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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  November 18, 2015 1:37am-4:30am CST

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the environmental group is wrapping up its first-ever shark tagging expedition in the gulf of mexico. cbs news has been following this group of fishermen and soin scientists were there. we were there when they tagged and reloosed the first great white shark. >> reporter: the gulf of mexico has received enormous attention, mostly for what went wrong. the deep water horizon to start. but five years later, parts of the gulf are teeming with life, providing research evers a chance to study how many sharks are there and where they're going.
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meet finley, a 10-foot long tiger shark. the first gulf shark to be spot tagged. >> here it is, finley the tiger shark for you to enjoy following across the gulf of mexico. >> reporter: this group of scientists just wrapped an expedition off the coast of texas. tiger sharks, sort of the white shark of the gulf? >> yes. tiger sharks love to come in to beaches and estuaries. >> reporter: during their expedition, they tagged four sharks, two tigers and two hammerheads. they're posting all of their data to their websites, bringing global attention to a body of watt with an often muddy reputation. a lot of people think of the gulf as a mess, largely because of the spill. what kind of shape is the gulf in? >> i think the gulf is in pretty good shape. it's rebounding and full of life.
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>> reporter: and he hopes full of sharks. remove too many and second tier predators would roam, throwing the ecosystem off balance. in the gulf, they're optimistic. fit over the past few decades, the influx of oil rigs has created just as many artificial reefs. we are 30 miles offshore. there are about 4,000 active oil rigs in the gulf of mexico. above water, they are steel, stark, industrial. but underwater, an explosion of life. >> you have to keep in mind they have been here for decades. no one realized the great ecosystems that would be formed around them. >> reporter: greg is one of the
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scientists working with o-search in the gulf. when you first saw one of these undersea worlds, what was your reaction? >> one, it's just the sheer size is amazing. on the surface, it's flat and looks like nothing. but when you dive down just a few feet and you see the size of a building under water, and then the next thing you see is just the abundance of marine life, particularly fish that are just everywhere. >> reporter: over time, man made structures like oil rigs become artificial reefs by attracting an entire food chain. microscopic organisms, coral, schools of fish and the lions of the ocean, sharks. they also attract controversy. usually when a rig is retired and a decision needs to be made. should parts of it stay or go? this is a tricky issue. everybody agrees that there are environmental benefits to it. but some say listen, we're against reefing, regardless of where it is or when it is, because it just encourages the oil companies to drill more.
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true? >> yeah. well, yes and no. believe it or not, the oil and gas companies don't necessarily want to do this. the scrap value of the steel is worth way more to bring it in. a lot of concern in the general public is that it's oil and gas and oil and gas doesn't always have the best reputation. look, ocean first. great grandchildren first. if you want an abundant future for the gulf of mexico, it would be an absolute catastrophe to not reef every single one of those rigs you can. >> reporter: for now, big oil's trash is fisher's treasure. finley and her friends will provide data scientists have never had. where gulf sharks are mating, breeding, and traveling. what role artificial reefs play, and what threats are real versus imagined. >> it's kind of crazy to be pioneering this work in 2015.
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an ocean with no sharks. if that is the case, there
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we've been changing things up with k-y love. oh yeah. it's a pleasure gel that magnifies both our sensations. it gives us chills in places we've never gotten chills before. yeah, it makes us feel like... dare to feel more with new k-y love. >> >> there are hundreds of species on the endangered list. and one photographer has made it his life's work to capture them all. martha teichner reports for
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>> reporter: they haunt you. these eyes. as intended. you're supposed to regard the greatest and the tiniest. the lowliest. equally. >> if we could get there and look these species in the eye, really get down low and look them in the eye and you see how lovely they are and how much intelligence there is there. they're telling us something. i mean, they're shouting it to me. >> reporter: for ten years now, our friend, national geographic photographer joel sartori, has made it his life's mission to be their messenger. and he hopes their protector. their noah building a photographic ark. >> this is the ark room we call
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we have 5002 species in here. at this rate, it would take two hours to see them all. it's supposed to overwhelm people with what life looks like on earth. >> reporter: and what might soon be extinct. >> the very last, that's the very last of its kind, of this tree frog. he's like nine years old at least. when he's gone, that's it. they will be extinct. >> reporter: his photo ark will be at the national geographic museum in washington, d.c. until april. >> this is the northern white rhino that i photographed at the zoo this summer in the czech republic. there were five at the time. this is a very old female, and she died one week to the day after we photographed her. now there are four. this is the pygmy rabbit. that animal has gone extinct.
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>> reporter: it has? >> yeah, yeah. you can seeer from thor end of the exhibit. we wanted people to be able to see her, come into this room and have the experience of, well, this is what we're talking about. this is the consequence if we ignore the world around us. this is the consequence of that. >> scientists over the past 500, ll, half a million years, we've seen five mass extinction shuns. you think of volcanos and astroids. scientists describe the current loss of plants and animals as the sixth extinction. >> reporter: catherine workman is senior director of national geographic's protecting wildlife initiative. >> we're losing animates at 1,000 times the rate. we have hunting, climate change, habitat loss and the combination of all these changes is really
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hammering the planet's biodiversity. >> reporter: joel didn't set out to create a photo ark. it began as an act of desperation, when his wife, cathy, was diagnosed with breast cancer and he needed to stay home in lincoln, nebraska. >> i just thought i need to shoot something. cathy's going to be sick for a long time, and on the days when she felt better through the chemo cycles, i just needed something to shoot. >> reporter: so this world traveler, who shot 35 stories for national geographic -- >> that's what i came here for. >> reporter: including six covers, drove to the lincoln children's zoo a mile from his house and asked if he could photograph the animals. >> they let me take a naked mole rat and put it on a white background and i did a couple of blue and black poison dart
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that was 5400 species ago. >> reporter: he's not quite halfway through photographing all 12,000 animal species in captivity, endangered or not. he figures it will take him the rest of his life to finish. he's taken pictures at more than 200 zoos in the united states alone. the how-to part can be tricky. >> therere he goes. we're just standing here as living fences. >> reporter: wrangling flamingos. not quite like getting your ducks in a row. >> doesn't this look nice? perfect for chimps. >> reporter: on the other hand, success is not always guarantied. >> not a bashful bird.
