this is a lifetime of trying to find what i call the open focus that is completely closed and completely open. >> that's very interesting. you sort of have to be both in a way. >> i have to be both. >> after the tower walk petite continue to perform, above the ground and on it. here, juggling for tips back in 1984. now 66, petite occasionally walks the wire. he is a performer in residence at new york's cathedral of st. john the divine.
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he holds frequent creativity workshops for kids. >> i want to try to share with you an image, a flash of the in possible. and is a popular motivational speaker. >> improvization is empowering. it welcomes the unknown. >> his legacy will forever be linked to that one bold act. made all the more resonant by the absence of his partners in crime, the twin towers. >> my life, when i look overy shoulder, though i am not at the end of the line. 66 years old. not in the middle either the i am an old man who refused to grow old. when i look over my shoulder to my life, i see one thread, one line, pun intended of course, the tightrope of embarrassed by a prostate exam? imagine e w your doctor feels. as a urologist, i i ve performed 9,421 and a half prostate exams. so why do i do it? because i get paid. und... on this side of the glove i know prostate exams can save lives.
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some businesses in an upscale washington, d.c. neighborhood are accused of racial profiling through a mobile app. shop keepers using a messaging service to alert each otherernd
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the policece about peoplpl who are acting suspiciously. but the vast majority of the reports are about black customers. the report from georgetown. >> reporter: in trendy georgetown, store owners will tell you shoplifting is part of the cost of doing business. keisha green works at elite. >> the people that are like a shoplifter they come in all the time. go tc the same item. get the feel of the store. >> reporter: in 60 day as loan, police recorded more than 120 theft in the heart of georgetown. to counter crime businesses are using an app, groupme. works look a private chat room. 380 members includemerchants, employees, community leaders and on duty police officers send descriptions and pictures of customers acting suspiciously. recent posts include african-american female, late 20. just stole from lacoste, need some one asap. person w wking out, black male.
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it. >> reporter: peter murray, reporter for the georgetowner newspaper was unsettled by what he saw. >> a glance at the app you see rashl bias. >> reporter: murray found from march 1 to july 5 of this year, 330 people were identified in messages warning of sususcious or criminal activity. of those, 72% were described as african-americans. >> not only was there this jump to conclusion somebody has committed a crime because they're suspicious or wearing a hair style. but also the people who are texting each other are sort of reveling in this game of following people around and saying they're suspicious. >> any idea what percentage of those identified as african-american are arrested? >> i would say very small percentage. less than 5%. >> reporter: joe sternly runs georgetown business improvement district which started the neighborhood grououe. he pushes back at the notion it is profiling. >> somebody posts something that
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is inappropriate, the group, our staff goes out, meets with the person, retrains them, makes sure they're comfortable with the rules and can abide. weave we kick them off. >> one or two people have been kicked out of the group for racial profiling. originally, police here endorsed the use of the app. but yesterday when we asked metropolitan! metropolitan, pd, would not comment. that's the "cbs overnight news" for this friday. for some of you, the news continues. for others check back with us a lilile later for theheorning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city. senior slam, no social security raise, millions could see medicaid premiums soar. tonight the president delays the pullout from afghanistan.
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>> it's the right thing to do. >> a key part of america's anti-terror security system crashes creating a travel nightmare. and, at the white house, the sound of warming relations with cuba.. >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." the social security administration is telling nearly 65 million retirees they will not be getting a raise next year. because inflation is too low to trigger one. and the bad news gets worse. the 55 million on medicare could 50%. with higher deductibles as well. here's major garrett. >> reporter: the increase in out of pocket medicare costs would supplies, walkers, wheelchairs.
