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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  October 19, 2015 2:00am-4:30am CDT

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some are trying to save the heart of texas from losing its beats. >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the "cbs overnight news," everyone. i'm jeff glore. hillary clinton, joe biden, donald trump, jeb bush, all four names were all over political headlines sunday. clinton preparing for new testimony over benghazi. bibin preparing to possibly announce his campaign. bush and trump escalated a bitter spat over 9/11. in our washington >> i don't really know what their objective is. >> reporter: hillary clinton is dismissing upcoming appearance saying two previous testimonies. >> what difference at this point does it make? >> reporter: other congressional inquiries into the 2012 attacks refuteteconspiracy theories and now an attempt to derail her presidential campaign. >> i think it is pretty clear that whatever they might have thought they were doing they ended up becoming a partisan arm of the republican national committee.
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>> reporter: she is an important witness. but she is one witness. the chairman insisted he wants to focus on events surrounding the e tacks. >> i h he told my own republican colleagues and friends, shut up talking about things that you don't know anything about. >> reporter: it will be impossible to take politics out of the equation on thursday, with vice president joe biden waiting in the wings to possibly launch his own bid. democrats are anxiously watching to see how the front-runner performs. >> what will happen with benghazi? will b bvery interereing. i look forward to it. >> rorter: and so are gop presidential candidates. >> i wish for once mrs. clinton would be prepared to stand and be helaccountable for the murder of four americans in benghazi, libya. >> reporter: meanwhile, this weekend, donald trump and jeb bush continue to spar over the september 11, 2001 terrorist attacks and the gop p ont-runner suggestion former president george w. bush was responsibib.
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foreign policy mr. trump tal about things as though he is still on "the apprentice." >> bush has been under pressure to take a harder line against trump. increasingly making the case the republican front-runner isn't fit to be president. >> meanwhile, republicans are still looking for a speaker of the house. there is some paul ryan news. >> right. cbs news learned that paul ryan has warmed to the idea of becoming house speaker. but only if he has nearly unanimous support of republicans. jeff that includes the most conservative members. >> julianna goldman. in washington. thank you very much. >> major trucking route in southern california will remain closed several days. a mile long stretch of state route 58, is buried in mud up to 6 feet deep. here's cbs' maria villareal. >> reporter: from the sky you get the impact of thursday's 30 minute downpour where three inches of rain turned a dry landscape into a mud pit leaving
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stranded. truck driver david noe was one of them. >> i have been through hurricanes, floods, tornados, but thth is a first for me after 31 years of driving. >> reporter: in the initial river of mud there were dramatic rescues like this one. a driver pulling his girlfriend to safety. it is believed everyone trapped in this mess got out. but emergency workers are double checking. as quickly as they found themselves stuck, getting unstuck is proving tedious. for now, all drivers can do is wait and see what's next for the highway that appears to be frozen in time. maria villareal, cbs news, los angeles. secretary of state john kerry said today he will meet separately this week with israeli prime minister netanyahu, and palestinian leader mahmoud abbas.
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during a cycle of violence that continued with a deadly shooting at a bus station in southern israel. jonathan vigliatti is in tel aviv. >> reporter: cell phone video captured the horrific scene as at least one gunman believed a palestinian opened fire at a bus station. one attacker and at least one israeli were killed and several were seriously injured. in what is the latest in a series of escalating attacks that have israelis now taking matters into their own hands. the gunshot and shooting range in jerusalem was packed as israeli civilians clamored to buy guns. >> if we work 24 hours a day it would probably be insufficient to cover all the people coming in now. >> reporter: shooting instructor, ari debule said in the last week, hundreds of israelis have applied for permits and signed up for shooting tutorials after a month long wave of palestinian attacks. >> i think it is important to have a means of self defense. >> reporter: police have tried
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blocking off arab neighborhoods. but there are fears such measures ould fuel more attacks and pro pests that began after rumors israeli politicians want to block palestinian access to the revered mosque. >> in one of five separate attacks yesterday, this israeli civilian seen on camera holding a gun moments after he shot and killed a palestinian he says tried to stab him. heavily armed israeli police were on patrol at tonight's attack. but they were unable to stop it in time. as the violence continues, cities like tel aviv are now suggesting banning arab maintenance workers and cleaners from schools. jeff, some israeli parents are worried about attacks against their children. >> johnthan, thank you. tonight, at least two are dead as oppu barrels. across the northern philippines. fierce wind and rain forced thousand to evacuate. seth doan has more. >> reporter: 15,000 villagers
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have left their homes. many struggling to escape rising floodwaters as 300 mile wide typhoon koppu slams the philippines. entire provinces are without power. downed trees, mudslides, and collapsing structures are making travel difficult. the slow-moving typhoon is blowing inland expected to dump 2 feet of rain in the next several days. koppu made landfall as a super typhoon. category four storm with sustained winds of 150 miles per hour. but has since weakened to 90 miles an hour. many residents are still recovering from 2013s catastrophic typhoon, category 5 that took 6,200 lives. since then an early warning difference. national disaster risk reduction chief alexander palmer said. fortunately,
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reports of search-and-rescue operations. typhoon koppu is expected to weaken further in the next 24 hours. but heavy rain and continued flash flooding is expected through wednesday. seth doan, cbs news, tokyo. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. almost sixty million americans are affected by mental illness. together we can help them with three simple words. my name is chris noth and i will listen. from maine to maui, thousands of high school students across the country are getting in on the action by volunteering in their communities. chris young: action teams of high school students are joining volunteers of america and major league baseball players to help train and inspire the next generation of volunteers. carlos pea: it's easy to start an action team at your school
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get in on the action at actionteam.org. 'cause you'll be in my heart yes, you'll be in my heart from this day on now and forevermore... narrator: if animals are our best friends, shouldn't we be theirs? visit your local shelter, adopt a pet. you'll be in my heart no matter what...
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if you were a hippie in the '60s, you need to know. it's the dawning of the age of aquarius. yeah, and something else that's cool. what? osteoporosis is preventable. all: osteo's preventable? right on! if you dig your bones, protect them. all: cbs cares! the search continues for a gunman who opened fire at a zombie convention in fort myers, florida. one person was killed. five others hurt at the costume event. >> reporter: 20,000 people dressed in zombie costumes filled the streets of downtown for the myers, florida. many carried cell phones to capture zombieconfess tiff tease. what ended up being caught on camera was chaos. witnesses say they heard from
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anywhere from 8 to 10 gunshots. >> the guy right there. right there in front of me the i mean right here. the body is right there. >> reporter: several videos posted to social media show participants running away from the scene. the fort myers police hope the image was caught some someone's cell phone. >> a lot of witnesses. a lot of people taking pictures. using their cell phones for video. anything that could help us with this investigation would be greatly appreciated. >> reporter: officers had a tough time in the early stages of the investigation with so many people dressed up in torn clothes and fake blood. 20-year-old was shot and killed. he played football at asa college in miami. friend began posting tributes on facebook almost immediately. his sister, amanda andrews says taylor will be missed. five other people were injured. police say they will all be okay. shooting has taken place in the
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some who attended zombiecon have had enough. >> i definitely want to bring myself here next year the i don't feel safe. >> the zombiecon, event has gone on for a decade and raises nine money for a local organization that makes art and music accessible to everyone. jeff, the group released a statement saying -- and it takes safety of patrons very seriously. they had hired security to work the event. >> jamie, thank you very much. outrage over the recent killing of a giant african elephant in zimbabwe. the hunt was legal. sanctioned by the country's national parks to raise fund for conservation. did the elephant as some believe die for a good cause? deborah patta reports. >> reporter: the zimbabwe national park authority says the shooting of this massive african elephant was legal. some conservationists say it is unethical. others say the hunting fees,
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crucial for conservation. like this man of the conservation group panthera. >> i am appalled. i can't stand it. it is a necessary evil. >> reporter: there is growing international concern that zimbabwe's elephant population is in significant decline. so much so the fish and wildlife service suspended all imports of sport hunted elephant trophies from that country. but money from legal hunting and photographic tourism unlike the illegal hunt in which cecil the lion was shot is the national park's sole source of funding. it is supposed to be put back into conservation and assist poverty stricken communities living near the parks. but the safari operators association in zimbabwe says corruption and bloated bureaucracy prevent much of the money from helping those in
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>> local chief, group in one community near the national park. how much money does the community get at the moment? >> well are getting noth. absolutely nothing. >> reporter: even though it appears there is no tangible benefit to communities, the high price tag that hunters are willing to pay for their on. johannesburg, south africa. an alarming weekend on beaches of hawaii. two men were attacked by sharks in two separate incidents. one is in critical condition. he was bit on beth feet. this makes seven shark attacks in hawaiian waters this year. in april a woman was killed by a shark. a federal judge ordered the release of thousand of women and children from immigrant detention centers in pennsylvania and texas and wants it done by friday. the undocumented immigrants are
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mostly from central america. as omar villafranca reports, many have been held for months. >> reporter: juanita lucas says she fled to america with three children to get away from violence in her home country from guatemala. she says, when they turned themselves in at the border they didn't expect the treatment they received. >> translator: we are not criminals. the kids are not criminals. yet we were treated like criminals she says. 2,000 central american women and children caught trying to cross the border are currently being detained at facilities in dilly, texas or nearby carne city, where the lucas family spent two months in detention. >> translator: the children were upset. were traumatized. they cried because they were closed in. says lucas. >> these facilities are not set up to provide with basic services. >> reporter: he is with the refugee and immigration center for education and legal services. he says the no release policy and harsh substandard conditions
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child detention settlement signed by federal immigration officials. >> we really call on the obama administration to recognize the families of the centers as folks that are fleeing violence, immense violence and given protections. >> reporter: this isn't rocket science. mark gregorian heads the center for immigration studies. >> if the message gets back to central america, people are not being detained. >> reporter: of course, more people are going to want to try to do that. >> reporter: he says, the u.s. could see illegal immigration like last summer's surge when facility were overwhelmed by tens of thousands of central americans, who crossed illegally into south texas. to make space, women and children were released on a promise to appear in court. records show only about 15% of the women and half the children showed up in front of a judge.
