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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  October 21, 2015 1:37am-4:30am CDT

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hundred of thousand of migrants fleeing war and poverty are flooding into europe. they've come by land and sea. many who cross the mediterranean land on the small greek island of lesbos. anderson cooper met them there for "60 minutes." >> reporter: they begin to arrive in the delicate light of dawn, war weary and desperate packed into rubber boats never meant to crossss such a sea. the boats are supposed to hold just 12, but 40 to 50 men, women, children are squeezed on board. most have traveled for days or weeks from syria, iraq or afghanistan, just to reach the turkish coast.
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across the aegean sea they pay turkish smugglers a small fortune as much as $1,500 apiece. half price for kids. when they finally land on lesbos, scared, exhausted many have no idea where they are. we notice one of the first things they do is wrap c cl phones p ptected in plpltic. and want to call their relatives to let them knkn they didn't drown. ahmed dahsem and his wife and son left syria six days ago. where are you hoping to go? >> germany. >> why germany?
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in germany? we hope a better life for him. [ indiscernible ] >> reporter: so you feel safe now? >> just kiss the ground. >> reporter: in the hour and a half we were on this stony stretch of beach, 15 dinghies arrived and elsewhere on the island, there were plenty more. some 4,000 people land here each day. nearly 3/4 are syrian. and they don't stay on the beach very long. >> they have an internal clock and desperate to got to europe quickly as possible. >> reporter: the emergency field director for the international
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rescue committee on lesbos. what they leave behind first and foremost is life jackets. the kind of thing. a child wears in the swimming pool not what you wear across the ocean. >> it says not for use in boating. our main concern is we are going to continue to have high numbers of refugees coming. i think unfortunately, we will have more capsized boats and drownings. this is not going to save any one's life. >> reporter: while we were on lesbos four people who drowned and washed ashore were buried. no one knew their names. drowned trying to reach europe so far this year. engines often fail, and overcrowded boats cap sized. that's how this 3-year-old syriananboy, drowned in september. after these photographs of his body on a turkish beach were seen around the world. volunteers started showing up on lesbos to help new arrival make
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but for months it has been private aid groups like international rescue committee doing what the greek government hobbled by its own economic crisis was not able to do. governments aren't giving you money? >> no. as if there is an attrition strategy put in place. make it as difficult for people to come. make them risk their lives, live in unsanitary conditions and fewer people will come. nothing could be farther from the truth. >> reporter: who are the people coming? >> in the beginning, it was -- mostly syrians. an mostly they were n. and e erybody was saying, they're all young men. they're all young men. where e the families. over the course of the past three months you have higher percentage of women and children. male members of families went first to see it was safe. get settled in europe. calling for their families. >> syrians and others have to get fingerprinted and registered
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the process used to take up to a week. now it is so fast when we went to the port where a ferry departs daily for athens we were surprise to see a dad and his little boy. ten hours after arriving on the island theyyad their ferry tickets anddere ready to leave. >> reporter: you registered? you got the ticket. okay. their journey went b easy. the route to germany keeps changing as borders open and close along the way. and greater controls are put in place. from greece, most now travel through macedonia, then serbia, croatia, slovenia, then on through austria. at austria's border with germany we found hundreds sleeping in tents waiting to be allowed to cross. german authorities had just slowed down the entrance process. only a handful at a time were
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not far away atalzburg central train station, hundred more waited in an underground garage. the maximum capacity here in the shelter is 800. but, we had nights where we had thousand here. the mayor of salzburg. he has no idea each day how many people he will have to find shelter for. do you get advance notice when germany decides to slow the number of people coming through? >> i don't get advance notice. but i notice right away. >> reporter: can you imagine what would happen if germany closed it borders? >> i don't want to imagine that. then we have a situation which will be a humanitarian catastrophe. >> reporter: do you w wry abobo securiri? do you knono who a lot of these people are? where e ey're really from? >> i'm not worried about security. and if a terrorist really wants to come to tower conour country or anywhere in europe, they find their ways.
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they don't need the refuge. they certainly do not march along with the refugees all the way from turkey through southern europe. >> reporter: when a train for germany is expected many who have waited for days rush to line up. hoping their chance has finally come. while we were there, just one train left salzburg for germany. ononboard, we found mohamed and his mother. they left baghdad two weeks ago. do you know much about germany? >> no. >> reporter: no. what do you think it is going to be like? >> better than anything. >> reporter: better than anything. what are you most looking forward to? >> i just want to have a good life with my mother in peace. >> reporter: it was oktoberfest when we got to munich. there was music and bratwurst
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and plenty of beer. a culture shock for anyone. but for muslims from the warzone it must seem especially ststnge. do they have a a real sense of what life in germany is going to be like? >> i often germany, is an arabic word for paradise. obviously that is not the case. >> reporter: the streets are paved with gold. >> katarin runs save me mining which helps new arrivals learn to adjust to life in germany. >> reporter: they think it will be easy to find a job, housing? >> sure, sure, the relative whose are already in germany, they would call home and tell them, oh it is amazing here. you know i am having a good life. i am very successful. obviously in most cases that is not true. >> reporter: more than 500,000 new arrivals havave already crososd into germanyn the last nine months.
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half a mill yunl meion more by the end of the year. they're placed in shelters throughout the country where they have to wait foronths to be granted asylum. if they are, they get free language classes, full government benefits and can start looking for a job. what are the biggest challenges? >> the biggest challenge definitely is to find housing. at the moment we are having such a huge influx the community shelters are overcrowded. you know, people are sharing rooms with five, six, seven other men, you know? there is no -- there is no space fofo privacy. in berlin, fights have erupted as frustrated asylum seekers wait days in lines in order to register. and smaller cities are struggling to find shelter for so many people. wolfgang ponzer, the mayor of a town of 25,000 is told to expect
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he says he welcomes them but for now can only put them in temporary shelters like this. >> do you have other spaces? if more people come? >> no. that's our problem. we have no spaces. >> you can see more of anderson's report at our website, cbsnsns.com. the "cbs overnight news" will be righghback. it can b bespecially serious-s-ven fatal to infants. unfortunately, many people who spread it may not know they have it. it's called whooping cough anthe cdc recommends everyone, including those around babies, make sure their whooping cough vaccination is up to date. understand the danger your new grandchild faces. talk to your doctor or pharmacist about you and your
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viagra is now available in pharmacies. called adi, the first drug approved to treat low libido in women. jon lapook reports. >> reporter: this 34-year-old woman has been looking forward to this day. >> i have no libido, lack of desire, no sexual thoughts. and it's been like that since i was 17. >> reporter: adi approved for use in premenopausal women who have low libido. unlike male sexual dysfunction drugs that work on blood flow, adi works on chemicals in the brain responsible for pleasure. she is willingngo give it a try. >> i tried several supplements, vitamins, me and my husband have tried counseling, hypnotherapy. none of those have worked. >> decreased sexual libido can have a dramatic impact on a marriage, relationship.
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>> reporter: an obgyn at len knox hill hospital in new york and says women should be evaluated for underlying causes before seeking adi. >> reporter: thyroid disorders and depression. >> reporter: adi taken daily sxiz pected to be priced at $20 a month for those with insusunce. rejectct twice by the fdfdover fety concerns and it was modestly effective. the e ug also carries a black box warning because drinking alcohol can cause low blood pressure and fangt. doctors emphasize any benefit won't be immediately. >> this is a drug patients take at bedtime on a daily basis. you don't expect a dramatic overnight change. we expect a modest gradual increase in desire. >> adi is not approved for use in post men paul-menopausal women. more studies are needed.
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major lisa jaster, the first to make it through the grueling army school. not only did she complete a training most soldiers can't dream of, she did it at 37 years old. vinita nair reports. >> reporter: one of the toughest training schools in the military. a grueling cocose at fort ning, georgia, just oveve 77,000 sololers havecompletete all of them men. until this year. >> you are now part of a lifelong brotherhood and sisterhood for those who have chose in to go above and beyond. >> reporter: yesterday she became the third woman ever to receive the ranger badge. the 37-year-old mother of two the first female reserve officer
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to earn the distin tktive tab. >> there is no quitting. i can't have quit in me. there was never an option to stop. never an option to quit now. when chris and shay moved on and, i didn't, that was by far one of the hardest days o o ranger school for me. >eporter: kristinin and shay were the first will tune finish armymy rangerchool in august. they returned yesterday to show their support. 19 women began ranger school in april as part of of a pentagon mandate to begin opening combat units to women. a decision that has not been without its critics. many have taken to social media to question if the military lowered their standard and oklahoma congressman steve russell requested documents to prove the female graduates weren't given special treatment. but at fort benning it is a different story. while some male rangersay they were skeptical at first the women proved themselels in the field. >> they c c serveve by my side a any type. i know i can trust them. i hope they can trust me.
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ranger said he couldn't have made it if first lieutenant haver didn't help him carry some of his gear. >> shay what only one to volunteer to took the weight. took the weight off me. carried the last half. literally saved me. i probably wouldn't be sitting here if it wasn't forget. >> reporter: jaster faced little resistance from fellow soldiers. >> once you get in the field start training shoulder to shoulder. gender stops mattering quickly. it was can-up accomplish the mission. >> if the missisi accomplished. she says she willl return homom to her job and family. but now, as a graduate of the army ranger school. monday i will call my boss at, my day job, and start getting reintegrated. in the next week or so. i will be back to normal. minus the hair. >> that's the "cbs overnight news" for this wednesday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little later on the morning news. and cbs this morning.
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york city. a big change for millions of women. new w idelines for when they should be screened for breast cancer. also tonight, candidate in waiting biden is not waiting to go after the front-runner >> we've had two great secretaries of state. but when i go they know i am speaking for the president. a black motorist breaks down on a florida highway and ends up dead, shot by a cop. and we'll go "back to the future." >> wednesday, octobob 21, 2015. >> bececse the future is abobo to arrive. >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." we beg this morning with a story that could affect virtually every woman. the american cancer society has revised its guidelines for
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screening for breast cancer. a disease that kills 40,000 american women every year. it now says that women should get their first mammogram years later than previously recommended. we asked our dr. jon lapook what's behind the change. >> ready? >> no. >> reporter: ready or r t today, 49-year-old kimberly taylor finanay got her first mammmmram. i really took the a aice of the doctor first in consideration. but it was very confusing. >> reporter: in recent years medical groups disagreed about when to start screening and how often to do it. major task force suggested mammography every other year starting at 50. the american cancer society previously recommended annual screening beginning at 40. today's new guidelines recommend women of average risk be screened annually starting at 45, then every two years starting at 55.