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>> reporter: ouch! and there can be hazards. you've heard of angry birds? >> this is like a $6,000 camera. doesn't he know that? this bird is the nastiest, most bad-ass bird i've ever had to do. got it, got it, nice. >> reporter: why zoo animals? >> zoos have the only populations of these animals. >> reporter: he accepts that people fall in love with fuzzy, cute animals. like the fennic fox. these at the st. louis zoo. but he wantstous appreciate the importance of the uncuddly ones. the ones we've never heard of. >> this is often the only voice they'll ever have before they go this is their only chance to
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>> reporter: his animals have been projected on the empire state building. and at the u.n. soon, they'll be shown on the vatican. >> this has gone extinct, and this. >> reporter: anywhere he can, as often as he can. joel sartori pleads for their lives. >> this is the best time ever to be alive to save species, because there's so many species that need our help. >> reporter: he hopes his photographs will get people to help, and he likes to hook them young. >> what grade are you guys in? >> fourth. >> reporter: i do take comfort in the fact that all is not lost, by any means. in this country, the whooping crane, black footed ferret, the california condor, mexican wolf, all of those animals all got down to two dozen. they're all stable now. and that just speaks volumes to the fact that people do care, but we have to let them know
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these animals exist and they're in trouble and what the need is. >> reporter: the ark is his
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eye, to look hard. the national museum of african-american history and culture doesn't officially open until next year. but the museum's first exhibit was put on display a little early. jan crawford reports. >> reporter: the building on the national mall may not be ready for visitors, but it proved a fine canvas for the first exhibition at the national museum of african-american history and culture. >> we felt that history couldn't wait. it's important this museum contribute today. >> reporter: this is the museum director. >> all of us, regardless of race, are shaped in profound ways by the african-american experience. our goal is to make sure that we can tell a rich and complicated
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history of america. >> reporter: the live event included a musical performance and film to commemorate and celebrate freedom, 150 years of the african-american experience reaching five stories high. documentary filmmaker stanley nelson produced the display with his wife, marsha smith. >> i think the smith is inspiring, that african-american history is all about history, but that it's an inspiring history. it's a history that has ups and downs, but when you take it all together, you know, it tells an incredible story of the american people.. >> each of these boxes has a story. >> reporter: the museum had already collected more than 30,000 pieces when we visited curators in a warehouse last year. there are gold medals from olympian carl lewis, the jacket of a tuskegee airman, a.d even a
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plan the group used for training ahead of world war ii. triumphs will be celebrated here and a nation's dark past will be remembered. but not every collection has a focus on the past, because history is happening now. >> please keep your hands up. >> reporter: museum curators were in baltimore to document this year's riots following the death of freddie gray while in police custody. amazing grace >> reporter: they were in charleston, too, after a pastor and his bible study group, were all murdered in their house of worship. the film concludes with images of the black lives matter movement. >> and that's the "overnight news" for this wednesday. for some of you, the news continues.
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for the morning news and "cbs this morning." tonight from paris, the manhunt widens. the search is on for a second terrorist who got away. france launches more bombing raids against isis. secretary kerry tells us the u.s. and russia may join forces against the terror group. and how do you explain evil to the most innocent among us? a dad's tender words of wisdom. this is the "cbs overnight news."." the president of france ordered a third round of attacks
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on isis targets tonight. inspired, he says, by the faces that don't leave his mind. the faces of the 129 killed in the terror attacks, most of them under the age of 30. youth, he said, in all its diversity. the violinist from algeria, studying music at the sorbonne. the french advertising executive who once attended the university of north texas. the architect from germany. the romanians who immigrated to paris to find a better life and found each other. tonight, france celebrates who they were and weeps for what they might have been. the search for the terrorists widened today, and elizabeth palmer is following the investigation. liz. >> reporter: scott, the police say that tonight they're looking for a second man who got away. that would make him the ninth terrorist, and they say they spotted him inside a car on surveillance camera video very near the place where the clients of the restaurants and cafes were gunned down.
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first, a police robot moved in to examine this car abandoned on a paris street. then an officer broke in, searching for links to the terrorists. police are scouring europe for evidence that might lead them to salah abdeslam, the attacker who got away. but in brussels, his brother mohammed appealed to him directly. "my advice to him is to turn himself in to the police," he said, "so justice can shed light on what happened." at this hotel in the paris suburbs, another piece of the puzzle fell into place. it's where salah abdeslam and his co-conspirators are believed to have spent the two days before the attacks. police discovered it and dusted it for fingerprints on the weekend. when salah abdeslam reserved two rooms in this hotel, he did it with his own credit card and he used his own name, which suggests he wasn't the least bit concerned about leaving a trail for investigators. knowing what they were about to do, he probably didn't think
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he'd survive. and it's unclear why he did. but incredibly, in the pandemonium following the massacre, he called some friends to come and pick him up. they drove him back to belgium, where he vanished. the police have also asked for help in identifying this man, one of the suicide bombers at the football stadium who came to france on a false syrian passport with a fake name. the picture, though, is accurate, and so the police say somebody's got to know who he is. >> elizabeth palmer, thank you, liz. in belgium, the hunt is focused on molenbeek, a suburb of brussels, there was a raid there tonight and allen pizzey is there. >> reporter: police say the operation tonight was not directly targeting anyone connected to the paris attacks. but it's clear they're intent on not letting anything slip through the net. they closed this bar for drug offenses three weeks ago, and now one of the owners, salah
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international arrest warrant for the paris attacks. his older brother was a suicide bomber there. this woman, who only agreed to talk if her identity and voice were heavily disguised, knew them well. "there is no way i would have thought they were terrorists," she said. "quite the opposite. they ran a cafe where drugs were taken. they defended women who were dressed provocatively." how could they go from that to launching a terrorist attack? the suburb of molenbeek with it's mix of languages and cultures, is opaque to outsiders, a place where strangers and police are viewed with suspicion. it also has connections to many of the major terrorist attacks in europe. the gunmen in the "charlie hebdo" massacre are believed to have bought guns here. so is the man who attacked the belgium jewish museum. and a gunman who was stopped by three americans for murdering passengers on a high-speed train to paris lived here for a while. for the police, figuring out how and why molenbeek breeds extremists is as important as tracking them down and in the case of ones who committed the paris massacres, perhaps even
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harder. scott? >> allen pizzey, in belgium, thank you, allen. tonight, the u.s. is working to put together a military alliance with russia and france in the war on isis in its syrian homeland. secretary of state john kerry told us he can foresee u.s. and russian forces fighting alongside one another. kerry visited french president francois hollande today. hollande will meet in washington with president obama next week, and then with russian president putin. after meeting hollande today, kerry sat down with us. he calls isis by its arabic acronym, daesh. >> the basic strategy of destroying daesh's center, its core, which is what we did with al qaeda, is working, and al qaeda was diminished as an entity that had the ability to do what it did in 9/11 through the protracted effort in afghanistan and pakistan and
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elsewhere, in the arabian peninsula. and daesh sort of filled their void. >> we did that. >> now we have to do it to daesh. >> we did that with an enormous land invasion of afghanistan. you know better than anyone that never in history has an air campaign accomplished the goals that you just set out in this interview. >> correct, and there's no pretense here. president obama has never suggested. >> how do you root them out of syria? >> which is exactly what is beginning to happen now as the syrian arabs, the kurds and others move and earn back their capacity to be able to fight. they are currently full square in the fight to liberate ramadi. it's a tough fight and they've lost over 200 people and 1200 wounded, but they're fighting that's exactly what the strategy is. it may take a little longer. it's tougher. who knows? but if we don't ememwer them to
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communities, then when you leave, daesh will move right back in. and you wind up this cycle. that's not where we want to go, and i think the president's on the right track to be able to take out daesh in a methodical, systematic way, which is going to increase through the help of the russians, the french are now upping their involvement, and that's all to the better in terms of speeding up the process of taking them out. >> after paris, the question becomes do we have time to wait for that strategy to work, before we see this kind of thing in the united states? >> we are doing everything possible within the framework of homeland security, and what we worry about is that for terrorists, if you're willing to die-- you nt to strap a suicide vest around yourself and you want to walk into a crowd and blow yourself up -- you can choose almost anywhere to go do that. and everybody else who is in law
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enforcement trying to prevent it has to get every single thing right all the time, 24/7, 365. that's a much tougher task. >> the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. almost sixty million americans are affected by mental illness. together we can help them with three simple words. my name is chris noth and i will listen. from maine to maui, thousands of high school students across the country are getting in on the action by volunteering in their communities. chris young: action teams of high school students are joining volunteers of america and major league baseball players to help train and inspire the next generation of volunteers. carlos pea: it's easy to start an action team at your school so you, too, can get in on the action. get in on the action at actionteam.org. 'cause you'll be in my heart
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from this day on now and forevermore... narrator: if animals are our best friends, shouldn't we be theirs? visit your local shelter, adopt a pet. you'll be in my heart no matter what... cbs cares. if you were a hippie in the '60s, you need to know. it's the dawning of the age of aquarius. yeah, and something else that's cool.