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u.s. homeland security secretary jay johnson, said in a statement we must make changes in our detention practices with respects to families with children. omar villafranca, cbs news, san antonio, texas. >> for the first time in modern history, a married couple are becoming saints. louis and zellie martin who lived in france in the 19th century, were parents of saint teresa of azu, a favorite of pope francis. the pope praised martins for role models for daughters who created an environment of faith and love. the fight to save a texas tradition. i pinky promised my little girl a fabulous garden party for her birthday. so i mowed the lawn, put up all the decorations. i thought i got everything.
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insurance company says the valley wildfire in northern california did $1.5 billion in damage. destroyed 1,200 homes. four people were killed. four firefighters injured. eight firefighters from middletown lost their own homes. here's carter evans. >> i have been seeing burned houses all day. and knowing this was mine and nothing i could do. it's surreal. >> reporter: cal fire chief paul duncan says he took all the proper precautions. >> this was all green. we had done our clearances. so when duncan saw smoke in the distance he left his wife courtney and daughters rose and
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flames. the valley fire was 25 miles from its home when it suddenly exploded. a wall of flames bearing down on middletown. just six minutes after the order came to evacuate. >> the houses down the road were look already on fire. i texted my dad the i am so scared. where do we go? she said there are cars in front of me on fire. fire beside me. fire behind me. i said i love you. he said i love you. in case anything would have happened. >> i said you know where the road is. need to drive. step on the gas. drive through the fire. >> reporter: four people died in the valley fire. but duncan says fire crews helped save thousand by evacuating entire neighborhood. the firefighters are just trying to get people out of the way. you know, life over property. >> reporter: justin galvin was facig flames when he heard middletown was being overrun.
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the irony of this. you are a fire fighter. you are out on the fire lines. and your home is on fire. there is no one to protect it. >> i know. what's the alternative. bring resources over here. save my house. have people perish down the street. not an option. >> reporter: eight firefighters lost their homes. so did 100 students in middletown high school. this is all that's left of principal roderick's house, wife shawn is a teacher, their daughter taylor, a middletown high freshman. >> this was my house for most of my childhood. >> reporter: the rodericks were out of town when the fire broke out. they frantically called a neighbor hoping to rescue what mattered most. >> whatever you have to do. she is like, shawn, i will not leave. the fire is mine backyard. i will not go without tinker bell. >> it was a promise kept. >> she is the care taker of our little family. all 4 pounds. >> this, it's memories. it hurts. don't get me wrong. it hurts.
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you know. but we are all okay. >> reporter: it's not just you, it is a large part of your community starting over from scratch. >> yep. >> reporter: just two weeks after the fire. classed resumed at middletown high. >> let's go, guys, that's the bell. where rose duncan was a sophomore. >> it was emotional. at least 2/3 of my friends have lost their homes. going through school is helping me cope through this. knowing the teachers are going through the same things. students are going through the same things. >> reporter: not every student felt that comfort. >> i am pretty much the only one out of my friend group that lost their house. they kept messaging me. my house is there. my house is fine. all of this stuff. and, it was like. yea. like. congratulations. i don't have clothes to go out to the grocery store and get food. i only have pajamas. they're look i don't have wi-fi.
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a community that welcomes any sign of normalcy. but where so much remains to be done. and so many still need aid. >> i don't like getting stuff from other people. i don't like charity. >> it feels very natural for us and our children. to be on the helping side. being on-- the other side is -- very unusual. very uncomfortable. but, it ultimately will help us get back to where we can help other people again. >> reporter: for now the duncans are digging through the rubble. finding small treasures. >> there we go. it is emotional. it is something survived. very little did. most of it was ceramics. it does provide just a little bit of piece of your past back. >> reporter: most three though, all about looking forward. >> the hills are going to get green again. people are going to rebuild. it will be better than it was before. it will be. how can it not me. >> reporter: even with damage on such a wide scale.
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the recovery has begun. so has the resiliency. carter evans, middletown, california. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. the heart of texas used to woman: what does it feel like when a woman is having a heart attack? chest pain, like there's a ton of weight on your chest. severe shortness of breath. unexplained nausea. cold sweats. there's an unusual tiredness and fatigue. there's unfamiliar dizziness or light-headedness. unusual pain in your back, neck, jaw, one or both arms, even your upper stomach, are signs you're having a heart attack. don't make excuses. make the call to 9-1-1 immediately. learn more at womenshealth.gov/heartattack. bipolar disorder is a brain condition that causes unusual or dramatic mood swings. it affects millions of americans and compromises their ability to function. when diagnosed, bipolar disorder
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can be effectively treated by mood stabilizers. but most people with bipolar disorder suffer for years without help because the symptoms are missed or confused with other illnesses, like depression. learn how easily you can help keep this from happening to a loved one.
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the heart of texas used to beat to the sound of local dance halls. most had a honky-tonk. david begnaud reports those days are drifting away. >> reporter: shuffle your way through the broken spoke dance hall in austin, texas, meet james white. the local rhinestone cowboy. >> living legend right here. >> reporter: since he opened the flocked in five days a week to enjoy texas's oldest traditions, two stepping to the sound of
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>> come out here to the honkey toning, drink beer, listen to country music band. get up. dance. have a good time. true mom and pop operation. i tell people, that my wife is the working half of the family. i'm in charge of b.s. and we ain't going to change nothing. >> he's pretty good at b.s. >> i know he is. >> reporter: that country charm is what's allowed it to thrive. elsewhere across texas, in historic dance halls are in >> many of them have actually disappeared either through lack of interest or support. fallen down. burned. >> reporter: deb fleming is president of texas dance hall preservation inc. >> how much of the heritage of texas can be traced back to a dance hall? >> i think pretty much all of it can be. pretty much, everybody came to the dance hall. community center to share. enjoy. and the community they lived in. >> reporter: does it make you emotional? >> it does. >> reporter: why? >> because it is such a great thing.
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to see them dying. >> reporter: twin sister is surviving. it is the oldest dance hall in texas, one hour west of austin. it opened to the public in 1870. it is estimated 1,000 dance halls were built in texas. between the late 1800s and early 1900s. now just 400 still stand. only two operate daily. luckenbach dance hall and this one, green hall, where willie nelson still uses a window entrance when he performs. >> one night randy travis -- >> reporter: when it cups to preserving, texas's decaying dance halls, the broken spoke is still rolling. >> no matter who it is. nobody has to tell them where they're at. they know darn well they're not at carnegie hall. all right i've got to do >> reporter: that's true texas talk from a cowboy dedicated to at a time. david begnaud, cbs news. that's the "cbs overnight news" for sunday. continues. for others check back later for
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morning" from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm jeff grole. >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the overnight news. i'm jeff glore. the terror attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi is under focus this week on capitol hill. former secretary of state hillary clinton will testify before the house committee investigating the attack. four americans were killed including ambassador chris stevens. john dickerson spoke to the ranging democrat on the committee, elijah cummings for face the nation.
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>> i want to speak to you about people from your own party, you are familiar with their remarks, house majority leader, kevin mccarthy suggested this committee has driven down hillary clinton's poll numbers. richard hannah, republican from new york said explicitly this was a political investigation. a former investigator on your team has said this was a politically motivated investigation. why would all of these people say that? >> i guess because they didn't have any idea what the facts are. john, if you look at the facts. we have done 50 witnesses. one of whom you could argue was exclusively related to her e-mail. the shortest interview we have done. we have 50,000 new documents. less than 5% have anything to do with secretary clinton. she is an important witness, but she is one witness. and by the time we are through, john, we will have interviewed 70 witnesses. so, she is one out of the 70. i get she gets more attention than the other 69. but frankly if you ask me, the eyewitnesses on the ground that night in benghazi are more
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important to me as a former prosecutor than the former secretary of state. >> as a former prosecutor if you looked at evidence from republicans in your own party, who said this is a political committee wouldn't that be enough to start an investigation into whether this is politically motivated. >> actually, there is no evidence. there are three people who don't have any idea what they're talking about. two of them are colleagues. the two republican members of the conference never asked for a update on our committee. they couldn't name three witnesses we have talked to. couldn't tell you a single document production we have received. and, the former staffer, left in june. so he has no idea what we have done since june. and his allegation about secretary clinton he never said until he sat down with somebody in your profession last friday. so the three wouldn't be called as a witness in my former job. because they have no firsthand knowledge. >> let me ask you, you told "the new york times" you would ask speaker boehner to allow another committee to focus on the clinton e-mails.
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you worried it would distract from the work of your committee. have your fears been realized? >> i don't know. other people are going to have to make the decision. i will tell you this. when speaker boehner called me. he never mentioned secretary clinton's name. not once. in my position, it's always been the same. four dead americans is more than enough work for me. she is a witness. she was the secretary of state. you have to talk to her. but we have already talked to 50 not named clinton. we'll talk to another couple dozen not named clinton. so i understand there is attention associated with her. from my perspective. i am more interested in chris stevens' e-mails which we just received than i am her e-mails we just received. >> speaking of the politicalization of this -- carly fiorina running for president, rendered her view on what the hearings are about this
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i wish for once mrs. clinton would be. >> thursday is about benghazi, before, during, after. frankly, secretary clinton's defense. she is going to have a lot more information about the before than he is the during and the after. so, i, i get that there is a presidential campaign going on. i have told my own republican colleagues and friends, shut up talking about things that you don't know anything about. and unless you are on the committee, you have no idea what we have done, why we have done it, what new facts we have found we have found new facts, john, that have absolutely nothing to do with her. >> what do you want to know from secretary clinton when she shows up? >> what i want to know is while violence was going up in libya why was our security profile going down. it wasn't staying the same. it was going down. in the past, john, she said i have people and processes in place to handle that.