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sloan kettering g aired the panel. >> we thought that@annual mammography gave us our best chance of both@reducing premature mortality as well as balancing out what the potential harms associated with mammography. >> reporter: those harms include false alarms leading to unnecessary biopsies and surgery. estimatetelifetime risk of dying from breast cancer is 2.7% with no screening. and 1.8% t t1.9% with today's guidelines. cancer society left room for screening women younger than 45. >> between 40 and 44, breast cancer is less common. there is still the risk for a false positive. we thought that need to be an informed shared decision between the woman and health care provider. >> reporter: women in higher risk groups would need more aggressive screening depending upon severity of the risk. but for routine screening today's guidelines narrow the gap between cancer society and major task force advising the government. better consensus may lessen the current confusion. >> jon lapook.
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thank you, doctor. unusual number of rare cancers has centers for disease control investigating in a commmmity outside st. louis, missouri. d vinita nair is fololwing thth. >> never forget the moment they tell you, we found lesions on your lung and liver. >> reporter: mary osckso has stage 4 lung cancer. we met in her backyard with six of her neighbors, all of who live in the st. louis suburbs. every one of these people either has cancer or lost a parent or child to it. >> it was just loaded with kids and young families. >> we'll all played outside. played flashlight tag, kicicthe can. >> reporter: their neieiborhood park i ipadlocked while armymy corps of engineers removes low level radioactive waste discovered beneath the topsoil. >> in this area here. >> reporter: janelle wright was one of the first neighbors who noticed common illnesses when former classmates started reconnection on facebook. >> if we did not have social media we would never put the
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pieces together. >> reporter: the group put together the map showing 2,700 instances of cancer, auto immune disorders and brain and thyroid tumors. >> within a six house radius, i knew four people with brain cancer one a child and one a young professor. i just thought that is reallll odd. >> reporter: the area where they lived isisalled north county which includes hazelwood and florisent, and coldwater creek runs through the toinz. for two decades, two sites were used to store radio active waste from america's nuclear weapons program. the waste came from st. louis's mallinckrodt chemical company which the government hired to process uranium. tens of thousand of barrels of nuclear waste, many open to the elements. contaminated the soil in the nearby creek. >> what you see is an environmental health disaster unfolding slowly over decades.
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director, dr. fasil kahn, says identifying a true cancer cluster is very difficult. but he says what's happening in north county needs long term study. >> the rates of apndix cancer, relatively rare, we see 800 cases across the nation, year wide. to find seven or eight cases in one zip code or geographic area is rather unusual. >> reporter: currently engineers are testing the rest of the 15-mile creek. it will take years to be completed. years mary osckso doesn't have. >> my husband and i sit dodo at nighghand have discussionsnsn do i want t tbe cremated or buried the i don't want to be buried in north county. that's one thing i told him. i do not want to be buried where the soil is. >> several residents filed a class action lawsuit against mallinckrodt and other companies that handled uranium. it is early in the process and mallinckrodt tells us the company worked under the
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and at no time did mallinckrodt own any uranium for byproducts. the atomic commission that hired the companies no longer exists so we are seeking comment from the department of energy. scott, we will continue to vol low this story. nita nair. nada took a left turn last night. justin trudeau and the liberal party rode in on a landslide. the new prime minister is the son of pierre trudeau who held the job from the '60s to the '80s. justin trudeau is 43. he ran on promises to tackle climate change. boost the economy and legalize marijuana. if you are ever late for a plane, don't do this. a security camera a ught mark remar running on t tthe tarmac in denver in august as hislane backed out. it looks like he tried to talk the tug driver into stopping the plane. remar might be explaining he was trying to get to his high school reunion.
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police. and yesterday, he was sentenced to two years probation. a lot of people trying to catch a space ship, caused major movie ticket web sites to crash. here is what's launched them. last nighthtthe new trailer for r "star wars: the force awakens," was released. and fandango got eight times more traffic than ever. the movie doesn't open until december 18th. >> in a moment, a movie prophecy
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suffering cubs' fans. almost sixty million americans are affected by mental illness. together we can help them with three simple words. my name is chris noth and i will listen. from maine t tmaui, thousands of high schoololtudents across the cououry are gettininin on the action by vololteering in their communities. chris young: action teams of high school students are joining volunteers of america and major league baseball players to help train and inspire the next generation of volunteers. carlos pea: it's easy to start an action team at your school so you, too, can get in on the action. get in on the action at actionteam.org. 'cause you'll be in my heart yes, you'll be in my heart from thth day on
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now a a forevermore... narrator: if animals are our best friends, shouldn't we be theirs? visit your lal shelter, adopt a pet. you'll be in my heart no matter what... cbs cares. if you were a hippie in the '60s, you need to know. it's the dawning of the age of aquarius. yeah, and something else that's cool. what? osteoporosis is preventable. all: osteo's preventable? right on!
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all: cbs cares! today, the u.s. and russia agreed on ways to keep their war planes separated over syria. the agreement specifies common radio frequencies and sets up a hotline between the forces. the u.s.s.nd russia are supporting opposose sides in the syrian civil warar thousand of refugees fleeing that war and the war in afghanistan are now being pursued by winter. in eastern europe many are stranded in slovenia, cold, hungry, after croatia and hungary closed their borders.
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western europe. desperate parents are now breaking up their families to save their children. charlie d'agata reports that 15,000 kids have applied for refuge in sweden. >> reporter: the ferry from germany broke through ththgloom of a thick morning fog leaving behind the heavy shroud of danger and uncertainty among the new arrivals are a record number of teenagers traveling on their own. in sweden, children who qualify for asylum are granted residency, $275 a month, an education and place to live. so many have arrived this school has now become a transit center, a a ngout for some of thth thousand of adadescents on their own from afghanistan and syria. some are barely teenagers like omar wahibbi from damascus. 13 years old?
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>> reporter: you came by yourself alone? >> yes. >> reporter: omar told us his parents made the decision when the war wouldn't let up. they said at least in sweden, he wouldn't die. >> translator: my mother was crying, she said, she was upset i was leaving. do you remember the last thing your mother and father said when you left? they said i should go, he told us, and they hope one day to see me in sweden. for many, that's the aim. to be granted asylum and then bring their families over too. matilda brinck larsen is the social worker who runs the transit center. she says many of the children are traumatized when they arrive. >> if someone puts his eyes on me, i have to put my papers away and sit for a minute. and share his story. and even if we don't have the same language, he can speak to
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with his eyes. with his expressions. >> reporter: she and her colleagues are trying to give them hope for a better future. >> reporter: when you grow up you want to be a doctor? >> yeah. >> reporter: that is a big dream. >> yes. >> reporter: because of the increased numbers, scott, the asylum process can now take more than a year. they stay in transit centers for a number of weeks before they're sent to empty nursing homes like one weep visited or foster homes. but sweden is struggling to keep up with the demand. >> remarkable story. charlie d'agata reporting from swede tune night. charlie, thank you. today in the holyland, a palestinian aimed his car at a crowded bus stop and then tried to stab israelis he was shot and killed. the renewed violence broke out a month ago after false rumors that israel was taking over jerusalem's holiest islamic site. some of the palestinians attackers are children and barry peterson spoke with the father of one of them. >> reporter: the video enflamed palestinians and shocked many
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israelis, a wounded palestinian boy in the street. an israeli man screams, die, die. another urges police to shoot him. it started when 13-year-old ahmed manashra and his cousin, hassan, armed with knives, chased israelis on the street seriously wounding a 13-year-old jewish boy. hassan ran at police and was shot dead. ahmed was hit by an israeli patrol vehicle fell, stunned. badly wounded. but his father, won't believe his son is a terrorist. if the israelis say your son did this, will you believe them? >> no, he says, i will not believe them. he is a child. >> reporter: in his first american television interview, manashra talked of a youngster who sleeps on a tom and jerry pillow.
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what did you feel as a father? >> my heart broke when high heard it. he said. he is just a child. even if you see a dog or a cat, injured in the street, you help them. i don't understand how the israelis think. ahmed was hospitalized by the israelis, he is nowen their custody. and denying he tried to stab anyone. scott, he is so far, the youngest palestinian involved in these attacks over the last several weeks. >> barry peterson in jerusalem for us tonight. barry, thanks. in politics, vice president joe biden sounded more like a presidential candidate talking up his foreign policy credentials, doing some rewriting of his own history, and firing a shot over the bow of the democratic front-runner. here's nancy cordes. >> reporter: the vice president never mentioned hillary clinton by name. but it was all too clear the comparison he was making when he
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>> i will get sent to go speak to putin or go speak to who ever, because the secretary of state, we have had two great secretaries of state. but when i go they know that i am speaking for the president. >> reporter: for the second day in a row, biden alluded to clinton's joke at last week's debate that republicans are her enemies. >> i still have a lot of republican friend. i don't think my chief enemy is the republican party. >> reporter: clinton may not be his chief enemy, but she is his biggest obstacle. a new national poll out today has clinton leading a third place biden by 38 points. today, he left her out of his story about the raid on osama bin laden's compound in 2011. clinton always claimed she was a strong proponent. but not inned by any telling of it. >> there are only two people who were definitive. and were absolutely certain. leon panetta said go. and, and bob gates has already publicly said, don't go.
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>> reporter: back in 2012, biden admitted he argued against the raid. >> mr. president, my suggestion is don't go. we have to do two more things to see if he is there. >> reporter: but today he told a different story. >> i told them my opinion. i thought he should go. follow his own instincts. >> it is possible biden is trying to tweak his role in the pivotal decision in advance of a presidential run. scott, even president obama said publicly the vice president was skeptical about the operation that killed bin laden. cbs news will bring you the next presidential debate with or without biden, from drake university, saturday, november 14th, at 9:00 eastern time. the debate will not include former senator jim webb of virginia. he dropped out of the race today. webb is considering running as an independent. a stranded motorist is shot
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>> early sunday morning a car broke down on a florida highway. the driver called for help. as he waited, an undercover police officer pulled up. the motorist wound up dead.