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what? osteoporosis is preventable. all: osteo's preventable? right on! if you dig your bones, protect them. all: cbs cares! one day before the paris attacks, isis struck in lebanon, which is bursting with syrian refugees. twin suicide bombings in beirut killed 43 and wounded more than 200. the victims were mostly from the shiite b bnch of islam. isis is the sunni branch. holly williams is following this from turkey. holly, how significant was that attack in lebanon? >> reporter: scott, it was very significant. lebanon has been a war-torn country, but this was the worst terror attack in the capital beirut in many years, and it comemeat a time when lebanon is especially fragile and the civil
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war raging just across the border in syria has played into those tensions, destabilizing lebanon. on top of that, lebanon, which has a population of around four million people, has had an influx of over a million syrian refugees since the civil war began. >> paris h h demanded the world's attention, but it's been at the expense of coverage like the story in lebanon. >> reporter: well, scott, that's true. and there's been a lot of criticism on social media coming from inside lebanon and other middle eastern countries asking why there wasn't more coverage of the attack in beirut. and some people have said that it was racist, that what the western media was effectively saying is that european lives matter more than arab lives. and, scott, there is one very important point which is sometimes forgotten but which we have made before and it's this: isis has killed many more muslims than it has members of
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including christians. >> holly williams in turkey for us tonight. holly, thank you. isis has already claimed responsibility for blowing up the russian jetliner over egypt. well, today, the russians confirmed it was a bomb with a force equivalent to about two pounds of t.n.t. that brought the plane down. 224 were killed, mostly vacationing families. in retaliation today, russia fired cruise missiles from ships in the mediterranean and dropped bombs from planes on isis targets in syria. major american cities have been tightening security, and here is our homeland security correspondent jeff pegues. >> reporter: around pennsylvania avenue in washington, it's not just the white house that is a potential terrorist target. it's also the restaurants, coffee shops, and public squares. the area has tight security, but even at midday, we didn't see any police presence.
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former assistant f.b.i. director ron hosko. >> there are simply not enough police, law enforcement on duty, off duty, hired security to cover every potential gathering spot where americans enjoy their liberty. >> reporter: in los angeles, deputy police chief michael downing says since the paris attacks, the l.a.p.d. has increased patrols and is working with the community to step up awareness around soft targets. >> there are 45,000 private security guards in the los angeles area alone. there's 10,000 l.a.p.d. when you combine that with community members that are interested as well, we have some good leverage. >> reporter: but law enforcement officials say the best way to stop a suicide attack is having the right intelligence, and once an attack is under way, cutting down on the response time is key. that involves active shooter training developed after the columbine school massacre.
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neutralize the threat. but hosko says even a huge show of force may not be enough. >> is that going to stop a determined terrorist who sees only one thing -- jihad and martyrdom and mass carnage? i don't know that it's been known to stop that. >> reporter: it is not just los angeles that's relying on private security guards. scott, we also spoke with philadelphia's police commissioner who says they are as well. >> jeff pegues reporting. jeff, thank you. today, the republican leaders of the house and senate called on the president to stop accepting syrian refugees. we have more on that from our congressional correspondent nancy cordes. >> it strikes me that we need to pause or a moratorium. >> reporter: it's no longer just the republican rank and file. senate leader mitch h connell and house speaker paul ryan both called for a halt today to the refugee program. >> this is a moment where it's
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better to be safe than to be sorry. >> reporter: but the administration isn't wavering from its plan to let in 10,000 syrians over the next year. white house officials insisted today one-on-one interviews are e conducted with each potential refugee, something that didn't happen when the refugees arrived in europe earlier this year. officials add that just 2% of the 2,300 syrians let in so far are single males of combat age. >> frankly, there are probably greater risks with passport- holding europeans. >> reporter: adam schiff is the top democrat on the house intelligence committee. what's wrong with taking a brief pause to make sure that the refugee program is as safe as possible? >> a refugee who is trying to come and find solace here in the united states now, it's still going to be a year and a half before they get through the process. so adding further delay to that i don't think makes sense. >> reporter: but 27 of the
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nation's governors now say they'll try to deny refugees resettlement assistance. robert bentley is alabama's governor. >> we're not going to allow them into the state of alabama. >> reporter: white house officials are holding a conference call with governors tonight while the f.b.i. director briefs members of congress here on capitol hill. it is a full court press from an administration, scott, that has been criticized abroad for not taking in more refugees. >> nancy cordes on the story in washington. nancy, thank you. there's also breaking news tonight in the presidential race. republican bobby jindal, the governor of louisiana, is dropping out. jindal never got out of single digits in the polls. still ahead, the hunt for isis in iraq. the "cbs overnight news" will be
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isis has captured much of syria and iraq already, and it's using terrorism to expand its reach in those countries. charlie d'agata went along as kurdish troops hunted for isis sleeper cells in northern iraq. >> reporter: on the outskirts of kirkuk, the anti-terror squad hoped to find four isis suspects. they've been under surveillance for a while. they are considered dangerous, and they don't know what to expect once they get there.