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processes in place to handle, drivel produced by sydney blumenthal. i want to know why certain things made tight your inbox, madam secretary, but the plaintiff pleadings of our own ambassador that you put in place for more security never bothered to make it to your inbox. i think that is a fair question. >> it is interesting that after 17 months, 4.7 million and counting of taxpayers' money that chairman is now saying he has another two dozen witnesses to interview. it's very interesting. and i do believe that, what he is trying to do, i listen to him carefully. now trying to shift back to where we should have been all along. that is looking at the benghazi incident. and, it's clear to me. he can try to dismiss the words
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the second. highest ranking member in congress. try to dismiss the word of congressman and of his hand picked investigator, who quit. the fact is he keeps saying don't listen to what they say. they don't know anything. well we were on the committee too. by the way he said there were seven members. also five democrats. we know what has been going on. and, and, listen to this. he has not yet interviewed the head of the cia. but he has not yet interviewed the head of joint chiefs. the head of the, the secretary of defense. none of that. >> let me ask you, you mention, ms. abdin, the adviser to hillary clinton, is this a sham on thursday? >> i think it's -- i think it is a sad day for, for all of us. because we made a commitment to
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their eyes literally. said please do not make this a political football. that's what happened. they said. find out more information about what did happen. and then they asked us to do, one other thing. and that is -- try to make sure you figure out how this does not happen again. i think we failed in all three. if you listen to the chairman. he says two new things. looking at ambassador stevens' e-mails you get a sense how much he was pleading. not being listened to. lines of communication not open. new information about the ability to respond to an attack like that. isn't that worthy information? >> we need. we need to honor the family's request. we figure out how to make sure this doesn't happen again. i would be happy to look into that. we have investigations, by the way, i think, he talked about, sydney blumenthal and others. we need to have a transparent record. i am calling on him to make sure that -- he releases the
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interviewed. most were state department people. or they were hillary clinton's former aides. people worked in her campaign. speech writers. when he talks about the 50 witnesses. we have been zeroed in on
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absolutely no doubt about that. the war of words heating up between republican presidential contenders, donald trump and jeb bush. during the last gop debate. bush gave his brother, former president george w. bush credit for keeping the nation safe on his watch. trump criticized that statement pointing out the 9/11 attacks happened with bush in office. trump, said if his immigration policies were in place at the time, he says the terrorists would not have been able to get into the country in the first place.
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more on "cbs this morning." >> when many people looked at this campaign before it really began. you were the guy they thought would be the front-runner. the first vote doesn't take place until february. people look at the numbers i repeated and say what happened to jeb bush. >> i was one of though that thought i was the front-runner. i know i have to go tell the jeb story. people know me as george's boy, george's brother the they don't know that i was an effective conservative governor that disrupted the old order in florida. and made big changes i tell that story each and every day. it resonates. >> why can't you have more resonance then, this long, two debates from telling the jeb bush story. what's the problem to connect with the voters? >> it's not a problem. we are just starting. the important race is iowa. new hampshire. south carolina. nevada. you go into the super tuesday states. building an organization in all the places the i feel confident where we are right now? >> during the democratic debate.
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-- the american people are sick of the damne-mails. are you sick and tired of donald trump. he its getting all of at tension in the race. all the candidates are saying, look, we are over here weft have something to say. how are you and your team dealing with the donald trump candidacy. >> i admire the fact that he is politically incorrect. we are too uptight as a nation. and i admire the fact that he doesn't feel embarrassed about his wealth. what else do i admire? let me think. running out of things. he's got a great family. >> is it frustrating? >> ultimately people are going to want to know who is going to sit behind the big desk. who is going to be making decisions tha impact millions of americans. are we going to be safe? are we going to create a climate? >> anything about donald trump that makes you think we would not be safe and worried if he was there? >> i have no clue. that's the point. he hasn't shared his views. when he talks foreign policy. he talks about -- how putin ought to take care of isis. and the week before -- and isis ought to take care of assad.
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these are serious times. you need a person who has the temperament and the leadership skills to fix the things that are broken and do it with compassion and conviction. and have the skills to lead. over the long haul that's the lane i will stay in. i believe i will be effective. i don't know about donald trump's view of leadership. he talks about himself the whole time. rather than what he would do. >> governor, i want to ask you a couple policy serious questions. quickly, you talked about being your own man do. you see your brother. george w. bush coming out on the campaign trail with you. >> i don't know. >> i don't know. he has been helpful raising money. giving me advice. last republican to be elected. the one before that. the one guy that i rely on, on, on, you know the ebbing and flowing of politics. it is pretty wild. he has done it. >> let me talk to you about afghanistan. that's the front page of the papers today. president obama leaves office in 15 months. saying the draw down will be
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you have said that obama is commander. be specific. how many american troops would you leave in the ground in afghanistan. >> take the recommendation of the, the general that was responsible for it. who is now the chairman of the 10,000 troops. 9,800 troops. the proper place to be. without a time line. line. enemies are organizing for i think that's the proper thing to do. >> insurance company says the valley wildfire in northern california last month did $1.5 billion in damage. it destroyed more than 1,200 homes. four people were killed. four firefighters injured. eight firefighters from middletown lost their own homes. here's carter evans. >> i had been seeing burned houses all day. knowing this was mine. and knowing there was nothing i could do. it's surreal. cal fire battalion chief, paul duncan says he took all the proper precautions. >> this was all green.
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we had done our clearances. >> reporter: when duncan saw smoke in the distance the he left his wife courtney and daughters rose and page. and raced towards the flames. the valley fire was 25 miles from his home when it suddenly exploded. a wall of flames bearing down on middletown. just six min ufts after the order came to evacuate. >> the houses down the road were already on fire. i texted my dad. i am so scared. where do we go? >> she said there is cars in that are on fire. fire beside me. fire behind me. i texted him that i loved him. he said i love you too. just in case, anything would >> i said you know where the road is. you need to drive. step on the gas. >> reporter: four people died in the valley fire. duncan says fire crews helped save thousand evacuating entire neighborhoods. >> the firefighters are just trying to get people out of the way.
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life over property. >> reporter: justin was facing flames when he heard middletown was being overrun. the irony of this, yeah. you are a fire fighter. out on the fire lines. and, your home is on fire. and there is no one to protect it. >> i know. what's the alternative. you know. bring a bunch of resources over here. save my house. and then have people perish down the street? you know that is not an option. >> reporter: eight fire fighters lost their homes. so did 100 students in middletown high school. this is all right that is left of principal bill roderick's house. his wife shawne, a teacher. their daughter taylor, a freshman. >> this was my house for most of my childhood. they were out of town when fire broke out. they frantically called a neighbor hoping to rescue what mattered most. >> whatever you have to do. she was like, shawne, i will not leave. the fire is in my backyard. i am not going to go without tinker bell. >> it was a promise kept.
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>> the caretaker of our family. all four pounds. >> this, it is memories. it hurts. don't get me wrong. it hurts. but, we're all okay. >> it's not just you. a large part of your community. starting over from scratch. >> yep. >> reporter: just two weeks after the fire classes resumed at middletown high. >> let's go, guys. that's the bell. >> rose duncan is a sophomore. >> it was emotional. 2/3 of my friends have lost their homes. going to school is definitely helping me cope through this. knowing our teachers are going through the same thing. students are going through the same things. >> reporter: not every student felt that comfort. >> pretty much the only one out of my friend group that lost their house. they kept messaging me. my house is there. my house is fine the all this stuff. i was like, yea. congratulations.
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i don't have clothes to go out to the grocery store to get food. only have my pajamas. they're like, oh, i don't have wi-fi. >> reporter: it is a dilemma for a community that welcomes any sign of normalcy. but where so much remains to be done. and so many still need aid. >> i don't like getting stuff from other people. i don't like charity. >> it feels very natural for us. and our children. to be on the helping side. being on, on the other side is, is very unusual. very uncomfortable. but, it ultimately will help us get back to where we can help other people again. >> reporter: for now, the duncans are digging through the rubble finding small treasures. >> there we go. >> it's emotional. it's something survived. very little did. most of it was ceramics. it does provide a little bit. piece of your past back. >> reporter: mostly all about looking forward. >> the hills are going to get green again.
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it will be better than it was before. it will be. how can it not be? >> reporter: even with damage on such a wide scale, the recovery has begun. and so has the resiliency. carter evans in middletown, california. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.asy way to draw attention perfect point liner smudge with sponge-tip to create a smokin' kitten eye lash blast mascara adds an instant blast of volume add a pow to your brow! wow! from easy, breezy, beautiful covergirl 130 yards now... bill's got a very tough lie here... looks like we have some sort of sea monster in the water hazard here. i believe that's a "kraken", bruce. it looks like he's going to go with a nine iron.
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i did everything i could to make her party perfect. almost everything. you know, 1 i n 10 houses could get hit by an expensive septic disaster. but for only $7 a month, rid-x helps break down waste. avoid a septic disaster with rid-x. early voting under way in ohio. the hot issue legalizing marijuana.
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allow recreational pot use. in each state voters allowed medical marijuana first. ohio could make history by allowing both at the same time. polls show 58% support legalization. some opponents don't like the way the law is written. barry peterson is there. >> how many days do we have left? >> 21. >> reporter: the pro-marijuana camp is wrapping up until the days until the vote are counting down. >> reporter: they aim to knock on a million doors between now and the election day. we were able to accelerate this. ian james spent 30 years as a campaign strategist here in ohio. now he is leading the charge to legalize pot. what is it going to say to the country if you win this issue in ohio? >> i think you have got the old saying, so goes ohio so goes the nation. ohio is known as a battleground state.
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in this election it really as it bout the ground. this ground. one of the fields that would be turned into an area where marijuana will be grown. but unlike other states, that have legalized pot, a yes vote would amend the constitution to allow only 10 groups of already hand picked investors the exclusive right to grow the state's entire supply of pot. >> this is not the right way to do it. >> reporter: popular two term governor bob taft is one of the amendments most vocal opponents. >> if not a monopoly. it's an oligopoly. ten growing sites that will control the market in the state of 11 million people. so that is an exclusive commercial right. >> reporter: when a taft speaks, ohio listens. for a century the family produced politicians from senators to a president. >> i don't think that the tax
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risks of going recreational, medical all the way. flooding our state with edible products that are attractive to our kids. >> this would be butler county grow site. >> woody is bob's distant cousin. this taft find himself on the opposite side of the issue. because woody is within of the investors who will get to grow the pot. >> i'm in this first because i believe in it. that it is right. i'm in it second to make money. >> so far, woody and the other investors have funded $20 million of the $23 million pro-legalization campaign. it doesn't look clean and open to me. it looks like what the other side says. a monopoly. >> look someone is going to step forward and do this. it takes money to got on the ballot. >> no on issue 3. >> reporter: opponents are fighting back with their own amendments on the ballot to ban monopolies.