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currently the monthly premium is $104. it could rise to $159. eight million could face the costs. a million are federal retirees. jessica clement -- of the nationall actcte and retired federal employees association. >> $55 a month makes a big big difference to individuals living on a fixed income. >> reporter: here is the problem. health care costs are rising fast by law 70% of people on medicare are protected from higher premiums if they don't get a social security cost of living raise. that's what is going to happen nextear. which leaves only 30% of medicare patients to absorb all the higher health care costs. that 30% include the wealthy, seniors who recently signed up for medicare and federal employees. congress can reverse the cost increase due to start january 1. something the white house supports. >> there seems to be bipartisan support in congress for preventing this. how you do that if you have to
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offset the costs, however, could complicate the issue. >> reporter: preventinged medicare premium increases is part of secret budget talks between the white house and congressional republicans, scott. that means seen seniors could be caught in a fit to avoid a governnt shutdown. >> you would imagine they would figure out how to make a deal in an election year. for us. major garrett, thank you. last night a computer system used to keep terror suspects out of the country crashed. turning thousands of passengers s into virtual prisoners. here is kris van cleave. >> reporter: the national outage gridlocked the emirates check-in desk at jfk last night. some flights were delayed. long lines formed as custom check points across the country ground to a virtual halt, stranding thousands. >> the people up there were all cursing. there was people that couldn't walk. it was crazy. crazy. people in the wheelchair were
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like crying. waiting there for hours. >> reporter: cameron miller got stuck in lines in dallas. they told me the computer system was down. we needed to fill out some forms. old school style. >> reporter: old school is fitting description. for 90 minutes software customs officers used to access lists was offline requiring alternative procedures including manually processing passports and doing passenger interviews. it was described as tedious. sources familiar with the watch st said those needing additional screening would be sent to custom officers by other means, fax or e-mail. >> the question i am left with after last night why isn't there a backup system? >> we get what we invest in. with respect to government. >> watch list data are maintained by the fbi ron hosko, former assistant director. >> i don't think our security is enhanced when we go from an automated system to a paper
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system. on a list. >> reporter: customsmsnd border software a a railroad that prevented information from flowing between systems. it was not malicious. a senior official said any passenger who needed to be checked against a list was fully vetted. >> kris van cleave our transportation specialist, kris, thank you. today, president obama confirmed what we reported right here last night. america's longest war, already 5,122 days oldldwill continue longer than he wanted. longer than he promised. he is keeping at least 5500 troops in afghanistan through the end of his presidency. and here is david martin. >> reporter: the taliban takeoverf the capital of explanation point. the handwriting was already on the wall for president obama to read. >> afghan forces are still not as string as they need to be. meanwhile the taliban has made
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gains. particularar in rural areas. and can still launch deadly attacks in cities including kabul. >> reporter: under his new plan. american troops will be based in the capitat of kabul, main airfield at bagram and locations in the east and south. one of the locations will allow the cia to continue to conduct drone strikes against terrorist hideouts in n kistan. >> these bases will give us the presence and reach our forces require to achieve their mission. although the u.s. combat mission officially ended with much fanfare last december. american commandos continue to carry out raids and american war planes continue to conduct air strikes. just last week, u.s. and afghan forces killed an estimated 120 al qaeda fighters in one of the largest assault efforts ever
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gunship opened fire on a hospital near kukuuz as u.s. green berets were helping afghan troops retake the city. how long the 5500 troops remain in afghanistan will be up to the next president. president obama suggested american troops will be needed until there is a peace treaty with the taliban. scott. >> david martin at the pentagon. thank you. the cost of 14 years of war in afghanistan has been more than 2,200 american lives. and nearly 700 billion dollars. former u.s. speaker of the house, dennis hastert struck a deal with prosecutors. hastert charged with violating banking laws and lying to federal agents about it. hastert was repopoedly paying hush money to a man who claimed that hastert sexually abused him decades before when hastert was a high school wrestling coach. hastert will change his plea to guilty, likely in return for a
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right back. almost sixty million americans are affected by mental illness. together we can help them with three simple words. my name is chris noth
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from maine to maui, thousands of high school students across the country are getting in on the action by volunteering in their communities. chris young: action teams of high school students are joining volunteers of america and major league baseball players to help train n d inspire the next generation of volunteers. carlos pea: it's easy to start an action team at your school so ycu, too, can get in on the action. get in on the action at actionteam.org. 'cause you'll be in my heart yes, you' be in my heart from this day on now and forevermore... narrator: if animals are our best friends, shouldn't we be theirs? visit your local shelter, adopt a pet. y y'll be in my hearar no matt what...
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if you were a hippie in thth'60s, you need to know. it's theheawning of the age of aquarius. yeah, and something else that's cool. what? osteoporosis is preventable. all: osteo's preventable? right on! if you dig your bones, protect them. all: cbs cares! six members of a church have pleaded not guilty to charges of manslahter and assault.