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the men spread out and surrounded the house. then they burst through the gate, weapons drawn. but it's not until the next house that they nabbed the first suspect, but he was alone. and the only information he would give them was his name. general sadar qadir told us the men are suspected of being among the gunmen who massacred as much as 1,700 army recruits when isis overran a military base in tikrit last year. now they're believed to be part of an isis sleeper cell plotting to attack civilian areas. the next location was a warehouse. men were ordered to face the wall and squat on the ground. back at the base, the general told us the tragic events in paris just showed that isis is a global enemy. "it's very sad," he said.
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seven car bombs went off in kirkuk, and hundreds were killed, just like france." and although they captured two isis suspects overnight, there are now two more on the run. these squads are out there day and night, scott, and the general told us because it is the aim of the terrorists to kill civilians, they pose a greater threat than the isis militants his forces face on the battlefield. >> charlie d'agata on the battlefield in northern iraq.
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will be right back. back home, storms are heading east tonight through arkansas, louisiana, and mississippi. the system spun off tornadoes yesterday, four in the texas panhandle. as many as ten in kansas where a number of homes were destroyed. and a fierce snowstorm dumped more than a foot of snow in kansas and colorado. there was a bomb scare at a soccer stadium in germany today. turned out to be a false alarm, but the match between germany and the netherlands was canceled. soccer was played in london as two rivals stood together. here's mark phillips. >> viva la france! >> reporter: when is a game more than a game? when the visiting team's anthem is the theme song of the night.
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when the national stadium of england is decorated i ithe colors and slogan of the old sporting enemy, france. when the game comes just four days after suicide bombers tried to blow themselves up in the crowd during another game in paris. but had to settle for detonating outside when they couldn't get in. when two members of the french team were directly affected by the attacks, lassana diara's cousin was killed. antoine griezmann's sister escaped from the bataclan hall massacre. when the heaviest security anybody can remember is set up around the stadium. it was the french who said they wanted this game to go ahead. the english not only agreed. they turned it into an exercise in solidarity. >> we here to support england, we're here to support france. we're here to say yes to peace and no to terror. >> reporter: and when it was
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a competition between rivals, there was a singalong, the words to the french "marseillaise" put up on the scororoard so the english fans could join in. and those two century-old french revolutionary lyrics about resistance to invasion and blood flowing seemed as relevant now as when they were written. the anthem's message of historic defiance resonates today and not just in france. the challenge, though, is how to turn that defiance into effective international action. but what mattered here was the sentiment. >> i cried, like, for two days, and i was dispirited. and now i'm here to support my country. and know that every country are behind us in this situation. >> reporter: the score in the game, 2-0, england. nobody cared. mark phillips, cbs news, london.
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reassuring words, next. woman: what does it feel like when a woman is having a heart attack? chest pain, like there's a ton of weight on your chest. severe shortness of breath. explained nausea. cold sweats. there's an unusual tiredness and fatigue. there's unfamiliar dizziness or light-headedness. unusual pain in your back, neck, jaw, one or both arms, even your upper stomach, are signs you're having a heart attack. don't make excuses. make the call to 9-1-1 immediately. learn more at womenshealth.gov/heartattack. bipolar disorder is a brain condition that causes unusual or dramatic mood swings. it affects millions of americans and compromises their ability to function. when diagnosed, bipolar disorder can be effectively treated by mood stabilizers. but most people with bipolar disorder suffer for years without help because the symptoms are missed or confused
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learn how easily you can help keep this from happening to a loved one.
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we don't usually ask you to read our stories, but we will tonight, as a parisian father explains to his young son, in
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here.
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news" for this wednesday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back with us a little bit later for the morning news and, of course, "cbs this morning." from outside the cathedral of
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pelley. this is the "cbs overnight news." >> welcome to the "overnight news." the international manhunt for those behind the paris terror attacks is now focused on two fugitives. french investigators say both were directly involved with the attacks that left at least 129 people dead, and another 350 wounded across paris. the islamic state has claimed responsibility, and tonight, the group is feeling the wrath. french warplanes again bombed isis targets in and around their self-proclaimed capital of raqqah and moscow is stepping up attacks as well after concluding the russian jetliner that
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crashed in egypt was brought down by a bomb. all 224 people on board died and isis has claimed responsibility. vladamir putin is offering a $50 million reward for those who actually planted the device. mark phillips has more. >> reporter: russian security services has said they now have the evidence to confirm what was always the prime suspicion, that the russian jet crash in the sinai was caused by a bomb. the fact that the wreckage from the plane was spread over such a large area had always indicated the plane broken up at altitude. the question was whether that was due to explosion or structural failure, a much less likely cause. now, the head of the main russian security agency, the fsb, has told vladamir putin that tests on the wreckage proved that a homemade explosive device, as he described it, blew the plane up. the continuing suspicion is that the bomb was placed on board at sharm el sheikh. a lapse in security, the egyptians resisted admitting to. reports that two airport workers
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have been arrested haven't been confirmed. but the responsibility of the deaths of those on board has long been claimed by the islamic state, saying it was retaliating for the russian bombing campaign against them. vladamir putin has vowed to find them and to punish them. the russian navy has warships in eastern mediterranean conducting cruise missile strikes in syria. vladamir putin ordered his commanders to cooperate with the french military in their assaults. in paris, scott pelley sat down with secretary of state john kerry to ask him about this new alliance. >> the secretary outlined for us today a dramatic, and if it works, a historic grand alliance alliance. he said he can imagine in the next few weeks the united states, russia, and france cooperating militarily against
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it, daesh, in syria. the idea of u.s. and russian forces fighting together, working together against this terrible enemy is a remarkable idea. but that is exactly what they're trying to do. you know, it seems to me that the americans can't say they're supporting the russians and the russians can't say they're supporting the americans. but both can say they're supporting france. in two weeks' time, isis brought down the russian jetliner, attacked their enemies in lebanon and now attacked paris. it doesn't feel like it's working. >> well, the strategy is to contain isis within iraq and syria, and diminish their hold and destroy their headquarters and them fundamentally. because that's where all of this has emanated from. slowly but surely, that is working. but yes, they have foreign fighters who have left there and gone to other places.