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understanding what's next? >> if there is one lawyer alive in the state of ohio there is going to be a lawsuit. >> the responses have been good. >> reporter: a battle in yet another state to turn a black market into the newest big business. barry peterson. columbus, ohio. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. when the engines failed on the plane i was flying, i knew what to do to save my passengers. but when my father sank into depression, i didn't know how to help him.
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many think ice hockey is a young man's sport. but for one man, the rink has become a fountain of youth. in northern minnesota it's not uncommon to find a guy in his 90s looking back on his glory days is a a hockey player. but it is uncommon to find a guy still living them. yourself a little bit. i think that's what keeps you going. >> reporter: like his handlebar mustache, mark's hockey days appear never ending. he started playing as a little
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kid and is still putting on pads and gloves at the unbelievable age of 94. >> just putting all right equipment on is a miracle the he does it. three four times a week. >> reporter: he is like nothing i have ever seen. just stepping over the boards is like nothing i have ever seen. mark plays in pickup games. every time he comes to the rink he is oldest by a generation. some of the guys could be his great, great grandchildren. yet he keeps right up with them all most as if he is oblivious to his age. >> you ever heard of shuffleboard? >> heard of it. never played it. >> reporter: it would be safer that's for sure. a few months ago he took a hard hit. >> bad collision. fractured two ribs. punctured my lung. >> reporter: can you imagine at 94. doctors told him he would have to sit out at least six weeks. he was back in three. >> i just love the game i guess. >> reporter: and he's good at it too. watch this. that's him with the puck. scoring.
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how many goals did you skr today? >> should have had more. i only had six. >> only six today. >> yeah. that's more than anybody else. >> i think so. yeah. >> for the record it was. >> to add insult to injury. not only does mark beat the pants off the whipper snappers. he takes their money too. way back when mark was just 80, the other guys in the group offered to pay his skating fees for life, thinking how much longer could it be? >> it's killing us. killing our budget. >> that was 14 years ago. >> is that true? >> true. >> pretty good deal. >> you love hockey or you are cheap? >> you would ask that, wouldn't you? [ laughter ] >> no, i so enjoy what i am doing. >> reporter: and he has no plans to stop. in fact, he suggested we come back to watch him play again. at 100. >> yeah, got to think that way, don't you? >> it's on my calendar.
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in duluth, minnesota. that's the "cbs overnight news" for this sunday. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back with us a little later for "the morning news" and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city. i'm jeff glore. a pivotal week in politics. an announcement from joe biden potentially any day. hillary clinton set for a showdown with house republicans on benghazi. the trump-bush war of word is escalating. >> mr. trump talks about things as though he is on the apprentice. philippines. >> the search for a gunman after a fatal shooting at zombiecon in florida. dying down. some are trying to save the
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>> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the "cbs overnight news," everyone. hillary clinton, joe biden, donald trump, jeb bush, all four names were all over political headlines sunday. clinton preparing for new testimony over benghazi. biden preparing to possibly announce his campaign. bush and trump escalated a bitter spat over 9/11. we start in our washington bureau. >> i don't really know what their objective is. >> reporter: hillary clinton dismissing upcoming appearance saying two previous testimonies. >> what difference at this point does it make? >> reporter: other congressional inquiries into the 2012 attacks refuted conspiracy theories and now an attempt to derail her presidential campaign. >> i think it is pretty clear that whatever they might have thought they were doing they
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committee. >> reporter: she is an important witness. but she is one witness. the chairman insisted he wants to focus on events surrounding at takes. >> i have told my own republican colleagues and friends, shut up talking about things that you don't know anything about. >> reporter: it will be impossible to take politics out of the e quagsquation with vice president joe biden waiting in the wings to possibly launch his own bid. democrats are watching to see how the front-runner performs. >> what will happen with benghazi? >> so are gop presidential candidates. >> i wish for once mrs. clinton would be prepared to stand and be held accountable for the murder of four americans in benghazi, libya. roim >> reporter: donald trump and jeb bush continue to spar over the september 11, 2001 terrorist attacks and the gop front-runner
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george w. bush was responsible. >> across the spectrum of foreign policy mr. trump talks about things as the he is on the apprentice. >> bush has been under pressure to take a harder line against trump. increasingly making the case the front-runner isn't fit to be president. >> meanwhile, republicans are looking for a speaker of the house. there is some paul ryan news. >> right. cbs news learned that paul ryan warmed to the idea of becoming house speaker. but only if he has nearly unanimous support of republicans. jeff that includes the most conservative members. >> julianna goldman. thank you very much. >> major trucking route in southern california will remain closed several days. a mile long stretch is buried in mud up to 6 feet deep. maria villareal. >> reporter: from the sky you get the impact of thursday's 30 minute downpour where three inches of rain turned a dry
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nearly 200 cars and 300 people stranded. truck driver david noe was one of them. >> i have been through hurricanes, floods, tornados, but this is a fir forsst for me after 31 years of driving. >> reporter: in the initial river of mud there were dramatic rescues like this one. a driver pulling his girlfriend to safety. it is believed everyone trapped in this mess got out. but emergency workers are checking out. as quickly as they found themselves stuck, getting unstuck is proving tedious. for now, all drivers can do is wait and see what's next for the highway that appears to be frozen in time. maria villareal, cbs news, los >> john kerry said today he will meet separately this week with israeli prime minister net and mahmoud abbas. during a cycle of violence that continued with a deadly shooting
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at a bus station in southern israel. jonathan vigliatti is in tel aviv. >> reporter: cell phone video captured the horrific scene as one gunman believed a palestinian opened fire at a bus station. one attacker and at least one israeli were killed and several were seriously injured. in what is the latest in a series of escalating attacks that have israelis now taking matters into their own hands. the gunshot and shooting range in jerusalem was packed as israeli civilians clamored to buy guns. >> if we work 24 hours a day it would probably be insa fishn't to cover all the people coming in now. >> reporter: shooting instructor, ari debule said hundred aplayed for permits and signed up for shooting tutorials after a month long wave of palestinian attacks. >> i think it is important to have a means of self defense. >> reporter: police have tried
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blocking off arab neighborhoods. but there are fears such measures could fuel more attacks and pro pests that began after rumors israeli politicians want to block palestinian access to the revered mosque. >> in one of five separate attacks yesterday, this israeli civilian seen on camera holding a gun moments after he shot and killed a palestinian he says tried to stab him. heavily armed israeli police were on patrol at tonight's attack. but they were unable to stop it in time. as the violence continues, cities like tel aviv are now suggesting banning arab maintenance workers and cleaners from schools. jeff, some israeli parents are worried about attacks against their children. >> johnthan, thank you. two are dead as koppu barrels. rain forced thousands to evacuate. seth doan has more. >> reporter: 15,000 villagers
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left their homes. many struggling to escape rising floodwaters as 300 mile wide typhoon koppu slams the philippines. entire provinces are without power. downed trees, mudslides, and collapsing structures are making travel difficult. the slow-moving typhoon is blowing inland expected to dump 2 feet of rain in the next several days. koppu made landfall as a super typhoon. category four storm with sustained winds of 150 miles per hour. but has since weakened to 90 miles an hour. many residents are still recovering from 2013s catastrophic typhoon, category 5 that took 6,200 lives. since then an early warning system seems to have made the difference. national disaster risk reduction chief alexander palmer said. at this time there are no
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reports of search-and-rescue operations. typhoon koppu is expected to weaken further in the next 24 hours. but heavy rain and continued flash flooding is expected through wednesday. seth doan, cbs news, tokyo.
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will be right back. the search continues for a gunman who opened fire at a zombie convention in fort myers, florida. one person was killed. five others hurt at the costume event. >> reporter: 20,000 people dressed in zombie costumes filled the streets of downtown for the myers, florida. many carried cell phones to capture zombieconfess tiff tease. what ended up being caught on camera was chaos. witnesses say they heard from
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>> the guy right there. right there in front of me the i mean right here. the body is right there. >> reporter: several videos posted to social media show participants running away from the scene. the fort myers police hope the image was caught some someone's cell phone. >> a lot of witnesses. a lot of people taking pictures. using their cell phones for video. anything that could help us with this investigation would be greatly appreciated. >> reporter: officers had a tough time in the early stages of the investigation with so many people dressed up in torn clothes and fake blood. 20-year-old was shot and killed. he played football at asa college in miami. friend began posting tributes on facebook almost immediately. his sister, amanda andrews says taylor will be missed.
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five other people were injured. police say they will all be okay. the second time in a week a shooting has taken place in the downtown area. some who attended zombiecon have had enough. >> i definitely want to bring myself here next year the i don't feel safe. >> the zombiecon, event has gone on for a decade and raises nine for an organization. and it takes safety of patrons very seriously. they had hired security to work the event. >> jamie, thank you very much. outrage over the recent klg of a giant african elephant in zimbabwe. the hunt was legal. sanctioned by the country's national parks to raise fund for conversation. did the elephant as some believe die for a good cause. >> reporter: the zimbabwe national park authority says the shooting of this massive african elephant was legal. some conservationists say it is unethical. others say the hunting fees,
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$90,000 for a single animal are crucial for conservation. like this man of the conservation group panthera. >> i am appalled. i can't stand it. >> reporter: there is growing international concern that zimbabwe's elephant population is in significant decline. so much so the fish and wildlife service suspended all imports of sport hunted elephant trophies from that country. but money from legal hunting and photographic tourism unlike the illegal hunt in which cecil the lion was shot is the national park's sole source of funding. it is supposed to be put back into conservation and assist poverty stricken communities living near the parks. but the safari operators association in zimbabwe says corruption and bloated bureaucracy prevent much of the
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money from helping those in need. awe >> local chief, group in one community near the national park. how much money does the community get at the moment? >> well are getting noth. absolutely nothing. >> reporter: even though it appears there is no tangible benefit to communities, the high price tag that hunters are willing to pay for their trophies means the hunt will go on. deborah patta, cbs news, johannesburg, south africa. an alarming weekend on beaches of hawaii. two men were attacked by sharks in two separate incidents. one is in critical condition. he was bit on beth feet. this makes seven shark attacks in hawaiian waters this year. in april a woman was killed by a shark. a federal judge ordered the release of thousand of women and children from immigrant detention centers in pennsylvania and texas and wants it done by friday. the undocumented immigrants are
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as omar villafranka reports, many have been held for months. rip she >> reporter: she fled to america with three children to get away from violence in her home country from guatemala. when they turned themselves in at the border they didn't expect the treatment they received. we are not criminals. the kids are not krim namz. yet we were treated like criminals she says. 2,000 central american women and children caught trying to cross the border are currently being detained in dilly texas or carne city, where the family spent two months in detention. >> translator: the children were upset. were traumatized. they cried because they were closed in. says lucas. >> these facilities are not set up to provide with basic services. >> reporter: he is with the refugee and immigration center for education and legal services.