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shot by the cop. mark strassmann has the latest on the investigation. >> reporter: cory jones wasn't confrontational his family says. he was practically raised in church. gale banks his aunt. >> anything you need cory would be there. if you needed a shirt. he would give you his shirt. he would be cold just to keep you warm. jones needed a tow truck early last sunday morning. the 31-year-old city employee moonlighted as a drummer and was returning home from a gig when his car broke down on an exit ramp along i-95. he called, band mate mat huntsberger for help. >> i left him. he was like. gave me a high five. he said thank you. thanks for helping me out. coming out of your way. >> reporter: some time at 3:00 a.m., 38-year-old officer, nouman raja arrived. the palm beach guarders police department said in a facebook statement it has since deleted,
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said, nouman raja on duty in plain clothes capacity in an unmarked police vehicle stopped to investigate what he believed was an abandoned vehicle. as the the officer exited his vehicle, he was suddenly confronted by an armed subject. as a result of the confrontation, the officer discharged his firearm resulting in the death of the subject. officer raja was not wearing a body camera and cruiser had no dashboard camera. he joined the force six month as go. police say they did find a handgun at the scene where jones was killed and records show she had bought it three days earlier. the officer involved remains on administrative leave, scott, while a separate police agency investigates the shooting. >> mark strassmann tonight. mark, thank you very much.
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right back. woman: what does it feel like when a woman is having a heart attack? chest pain, like there's a ton of weight on your chest. severe shortness of breath. unexplained nausea. cold sweats. there's an unusual tiredness and fatigue. there's unfamiliar dizziness or light-headedness. unusual pain in your back, neck, jaw, one or both arms, even your upper stomach, are signs you're having a heart attack. don't make excuses. make the call to 9-1-1 immediately. learn more at womenshealth.gov/heartattack. bipolar disorder is a brain condition that causes unusual or dramatic mood swings. it affects millions of americans and compromises their ability to function. when diagnosed, bipolar disorder can be effectively treated by mood stabilizers. but most people with bipolar disorder suffer for years without help because the symptoms are missed or confused with other illnesses, like depression. learn how easily you can help keep this from happening to a loved one.
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we end tonight, tomorrow. jim axelrod with a movie whose time has come. >> reporter: after his wedding day and the day his daughter was born. >> october 21, 2015. >> reporter: tomorrow has always been the most important day on bob gale's calendar. exactly what you expect from writer and co-producer of back to the future movies. what is your relationship with the day on the calendar. >> forever and ever, it's known as become to the future day. how great is that? >> reporter: the trilogy traveled past, present, future in a delorean. michael j. fox's marty mcfly
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tomorrow, some things gale and his team got right. don't these look just like google glasses? isn't that skyping on a flat screen tv? >> how is it hanging, mcfly? >> in your mind what's the coolest thing you got right? >> the coolest thing that is happening is the hover board thing. the hover board thing was a total flight of fancy. every kid in the world wanted one. now we have, they have a magnetic hover board now. >> reporter: on the other hand not a smartphone in sight. but fax machines they're everywhere. fax machines? >> yeah, yeah, we blew that. they were so ubiquitous when we wrote it. >> reporter: while there is no jaws 19, and no black & decker hydrator, bob gale predicted something no one outside of chicago ever would have. >> cubs win world series. >> reporter: as of tonight the dream of getting that prediction right is still alive.
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they might win it. that is absolutely nuts. >> it is. >> and you love it? >> of course, how could you not love it? >> reporter: three decades ago, bob gale took a stab at the future for all to see. >> one of the things that kind of gave us permission to let our mind go wild was to say, look, we know we are going to get this wrong. because nobody ever gets it right. >> reporter: now with the future officially upon us, his vision made a movie that is positively timeless. jim axelrod, cbs news, new york. that's the "cbs overnight news" for this wednesday. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back with us a little later on the "morning news" and "cbs this morning."
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york city, i'm scott pelley. >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the overnight news. the fbi still hasn't tracked down the hacker or hackers who managed to get into the private e-mail accounts of two of the top national security officials in the u.s. government. cia director john brennan and home land security secretary jay johnson both had their e-mail accounts hacked into. some of their government documents were later posted online. those responsible shouldn't be too hard to find, they have been bragging to "the new york post" and say a top pentagon official is next. >> reporter: cbs news learned there may be more than one person responsible for the cyberhack.
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it tells cbs news there are six people in his group who breached the accounts and same twitter handle releasing information from private e-mail accounts of the cia director and secretary of homeland security is also claiming to have access to the account of an official at the white house. there are threats of more disclosures to come. the person tweeting under the disabled twitter handle cwa fol followed through on threats to release sensitive information monday. you know we don't lie. what you have all been waiting for. sorry for the delay. along with that statement came an attachment with the names, social security numbers, and phone numbers of about 20 people said to be affiliated with the head of the cia. cbs contacted some of the people whose names were on the list and there is a common thread. many work for president obama's transition team following the 2008 campaign. the unidentified hacker who claims to bea high school student, said the information
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e-mail account of cia director john brennan. the same person claimed to have hacked into the private comcast e-mail account of homeland security secretary jay johnson. in a statement the cia would only say it is referred the matter to the appropriate authorities. on twitter the hacker appeared to be taunting officials and others in government before the account was suspended. with tweets like this one -- anyone know who we should target next? while also expressing a political motive for his criminal act. we are not doing this for personal satisfaction, we are doing this because innocent people in palestine are being killed daily. it is impossible to confirm his identity, the person who says he is behind the attack says all the people in his group live in the u.s. and have not yet been contacted by investigators. law enforcement sources say this is a criminal investigation and they are working to track the suspect or suspects down.
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as the blade runner, olympic sprinter oscar pistorius is out of prison one year after he gunned down his girlfriend through a locked bathroom door. pistorius was convicted of manslaughter and will spend the rest of his sentence in a family mansion. >> reporter: one day short of a year behind bars, oscar pistorius was secretly whisked out of the jail last night and brought here to his uncle's plush home. there was no sign of oscar pistorius. family spokeswoman came outside to speak to the media. >> it is very important for the family to emphasize, oscar's sentence has not been shortened or reduced. he is entering the next phase of his sentence now. >> reporter: pistorius' trial was a roller coaster where he constantly broke down as he stumbles through his testimony. he shot his model girlfriend, reeva steenkamp, four times behind a locked bathroom
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door saying he thought she was an intruder. >> reporter: the court accepted this and found him guilty of manslaughter, not murder sentencing him to five years behind bars. there were no cell blocks for pistorius during his jail term. he was filmed playing football on one occasion. now he will leave his luxury mansion to report daily to a police station, and a lawyer explains he will probably only be confined to his home at night. >> he will be under house arrest. which is a form of detention where his movements will be monitored. he will be gradually integrated into the community allowed to get employment whatever that may be. >> reporter: a year behind bars was simply not enough of a punishment. pistorius faces another hurdle. the prosecution is appealing his conviction. they want it changed to murder.
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pistorius could find himself back in jail before the end of the year. you may remember the story of 14-year-old ahmed mohamed brought a hand made clock to school and was arrested as suspected terrorist. well ahmed was at the white house for astronomy night and so was major garrett. >> reporter: ahmed mohamed saw stars on the south lawn of the white house. he was one too. posing for pictures as the embodiment of youthful scientific curiosity, controversy and misunderstanding in an age of terror. ahmed met scientific stars, like astronaut alvin drew before taking his seat to hear president obama. we have to watch for and cultivate and encourage those glimmers of curiosity and possibility not suppress them, not squelch them. afterward the president and ahmed chatted. briefly in an encounter that capped an amazing odyssey. >> i am trying to got a message of how you shouldn't judge a
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person by what they look like. you should always judge a person by their heart. >> reporter: over a month ago, ahmed brought this crude digital clock he constructed at home to school. the motive impress his engineering teacher. his english teacher saw the contraption and thought it might be a bomb. how rapidly did you know things were sort of moving in a different direction? >> when i saw her eyebrows go up. >> reporter: like that? >> yeah. >> reporter: ahmed was arrested and suspended from school. tech executives around the country rallied to his cause. and mr. obama took to twitter to praise his innovative spirit. when ahmed said might make a difference some day in space. >> we talked about mars. and 2030. and i talked to him about what i am making how it could help people on mars. >> your motive for making it and bringing it to school was what? >> to impress my teacher. >> what happened was the last thing you were expecting? >> yes.
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>> reporter: during his suspension, ahmed and his parents traveled the world. one stop generated still more controversy. ahmed posing with the president of sudan, omar al-bashir who is indicted by the international criminal court on war crimes charges. both of ahmed's parents emigrated from sudan. he told us he wanted to honor the invitation did not want to be rude. gale, the picture raised eyebrows here at the white house
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hundred of thousand of migrants fleeing war and poverty are flooding into europe. they've come by land and sea. many who cross the mediterranean land on the small greek island of lesbos. anderson cooper met them there for "60 minutes." >> reporter: they begin to arrive in the delicate light of dawn, war weary and desperate packed into rubber boats never meant to cross such a sea. the boats are supposed to hold just 12, but 40 to 50 men, women, children are squeezed on board. most have travaved for days or weeks from syria, iraq or
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turkish coast. then for the six-mile journey across the aegean sea they pay turkish smugglers a small fortune as much as $1,500 apiece. half price for kids. whwh they finally land on lesbos, scared, exhausted many have no idea where they are. we notice one of the first things they do is unwrap cell phones protected in plastic. and want to call their relatives to let them know they didn't drown. ahmed dahsem and his wife and son left syria six days ago.% where are you hoping to go? >> germany. >> why germany? this is your son? do you hope he gets a new life in germany? we hope a better life for him. [ indiscernible ] >> reporter: so you feel safe now? >> just kiss the ground.