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we've known all along that challenge is there. the basic strategy of destroying daesh's center, its core, which is what we did with al qaeda, is working. and that's -- daesh sort of filled their void. >> we did that with an enormous land invasion of afghanistan. you know better than anyone that never in history has an air campaign accomplished the goals that you just set out in this >> correct, and that's no pretense here. president obama has never suggested. >> how do you root them out of syria? >> which is exactly what is beginning to happen now, as the syrian arabs, the kurds and others move and earn back their capacity to be able to fight. one of the lessons of iraq is, that it doesn't have to be american soldiers who are on the ground in order to be able to fight the fight, that they can
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have to have the people that live there invested in that fight. president obama's strategy is to continue to empower them, which is what we're doing. they are currently full square in the fight to liberate ramadi. and it's a tough fight. they've lost over 200 people and 1200 wounded, but they're fighting. they're doing it. and that's exactly what the strategy is. it may take a little longer. it's tougher. who knows? but if we don't empower them to have the control of their communities, then daesh will move right back in when we leave. and you wind up in this cycle. that's not where we want to go and i think the president is on the right track to be able to take out daesh in a methodical, systematic way, which is now frankly going to increase through the help of obviously the russians, the french are now upping their involvement. and that's all to the better in terms of speeding up the process of taking them out. >> this is an ambition, his is
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come along. secretary kerry seemed to think it would just be in the next few weeks, if it was indeed possible at all. president hollande of france is going to be meeting with president obama in washington next week and then going directly to moscow to meet with president putin. the hunt for isis terror cells is not limited to france and belgium. kurdish forces are also rooting them out in northern iraq. charlie d'agata was embedded with kurdish special forces and reports now from irbil. >> reporter: here they hunt down terror suspects every day, mostly at night. last night we spent the night with a squad going after suspects from one of the worst isis atrocities this country has seen. we met the general at a secret location south of kircut. he told us they were after four isis suspects. a sleeper cell lying low among
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terror attacks in iraq. down a muddy road, they nab the first one. he didn't put up any resistance. but in the back of the truck, it's starting to sink in. the targets, men suspected of taking part in a massacre of as many as 1700 army recruits when isis overran a military base in tikrit last year. lined up by the hundreds, shot dead in shallow graves. who is this young man? the general said the men they were after are among those who pulled the trigger. the next location is a warehouse where they hoped to find three other suspects. they only found one. he too is blind folded and taken away for interrogation. two more men from the suspected terror cell are still at large. now they know their cohorts are already been taken in. the general told us because they hide in plain sight and then
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strike civilian areas, the suspects he and his men go after every week pose more of a threat than isis militants his forces face on the front lines. >> the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. try head & shoulders instant relief. it cools on contact, and also keeps you 100% flake free. try head & shoulders instant relief. for cooling relief in a snap. it's judgment day. back seat chefs peer inside your oven. but you've cleaned all baked-on business from meals past with easy-off, so the only thing they see is that beautiful bird. go ahead.
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in one tiny pill. move free ultra. get your move on. and now try move free night. the first and only 2-in-1 joint and sleep supplement. the environmental group o-search is wrapping up its first-ever shark tagging expedition in the gulf of mexico. cbs news has been following this group of fishermen and scientists for years. we were there when they tagged and released the first great white shark in north atlantic waters. jeff gror was out with o-search on their latest trip. >> reporter: the gulf of mexico has received enormous attention, mostly for what went wrong. the deep water horizon spill to start. but five years later, parts of the gulf are teeming with life, providing researchers a chance to study how many sharks are there and where they're going. meet finley, a 10-foot long
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the first gulf shark to be spot tagged on o-search's crab boat turned laboratory. >> here it is, finley the tiger shark for you to enjoy following across the gulf of mexico. >> reporter: this group of scientists just wrapped an expedition off the coast of chris fisher is their leader. tiger sharks, sort of the white shark of the gulf? >> yes. >> reporter: and a shark that gets very close to shore. >> tiger sharks love to come in to beaches and estuaries. >> reporter: during their expedition, they tagged four sharks, two tigers and two hammerheads. they're posting all of their data to their websites, bringing global attention to a body of water with an often muddy reputation. a lot of people think of the gulf as a mess, largely because of the spill. what kind of shape is the gulf in? >> oh, i think the gulf is in pretty good shape. if you talk to the people out there fishing, it's rebounding, full of life.
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remove too many and second tier predators would roam, throwing the ecosystem off balance. in the gulf, they're optimistic. thinning, one of the biggest threats to shark populations, is not as prevalent here. over the past few decades, the influx of oil rigs has created just as many artificial reefs. we are 30 miles offshore. there are about 4,000 active oil rigs in the gulf of mexico. above water, they are steel, stark, industrial. but underwater, an explosion of life. >> you have to keep in mind they have been here for decades. no one realized the great ecosystems that would be formed around them. >> reporter: greg is one of the scientists working with o-search in the gulf. >> we're going to be fishing oil and gas structures.
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>> reporter: you've been down diving at many of these reefs. when you first saw one of these undersea worlds, what was your reaction? >> one, it's just the sheer size is amazing. on the surface, it's flat and looks like nothing. but when you dive down just a few feet and you see the size of a building under water, and then the next thing you see is just the abundance of marine life, particularly fish that are just everywhere. >> reporter: over time, man made structures like oil rigs become artificial reefs by attracting an entire food chain. microscopic organisms, coral, schools of fish and the lions of the ocean, sharks. they also attract controversy. usually when a rig is retired and a decision needs to be made. should parts of it stay and be permanently reefed or go? this is a tricky issue. everybody agrees that there are environmental benefits to it. but some say listen, we're against reefing, regardless of where it is or when it is, because it just encourages the oil companies to drill more. true?
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well, yes and no. many say it's ocean dumping, you're just leaving the trash. believe it or not, the oil and gas companies don't necessarily want to do this. the scrap value of the steel is worth way more to bring it in. a lot of concern in the general public is that it's oil and gas and oil and gas doesn't always kave the best reputation. look, ocean first. great grandchildren first. if you want an abundant future for the gulf of mexico, it would be an absolute catastrophe to not reef every single one of those rigs you can. >> reporter: for now, big oil's trash is fisher's treasure. finley and her friends will provide data scientists have never had. where gulf sharks are mating, breeding, and traveling. what role artificial reefs play, and what threats are real versus imagined. >> it's kind of crazy to be pioneering this work in 2015. you would have thought it was done a long, long time ago, but it's crucial. we should also be terrified of an ocean with no sharks.
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if that is the case, there simply will not be fish
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there are hundreds of species on the endangered list. and one photographer has made it his life's work to capture them all. martha teichner reports for
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>> reporter: they haunt you. these eyes. as intended. you're supposed to regard the greatest and the tiniest. the lowliest. equally. >> if we could get down and look these species in the eye, really get down low and look them in the eye and you see how lovely they are and how much intelligence there is there. they're telling us something. i mean, they're shouting it to me. >> reporter: for ten years now, our friend, national geographic photographer joel sartori, has made it his life's mission to be their messenger. and he hopes their protector. their noah building a photographic ark. >> this is the ark room we call it. we have 5,002 species in here.