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and harsh substandard conditions for children, violates a 1997 child detention settlement signed by federal immigration officials. >> we really call on the obama administration to recognize the families of the centers as folks that are fleeing violence, immense violence and given protections. >> reporter: this isn't rocket science. mark gregorian heads the center for immigration studies. awe if the message gets back to central america, people are not being detained. in course more people are going to want to fry totry to do that. >> reporter: he says, the u.s. could see illegal immigration like last summer's surge when facility were overwhelmed by those from central america. women and children were released on a promise to appear in court. records show only about 15% of the women and half the children showed up in front of a judge.
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u.s. homeland security secretary said in a statement we must make changes in our detention practices with respects to families with children. omar villafranca, cbs news, san antonio, texas. >> for the first time in modern history, a married couple are becoming saints. louis and zellie martin who lived in france, were the parents of a favorite of pope francis. the pope praised martins for role models for daughters who created an environment of faith and love. the fight to save a texas tradition. i did everything i could to make her party perfect. almost everything. you know, 1 i n 10 houses could get hit by an expensive septic disaster. but for only $7 a month, rid-x helps break down waste.
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insurance company says the wildfire in northern california did $1.5 billion in damage. destroyed 1,200 homes. four people were killed. four firefighters injured. eight firefighters from middletown lost their own homes. here's carter evans. >> i have been seeing burned houses all day. and knowing this was mine and nothing i could do. it's surreal. >> reporter: cal fire chief paul duncan took all the proper precautions. >> this was all green wecht had done our clearances. so when duncan saw smoke in the
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courtney and daughters rose and paige and raced towards the flames. the valley fire was 25 miles from its home when it suddenly exploded. a wall of flames bearing down on middletown. just six minutes after the order came to evacuate. >> the houses down the road were look already on fire. i texted my dad the i am so scared. where do we go? she said there are cars in front of me on fire. fire beside me. fire behind me. i said i love you. he said i love you. in case anything would have happened. >> i said you know where the road is. need to drive. step on the gas. drive through the fire. >> reporter: four people died in the valley fire. but duncan says fire crews helped save thousand by evacuating entire neighborhood. the firefighters are just trying to get people out of the way. you know, life over property. >> reporter: justin galvin was
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facing flames when he heard middletown was being overrun. the irony of this. you are a fire fighter. you are out on the fire lines. and your home is on fire. there is no one to protect it. >> i know. what's the alternative. bring resources over here. save my house. have people perish down the street. not an option. >> reporter: eight firefighters lost their homes. so did 100 students in middletown high school. this is all that's left of principal roderick's house, wife and daughter. >> this was my house for most of my childhood. >> reporter: the rodericks were out. they frantically called a neighbor hoping to rescue what mattered most. >> whatever you have to do. i will not leave. i will not go without tinker bell. >> it was a promise kept. >> she is the care taker of our little family. all 4 pounds. >> this, it's memories. it hurts.
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it hurts. you know. but we are all okay. >> reporter: it's not just you, it is a large part of your community starting over from scratch. >> yep. >> reporter: just two weeks after the fire. classes resumd at middletown high. >> let's go, guys, that's the bell. where rose duncan was a sophomore. >> it was emotional. at least 2/3 of my friend lost their homes. going through school is helping me copy through this. knowing the students and teachers are going through the same things. >> reporter: not every student felt that comfort. >> i am pretty much the only one out of my friend group that lost their house. they kept messaging me. my house is there. my house is fine. all of this stuff. and, it was like. yea. like. congratulations. i don't have clothes to go out to the grocery store and get food. i only have pajamas. they're look i don't have wi-fi.
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>> reporter: it is a dilemma for a community that welcomes any soon of normalcy. but where so much remains to be done. and so many still need aid. >> i don't like getting stuff from other people. i don't like charity. >> it feels very natural for us and our children. to be on the helping side. being on-- the other side is -- very unusual. very uncomfortable. but, it ultimately will help us get back to where we can help other people again. >> reporter: for now the duncans are digging through the rubble. finding small treasures. >> there we go. it is emotional. it is something survived. very little did. most of it was ceramics. it does provide just a little bit of piece of your past back. >> reporter: most three though, all about looking forward. >> the hills are going to get green again. people are going to rebuild. it will be better than it was before. it will be. how can it not me.
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>> reporter: even with damage on such a wide scale. the recovery has begun. so has the resiliency. carter evans, middletown, california. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. every day it's getting closer going faster than a roller coaster
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a love like yours will surely come my way hey, hey, hey babies aren't fully developed until at least 39 weeks. if your pregnancy is healthy, wait for labor to begin on its own. a healthy baby is worth the wait. o0 c1 travel is part of the american way of life. when we're on vacation, we keep an eye out for anything that looks out of place. [ indistinct conversations ] miss, your bag. when we travel from city to city, we pay attention to our surroundings. [ cheering ] everyone plays a role in keeping our community safe. whether you're traveling for business or pleasure, be aware of your surroundings. if you see something suspicious, say something to local authorities. [ vocalizing ] [ buzzing ] [ tree crashes ]
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[ wind howling ] visit worldwildlife.org. the heart of texas used to beat to the sound of local dance halls. most had a honky-tonk. david begnaud reports those days are drifting away. >> reporter: shuffle your way through the broken spoke dance hall in austin, texas, meet james white. the local rhinestone cowboy. >> living legend right here. >> reporter: since he opened the place in 1964, guests blocked in five days a week to enjoy texas's oldest traditions, two stepping to the sound of country.
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>> come out here to the honkey tong, drink beer the listen to country music band. dance. have a good time. true mom and pop operation. i tell people, that my wife is the working half of the family. >> he's pretty good at b.s. >> i know he is. >> reporter: that country charm allowed it to thrive. mostly in texas in rural areas, historic dance halls are in danger. >> many of them have actually disappeared either through lack of interest or support. fallen down. burned. >> reporter: deb fleming is president of texas dance hall preservation inc. >> how much of the heritage of texas can be traced back to a dance hall? >> i think pretty much all can be. everybody came to the dance hall. community center to share.- enjoy. and the community they lived in. >> reporter: does it make you emotional? >> it does. >> reporter: why? >> such a great thing.
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to see them dying. twin sisters is surviving. the olest dance hall in texas one hour west of austin. it opened to the public in 1870. it is estimated 1,000 dance halls were wiltbuilt in texas. now just 400 still stand. only two operate daily. luckenbach dance hall and this one, where willie nelson uses a window entrance when he performs. when it comes to preserving, texas's decaying dance halls, the broken spoke is still rolling. >> no matter who it is. nobody has to tell them where they're at. they know darn well they're not at carnegie hall. >> reporter: that's true texas talk from a cowboy dedicated to saving what's left, one two step at a time. david begna of theud, cbs news. that's the "cbs overnight news" for sunday.
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for others check back later for the "morning news" and cbs this morning" from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm jeff grole. news. i'm jeff glore. the terror attack in benghazi is under focus. hillary clin will testify before the house committee investigating the attack. four americans were killed including ambassador chris stevens. john dickerson speck to elijah cummings for face the nation.
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>> i want to speak to you about people from your committee, you are familiar with their remarks, kevin mccarthy suggested this committee has driven downhill ear clinton's poll numbers. richard hannah, republican from new york said explicitly this was a political investigation. a former investigator on your team has said this was a politically motivated investigation. why would all of these people say that? >> i guess because they didn't have any idea what the facts are. john. if you look at the facts. we have done 50 witnesses. one of whom you could argue was exclusively related to her e-mail. the shortest interview we have done. we have 50,000 new documents. less than 5% have anything to do with secretary clinton. she is an important witness, but she is one witness. and by the time we are through, john, we will have interviewed 70 witnesses. so, she is one out of the 70. i get she gets more attention than the other 69. but frankly if you ask me, the
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eyewitnesses on the ground that night in benghazi are more important to me as a former prosecutor than the former secretary of state. >> as a former prosecutor if you looked at evidence from republicans in your own party, who said this is a political committee wouldn't that be enough to start an investigation into whether this is politically motivated. a pretty big body of evidence. >> actually, there is no evidence. there are three people who didn't have any idea what they're talking about. two of them are colleagues. the two republican members of the conference never asked for a update on our committee. they couldn't name three witnesses we tacked to. couldn't tell you a single document production we have received. and, the former staffer, left in june. so he has no idea what we have done since june. and his allegation about secretary clinton he never said until he sat down with somebody in your profession last friday. so the three wouldn't be called as a witness in my former job. because they have no firsthand knowledge. >> let me ask you, you told "the new york times" you would ask
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committee to focus on the clinton e-mails. you worried it would distract from the work of your committee. have your fears been realized? >> i don't know. other people are going to have to make the decision. i will tell you this. when speaker boehner called me. he never mentioned secretary clinton's name. not once. in my position, it's always been the same. four dead americans is more than enough work for me. she is a witness. she was the secretary of state. you have to talk to her. talked to 50 not named clinton. another couple dozen not named clinton. there is attention associated with her. from my perspective. i am more interested in chris stevens' e-mails which we just received than i am her e-mails we just received. >> carly fiorina running for president, rendered her view on what the hearings are about this week. i wish for once mr. clinton
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would be prepared to stand and be -- i wish for once mrs. clinton would be prepared to stand. >> thursday is about benghazi, before, during, after. frankly, secretary clinton's defense. she is going to have a lot more information about the before than she is the during and the after. so, i, i get that there is a presidential campaign going on. i have told my own republican colleagues and friends, shut up talking about things that you don't know anything about. and unless you are on the committee, you have no idea what we have done, why we have done it, what new facts we have found the we have found new facts, john that have absolutely nothing to do with her. >> what do you want to know from up? >> what i want to know is while violence was going up in libya why was our security profile going down. it wasn't staying the same. it was going down. in the past, john, she said i have people and processes in place to handle that.