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were beaten by their parents, their sister, and other members of the secretive word of life churchchn upstate new york. one of t t brothers died. michelle miller is there. >> reporter: today police were seen serving what they describe as court papers to members of the world of life church. the site of sunday's brutal assault. the victim's parents, deborah and bruce leonard remain in jail on first degree manslaughter charges in the beating death of their 19-year-old son lucas. devin garimore represents the victim any mother. >> i don't think it was her idea. i think that this is something that she didn't foresee going this far. and i thininshe lost control of it. >> reporter: four other church members are accused of assaulting lucas' 17-year-old
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sunday. the district attorney says the beatings may have lasted more than ten hours. what did happen? what we understand there was an issue whether or not they wanted to stay, the oldest brother wanted to stay in the church. there was a confrontation between the two boys and the parents about that. >> reporter: investigators believe church members home school their children inside the former public school compound, bought more than 30 years ago. several of thehehildren were taken away yesterday by child otective services. >> was the assault part of some religious ritual? >> it is not our allegation it was a religious ritual for anything of that nature. but for purposes of what we are dealing with right now, we are looking at what i would characterize as a form of a gang assault. >> authorities say seveval former church members arar helping in their investigation. and scott, we are told, that the younger brother is conscious, cooperating and is expected to make a full recovery. >> michelle miller, reporting
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thank you. tonight a 13-year-old boy is at the center of the never-ending battle e tween israelis and palestinians. to one side, he is a victim. to the other, a terrorist. jonathan vigliatti is in tel aviv. >> reporter: the 13-year-old lay bleeding badly on a jerusalem street. the palestinian authority said he was killed by israeli soldiers.. t then the israelis s leased this video of the arababoy very much alive recovering in a hospital. israel says that he stabbed two including a jewish teenager and was hit by a car when he fled the scene. it its the latest in a string of knife attacks against israelis at have spooked the country. palestinians mostly young men, armed with knives appear out of nowhere stabbing as many as they can. targets appear random. which has added to the fear.
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arrested or fatally shot by israeli security forces. like this woman, gunned down at a bus station. now, for the first time since 2000, israeli security forces set up extra check points around the palestinian neighborhoods of east jerusalem. so far, it hasn't done much to reassureany one, like this resident. father of five. >> it is very, very dangerous place. we are, scared all of the time. >> reporter: meantime, both sides buried their dead this week. and another grim procession of death. palestinians are calling for a day of mass protest, following tomorrow's weekly muslim prayers. scott, the country its bracing itself for what could be a day of more violence. >> in tel aviv, , anks. ken taylor, the former canadian ambassador to iran has died. if you saw the oscar winning film "argo" you know his story. during the hostage crisis in 1979, taylor sheltered six
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americans and helped them escape with fake passports. for that he was awarded the u.s. congressional gold medal. ken taylor was 81. today a zimbabwean hunter expects to be cleared of charges that he helped an american illegally kill a beloved lion called cecil. the american, walter palmer does not face charges. deborah patta was there as the the hunter came into the cross hairs of t t court. >> reporter: hiding behind dark glasses and a cap, hunting guide, theo bronkhearst sat in his car anxiously waiting for court to start. he insistete he did nothing wrong. he says he had a l lal permit. >> i guess i shot a famous lion. >> reporter: cecil was a major attraction at the national park. the government says that he lured cecil off protected park land to a nearby farm where he was shot with a cross bow. >> absolute nonsense.
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we got the, the animal was on an elephant carcass.. it is utter nonsense. we didn't have to lure him. he was there. >> reporter: he says he is being made a scapegoat. most of the $50,000 palmer paid for his hunting license goes to bronchearst. on whoseand cecil was killed. but those days could be over. >> it's destroyed us, eh. it's destroyed the family. my business. >> reporter: it's been tough? >> you know, we employ a lot of people. and -- they are on halftime now. i guess each family is supporting six, six orore dependents. >> reporter: illegal hunting is prosecuted in zimbabwe, but the researcher, studying cecil was convinced because of the
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would be different. he believes the american dentist should have been charged. >> i really thought this was going to be an example to other people that have done this before who would do it in the future. so very disappointed we are not going to see justice. >> repepter: he told us if the american dentist isn't'tacing charge he's shouldn't either. his lawyers did not get a chance to argue the case in court today, scott, as the trial was postponed until next week. >> deborah patta reporting. thank you. a hollywood star puts a affecting many new mothers. employers, let us in on the most absurd excuses for calling in sick. > and, a new look at camelot. i asked my dentist if an electric toothbrush was going to clean better than a manual? he said sure. but don't get just any one. get one inspired by dentists. with a round brush head. go pro with oral-b. oral-b's rounded brush head cups your teeth to break up plaque and rotates to sweep it away.
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and oral-b delivers a clinically provov superior clean versus sononare diamondclean. my mouth feels super clean. al-b know you're getting a superior clean. i'm never going back to a manual brush. we, things in the bedroom have always been pretty good. yeah, no complaints. we've always had a lot of fun, but i wanted to try something new. and i'm into that. so we're using k-y love. it's a pleasure gel that magnifies both of our sensations.