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all rolling past. at this rate, it would take two hours to see them all. it's supposed to overwhelm people with what life looks like on earth. >> reporter: and what might soon be extinct. >> the very last, that's the very last of its kind, of this tree frog. his name is toughy, because he's outlived projections. he's like nine years old at least. when he's gone, that's it. they will be extinct. >> reporter: his photo ark will be at the national geographic museum in washington, d.c. until april. >> this is the northern white rhino that i photographed at the zoo this summer in the czech republic. there were five at the time. this is a very old female, and she died one week to the day after we photographed her. now there are four. this is the pygmy rabbit. that animal has gone extinct. she was very near the end of her life. >> reporter: it has?
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>> yeah, yeah. you can see her from thor end of the exhibit. we wanted people to be able to see her, come into this room and have the experience of, well, this is what we're talking about. this is the consequence if we ignore the world around us. this is the consequence of that. >> scientists over the past 500, well, half a billion years. we've seen five mass extinction shuns. you think of volcanos and astroids. scientists describe the current loss of plants and animals as the sixth mass extinction. >> reporter: catherine workman is senior director of national geographic's protecting wildlife initiative. >> we're losing animals at a rate a thousand times the rates of extinction in the past. we have hunting, climate change, habitat loss and the combination of all these changes is really hammering the planet's biodiversity.
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to create a photo ark. it began as an act of desperation, when his wife, cathy, was diagnosed with breast cancer and he needed to stay home in lincoln, nebraska. >> i just thought i need to shoot something. cathy's going to be sick for a long time, and on the days when she felt better through the chemo cycles, i just needed something to shoot. >> reporter: so this world traveler, who shot 35 stories for national geographic -- >> that's what i came here for. >> reporter: including six covers, drove to the lincoln children's zoo a mile from his house and asked if he could photograph the animals. >> they let me take a naked mole rat and put it on a white background and i did a couple of blue and black poison dart frogs, i think.
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>> reporter: he's not quite halfway through photographing all 12,000 animal species in captivity, endangered or not. he figures it will take him the rest of his life to finish. he's taken pictures at more than 200 zoos in the united states alone. the how-to part can be tricky. >> there he goes. we're just standing here as living fences. >> reporter: wrangling flamingos. not quite like getting your ducks in a row. >> doesn't this look nice? perfect for chimps. >> reporter: on the other hand, success is not always guarantied. >> not a bashful bird.
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>> reporter: ouch! and there can be hazards. you've heard of angry birds? >> this is like a $6,000 camera. doesn't he know that? this bird is the nastiest, most bad-ass bird i've ever had to do. got it, got it, nice. >> reporter: why zoo animals? >> zoos often have the only populations of these animals. >> reporter: he accepts that people fall in love with fuzzy, cute animals. like the fennic fox. these at the st. louis zoo. but he wants us to appreciate the importance of the uncuddly ones. the ones we've never heard of. >> this is often the only voice they'll ever have before they go away. this is their only chance to sing, in a way.
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state building. and at the u.n. soon, they'll be shown on the vatican. >> this has gone extinct, and this. >> reporter: anywhere he can, as often as he can. joel sartori pleads for their lives. >> this is the best time ever to be alive to save species, because there's so many species that need our help. >> reporter: he hopes his photographs will get people to help, and he likes to hook them young. >> what grade are you guys in? >> fourth. >> we already know that tiger bones are sold as medicine. >> i do take considerate -- comfort in the fact that all is not lost, by any means. in this country, the whooping crane, black footed ferret, the california condor, mexican wolf, all of those animals all got down to two dozen. they're all stable now. not in the best shape but stable. and that just speaks volumes to the fact that people do care, but we have to let them know
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in trouble and what the need is. >> reporter: the ark is his invitation to look them in the eye, to look hard. when the engines failed on the plane i was flying, i knew what to do to save my passengers. but when my father sank into depression, i didn't know how to help him. when he ultimately shot himself, he left our family devastated. don't let this happen to you. if you or a loved one is suicidal, call the national suicide prevention lifeline.
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no matter how hopeless or helpless you feel, with the right help, you can get well. (franklin d. roosevelt) the inherent right to work is one of the elemental privileges of a free people. endowed, as our nation is, with abundant physical resources... ...and inspired as it should be to make those resources and opportunities available for the enjoyment of all... ...we approach reemployment with real hope of finding a better answer than we have now. narrator: donate to goodwill where your donations help fund
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the national museum of african-american history and culture doesn't officially open until next year. but the museum's first exhibit was put on display a little early. jan crawford reports. >> reporter: the building on the national mall may not be ready for visitors, but it proved a fine canvas for the first exhibition at the national museum of african-american history and culture. >> we felt that history couldn't wait. it's important this museum contribute today. >> reporter: this is the museum director. >> all of us, regardless of race, are shaped in profound ways by the african-american experience. our goal is to make sure that we can tell a rich and complicated
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>> reporter: the live event included a musical performance and film to commemorate and celebrate freedom, 150 years of the african-american experience reaching five stories high. documentary filmmaker stanley nelson produced the display with his wife, marsha smith. >> i think the message is inspiring, that african-american history is all about history, but that it's an inspiring history. it's a history that has ups and downs, but when you take it all together, you know, it tells an incredible story of the american people. >> each of these boxes has a story. >> reporter: the museum had already collected more than 30,000 pieces when we visited curators in a warehouse last year. this will go in a sports ss exhibit? >> yes.
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medals from olympian carl lewis, the jacket of a tuskegee airman, and even a plane the group used for training ahead of world war ii. triumphs will be celebrated here and a nation's dark past will be remembered. but not every collection has a focus on the past, because history is happening now. >> please keep your hands up. >> reporter: museum curators were in baltimore to document this year's riots following the death of freddie gray while in police custody. amazing grace >> reporter: they were in charleston, too, after a pastor and his bible study group, were all murdered in their house of worship. >> part of the goal is to be about as much as today and tomorrow as it was yesterday. >> reporter: the film concludes with images of the black lives matter movement before the
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door. tonight from paris, the manhunt widens. the search is on for a second terrorist who got away. france launches more bombing raids against isis. secretary kerry tells us the u.s. and russia may join forces against the terror group. and how do you explain evil to the most innocent among us? a dad's tender words of wisdom. this is the "cbs overnight news." ordered a third round of isis targets on syria tonight.