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well, you also have people and processes in place to handle, drivel produced by sydney blumenthal. i want to know why certain things made tight your inbox, madam secretary, but the pleadings of our own ambassador that you put in place for more security never bothered to make it to your inbox. i think that is a fair question. >> it is interesting that after 17 months, 4.7 million and counting of taxpayers' money that chairman is now saying he has another two dozen witnesses to interview. it's very interesting. and i do believe that, what he is trying to do, i listen to him carefully. now trying to shift back to where we should have been all along. that is looking at the benghazi incident. and, it's clear to me. he can try to dismiss the words
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the second. highest ranking member in congress. try to dismiss the word of congressman and of his hand picked investigator, who quit. the fact is he keeps saying don't listen to what they say. they don't know anything. well we were on the committee too. by the way he said there were seven members. also five democrats. we know what has been going on. and, and, listen to this. he has not yet interviewed the head of the cia. but he has not yet interviewed the head of joint chiefs. the head of the, the secretary of defense. none of that. >> let me ask you, you mention, huma abedin, the adviser to hillary clinton, is this a sham on thursday? >> i think it's -- i think it is a sad day for, for all of us. because we made a commitment to
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families came in with tears in their eyes literally. said please do not make this a political football. that's what happened. they said. find out more information about what did happen. and then they asked us to do, one other thing. and that is -- try to make sure you figure out how this does not happen again. i think we failed in all three. if you listen to the chairman. he says two new things. looking at ambassador stevens' e-mails you get a sense how much he was pleading. not being listened to. lines of communication not open. new information about the ability to respond to an attack like that. isn't that worthy information? >> we need. we need to honor the family's request. we figure out how to make sure this doesn't happen again. i would be happy to look into that. we have investigations, by the way, i think, he talked about, sydney blumenthal and others. we need to have a transparent
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i am calling on him to make sure that -- he releases the transcripts of all the people we interviewed. most were state department people. or they were hillary clinton's former aides. people worked in her campaign. speech writers.
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the war of words heating up between donald trump and jeb bush. during the last gop debate. bush gave his brother, former george w. bush credit for keeping the nation safe on his watch. trump criticized that statement pointing out the 9/11 attacks happened with bush in office. he says the terrorists would not have been able to get into the country in the first place.
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more on cbs this morning. >> when many people looked at began. you were the guy they thought would be the front-runner. the first vote doesn't take place until february. people look at the numbers i repeated and say what happened to jeb bush. >> i was one of though that thought i was the front-runner. story. people know me as george's boy, george's brother the they don't know that i was an effective conservative governor that disrupted the old order in florida. and made big changes i tell that story each and every day. it resonates. >> why can't you have more resonance then, this long, two debates from telling the jeb bush story. what's the problem to connect with the voters? >> it's not a problem. we are just starting. the important race is iowa. new hampshire. new hampshire. south carolina. nevada. you go into the super tuesday states. building an organization in all the places the i feel confident where we are right now? >> during the democratic debate.
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bernie sanders said they're stick of the e-mails. are you sick and tired of donald trump. he is gifting all the attention in the race. all the candidates are saying, look, we are over here weft have something to say. how are you and your team dealing with the donald trump candidacy. >> i admire the fact that he is politically incorrect. we are too uptight as a nation. and i admire the fact that he doesn't feel embarrassinged about his wealth. what ls do i admire. let me think. running out of things. he's got a great family. >> is it frustrating? >> ultimately people are going to want to know who is going to sit behind the big desk. who is going to be making decisions that impact millions of americans. are we going to be sam. are we going to create a climate? >> anything about donald trump that makes you think we would not be safe and worried if he was there? >> i have no clue. that's the point. he hasn't shared his views. when he talks foreign policy. how putin ought to take care of isis.
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send refugees back to syria to their slaughter. these are serious times. you need a person who has the trem prament temperament and do it with compassion and conviction. and have the skills to lead. over the long haul that's the lane i will stay in. i believe i will be effective. i don't know about donald trump's view of leadership. time. rather than what he would do. >> governor, i want to ask you a couple policy serious questions. quickly, you talked about being your own man do. you see your brother. george w. bush coming out on the campaign trail with you. >> i don't know. he has been helpful raising money. giving me advice. last republican to be elected. the one before that. the one guy that i rely on, on, on, you know the ebbing and flowing of politics. it is pretty wild. he has done it. afghanistan. day. president obama leaves office in 15 months. saying the draw down will be left to his successor. you have said that obama is
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short changing our military commander. be specific. how many american troops would you leave in the ground in afghanistan. >> take the recommendation of the, the general that was responsible for it. who is now the chairman of the joint chiefs. 10,000 troops. 9,800 troops. the proper place to be. without a time line. the minute you create a time line. you are also, your opponents, enemies are organizing for waiting you out. i think that's the proper thing to do. >> insurance company says the valley wildfire in northern california last month did $1.5 billion in damage. it destroyed more than 1,200 homes. four people were killed. four firefighters injured. eight firefighters from middletown lost their own homes. here's carter evans. >> i had been seeing burned houses all day. knowing this was mine. and knowing there was nothing i could do. it's surreal. cal fire battalion chief, paul duncan says he took all the proper precautions.
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we had done our clearances. >> reporter: when duncan saw smoke in the distance the he left his wife courtney and daughters rose and page. and raced towards the flames. the valley fire was 25 miles from his home when it suddenly exploded. a wall of flames bearing down on middletown. just six min ufts after the order cam to evacuate. >> the houses down the road were already on fire. i texted my dad. i am so scared. where do we go? >> she said there is cars in front of me. fire beside me. fire behind me. >> i texted hem i loved him. he said i love you too. just in case, anything would have happened. >> i said you know where the road is. step on the gas. drive through the fire. >> reporter: four people died in the valley fire. duncan says fire crews helped save thousand evacuating entire neighborhoods. >> the firefighters are just
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life over property. >> reporter: justin was facing flames when he heard middletown was being overrun. the irony of this, yeah. you are a fire fighter. out on the fire lines. and, your home is on fire. and there is no one to protect it. >> i know. what's the alternative. you know. bring a bunch of resources over here. save my house. and then have people perish down the street? you know that is not an option. >> reporter: eight fire fighters lost their homes. so did 100 students in middletown high school. this is all right that is left of principal bill roderick's house. >> this was my house for most of my childhood. they were out of town when fire broke out. they frand ictically called a neighbor hoping to rescue what mattered most. >> whatever you have to do. i will not leave, the fire is mine backyard the i will not go without tinker bell.
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>> the caretaker of our family. all four pounds. >> this, it is memories. it hurts. don't get me wrong. it hurts. but, we're all okay. >> it's not just you. a large part of your community. starting over from scratch. >> yep. >> reporter: just two weeks after the fire classes resumed at middletown high. >> let's go, guys. that's the bell. >> rose duncan is a sophomore. >> it was emotional. 2/3 of my friends hatch lost their homes. going to school is definitely helping me cope through this. knowing our teachers are going through the same thing. students are going through the same things. >> reporter: not every student felt that comfort. >> pretty much the only one out of my friend group that lost their house. they kept messaging me. my house is there. my house is fine the all this stuff. i was like, yea. congratulations. i don't have clothes to go out to the grocery store to get food. only have my pajamas.
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they're like, oh, i don't have wi-fi. >> reporter: it is a dilemma for a community that welcomes any sign of normalcy. but where so much remains to be done. and so many still need aid. >> i don't like getting stuff from other people. i don't like charity. >> it feels very natural for us. and our children. to be on the helping side. being on, on the other side is, is very unusual. very uncomfortable. but, it ultimately will help us get back to where we can help other people again. >> reporter: for now, the duncans are digging through the rubble finding small treasures. >> there we go. >> it's emotional. it's something survived. very little did. most of it was ceramics. it does provide a little bit. piece of your past back. >> reporter: mostly all about looking forward. >> the hills are going to get green again. people are going to rebuild.
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it will be better than it was before. it will be. how can it not be? >> reporter: even with damage on such a wide scale, the recovery has begun. and so has the resiliency. carter evans in middletown, california. it's the final countdown! the final countdown! if you're the band europe, you love a final countdown. it's what you do. if you want to save fifteen percent or more on car insurance, you switch to geico.
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your clever moves won't stop the cold and flu. but disinfecting with lysol can. because lysol wipes and spray are approved to kill more types of germs than clorox. including those that can make you sick. for a healthy home this cold and flu season... lysol that. early voting under way in ohio. the hot issue legalizing
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marijuana. four states and washington, d.c. allow recreational pot use. in each state voters allowed medical marijuana first. ohio could make history by alug both at the same time. polls show 58% support legalization. some opponents don't like the way the law is written. barry peterson is there. >> how manan days do we have left? >> 21. >> reporter: the pro-marijuana camp is wrapping up until the days until the vote are counting down. >> we are just doing polling. >> reporter: they aim to knock on a million doors between now and the election day. we were able to accelerate this. ian james spent 30 years as a campaign strategist here in ohio. now he is leading the charge to legalize pot. what is it going to say to the country, if you win thisser to in ohio? >> i think you have got the old
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ohio is known as a battleground state. in this election it really as it bout the ground. this ground. one of the fields that would be turned into an area where marijuana will be grown. but unlike other states, that have legalized pot, a yes vote would amend the constitution to allow only 10 groups of already hand picked investors the exclusive right to grow the state's entire supply of pot. >> this is not the right way to do it. reporter: popular two term gogornor bob taft is one of the amendments most vocal opponents. >> if not a monopoly. ten growing sites that will control the market in the state of 11 million people. so that is an exclusive commercial right. >> reporter: whenn taft speaks, ohio listens. for a century the family produced politicians from senators to a president. >> i don't think that the tax
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benefits outweigh the hazards. risks of going recreational, medical all the way. flooding our state with medical products that are attractive to our kids. >> this would be butler county grow site. >> woody is bob's distant cousin. this taft find himself on the opposite side of the issue. because woody is within of the investors who will get to grow the pot. >> i'm in this first because i believe in it. that it is right. i'm in it second to make money. >> so far, woody and the other investors have funded $20 million of the $23 million pro-legalization campaign. it doesn't look clean and open to me. it looks like what the other side says. a monopoly. >> look someone is going to step forward and do this. it takes money to got on the ballot ballot. >> no on issue 3. >> reporter: opponents are fighting back with their own amendments on the ballot to ban monopolies. if both of these pass and you're understanding what's next?