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>> reporter: in the hour and a half we were on this stony stretch of beach, 15 dinghies arrived and elsewhere on the islala, there were plenty y re. some 4,000 people land here each day. nearly 3/4 are syrian. and they don't stay on the beach very long. >> they have an internal clock
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quickly as possible. >> reporter: the emergency field director for the international rescue committee on lesbos. what they leave behind first and foremost is life jackets. the kind of thing. a child wears in the swimming pool not what you wear across the ocean. >> it says not for use in boating. our main concern is we are going to continue to have high numbers of r%fugees coming. i think unfortunately, we will have more capsized boats and drownings. this is not going to save any one's life. >> reporter: while we were on lesbos four people who drowned and washed ashore were buried. no one knew their names. more than 3,000 people have drowned trying to reach europe so far this year. engines often fail, and overcrowded boats cap sized. that's how this 3-year-old syrian boy, drowned in september. after these photographs of his body on a turkish beach were seen around the world. volunteers started showing up on
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it onshore. but for months it has been private aid groups like international rescue committee doing what the greek government hobbled by its own economic crisis was not able to do. governments aren't giving you money? >> no. as if there is an attrition strategy put in place. make it as d dficult for people to come. make them risk t tir lives, live in unsanitary conditioio and fewer people will come. nothing could be farther from the truth. >> reporter: who are the people coming? >> in the beginning, it was -- mostly syrians. an mostly they were men. and everybody was saying, they're all young men. they're all young men. ere is the families.s. over the course of the past three months you have higher percentage of women and children. male members of families went first to see it was safe. get settled in europe.
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calling for their families. >> syrians and others have to get fingerprinted and registered before they leave lesbos. the process usededo take up to a week. now it is so fast when we went to the port where a ferry departs daily for athens we were surprise to see a dad and his little boy. ten hours after arriving on the island they had their ferry tickets and were ready to leave. >> reporter: you registered? you got the ticket. okay. their journey went be easy. the route to germany keeps changing as borders open and close along the way. and greater controls arereut in place. from greece, most now travel through macedonia, then serbia, croatia, slovenia, then on through austria. at austria's border with germany we found hundreds sleeping in tents waiting to be allowed to cross. german authorities had just slowed down the entrance process. only a handful at a time were being allowed in.
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not far away at salzburg central train station, hundred more waited in an underground garage. the maximum capacity here in the shelter is 800. but, we had nights where we had thousand here. the mayor of salzburg. he has no idea each day how many people he will have to find shelter for. do you get advance notice when germany decides to slow the number of people coming through? >> i don't get advance notice. but i notice right away. >> reporter: can you imagine what would happen if germany closed it borders? >> i don't want to imagine that. then we e ve a situation whichch will be a humamatarian catastrophe. >> reporter: do you worry about security? do you know who a lot of these people are? where they're really from? >> i'm not worried about security. and if a terrorist really wants to come to our country or anywhere in europe, they find their ways. they don't need the refugees.
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along g th the refugees all the way from turkey through southern europe. >> reporter: when a train for germany is expected many who have waited for days rush tg line up. hoping their chance has finally come. while we were there, just one trtrn left salzburg for germany. on board, we found mohamed and his mother. they left baghdad two weeks ago. do you know much about germany? >> no. >> reporter: no. what do you think it is going to be like? >> better than anything. >> reporter: better than anything. what are youost looking forward to? >> i just want to have a good life with my mother in peace. >> reporter: it was oktoberfest when we got to munich. there was music and bratwurst
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a culture shock for anyone. but for muslims fromomhe zone it must seem espepeally strange. do they have a real sense of what life in germany is going to be like? >> i often germany, is an arabic word for paradise. obviously that is not the case. >> reporter: the streets are paved with gold. >> katarin runs save me mining which helps new arrivals learn to adjust to life in germany. >> reporter: they think it will be easy to find a job, housing? >> sure, sure, the relative whososare already in germama, they would c cl home and tell them, ohoht is amazing here. you know i am having a good life. i am very successful. obviously in most cases that is not true. >> reporter: more than 500,000 new arrivals have already crossed into germany in the last nine months. the german government expects half a million more by the end of the year.
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they're placed in shelters throughout the country where they have to wait for months to be granted asylum. if they are, they get free language classes, full government benefits and can start looking for a job. what are the biggest challenges? >> the biggest challenge definitely is to find housing. a huge influx the community you know, people are sharing rooms with five, six, seven other men, you know? there is no -- there is no space for privacy. in berlin, fights have erupted as frustrated asylum seekers wait days in lines in order to register. and smaller cities are struggling to find shelter for so many people. wolfgang ponzer, the mayor of a town of 25,000 is told to expect 1,000 new arrivals.
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now can only put them in temporary shelters like this. >> do you have other spaces? if more people come? >> no. that's our problem. we have no spaces. >> you can see m me of anderson's report at our website, cbsnews.com.
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called adi, the first t ug approved to treat low libido in women. jon lapook reports. >> reporter: this 34-year-old woman has been looking forward to this day. >> i have no libido, lack of desire, no sexual thoughts. ananit's been like that t nce i was 17. >> reporter: adi approved for use in premenopausal women who have low libido. unlike male sexual dysfunction drugs that work on blood flow, adi works on chemicals in the brain responsible for pleasure. she is willing to give it a try. >> i tried several supplements, vivimins, me and my husband have tried counseling, hypnotherapy. none of those have worked. >> decased sexual libido can have a dramatic impact on a marriage, relationship. >> reporter: an obgyn at len knox hill hospital in new york
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aluated for underlying causes before seeking adi. >> reporter: thyroid disorders and depression. >> reporter: adi taken daily is expected to be priced at $20 a month for those with insurance. rejected twice by the fda over safety concerns and it was modestly effective. the drug also carries a black box warning because drinking alcohol can cause low blood pressure and fainting. doctors emphasize any benefit won't be immediate. >> this is a drug patients take at bedtime on a daily basis. you don't expect a dramatic overnight change. we expect a modest gradual increasesen desire. >> adi is not t proved for use in post-menopausal women. the f da says more studies are needed if it is safe and effective for them. dr. jon lapook, cbs, new york.
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right back. when the engines failed on the plane i was flying, i knew what to do to save my passengers. but when my father sank into depression, i didn't know how to help him. whenene ultimately shot himself, he left our r mily devastated. don't let this happen to you. if you or a loved one is suicidal, call the national suicide prevention lifeline. no matter how hopeless or helpless you feel,
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(franklin n roosevelt) the e herent right to workrk is one of the elemental privileges of a free people. endowed, as our nation is, with abundant physical resources... ...and inspired as it should be to make those resources and opportunities available for the enjoyment of all... ...we approach reemployment with real hope of finding a better answer than we have now. narrator: donate to goodwill where your donations help fund
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major lisa jaster, the first to make it through the grueling army school. not only did she complete a training most soldiers can't dream of, she did it at 37 years old. vivita nair reports. >> reporter: one of the toughest training schools in the military. a grueling course at fort bening, georgia, just over 77,000 soldiers have completed. all ofofhem men. until this year. >> you are now pararof a lifelong brotherhood and sisterhood for those who have chose in to go above and beyond. >> reporter: yesterday she became the third woman ever to receive the ranger badge. the 37-year-old mother of two
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to earn the distinctive tab. >> there is no quitting. i can't have quit in me. there was never an option to stop. never an option to quit now. when chris and shay moved on and, i didn't, that was by far one of the hardest days of ranger school for me. >> reporter: kristin and shay were the first will tune finish army ranger school in august. they returned yesterday to show their support. 19 women began ranger school in april as part of of a pentagon mandate to begin opening combat units to women. a decision that has not been without its critics. many have taken to social media to question if the military lowered their standard and oklahoma congressman steve russell requested documents to prove the female graduates weren't given special treatment. but at fort benning g is a different story. while some male rangers say they were skeptical at first the women proved themselves in the
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field. >> they can serve by my side at any type. i know i can trust them. i hope they can trust me. >> reporter: in fact, one male ranger said he couldn't have made it if first lieutenant haver didn't help him carry some of his gear. >> shay what only one to volunteer to took the weight. took the weight off me. carried the last half. literally saved me. i probably wouldn't be sitting here if it wasn't forget. >> reporter: jaster faced little resistance from fellow soldiers. >> once you get in the field start training shoulder to shoulder. gender stops mattering quickly. it was can-up accomplish the mission. >> if the mission accomplished. she says she will return home to her job and family. but now, as a graduate of the army ranger school. monday i will call my boss at, my day job, and start getting reintegrated. in the next week or so. i will be back to normal. minus the hair. >> that's the "cbs overnight news" for this wednesday. for some of you the news continins. for others check back with us a little later on the morning news. and cbs this morning.
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from the broadcast center in new york city. a big change for millions of women. new guidelines for when they ould be screened d r breast cancer. also tonight, candidate in waiting biden is not waiting to go after the front-runner >> we've had two great secretaries of state. but when i go they know i am speaking for the president. a black motorist breaks down on a florida highway and ends up dead, shot by a cop. and we'll go "back to the future." >> october 21, 2015. >> because the future is about to arrive. >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." we begeg this morning w wh a story that could affect virtually every woman. the american cancer society has
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revised its guidelines for screening for breast cancer. a disease that kills 40,000 american women every year. it now says that women should get their first mammogram years later than p pviously recommended. we asked our dr. jon lapook what's behind the change. >> ready? >> reporter: ready or not today, 49-year-old kimberly taylor finally got her first mammogram. >> i really took the advice of the doctor first in consideration. but it wasasery confusing. >> reporter: in recent years medical groups disagreed about wh to start screening and how often to do it. a major task force suggested mammography every other year starting at 50. the american cancer society previously recommended annual screening beginning at 40. today's new guidelines recommend womennf average risk be screened annually starting at 45, then every two years starting at 55.
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dr. kevin oeffinger, of memorial sloan kettering chaired the panel. >> we thought that annual mammography gave us our best chance of both reducing premature mortality as well as balancing out what the potential harms associated with mammography. >> reporter: those harms include false alarms leading to unnecessary biopsies and surgery. estimated lifetime risk of dying from breast cancer is 2.7% with no screening. and 1.8% to 1.9% with today's guidelines. cancer society left room for screening women younger than 45. >> between 40 and 44, breast cancer is less common. there is still the risk for a false positive. we thought that need to be an informed shared decision between the woman and health care provider. reporter: women inn higher risk groups would need more aggressive screening depending upon severity of the risk. but for routine screening today's guidelines narrow the gap between cancer society and major task force advising the government. better consensus may lessen the current confusion.
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>> jon lapook. ththk you, doctor.. unusual number of rare cancers has centers for disease control investigating in a community outside st. louis, missouri. and vinita nair is following that. >> never forget the moment they tell you, we found lesions on yoururung and liver. reporter: mary osckso has stage 4 lung cancer. we met with sex of her neighbors who live in the st. louis suburbs. every one of these people either has cancer or lost a parent or child to it. >> it was just loaded with kids and young families. >> we'll all played outside. played flashlight tag, kick the can. >> reporter: their neighborhood park is padlocked while ay corps of engineers removes low level radioactive waste discovered beneath the topsoil. >> in this area here. >> reporter: janelle wright noticed common illnesses when former classmates started reconnection on facebook.