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inspired, he says, by the faces that don't leave his mind. the faces of the 129 killed in the terror attacks, most of them under the age of 30. youth, he said, in all its diversity. the violinist from algeria, studying music at the sorbonne. the french advertising executive who once attended the university of north texas. the architect from germany. the romanians who immigrated to paris to find a better life and found each other. tonight, france celebrates who they were and weeps for what they might have been. the search for the terrorists widened today, and elizabeth palmer is following the investigation. liz. >> reporter: scott, the police say that tonight they're looking for a second man who got away. that would make him the ninth terrorist, and they say they spotted him inside a car on surveillance camera video very near the place where the clients of the restaurants and cafes
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were gunned down. first, a police robot moved in to examine this car abandoned on a paris street. then an officer broke in, searching for links to the terrorists. police are scouring europe for evidence that might lead them to salah abdeslam, the attacker who got away. but in brussels, his brother mohammed appealed to him directly. "my advice to him is to turn himself in to the police," he said, "so justice can shed light on what happened." at this hotel in the paris suburbs, another piece of the puzzle fell into place. it's where salah abdeslam and his co-conspirators are believed to have spent the two days before the attacks. police discovered it and dusted it for fingerprints on the weekend. when salah abdeslam reserved two rooms in this hotel, he did it with his own credit card and he used his own name, which suggests he wasn't the least bit concerned about leaving a trail for investigators. knowing what they were about to
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he'd survive. and it's unclear why he did. but incredibly, in the pandemonium following the massacre, he called some friends to come and pick him up. they drove him back to belgium, where he vanished. the police have also asked for help in identifying this man, one of the suicide bombers at the football stadium who came to france on a false syrian passport with a fake name. the picture, though, is accurate, and so the police say somebody's got to know who he is. >> elizabeth palmer, thank you, liz. in belgium, the hunt is focused on molenbeek, a suburb of brussels, there was a raid there tonight and allen pizzey is there. >> reporter: police say the operation tonight was not directly targeting anyone connected to the paris attacks. but it's clear they're intent on not letting anything slip through the net. they closed this bar for drug offenses three weeks ago, and now one of the owners, salah abdeslam, is the subject of an international arrest warrant for
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the paris attacks. his older brother was a suicide bomber there. this woman, who only agreed to talk if her identity and voice were heavily disguised, knew them well. "there is no way i would have thought they were terrorists," she said. "quite the opposite. they ran a cafe where drugs were taken. they defended women who were dressed provocatively." how could they go from that to launching a terrorist attack? the suburb of molenbeek with it's mix of languages and cultures, is opaque to outsiders, a place where strangers and police are viewed with suspicion. it also has connections to many of the major terrorist attacks in europe. the gunmen in the "charlie hebdo" massacre are believed to have bought guns here. so is the man who attacked the belgium jewish museum. and a gunman who was stopped by three americans for murdering passengers on a high-speed train to paris lived here for a while. for the police, figuring out how and why molenbeek breeds extremists is as important as tracking them down and in the case of ones who committed the
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paris massacres, perhaps even harder. scott? >> allen pizzey, in belgium, thank you, allen. tonight, the u.s. is working to put together a military alliance with russia and france in the war on isis in its syrian homeland. secretary of state john kerry told us he can foresee u.s. and russian forces fighting alongside one another. kerry visited french president francois hollande today. hollande will meet in washington with president obama next week, and then with russian president putin. after meeting hollande today, kerry sat down with us. he calls isis by its arabic acronym, daesh. >> the basic strategy of destroying daesh's center, its core, which is what we did with al qaeda, is working, and al qaeda was diminished as an entity that had the ability to do what it did in 9/11 through the protracted effort in afghanistan and pakistan and
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elsewhere, in the arabian peninsula. and daesh sort of filled their void. >> we did that. >> now we have to do it to daesh. >> we did that with an enormous land invasion of afghanistan. you know better than anyone that never in history has an air campaign accomplished the goals that you just set out in this interview. >> correct, and there's no pretense here. president obama has never suggested. >> how do you root them out of syria? >> which is exactly what is beginning to happen now as the syrian arabs, the kurds and others move and earn back their capacity to be able to fight. they are currently full square in the fight to liberate ramadi. it's a tough fight and they've lost over 200 people and 1200 wounded, but they're fighting and doing it. that's exactly what the strategy is. it may take a little longer. it's tougher. who knows? but if we don't empower them to have the control over their
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communities, then when you leave, daesh will move right back in. and you wind up in this cycle. that's not where we want to go, and i think the president's on the right track to be able to take out daesh in a methodical, systematic way, which is going to increase through the help of the russians, the french are now upping their involvement, and that's all to the better in terms of speeding up the process of taking them out. >> after paris, the question becomes do we have time to wait for that strategy to work, before we see this kind of thing in the united states? >> we are doing everything possible within the framework of homeland security, and what we worry about is that for terrorists, if you're willing to die-- you want to strap a suicide vest around yourself and you want to walk into a crowd and blow yourself up -- you can choose almost anywhere to go do that. and everybody else who is in law
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enforcement trying to prevent it has to get every single thing right all the time, 24/7, 365. that's a much tougher task. >> the "cbs overnight news" wi [ vocalizing ] [ buzzing ] [ tree crashes ] [ wind howling ]
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one day before the paris attacks, isis struck in lebanon, which is bursting with syrian refugees. twin suicide bombings in beirut killed 43 and wounded more than 200. the victims were mostly from the shiite branch of islam. isis is the sunni branch. holly williams is following this from turkey. holly, how significant was that attack in lebanon? >> reporter: scott, it was very significant. lebanon has been a war-torn country, but this was the worst terror attack in the capital beirut in many years, and it comes at a time when lebanon is especially fragile and the civil war raging just across the
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border in syria has played into those tensions, destabilizing lebanon. on top of that, lebanon, which has a population of around four million people, has had an influx of over a million syrian refugees since the civil war began. >> paris has demanded the world's attention, but it's been at the expense of coverage like the story in lebanon. >> reporter: well, scott, that's true. and there's been a lot of criticism on social media coming from inside lebanon and other middle eastern countries aking why there wasn't more coverage of the attack in beirut. and some people have said that it was racist, that what the western media was effectively saying is that european lives matter more than arab lives. and, scott, there is one very important point which is sometimes forgotten but which we have made before and it's this: isis has killed many more muslims than it has members of any other religious group,
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including christians. >> holly williams in turkey for us tonight. holly, thank you. isis has already claimed responsibility for blowing up the russian jetliner over egypt. well, today, the russians confirmed it was a bomb with a force equivalent to about two pounds of t.n.t. that brought the plane down. 224 were killed, mostly vacationing families. in retaliation today, russia fired cruise missiles from ships in the mediterranean and dropped bombs from planes on isis targets in syria. major american cities have been tightening security, and here is our homeland security correspondent jeff pegues. >> reporter: around pennsylvania avenue in washington, it's not just the white house that is a potential terrorist target. it's also the restaurants, coffee shops, and public squares. the area has tight security, but even at midday, we didn't see