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>> if there is one lawyer alive in the state of how hoi there is going to be a lawsuit. >> the responses have been good. >> reporter: a battle in yet another state to turn a black market into the newest big business. barry peterson. columbus, ohio. the "cbs oveveight news" embarrassed by a prostate exam? imagine how your doctor feels. as a urologist, i have performed 9,421 and a half prostate exams. so why do i do it? because i get paid. und... on this side of the glove i know prostate exams can save lives. so, if you are a man over 50, talk to you doctor to see if a prostate exam is right for you. if we can do it, so can you.
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the rink has become a fountain of youth. in northern minnesota it's not uncommon to find a guy in his 90s looking back on hihi glory days is a a hockey player. it is uncome mon to find a guy still living them. yohave got to challenge yourself a little bit. i think that's what keeps you going. >> reporter: like his mustache, mark's hockey days appear never ending.
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kid and is still putting on pads and gloves at the unbelievable age of 94. >> just putting all right equipment on is a miracle the he does it. three four times a week. >> reporter: he is like nothing i have ever seen. just stepping over the boards is lili nothing iave ever seen. mark plays in pickup games. every time he comes to the rink he is oldest by a generation. some of the guys could be his great, great grandchildren. yet he keeps right up with them all most as if he is oblivious to his age. >> you ever heard of shuffleboard? >> heard of it. never played it. >> reporter: it would be safer that's for sure. a few months ago he took a hard hit. >> bad collision. fractured two ribs. punctured my lung. >> reporter: can you imagine at 94. doctors told him he would have to sit out at least six weeks. he was back in three. >> i just love the g ge i guess. >> reporter: and he's good at it too.
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that's him with the puck. scoring. how many goals did you skr today? >> should have had more. i only had six. >> only sex todayayix today. >> yeah. >> more than any one else. >> for the record it was. >> to add insult to injury. not only does mark beat the pants off the whipper snappers. he takes their money too. way back when mark was just 80, the other guys in the group offered to pay his skating fees for life, thinking how much longer could it be? >> it's killing us. killing ouw budget. >> that was 14 years ago. >> is that true? >> true. >> pretty good deal. >> you love hockey or you are cheap? >> you would ask that, wouldn't you? [ laugher ] >> no, i so enjoy what i a a doing. >> reporter: and he haso plans to stop. in fact,e suggested we come back to watch him play again. at 100. >> yeah, got to think that way, don't you? >> it's on my calendar.
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steve hartman on the road. in duluth, minnesota.a. that's the "cbs overnight news" for this sunday. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back with us a little later for "the morning news" and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city. i'm jeff glore. a pivotal week in politics. an announcement from joe biden potentially any day. hillary clinton set for a showdown with house republicans on benghazi. the trump-bush war of word is escalating. >> mr. trump talks about things as though he is on the apprentice. deadly typhoon slams the philippines. >> the search for a gunman after a fatal shooting at zombiecon in florida. the dance hall days are dying down.
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some are trying to save the heart of texas from losing its beats. >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the "cbs overnight news," everyone. i'm jeff glore. hillary clinton, joe biden, donald trump, jeb bush, , l four names were all over political l headadnes sunday. clinton preparing for new testimony over benghazi. biden preparing to possibly announce his campaign. bush and trump escalated a bitter spat over 9/11. we start with julianna goldmdm in our washington bureau. >> i don't really know what their objective is. >> reporter: hillary clinton is dismissingpcoming appearance saying two previous testimonies. >> what difference at this point does it make? >> reporter: other congressional inquiries into the 2012 attacks refuted conspiracy theories and now an attempt to derail her presidential campaign. >> i think it is pretty clear that whatever they might have thought they were doing they ended up becoming a partisan arm of the republican national committee.
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>> reporter: she is an important witness. but she is one witness. e chairman insisted he wants to focus on events surrounding the attacks. >> i have told my own republican colleagues and friends, shut up talking about things that you don't know anything about. >> reporter: it will be impossible to take politics out of the equation on thursday, with vice president joe biden waiting in the wings to possibly launch his own bid. democrats are anxiously watching to see how the front-runner performs. >> what will happen with benghazi? will be very interesting. i look forward to it. >> reporter: and so are gop presidential candidates. >> i wish for once mrs. clinton would be prepared to stand and be held accountable for the murder of four americans in benghazi, libyb. >> reporter: meanwhile, this weekend, donald trump and jeb bush continue to spar over the september 11, 2001 terrorist attacks and the gop front-runner ggestion former president george w. bush w w responsible.
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foreign policy mr. trump talks about things as though he is still on "the apprentice." >> bush has been under pressure to take a harder line against trump. increasingly making the case the republican front-runner isn't fit to be president. >> meanwhile, republicans are still looking for a speaker of the house. there is some paul ryan news. >> right. cbs news learned that paul ryan has warmed to the idea of becoming house speaker. but only if he has nearly unanimous support of republicans. jeff that includes t t most conservatiti members. >> julianna goldman. in washington. thank you very much. >> major trucking route in southern california will remain closed several days. a mile long stretch of state route 58, is buried in mud up to 6 feet deep. here's cbs' maria villareal. >> reporter: from the sky you get the impact of thursday's 30 minute downpour where three inches of rain turned a dry landscape into a mud pit leaving nearly 200 cars and 300 people
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stranded. truck driver david noe was one of them. >> i have been through hurricanes, floods, tornados, but this is a first for me after 31 years of driving. >> reporter: in the initial river of mud there were dramatic rescues like this one. a driver pulling his girlfriend to safety. it is believed everyone trapped in this mess got out. but emergency workers are double checking. as quickly as they found themselves stuck, getting unstuck is proving tedious. for now, all drivers can do is wait and see whahas next for the highway that appears to be frozen in time. maria villareal, cbs news, los angeles. secretary of state john kerry said today he will meet separately this week with israeli prime minister netanyahu, and palestinian leader mahmoud abbas. during a cycle of violence that
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continued with a deadly shooting at a bus station in southern israel. jonathan vigliatti is in tel aviv. >> reporter: cell phone video captured the horrific scene as at least one gunman believed a palestinian opened fire at a bus station. one attacker and at least one israeli were killed and several were seriously injured. in what is the latest in a series of escalating attacks that have israelis now taking matters into their o o hands. the gunsnst and shooting range in jerusalem was packed as israeli civilians clamored to buy guns. >> if we work 24 hours a day it would probably be insufficient to cover all the people coming in now. >> reporter: shooting instructor, ari debule said in the last week, hundreds of israelis have applied for permits and signed up for shooting tutorials after a month long wave of palestinian attacks. >> i think it is important to have a means of self defense. >> reporter: police have tried
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blocking offffrab neighborhoods. but there are fears such measures ould fuel more attacks and pro pests that began after rumors israeli politicians want to block palestinian access to the revered mosque. >> in one of five separate attacks yesterday, this israeli civilian seen on camera holding a gun moments after he shot and killed a palestinian he says tried to stab him. heavily armed israeli police were on patrol at tonight's attack. but they were unable to stop it in time. as the violence continues, cities like tel aviv are now suggesting banning arab maintenance workers and cleaners from schools. jeff, some israeli parents are worried about attacks against their children. >> johnthan, thank you. tonight, at least two are dead as oppu barrels. across the northern philippines. fierce wind and rain forced thousand to evacuate. seth doan has more. >> reporter: 15,000 villagers
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many struggling to escape rising floodwaters as 300 mile wide typhoon koppu slams the philippines. entire provinces are without power. downed trees, mudslides, and collapsing structures are making travel difficult. the slow-moving typhoon is blowing inland expected to dump 2 feet of rain in the next several days. koppu made landfall as a super typhoon. category four storm with sustained winds of 150 miles per hour. but has since weakened to 90 miles an hour. many residents are still recovering from 2013s catastrophic typhoon, category 5 that took 6,200 lives. since then an early warning system seems to have made the difference. national disaster risk reduction chief alexander palmer said.
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reports of search-and-rescue operations. typhoon koppu is expected to weaken further in the next 24 hours. but heavy rain and continued flash flooding is expected through wednesday. seth doan, cbs news, tokyo. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. almost sixty million americans are affected by mental illness. together we can help them with three simple words. my name is chris noth and i will listen. from maine to maui, thousands of high school students across the country are getting in on the action by volunteering in their communities. chris young: action teams of high school students are joining volunteers of america and major leagueueaseball players to help train and inspire the next generation of volunteers. carlos pea: it's easy to start an action team at your school so you, too, can get in on the action.