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>> if we did not have social media we would never put the pieces together. >> reporter: the group put together the map showing 2,700 in stances of cancer, auto immune disorders and brain and thyroid tumors. >> within a six house radius, i knew four people withrain cancer one a chihi and onene a young professor. i just thought that is really odd. >> reporter: the area where they lived is called north county which includes hazelwood and cold walter creek runs through the towns. for two decades, two sites were used to store radio active waste from america's nuclear weapons program. the waste came from st. louis's mallinckrodt chemical company which the government hired to process uranium. tens of thousand of barrels of nuclear waste, many open to the elements. contaminated the soil in the nearby creek. >> what you see is ann environmental l alth disaster unfolding slowly over decades. >> reporter: county health director, says identifying a
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true cancer cluster is very difficult. but he says what's happening in north county needs long term study. >> the rates of a aendix cancer, relatively rare, we see #00 cases across the nation, year wide. to find seven or eight cases in one zip code or geographic area is rather unusual. >> reporter: currently engineers are testing the rest of the 15-mile creek. it will take years to be completed. years mary osckso doesn't have. >> my husband and i sit down at night and have discussions on do i want to be cremated or buried the i don't want to be buried in north county. that's one thing thit told him. i do not want to be buried where the soil is. >> several residen filed a class action lawsuit against mallinckrodt and other companies that handled uranium. it is early in the process and
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direction of the u.s. government and at no time did mallinckrodt own uraniumour our ion -- uranium products. night. justin trudeau and the liberal party rode in on a landslide. the new prime minister is the son of pierre trudeau who held the job from the '60s to the '80s. justin trudeau is 43. he ran on promises to tackle climate change. boost the economy and legalize marijuana. if you are ever late for a plane, don't do this. a security camera caught mark remar running on to the tarmac in denver in august as his plane backed out. it looks like he tried to talk the tug driver into stopping the plane. remar mimit be explaining he was tryiyi to get to his high school
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instead he was united with police. and yesterday, he was sentenced to two years probation. a lot of people trying to catch a space ship, caused major movie ticket web sites to crash. here is what's launchehe them. last night, the new trailer for "star wars: the force awakens," was released. and fandango got eight times more traffic than ever. the movie doesn't open until december 1th. in a moment, a movie profsy
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suffering cubs' fans. today, the u.s. and russia agreed o o ways toeep their warar planes separated over syria. the agreement specifies common radio frequencies and sets up a hotline between the forces. the u.s. and russia are supporting opposite sides in the syrian civil war. thousand of refugees fleeing thatatar and the war in afghanistan are now being pursued by winter. in eastern europe many are stranded in slovenia, cold, hungry, after croatia and hungary closed their borders.
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the refugees' destination is western europe. desperate pararts are now breaking up their families to save their children. charlie d'agata reports that 15,000 kids have applied for refuge in sweden. >> reporter: the ferry from germany broke through the gloom of a thick morning fog leaving behind the heavyuncertainty among the new arrivals are a record number of teenagers traveling on their own. in sweden, children who qualify for asylum are granted residency, $275 a month, an education and place to live. so many have arrived this school has now become a transit center, a hangout for some of the thousand of adolescents on their own from afghanistan and ria. some are barely teenagers like omar wahibbi from damascus. 13 years old? >> yeah.
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yourself alone? >> yes. >> reporter: omar told us his parents made the decision when the war wouldn't let up. they said at least in sweden, he wouldn't die. >> translator: my mother was crying, she said, she was upset i was leaving. do you remember the last thing your mother and father said when you left? they said i should go, he tolol us, and they hopee one day to see me in sweden. for many, that's the aim. to be granted asylum and then bring their families over too. matilda brinck larsen is the social worker who runs the transit center. she says many of the children are traumatated when they arrive. >> i i someone puts his eyes on me, i have to@ put my papers away and sit for a minute. and share his story. and even if we don't have the same language, he can speak to me. with his eyes. with his expressions.
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>> reporter: she and her colleagues are trying to give them hope for a better future. >> reporter: when you grow up you want to be a doctor? >> yeah. >> reporter: that is a big dream. >> yes. >> reporter: because of the increased numbers, scsct, the asylum p pcess can now take more than a year. they stay in transit centers f a number of weeks before they're sent to empty nursing homes like one weep visited or foster homes. but sweden is struggling to keep up with the demand. > remararble story.y. charlie e agata reporting from swede tune night. charlie, thank you. today in the holyland, a palestinian aimed his car at a crowded bus stop and then tried to stab israelis he was shot and killed. the renewed vie leps broke out a month ago after false rumors that israeae was takingver rusalem's holiestst islamic site. some of the palestinians attackers are children and barry peterson spoke with the father of one of them. >> reporter: the video enflamed
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palestinians and shocked many israelis, aounded palestinian boy in the street.. an israeli m screams, die, die. another urges police to shoot him. it started when 13-year-old ahmed manashra and his cousin, hassan, armed with knives, chased israelis on the streeee seriously wounding a 13-year-old jewish boy. hassan ran at police and was shot dead. ahmed was hit by an israeli patrol vehicle fell, stunned. badly wounded. but his father, won't b bieve his son is a terrorist. if the israelis say your son did this, will you believe them? >> no, he says, i will not believe them. he is a child. >> reporter: in his first american television interview, manashra talkeddf a youngster who sleeps on a tom and jerry pillow. what did you feel as a father? >> my heart broke when high
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heard it. he said. he is just a child. even if you see a dog or a cat, injured in the street, you help them. i don't understand how the israelis think. ahmed was hospitalized by the israelis, he is nowen their custody. and denying he tried to stab anyone. scott, he is so far, the youngest palestinian involved in these attacks over the last several weeks. >> barry peterson in jerusalem for us tonight. barry, thanks. in politics, vice president joe biden sounded more like a presidential candidate talking up his foreign policy credentials, doing some rewriting of his own history, and firing a shot over the bow of the democrcric front-runner. herere nancy cordes. >> reporter: the vice president never mentioned hillary clinton by name. but it was all too clear the comparison he was making when he said this about his stature overseas. >> i will get sent to go speak
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putin or go speak toered juan, or go speak to who ever, because the secretary of state, we have had two great secretaries of state. but when i go they know that i am speaking for the president. >> reporter: for the second day in a row, bidenen alluded to clinton's jek at last week's debate that republicans are her enemies. >> i still have a lot of republican friend. i don't think my chief enemy is the republican party. >> reporter: clinton may not be his chief enemy, but she is his biggest obstacle. a newew national poll o o today has clinton leading a third place biden by 38 points. today, he left her out of his story about the raid on osama bin laden's compound in 2011. clinton always claimed she was a strong proponent. but not inned by any telling off it. > there are only two people who re definitive. and were absolutely certain. leon panetta said go. and, and bob gates has already publicly said, don't go.
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>> reporter: back in 2012, bidenen admitted he argued against the raid. >> mr. president, my suggestion is don't go. we have to do two more things to see if he is there. >> reporter: but today he told a different story. >> i told them my opinion. i thought he should go. follow his own instincts. >> it is pososble biden is trying to tweak his role in the pivotal decision in advance of a presidential run. scott, even president obama said publicly the vice president was skeptical about the operation that killed oibbin laden. >> the next democrat debate, from drake university, saturday, november 14th, at 9:00 eastern time. the debate will not include former senator jim webb of virginia. he dropped out of the race today. webb is kconsidering running as an independent. a stranded mope torist is shot
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and now the family is demanding answers. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. laundry can wreak havoc on our clothes, ruining them forever. sweaters stretch into muumuus. d pilled cardigans become pets.
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>> early suny morning a car broke down on a florida highway. the driver called for help. as he waited, an undercover police officer pulled up.
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the motorist wound up ad. shot b b t t cop. mark strassmann has the latest on the investigation. >> reporter: cory jones wasn't confrontational his family says. he was practically raised in church. gale banks his aunt. >> a athing youeed coryy would be there.e. if you needed a shirt. he would be cold to coop you warm. jones needed a tow truck early last sunday morning. the 31-year-old city employee moonlighted as a drum r and was returning home from a gig when his car broke down o o an exit rara along i-95. he called, band mate mat huntsberger for help. >> i left him. he was like. gave me a high five. he said thank you. thanks for helping me out. coming out of your way. >> reporter: some time at 3:0000 a.m., 38-year-old officer, nouman raja arrived. the palm beach gardens facebook said, nouman raja on duty in plain clothes capacity in an
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unmarked police vehicle stpd to investigate what he believed was an abandoned vehicle. as the the offffer exited his vehicle, he was suddenly confronted by an armed subject. as a result of the confrontation, the officer discharged his firearm resulting in the death of the subject. officer raja was not w wring a bed cam body camera and cruiser had no dashboard camera. he joined the force six month as go. police say they did find a handgun at the scene where jones was killed and records show she had bought it three days earlier. the officer involved remains on admininirative leave, scott, while a separate police agency investigates the shooting. >> mark strassmann tonit. mark, thank you very much.
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right back. every day it's getting closer going faster than a roller coaster a love like yours will surely come my way hey, hey, h h babies aren't fully developed until at least 39 weeks. if your pregnancy is healthy, wait for labor to begin on its own.
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o0 c1 travel is partrt of the american way of life. when we're on vacation, we keep an eye out for anything that looks out of place. [ indistinct conversations ] miss, your bag. when we travel from city to city, we pay attention to our surroundings. [ cheering ] everyone plays a role in keeping our community safe. whether you're traveling for business or pleasure, be aware of your surroundings. if you see something suspicious, say something to local authorities. [ vocalizing ] [ buzzing ] [ tree crashes ] [ wind howling ]
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we end tonight, tomorrow. jim axelrod with a movie whose time has come. >> reporter: after his wedding day and the day his daughter was born. >> october 21, 2015. >> reporter: tomorrow has always been the most important day on bob gale's calendar. exactly what you expect from writer and co-prododer ofack to the future movies. what is your relationship with the day on the calendar. >> forever and ever, it's known as become to the future day. how great is that? >> reporter: the trilogy traveled past, present, future in a delorean. chael j.fox's marty mcfly visited the future was well tomorrow, some things gale and his team got right. don't these look just like google glasses?