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actress hayden pantiere has a lot going for her. 26, successful, engaged, last
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this week she announced shi is getting treatment for postpartum depression. hundred of thousand of other women are battling it too. dr. jon lapook has one woman's story. >> lauren saffron was 34 when she gave birth to lily. you looked so happy in the pictures. were you? >> no, i was very much the opposite. i was pretty certain i was not going to be able to handle being a mother. >> reporter: she was suffering postpartum depression. every year about 4 million women give b bth. anywhere from 8 to 19% report having frequent symptoms of depression. that's more than 300,000 women every year. dr. katherine burndoff of new rk presbyterian treaea women. >> the biggest myth about
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esn't exist. there are poem that believe it isn't possible to be depressed or upset or struggle around such a miraculous event as having a baby. >> reporter: saffron was treated with therapy and anan-depressants and is s therapist for women facing the same struggle she had. when you look at them now and think back to how you were feeling at the time you were born. what goes through your mind? >> it almost doesn't feel like it was me. you know? it feels so far away. >> the adjustment to motherhood. this is not easy. and, the idea that we want women smoothly and with a smile on problem. women to have sadness, irritability and changes in mood after giving birth. the symptoms usually resolve in two wewes. but if they're severe or persist longer it is important to seek help.. it is estimated at least 50% of postpartum depression goes unrecognized.
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dr. jon lapook. thank you, doc. law makers scrambled when
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that's coming up. photos released by the kennedy library. are giving us a peek into camelot. john kennedy relaxing on the and daughter caroline, u.s. j.f.k. jr. inherited his dad's love of the sea. and a rare shot of the president enjoying ice cream. and a color photo of his interview with walter cronkite, 12 weeks before the assassination. you think debate getetheated in our congress.. kosovo's congresesemptied out when lawmakers set off tear gas to protest a deal with serbia. kosovo declared independence from serbia seven years ago after a verb us war. old grudges die hard. >> careerbuilders out with its annual list of absurd excuses for calling in sick. one woman said she was going to the beach because she needed vitamin d from sun light. a man caught cheating on his
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belongings from the dumpster. and one guy said, grandma poisoned him with ham. but his boss thohoht it was baloney. a half century after the cuban missile crisis, cuban musicians in the white house. next. woman: what does it feel like when a woman is having a heart attack? chest pain, like there's a ton of weight on your chest. severe shortness of breath. unexplained nausea. cold sweats. there's an unusual tiredness and fatigue. there's unfamiliar dizziness or light-headedness.
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even your upper stomach, are signs you're having a heart attack. don't mama excuses. make the call to 9-1-1 immediately. learn more at womenshealth.gov/heartattack. bipolar disorder is a brain condition that causes unusual or dramatic mood swings. it affects millions of americans and compromises their ability to function. when diagnosed, bipolar disorder can be effectively treated by mood stabilizers. but most people wiwi bipolar disorder suffer for years without help because the symptoms are missed or confused with other illnesses, like depression. learn how easily you can help keep this from happening to a loved one.
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we end with the latest sign and sound of improving relations
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today cuban musicians performed at the white house for the first time in 50 years here is margaret brennan. >> reporter: the sound of cuban music blasting through the white house was a remarkable moment for guitarist elandes ochoa. and singer omaro puertoando. they never thought they would make it here. what does that mean to you? >> translator: this represents her flag, her culture and her ideaea. >> translator: the trip will be part of his artistic record forever. >> reporter: for decade the
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musicians were little known outside cuba. until the 1990s when the buen vista social club album made them a worldwide sensation. that inspired an academy award nominated documentary. and soon many band members had found fame in their 70s and 80s. >> i look to sing. >> reporter: they see hope in the thaw between two cold war foes. do you think that relations between the u.s. and cuba are getting better? >> a day will come when everyone will be able to sit down and eat at the same table. that gets a laugh from omara who says her band mate speaks the truth and beautiful word. their final song was the spanish version of "perhaps, perhaps, perhaps" a song made popular by nat king cole. >> i knew nat king cole? >> you knew him? >> yes, in cuba. we sang with nat king cole and other singers.s.
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he sang in cuba "perhaps, perhaps, perhaps." perhaps, perhaps -- i can't hear you >> reporter: and perhaps has never been promising. perhaps, perhaps margaret brennan, cbs news, washington. and that's the "overnight news" for this friday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and cbs "this morning." from the broadcast center in new
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