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if you were a hippie in the '60s, you need to know. it's the dawning of the age of aquarius. yeah, and something else that's cool. what? osteoporosis is preventable. all: osteo's preventable? right on! if you dig your bones, protect them. all: cbs cares! the search continues for a gunman who opened fire at a zombie convention in fort myers, florida. one person was killed. five others hurt at the costume event. >> reporter: 20,000 people dressed in zombie costumes filled the streets of downtown for the myers, florida. many cared cell phones to capture zombieconfegs tiff tease. what ended up being caught on camera was chaos. witnesses say they heard from
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anywhere from 8 to 10 gunshots. >> the g g right there. right there in front of me the i mean right here. the body is right there. >> reporter: several videos posted to social media show participants running away from the scene. the fort myers police hope the imime was caught some someone's cell phone. >> a lot of witnesses. a lot of people taking pictures. using their cell phones for video. anything that could help us with this investigation would be greatly appreciated. >> reporter: officers had a tough time in the early stages of the investigation with so many people dressed up in torn clothes and fake blood. 20-year-old was shot and killed. he played football at asa college in miami. friend began posting tributes on facebook almost immediately. his sister, amanda andrews says taylor will be missed. five other people were injured. police say they will all be okay. the second time in a week a shooting has taken place in the
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some who attended zombiecon have had enough. >> i definitely want to bring myself here next year the i don't feel safe. >> the zombiecon, event has gone on for a decade and raises nine money for a local organization that makes a a and music accessible to everyone. jeff, the group released a statement saying -- and it takes safety of patrons very seriously. they had hired security to work the event. >> jamie, thank you very much. outrage over the recent killing of a giant african elephant in zimbabwe. the hunt was legal. sanctioned by the country's national parks to raise fund for conservation. did the elephant as some believe die for a good cause? deborah patta reports. >> reporter: the zimbabwe national park authority says the shooting of this massive african elephant was legal. some conservationists say it is unethical. others say the hunting fees,
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crucial for conservation. like this man of the conservation group panthera. >> i am appalled. i can't stand it. it is a necessary evil. reporter: there is growing international concern that zimbabwe's elephant population is in significant decline. so much so the fish and wildlife service suspended all imports of sport hunted elephant trophies from that country. but money from legal hunting and photographic tourism unlike the illegal hunt in which cecil the lion was shot is the national park's sole source of funding. it is supposed to be put back into conservation and assist poverty stricken communities living near the parks. but the safari opepetors association in zimbabwe says corruption and bloated bureaucracy prevent much of the money from helping those in
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>> local chief, group in one community near the national park. how much money does the community get at the moment? >> well are getting noth. absolutely nothing. >> reporter: even though it appears there is no tangible benefit to communities, the high price tag that hunters are willing to pay for their trophies means the hunt will go on. deborah patta, cbs news, johannesburg, south africa. an alarming weekend on beaches of hawaii.i. two men were attacked bybyharks in two separate incints. one is in critical condition. he was bit on beth feet. this makes seven shark attacks in hawaiian waters this year. in april a woman was killed by a shark. a federal judge ordered the release of thousand of women and detention centers in pennsylvania and texas and wants it done by friday. the undocumented immigrants are
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mostly from central america. as omar villafranca reports, many have been held for months. >> reporter: juanita lucas says she fled to america with three children to get away from violence in her home country from guatemala. she says, when they turned themselves in at the border they didn't expect the treatment they received. >> translator: we are not criminals. the kids are not criminals. yet we were treated like criminals she says. 2,000 central american women and children caught trying to cross the border are currently being detained at facilities in dilly, texas or nearby carne city, where the lucas family spent two months in detention. >> translator: the children were upset. were traumatized. they cried because they were closed in. says lucas. >> these facilities are not set up to provide with basic services. >> reporter: he is with the refugee and immigration n nter for education and legal services. he says the no release policy and harsh substandard conditions
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child detention settlement signed by federal immigration officials. >> we really call on the obama administration to recognize the families of the centers as folks that are fleeing violence, protections. >> reporter: this isn't rocket science. mark gregorian heads the center >> if the message gets back to central america, people are not >> reporter: of course, more people are going to want to try to do that. >> reporter: he says, the u.s. could see illegal immigration like last summer's surge when facility were overwhelmed by tens of thousands of central americans, who crossed illegally into south texas. to make space, women and children were released on a promise to appear in court. records show only about 15% of the women and half the children showed up in front of a judge. ice officials declined to gon camera.
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u.s. homeland security secretary jay johnson, said in a statement we must make changes in our detention practices with respects to families with children. omar villafranca, cbs news, san antonio, texas. >> for the first time in modern history, a married couple are becoming saints. louis and zellie martin who lived in france in the 19th century, were parents of saint teresa of azu, a i pinky promised my little girl a fabulous garden party for her birthday. so i mowed the lawn, put up all the decorations. i thought i got everything.
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insurance company says the wildfire in northern california did $1.5 billion in damage. four people were killed. four firefighters injured. eight firefighters from middletown lost their own homes. here's carter evans. >> i have been seeing burned houses all day. and knowing this was mine and nothing i could do. it's surreal. >> reporter: cal fire chief paul duncan says he took all the proper precautions. >> this was all green. we had done our clearances. so when duncan saw smoke in the distance he left his wife courtney and daughters rose and
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flames. the valley fire was 25 miles from its home when it suddenly exploded. a wall of flames bearing down on middletown. just six minutes after the order came to evacuate. >> the houses down the road were look already on fire. i texted my dad the i am so scared. where do we go? she said there are cars in front of me on fire. fire beside me. fire behind me. i said i love you. he said i love you. in case anything would have happened. >> i said you know where the road is. need to drive. step on the gas. drive through the fire. >> reporter: four people died in the valley fire. but duncan says fire crews helped save thousand by evacuating entire neighborhood. the firefighters are just trying to get people out of the way. you know, life over property. >> reporter: justin galvin was facig flames when he heard middletown was being overrun.
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you are a fire fighter. you are out on the fire lines. and your home is on fire. there is no one to protect it. >> i know. what's the alternative. bring resources over here. save my house. have people perish down the street. not an option. >> reporter: eight firefighters lost their homes. so did 100 students in middletown high school. this is all that's left of principal roderick's house, wife shawn is a teacher, their daughter taylor, a middletown high freshman. >> this was my house for most of my childhood. >> reporter: the rododicks were out of town when the fire broke out. they frantically called a neighbor hoping to rescue what mattered most. >> whatever you have to do. she is like, shawn, i will not leave. the fire is mine backyard. i will not go without tinker bell. >> it was a promise kept. >> she is the care taker of our little family. all 4 pounds. >> this, it's memories. it hurts. don't get me wrong. it hurts.
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but we are all okay. >> reporter: it's not just you, it is a large part of your community starting over from scratch. >> yep. >> reporter: just two weeks after the fire. classed resumed at middletown high. >> let's go, guys, that's the bell. where rose duncan was a sophomore. >> it was emotional. at least 2/3 of my friends have lost their homes. going through school is helping me cope through this. knowing the teachers are going through the same things. students are going through the same things. >> reporter: not every student felt that comfort. >> i am pretty much the only one out of my friend group that lost their house. they kept messaging me. my house is there. my house is fine. all of this stuff. and, it was like. yea. like. congratulations. i don't have clothes to go out to the grocery store and get food. i only have pajamas. they're look i don't have wi-fi.
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a community that welcomes any sign of normalcy. but where so much remains to be done. and so many still need aid. >> i don't like getting stuff from other people. i don't like charity. >> it feels very natural for us and our children. to be on the helping side. being on-- the other side is -- very unusual. very uncomfortable. but, it ultimately will help us get back to where we can help other people again. >> reporter: for now the duncans are digging through the rubble. finding small treasures. >> there we go. it is emotional. it is something survived. very little did. most of it was ceramics. it does provide just a little bit of piece of your past back. >> reporter: most three though, all about looking forward. >> the hills are going to get green again. people are going to rebuild. it will be better than it was before. it will be. how can it not me. >> reporter: even with damage on such a wide scale.
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so has the resiliency. carter evans, middletown, california. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. the heart of texas used to woman: what does it feel like when a woman is having a heart attack? chest pain, like there's a ton of weight on your chest. severe shortness of breath. unexplained nausea. cold sweats. there's an unusual tiredness and fatigue. there's unfamiliar dizziness or light-headedness. unusual pain in your back, neck, jaw, one or both arms, even your upper stomach, are signs you're having a heart attack. don't make excuses. make the call to 9-1-1 immediately. learn more at womenshealth.gov/heartattack. bipolar disorder is a brain condition that causes unusual or dramatic mood swings. it affects millions of americans and compromises their ability to function. when diagnosed, bipolar disorder
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but most people with bipolar disorder suffer for years without help because the symptoms are missed or confused with other illnesses, like depression. learn how easily you can help keep this from happening to a loved one.
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the heart of texas used to beat to the sound of local dance halls. most had a honky-tonk. david begnaud reports those days are drifting away. >> reporter: shuffle your way through the broken spoke dance hall in austin, texas, meet james white. the local rhinestone cowboy. >> living legend right here. >> reporter: since he opened the place in 1964, guests have flocked in five days a week to enjoy texas's oldest traditions, two stepping to the sound of country.
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>> come out here to the honkey toning, drink beer, listen to country music band. get up. dance. have a good time. true mom and pop operation. i tell people, that my wife is the working half of the family. i'm in charge of b.s. and we ain't going to change nothing. >> he's pretty good at b.s. >> i know he is. >> reporter: that country charm is what's allowed it to thrive. elsewhere across texas, in mostly rural areas, historic dance halls are in danger. >> many of them have actually disappeared either through lack of interest or support. fallen down. burned. >> reporter: deb fleming is president of texas dance hall preservation inc. >> how much of the heritage of texas can be traced back to a dance hall? >> i think pretty much all of it can be. pretty much, everybody came to the dance hall. community center to share. enjoy. and the community they lived in. >> reporter: does it make you emotional? >> it does. >> reporter: why? >> because it is such a great thing.
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to see them dying. >> reporter: twin sister is surviving. it is the oldest dance hall in texas, one hour west of austin. it opened to the public in 1870. it is estimated 1,000 dance halls were built in texas. between the late 1800s and early now just 400 still stand. only two operate daily. luckenbach dance hall and this one, green hall, where willie nelson still uses a window entrance when he performs. >> one night randy travis -- >> reporter: when it cups to preserving, texas's decaying dance halls, the broken spoke is still rolling. >> no matter who it is. nobody has to tell them where they're at. they know darn well they're not at carnegie hall. all right i've got to do >> reporter: that's true texas talk from a cowboy dedicated to saving what's left, one two step at a time. david begnaud, cbs news. austin. that's the "cbs overnight news" for sunday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back later for the "morning news" and cbs this
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morning" from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm jeff grole. captioning funded by cbs it's monday, october 19th, 2015. this is the "cbs morning news." fall freeze. millions of americans are in for an early dose of wintry weather as frost's freeze warnings the mid-atlantic. clashes on the campaign trail. gop front-runner donald trump
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