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isn't that skyping on a flat screen tvtv >> how is ithanging, mcfly? >> in your mind what's the coolest thing you got right? >> the coolest thing that is happening is the hover board thing. the hover board thing was a total flight of fancy. every kid in the world wanted one. now we have, they have a magnetic hover board now. >> reporter: on the other hand not a smartphone in sight. but fax machines they're everywhere. fax machines? >> yeah, yeah, we blew that. they were so ubiquitous when we wrote it. >> reporter: while there is no jaws 19, and no black & decker hydrator, bob gale predicted something no one outside of chicago ever would have. >> cubs win world series. >> reporter: as of tonight the dream of getting that prediion right is still alive. >> the cubs might get in the world series. they might win it.
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that is absolutely nuts. >> it is. >> and you love it? >> of course, how could you not love it? >> reporter: three decades ago, bob gale took a stab at the future for all to see. >> one of the things that kind of gave us permission to let our mind go wild was to say, look, we know we are goingo get this wrong. because nobody ever gets it right. >> reporter: now with the future officially upon us, his vision made a movie that is positively timeless. jim axelrod, cbs nene, new york. that's the "cbs overnight news" for this wednesday. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back with us a little later on the "morning news" and "cbs this morning."
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york city, i'm scott pelley. >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the ernight news. the fbi still hasn't tracked down the hacker or hackers who managed to get into the private e-mail accounts of two of the top national security officials in the u.s. government. cia director john b bnnannd home land securiri secretary jay johnson both had their e-mail accounts hacked into. some of their government documents were later posted online. those responsible shouldn't be too hard to find, they have been bragging to "the new york post" and say a top pentagon official is next. >> reporter: cbs news learned there may be more than one person responsible for the cyberhack. a person claiming to be behind it tells cbs news there are sex
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peopop in his group w breached the accounts and same twitter handle releasing information from private e-mail accounts of the cia director and secretary of homeland security is also claiming to have access to the account of an official at the white house. there are threats of more disclosures to come. the person tweeting under the disabled twitter handle cwa fol led through on threats to release sensitive information monday. you know we don't lie. what you h he all been waiting for. sorry for the delay. along with that statement came an attachment with the names, social security numbers, and phone numbers off bout 20 people@ said to be affiliated with the head of the cia. cbs c ctacted some of the peoplpl whose names werere on the list and there is a common thread. many work for president obama's transition team following the 200 # campaign. the unidentified hacker who claims to bea high school
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came from the private aol, e-mail account of cia director john brennan. the same person claimed to have hacked into the private comcast e-mail account of homeland security secectary jay johnson. in a statement the cia would only say it i referred the matter to the appropriate authorities. on twitter the hacker appeared to be taunting officials and others in government before the account was suspended. with tweets like this one -- anyone know who we should target next? while also expressing a political motive for his criminal act. we are not doing this for personal satisfaction, we are doing this because innocent people in palestinian are beiei lled daily. it is impossle to confirm his identity, the person who says he is behind the attack says all the people in his group live in the u.s. and have not yet been contacted by investigators. law enforcement sources say this is a criminal investigation and they are working to trara the suspect or suspects down.
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>> in south africa the man known as the blade runner, olympic sprinter oscar pistorius is out of prison one year after he gunned d dn his girlfriend through a lockck bathroom door. pistorius was convicted of manslaughter and will spend the rest of his sentence in a family mansion. >> reporter: one day short of a year behind bars, oscar pistorius was secretlyy whisked out of the jail last night and brought here to his uncle's plush home. there was no soon of oscar pistorius. family spokeswoman came outside totopeak to the media. >> it isery impmptant for the family to emphasize, oscar's or reduced. he is entering the next phase of his sentence now. >> reporter: pistorius' trial was a roller coaster where he constantly broke down as he stumblbl through his testimony. he shot reeva steenkamp four
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door saying he thought she was an intruder. >> reporter: the court accepted this and found him guilt young people of manslaughter not murder sentencing him to five years behind bars. there were no cell blocks for pistoriussuringis jail term. he was filmed playing football on one occasion. now he will leave his luxury mansion to report daily to a police station, and a lawyer explains he will probably only be confined to his home at ght. >> he willl be under house arrest. which is -- a form of detension where his movements will be monitored. he will be gradually integrated into the community allowed to get employment whatever that may be. >> reporter: a year behind bars was simply notnough of a punishment. pistorius faces another hurdle.
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they want it changed to murder. if they're successful. pistorius could find himself back in jaiai before the end of the year. >>-up may remember the story of 14-year-old ahmed mohamed brought a hand made clock to school and was arrested as suspected terrorist. well ahmededas at the white house for astronomy night and so was major garrett. >> reporter: ahmed mohamed saw stars on the south lawn of the white house. he was one too. posing for pictures as the embodiment of youthful scientific cucuosity, controversy and misunderstanding in an age of terror. ahmed met scientific stars, alvin drew before taking his seat to hear president obama. >> we have to watch for and cult valt and encourage thosese glmers of curiosity and possibility not suppress them, not squelch them. afterward the president and ahmed chatted. >> i am trying to got a message
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of how you shouldn't judge a pepeon by what they l lk like. you should always judge a person by their heart. >> reporter: over a month ago, ahmed brought this crude digital clock he constructed at home to school. the motive impress his engineering teacher. his english teacher saw the contraption and thought it might be bomb. how rapidly did you know things were sort of moving in a different direction? >> when i saw her eyebrows go up. >> reporter: like that? >> yeah. >> reporter: ahmed was arrested and suspended from school. techchxecutives around the country rallied to his cause. and mr. obama took to twit tire praise his innovative spirit. when ahmed said might make a difference some day in space. >> we talked about mars. and 2030. and i tacked tolked to him about what i am making how it could help people on mars. >> your motive for making it and bringing it to school was what? >> to impress my teacher. >> what hahaened was the last
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instead i impressed the world. >> reporter: during his suspensionl ahmed and his parents traveled the world. one stop generated still more controversial. ahmed posing with the president of sudan, omar al-basasr indicted on war crimes charges. both of ahmed's parents emigrated from sudan. he told us he wanted to honor the invitation did not want to be rude.
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hundred of thousandf migrants fleeing war and poverty are flooding into europe. they've come by land and sea. many who cross the mediterranean land on the small greek island of lesbos. andedeon cooper met them there for "60 minutes." >> reporter: they begin to arrive in the delicate light of dawn, war weary and desperate packed into rubber boats never meant to cross such a sea. the boats are supposed to hold just 12, but 40 to 50 men, women, children are squeezed on board. most have traveled for days or weeks from syria, iraq or afghanistan, just to reach the turkish h ast.
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across the aegean sea they pay turkish smugglers a small fortune as much as $1,500 apiece. half price for kids. when they finally land on lesbos, scared, exhausted many have no idea where they are. we n nice one of the first things they do is unwrap cell phones protected in plastic. and want to call their relatives to let them know they didn't drown. ahmed dahsem and his wife and son left syria six days ago. where are you hoping to go? >> germany. >> why germany? this is your son?
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in germany? hope a bettete life for him. [ indiscernible ] >> reporter: so you feel safe now? >> just kiss the ground. >> reporter: in the hour and a half we were on this stony stretch of beach, 1 1 dinghies arrived and elsewhere on the island, there were plenty more. some 4,000 people land here each day. nearly 3/4 are syrian. and theyeyon't stay on the beaea very long. >> they have an iernal clock and desperate to got to europe quickly as possible. >> reporter: the emergency field director for the international
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rescue committee on lesbos. what they leave behind first and foremost is life jackets. the kind of thing. a child wears in the swimming pool not what you wear across the ocean. >> it says not for use in boating. our main concern is we are going to cononnue to have high numbers of refugees coming. i think unfortunately, we will have more capsized boats and drownings. this is not going to save any one's life. >> reporter: while we were on lesbos four people who drowned and washed ashore were buried. no one knew their names. more than 3,000 people have drowned trying to reach europe so far this year. engines often fail, and overcrowded boats cap sized. that's how this 3-year-old syrian boy, drowned in september. after these photographs of his body on a turkish beach were seen around the rld. volunteers started showing up on lesbos to help new arrival make
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but for months it has been private aid groups like international rescue committee doing what the greek government hobbled by its own economic crisis was not able to do. governments aren't giving you money? >> no. as if there is an attrition strategy put in place. make it as difficult for people to me. make them risk their liveve liviv in unsanitary conditions and fewer people will come. nothing could be farther from the truth. >> reporter: who are the people coming? >> in the beginning, it was -- mostly syrians. an mostly they were men. and everybodydy was saying,, they're all young men. they're all young men. where is the families. over the course of the past three months you have higher percentage of women and children. male members of families went first to see it was safe. get settled in europe. calling for their families. >> syrians and others have to get fingerprinted and registered before they leave lesbos.
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the processss usedo take up to a week. now it is so fast when we went to the port where a ferry departs daily for athens we were surprise to see a dad and his little boy. ten hohos after arriving on the island they had their ferry tickets and were ready to leave. >> reporter: you registered? you got the ticket. okay. their journey went be easy. the route to germany keeps changing as borders open and close alongng the way. and greater controls are put in place. from greece, most now travel through macedonia, then serbia, croatia, slovenia, then on through austria. at austria's border with germany we found hundreds sleeping in tents waiting to be allowed to cross. german authorities had just slowed down the entrance process. only a handful at a time werer
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not far away at salzburg central train station, hundred more waited in an underground garage. the maximum capacacy here in the shelter is 800. but, we had nights where we had thousand here. the mayor of salzburg. he has no idea each day how many people he will have to find shelter for. do you get advance notice when germany decides to slow the number of people coming through? >> i don't get advance notice. but i notice right away. >> reporter: can you imagine what would happen if germany closed ittborders? >> i don't want to imagine that. then we have a situation which will be a humanitarian catastrophe. >> reporter: do you worry about security? do you know who a lot of these people arar where they're really from? >> i'm not worried about security. and if a terrorist really wants to come to tower conour country or anywhere in europe, they find their ways.
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they don't need the refugees. they certainly do not m mch along with the refugees all the way from turkey through southern europe. >> reporter: when a train for germany is expected many who have waited for days rush to line up. hoping their chance has finally come. while we were there, just one train left salzburg for germany. on board, we found mohamed and his mother. they ldft baghdad two weeks ago. do you know much about germany? >> no. >> reporter: no. what do you think it is going to be like? better than anything. >> reporter: better than anything. what are you most looking forward to? >> i just want to have a good life with my mother in peace. >> reporter: it was oktoberfest when we got to munich. there was music and bratwurst
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and plenty of beer. a culture shock for anyone. but for muslims from the wararzone it must seem especially strange. do they have a real sense of what life in germany is going to be like? >> i often germany, is an arabic word for paradise. obviouslslthat is not thecase. >> reporter: the streets are paved with gold. >> katarin runs save me mining which helps new arrivals learn to adjust to life in germany. >> reporter: they think it will be easy to find a job,housing? >> sure, sure, the relative whose are already in germany, they would call home and tell them, oh it is amazing here. you know i am having a good life. i am very successful. obviously in most cases that is not true. >> reporter: more than 500,000 new arrivals have already crossed into germany in the last nine months.
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half a mill yunl moreion more by the end of the year. they're placed in shelters throughout the country where they have to wait for months to be granted asylum. if they are, they get free language clasass, full government benefits and can start looking for a job. what are the biggest challenges? >> the biggest challenge definitely is to find housing. at the moment we are having such a huge influx the comomnity shelters are overcrowded. you know, pple are sharing rooms with five, six, seven other men, you know? there is no -- there is no space for privacy. in berlin, fights have erupted as frustrated asylum seekers wait days in lines in order to register. and smaller cities are struggling to find shelter for so many people. wolfgang ponzer, the mayor of a town of 25,000 is told to expect
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he says he welcomes them but for now can only put them in temporary shelters like this. >> do you have other spaces? if more people come? >> no. that's our problem. we have no spaces. >> you can see more of anderson's report at our there's something out there. it's a highly contagious disease. it can be especially serious- even fatal to infants. unfortunately, many people who spread it may not know they have it. it's called whwhping cough. and the cdc recommends everyone, including those around babies, make sure their whooping cough vaccination is up to date. understand the danger your new grandchild faces. talk to your doctor or pharmacist about you and your
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viagra is now available in pharmacies. called adi, the first drug approved to treat low libido in women. jon lapook reports. >> reporter: this 34-year-old woman has been looking forward to this day. >> i have no libido, lack of desire, no sexual thoughts. and it's been like that since i was 17. >> reporter: adi approved for use in premenopausal women who have low libido. unlike malal sexual dysfunction drugs that work on blood flow, adi works on chemicals in the brain responsible for pleasure. she is willing to give it a try. >> i tried several suppppments, vitamins, me and my husband have tried counseling, hypnotherapy. none of those have worked. >> decreased sexual libido can have a dramatic impact on a marrrrge, relationonip.
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>> reporter: an obgyn at len knox hill hospital in new york and says women should be evaluated for underlying causes before seeking adi. >> reporter: thyroid disorders and depression. >> reporter: adi taken daily sxiz pected to be priced at $20 a month for those with insurance. rejected twice by the fda over safety concerns and it was modestly effective. the drug also carries a black box warning because drinking alcohol can cause low blood pressure and fangt. doctors emphasize any benefit won't be immemeately. >> this is a drug patients take at bedtime on a daily basis. you don't expect a dramatic overnight change. we expect a modest gradual increase in desire. >> adi is not approved foror use in post men paul-menopausal women. more studies are needed. dr. jon lapook, cbs, new york.
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major lisa jaster, the first to make it through the grueling army school. not only did she completet a training mt soldiers can't dream of, she did it at 37 years old. vinita nair reports. >> reporter: one of the toughest training schools in the military. a grueling course at fort bening, georgia, just over 77,000 soldiers have completed. all of them men. until this year. >> you are now partf lifelong brotherhood and sisterhood for those who have chose in to go above and beyond. >> reporter: yesterday she became the third woman ever to receive the ranger badge. the -year-old mother of two the first female reserve officer
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>> there is no quitting. i can't have quit in me. there was never an option to stop. never an option to quit now. when chris and shaha moved on and, i didn't, that was by far one of the hardest days of ranger school for me. >> reporter: kristin and shay were the first will tune finish army ranger school in august. they returned yesterday t t show ththr support. 19 women began ranaer school in april as part of of a pentagon mandate to begin opening combat units to women. a decision that has not been without its critics. manyave taken to social media to question if the military lowered their standard and oklahoma congressman steve russell requested documents to prove the female graduates weren't given special treatment. but at fort benning it is a different story. while some male rangers say they were skeptical at first the women proved themselves in the field. >> they can serve by my side at any type. i know i can trust them. i hoho they can trust me. >> reporter: in fact, one male
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ranger said he couldn't have made it if first lieutenant haver didn't help him carry some of his gear. >> shay what only one to volunteer to took theweight. took the weight off meme carried the last half. literally saved me. i probably wouldn't be sitting here if it wasn't forget. >> reporter: jaster faced little resistance from fellow soldiers. >> once you get in t t field start training shoulder to shoulder. gender stops mattering quicy. it was can-up accomplish the mission. >> if the mission accomplished. she says she will return home to her job and family. but now, ass a graduatee of thehe army ranger school. monday i will call my boss at, my day job, and start getting reintegrated. in the next week or so. i will be back to normal. minus the hair. >> that's the "cbs overnight news" for this wednesday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little later on the morning news. and cbs this morning.
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york city. a big change for millions of women. new guidelines for when they should be screened f f breast cancerer also tonight, candidate in waiting biden is not waiting to go after the front-runner >> we've had two great secretaries of state. but when i go they know i am speaking for the president. a black motorist breaks down on a florida highway and ends up dead, shot by a cop. and we'll go "back to the fufure." >> wednesday, october 21, 2015. >> because the future is about to arrive. >> announcer: thth is the "cbs overnight news." we begin this morning with a story that could affect virtually every woman. the american cancer society has revised its guidelines for
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a disease that kills 40,000 american women every year. it now says that women should get their first mammogram years later than previously recommended. we asked our dr. jon lapook what's behind the change. >> ready? >> no. >> reporter: ready or not today, 49-year-old kimberly taylor finally got her first mammogram. >> i really took the advice of the doctor first in consideration. but it w very confusing. >> reporter: in recent years medical groups disagreed about when to start screening and how often to do it. a major task force suggested mammography every y her year starting at 50. the american cancer society previously recommended annual screening beginning at 40. today's new guidelines recommend women of averara risk be screenedednnually starting at t 45, then every two years starting at 55.
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sloan kekeering chaired the panel. >> we thought that annual mammography gave us our best chance of both reducing premature mortality as well as balancing out what t potential harms associated with mammography. >> reporter: those harms include false alarms leading to ununcessary biopsies and surgery. estimated lifetime risk of dying from breast cancer is 2.7% with no screening. and 1.8% to 1.9% with today's guidelines. cancer society left room for screening women younger than 45. >> between 40 and 44, breast cancer is less common. there is still the risk for a false positive. we thought that need to be an informed shared decision between the woman and health care provider. >> reporter: women in higher risk groupupwould need more aggressive screening depending upon severity of the risk. but for routine screening today's guidelines narrow the gap between cancer society and major task force advising the government. better consensus may lessen the current confusion. >> jon lapook.
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thank you, doctor. unusual number of rare cancers has centers for disease control investigating in a community outside st. louis, missouri. and vinita nair is following that. >> never forget the e ment they tell you, we found lesions on your lung and liver. >> reporter: mary osckso has stage 4 lung cancer. we met in her backyard with six of her neighbors, all of who live in the st. louis suburbs. every one of these people either has cancer or lost a parent or child to it. >> it was just loaded with kids and young families. >> we'll all played outside. played flashlight tag, kick the can. >> reporter: their neighborhood park is padlocked while army corps of engineers removes low level radioactive waste discovered beneath the topsoil. >> in this area here. >> reporter: janelle wright was one of the first neighbors who noticed common illnesses when former classmates started reconnection on facebook. >> if we did not have social media we would never put the
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>> reporter: the group put together the map showing 2,700 instances of cancer, auto immune disorders and brain and thyroid tumors. >> within n six house radius, i knew four people with brain cancer one a child and one a young professor. i just thought that is really odd. >> reporter: the area where they lived is called north county which includes hazelwood and florisent, and coldwater creek runs through the toinz. for two decades, two sites were used to store radio active waste from america's nuclear weapons program. the waste came from st. louis's mallinckrodt chemical company which the governmentntired to process uranium. tens of thousand of barrels of nuclear waste, many open to the elements. contaminated the soil in the nearby creek. >> what you see is an environmental health disaster unfolding slowly over cades.
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director, dr. fafal kahn, says identifying a difficult. north county needs long term study. >> the rates of appendix cancer, relatively rare, we see 800 cases acroro the nation, year wide. to find seven or eight cases in one zip code or geographic area is rather unusual. >> reporter: currently engineers are testing the rest of the 15-mile creek. it will take y yrs to be completed. years mary osckso doesn't have. >> my husband and i sit down at night and have discussions on do i want to be cremated or buried the i don't want to be buried in north county. that's one thing i told him. i do not want to be buried where the soil is. >> several residents filed a class actiti lawsuit against mallinckrodt and other companies that handled uranium. it is early in the process and mallinckrodt tells us the company worked under the
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and d no time did mallinckrodt own any uranium for byproducts. the atomic commission that hired the companies no longer exists so we are seeking comment from the depapament of energy. scott, w w will continue to vol low this story. vinita nair. canada took a left turn last night. justin trudeau and the liberal party rode in on a landslide. the new prime minister is the son of pierre trudeau who held the job from the '60s to the '80s. justin trudeau is 43. he ran on promises to tackle climate change. boost the economy and legalize marijuana. if you are ever late f f a plane, don't do this. a security camera caught mark remar running on to the tarmac in denver in august as his plane backed out. it looks like he tried to talk the tug driver into stopping the plane. remar might be explaining he was trying to get to his high school union.
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police. and yesterday, he was sentenced to two years probation. a lot of people trying to catch a space ship, caused major movie ticket web sites to crash. here is what's launched them. last night, the new trailer for "star wars: the force awakens," was released. and fandango got eight times more traffic than ever. the movie doesn't open until december 18th. >> in a moment, a movie prophecy
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suffering cubs' fans. almost sixty million americans are affected by mental illness. together we can help them with three simple words. my name is chris noth d i will listen. from maine to mauiuithousands of high school students across the country are getting in on the action by volunteering in their communities. chris young: action teams of high school students are joining volunteers of america and major league baseball players to help train n d inspire the next generation of volunteers. carlos pa: it's easy to start an action team at your school so you, too, can get in on the action. get in on the action at actionteam.org. 'cause you'll be in my heart yes, you'll be in my heart frorothis day on
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now and forevermore... narrator: if animals are our best friends, shouldn't we be theirs? visit your lococ shelter, adopopa pet. you'll be in my heart no matter what... cbs cares. if you were a hippie in the '60s, you need to know. it's the dawning of the age of aquarius. yeah, and something else that's cool. what? osteoporosis is preventable. all: osteo's preventable? right on! if you dig your bones, protect them.
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all: cbs cares! today, the u.s. and russia agreed on ways to keep their war planes separatededver syria. the agreement specifies common radio frequencies and sets up a hotline between the forces. the u.s. and russia are supporting opposite sides in the syrian civil war. thousand of refugees fleeing that war and the war in afghanistan are now being pursued by winter. in eastern europe many are stranded in slovenia, cold, hungry, after croatia and hungary closed their borders.
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western europe. desperate parents are now breaking up their families to save their children. chchlie d'agata reports that 15,000 kids have applied for refuge in sweden. >> reporter: the ferry from germany broke through the gloom of a thick morning fog leaving behind the heavy shroud of danger and uncertainty among the new arrivals are a record number of teenagers traveling on their own. in sweden, children who qualify for asylum are granted residency, $275 a month, an education and placacto live. soany have arrived this school has now become a transit center, a hangout for some of the thousand of adolescents on their own from afghanistan and syria. some are barely teenagers like omar wahibbi from damascus. 13 years old?
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>> reporter: you came by yourself alone? >> yes. >> reporter: omar told us his parents made the decision when the war wouldn't let up. they said at least in sweden, he wouldn't die. >> translator: my mother was crying, she said, she was upset i was leaving. do you remember the last thing your mother and father said when you left? they said i should go, he told us, and they hope one day to see me in sweden. for many, that's the aim. to be granted asylum and then bring their families over too. matitia brinck larsen is the social worker who runs the transit center. she says many of the children are traumatized when they arrive. >> if someone puts his eyes on me, i have to put my papers away and sit for a minute. and shararhis story. and d en if we don't have the same language, he can speak to me.
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with his eyes. with his expressions. >> reporter: she and her colleagues are trying to give them hope for a better future. >> reporter: when you grow up you want to be a doctor? >> yeah. >> reporter: that is a big dream. >> yes. >> r rorter: because of the increased numbers, scott, the asylum process can now take more than a year. they stay in transit centers for a number of weeks before they're sent to empty nursing homes like one weep visited or foster homes. but sweden is struggling to keep up with the demand. >> remarkable story. charlie d'agata reporting from swede tune night. charlie, thank you. today in the holyland, a palestinian aimed his car at a crowded bus stop and then tried to stab israelis he was shot and killed. the renewed violence broke out a month ago after false rumors that israel was taking over jerusalem's holiest islamic sitete some of the palestinians attackers are children and barry peterson spoke with the father of one of them. >> reporter: the video enflamed
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boy in the s seet. an israeli man screams, die, die. another urges police to shoot him. it started when 13-year-old ahmed manashra and his cousin, hassan, armed with knives, chased israelis on the street seriously wounding a 13-year-old jewish boy. hassan ran at police and was shot dead. ahmed was hit by an israeli patrol vehicle fell, stunned. badly wounded. but his father, won't believe his son is a terrorist. if the israelis say your son did this, will you believe them? >> no, he says, i will not believe them. he is a child. >> reporter: in his first american television interview, manashra talked of a youngster who sleeps on a tom and jerry pillow.
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>> my heart broke when high heard it. he said. he is just a child. even if you see a dog or a cat, injured in the streeee you help themem i don't undersrsnd how the israelis think. ahmed was hospitalized by the israelis, he is nowen their custody. and denying he tried to stab anyone. scott, he is so far, the youngest palestinian involved in these attacks over the last several weeks. >> barry peterson in jerusalem for us tonight. barry, thanks. in politics, vice president joe biden sounded more like a presidential candidate talking up his foreign policy credentials, doing some rewriting of his own history, and firing a shot over the bow of the democratic front-runner. here's nancy cordes. >> reporter: the vice president never mentioned hillary clinton by name. but it was all too clear the comparison he was making when he
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>> i will get sent to go speak to putin or go speak to who ever, because the seetary of state, we he had two great secretaries of state. but when i go they know that i am speaking for the president. >> reporter: for the second day in a row, biden alluded to clinton's joke at last week's debate that republicans are her enemies. >> i still have a lot of republican friend. i don't think my chief enemy is the republican party. >> reporter: clinton may not be his chief enemy, but she is his biggest obstacle. a new national poll out today has clinton leading third place biden by 38 points. today, he left her out of his story about the raid on osama bin laden's compound in 2011. clinton always claimed she was a strong proponent. but not inned by any telling of it. >> there are only two people who were definitive. and were absolutely certain. leon panetta said go. and, and bob gates has already publicly said, don't go.
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>> reporter: back in 2012, biden admitted he argued against the raid. >> mr. president, my suggestion is don't go. we have to do two more things to see if he is there. >> reporter: but today he told a different story. >> i told them my opinion. i thought he should go. follll his own instincts. >> it is possiblblbiden is trying to tweak his role in the pivotal decision in advance of a presidential run. scott, even president obama said publicly the vice president was skeptical about the operation that killed bin laden. cbs news will bring you the next presidential debate with or without biden, from drake university, saturday, november 14th, at 9:00 eastern time. the debate will not include former senator jim webb of virginia. he dropped out of the race today. webb is considering running g an independent. a stranded motorist is shot to death by a cop.
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>> early sunday morning a a r broke down on a florida highway. the driver called for help. as he waited, an undercover police officer pulled up. the motorist wound up dead. shot by y e cop.
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mark strassmann has the latest >> reporter: cory jones wasn't confrontational his family says. he was practically raised in church. gale banks his aunt. >> anything you need cory would be there. if you needed a shirt. he would give you his shirt. he would be cold just to keep you warm. jones needed a tow truck early last sunday morning. the 31-year-old city employee moonlighted as a drummer and was returning home from a gig when his car broke down on an exit ramp a ang i-95. he called, bd mate mat huntsberger for help. >> i left him. he was like. gave me a high five. he said thank you. thanks for helping me out. coming out of your way. >> reporter: some time at 3:00 a.m., 38-year-old officer, nouman raja arrived. the palm beach guarders police department said in a facebook statement it has since deleted,
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plain clothes capacity in an unmarked police vehicle stopped to investigate whwh he believed was an abandoned vehiclele as the the offffer exited his vehicle, he was suddenly confronted by an armed subject. as a result of the confrontation, the officer discharged his firearm resulting in the death of the subject. officer raja was not wearing a body camera and cruiser had no dashboard camera. he joined the force six month as go. police say they did find a handgun at the scene where jones was killed and records show she had bought it three days earlier. ththofficer involved remains on administsttive leave, scott, while a separate police agency investigates the shooting. >> mark strassmann tonight.
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right back. woman: what does it feel like when a woman is having a heart attack? chest pain, like there's a ton of weight on your chest. severe shortness of breath. unexplained nausea. cold sweats. there's an unusual tiredness and fatigue. there's unfamiliar dizziness or light-headedness. unusual pain in your back, neck, jaw, one or both arms, even your upper ststach, are signs you're having a heart attack. don't make excuses. make the call to 9-1-1 immediately. learn more at womenshealth.gov/heartattack. bipolar disorder is a brain condition that causes unusual or dramatic mood swings. it affects millions of americans and compromises their ability to function. when diagnosed, bipolar disorder can be effectively treated by mood stabilizers. but most people with bipolar disorder suffer for years without help because the symptoms are missed or confused with other illnesses, like depression. learn how easily u can help keep this from happening to a loved one.
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we end tonight, tomorrow. jim axelrod with a movie whose time has come. >> reporter: after his wedding day and the day his daughter was born. >> october 21, 2015. >> reporter: t/morrow has always been the most important day on bob le's calendar. exactly what you expect from writer and co-producer of back to the future movies. what is your relationship with the day on the calendar. >> forever and ever, it's known as become to the future day. how great is that? >> reporter: the trilogy traveled past, present, future in a delelean. chael j. fox's martytycfly visited d e future was well
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tomorrow, some things gale and his team got right. don't these look just like google glasses? isn't that skyping oa flat screen tv? >> how is it hanging, mcfly? >> in your mind what's the coolest thing you got right? >> the coolest thing that is happening is the hover board thing. the hover board thing was a total flight of fancy. every kid in the world wanted one. now we have, they have a magnetic hover board now. >> reporter: on the other hand not a smartphone in sight. but fax machines they're everywhere. fax machines? >> yeah, yeah, we blew that. they were so ubiquitous when we wrote it. >> r rorter: while there i ino jaws 19, and no black & decker hydrator, bob gale predicted something no one outside of chicago ever would have. >> cubs win world series. >> reporter: as of tonight the dream of getting that prediction right is still alive. >> the cubs might get in the
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they might win it. that is absolutely nuts. >> it is. >> and you love it? >> of course, how could you not love it? >> reporter: three decades ago, bob gale took a stab at the future for all to see. >> one o othe things that kindnd of gave us pererssion to let our mind go wild was to say, look, we know we are going to get this wrong. because nobody ever gets it right. >> reporter: now with the future officially upon us, his vision made a movie that is positively timeless. jim axelrod, cbs news, new york. that's the "cbs overnight news" for this wednesday. for some of you the news continues. for othersrscheck back with us a little later on the "morning news" and "cbs this morning."
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york city, i'm scott pelley. captioning funded by cbs it's wednesday, october 21st, 201515 this is the "cbs morning news." congressman paul ryan says he is ready to run for house speaker, but he says h hll only go for the job if conservative lawmakers abide by his request. vice president joe biden shows signs he may be entering the white house race by contrasting himself to hillary clinton, but this morning, questions about his role in the raid that killed blk osama bin laden. >> one win away. the new york metsnd kansas
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