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any police presence. former assistant f.b.i. director ron hosko. >> there are simply not enough police, law enforcement on duty, off duty, hired security to cover every potential gathering spot where americans enjoy their liberty. >> reporter: in los angeles, deputy police chief michael downing says since the paris attacks, the l.a.p.d. has increased patrols and is working with the community to step up awareness around soft targets. >> there are 45,000 private security guards in the los angeles area alone. there's 10,000 l.a.p.d. when you combine that with community members that are interested as well, we have some good leverage. >> reporter: but law enforcement officials say the best way to stop a suicide attack is having the right intelligence, and once an attack is under way, cutting down on the response time is key. that involves active shooter training developed after the columbine school massacre. move in and immediately
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neutralize the threat. but hosko says even a huge show of force may not be enough. >> is that going to stop a determined terrorist who sees only one thing -- jihad and martyrdom and mass carnage? i don't know that it's been known to stop that. >> reporter: it is not just los angeles that's relying on private security guards. scott, we also spoke with philadelphia's police commissioner who says they are as well. >> jeff pegues reporting. jeff, thank you. today, the republican leaders of the house and senate called on the president to stop accepting syrian refugees. we have more on that from our congressional correspondent nancy cordes. >> it strikes me that we need to pause or a moratorium. >> reporter: it's no longer just the republican rank and file. senate leader mitch mcconnell and house speaker paul ryan both called for a halt today to the refugee program. >> this is a moment where it's better to be safe than to be
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>> reporter: but the administration isn't wavering from its plan to let in 10,000 syrians over the next year. white house officials insisted today one-on-one interviews are conducted with each potential refugee, something that didn't happen when the refugees arrived in europe earlier this year. officials add that just 2% of the 2,300 syrians let in so far are single males of combat age. >> frankly, there are probably greater risks with passport- holding europeans. >> reporter: adam schiff is the top democrat on the house intelligence committee. what's wrong with taking a brief pause to make sure that the refugee program is as safe as possible? >> a refugee who is trying to come and find solace here in the united states now, it's still going to be a year and a half before they get through the process. so adding further delay to that i don't think makes sense. >> reporter: but 27 of the
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they'll try to deny refugees resettlement assistance. robert bentley is alabama's governor. >> we're not going to allow them into the state of alabama. >> reporter: white house officials are holding a conference call with governors tonight while the f.b.i. director briefs members of congress here on capitol hill. it is a full court press from an administration, scott, that has been criticized abroad for not taking in more refugees. >> nancy cordes on the story in washington. nancy, thank you. there's also breaking news tonight in the presidential race. republican bobby jindal, the governor of louisiana, is dropping out. jindal never got out of single digits in the polls. still ahead, the hunt for isis it's judgment day. the in-laws, the type-a cousins, siblings and back seat chefs have all assembled to look inside your oven. but you've cleaned off all the baked-on
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isis has captured much of syria and iraq already, and it's using terrorism to expand its reach in those countries. charlie d'agata went along as kurdish troops hunted for isis sleeper cells in northern iraq. >> reporter: on the outskirts of kirkuk, the anti-terror squad hoped to find four isis suspects. they've been under surveillance for a while. they are considered dangerous, and they don't know what to expect once they get there.
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the men spread out and surrounded the house. then they burst through the gate, weapons drawn. but it's not until the next house that they nabbed the first suspect, but he was alone. and the only information he would give them was his name. general sadar qadir told us the men are suspected of being among the gunmen who massacred as much as 1,700 army recruits when isis overran a military base in tikrit last year. now they're believed to be part of an isis sleeper cell plotting to attack civilian areas. the next location was a warehouse. men were ordered to face the wall and squat on the ground. back at the base, the general told us the tragic events in paris just showed that isis is a global enemy. "it's very sad," he said.
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seven car bombs went off in kirkuk, and hundreds were killed, just like france." and although they captured two isis suspects overnight, there are now two more on the run. these squads are out there day and night, scott, and the general told us because it is the aim of the terrorists to kill civilians, they pose a greater threat than the isis militants his forces face on the battlefield. >> charlie d'agata on the battlefield in northern iraq.
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will be right back. back home, storms are heading east tonight through arkansas, louisiana, and mississippi. the system spun off tornadoes yesterday, four in the texas panhandle. as many as ten in kansas where a number of homes were destroyed. and a fierce snowstorm dumped more than a foot of snow in kansas and colorado. there was a bomb scare at a soccer stadium in germany today. turned out to be a false alarm, but the match between germany and the netherlands was canceled. soccer was played in london as two rivals stood together. here's mark phillips. >> viva la france! >> reporter: when is a game more than a game?
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when the visiting team's anthem is the theme song of the night. when the national stadium of england is decorated in the colors and slogan of the old sporting enemy, france. when the game comes just four days after suicide bombers tried to blow themselves up in the crowd during another game in paris. but had to settle for detonaing outside when they couldn't get in. when two members of the french team were directly affected by the attacks, lassana diara's cousin was killed. antoine griezmann's sister escaped from the bataclan hall massacre. when the heaviest security anybody can remember is set up around the stadium. it was the french who said they wanted this game to go ahead. the english not only agreed. they turned it into an exercise in solidarity. >> we here to support england, we're here to support france. we're here to say yes to peace and no to terror. >> reporter: and when it was
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time for the anthems, instead of a competition between rivals, there was a singalong, the words to the french "marseillaise" put up on the scoreboard so the english fans could join in. and those two century-old french revolutionary lyrics about resistance to invasion and blood flowing seemed as relevant now as when they were written. the anthem's message of historic defiance resonates today and not just in france. the challenge, though, is how to turn that defiance into effective international action. but what mattered here was the sentiment. >> i cried, like, for two days, and i was dispirited. and now i'm here to support my country. and know that every country are behind us in this situation. >> reporter: the score in the game, 2-0, england. nobody cared. mark phillips, cbs news, london. >> there's no greater antidote
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reassuring words, next. every day it's getting closer going faster than a roller coaster a love like yours will surely come my way hey, hey, hey
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if your pregnancy is healthy, wait for labor to begin on its own. a healthy baby is worth the wait. o0 c1 travel is part of the american way of life. when we're on vacation, we keep an eye out for anything that looks out of place. [ indistinct conversations ] miss, your bag. when we travel from city to city, we pay attention to our surroundings. [ cheering ] everyone plays a role in keeping our community safe. whether you're traveling for business or pleasure, be aware of your surroundings. if you see something suspicious,
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i we don't usually ask you to read our stories, but we will tonight, as a parisian father explains to his young son, in
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here. and that's the "overnight news" for this wednesday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back with us a little bit later for the morning news and, of course, "cbs this morning."
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pelley. this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the "overnight news." the international manhunt for those behind the paris terror fugitives. french investigators say both were directly involved with the attacks that left at least 129 people dead, and another 350 wounded across paris. the islamic state has claimed responsibility, and tonight, the group is feeling the wrath. french warplanes again bombed isis targets in and around their self-proclaimed capital of raqqah and moscow is stepping up
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the jet that crashed in egypt was brought down by a bomb and isis has claimed responsibility. vladamir putin is offering a $50 million reward for those who actually planted the device. mark phillips has more. >> reporter: russian security services has said they now have the evidence to confirm what was always the prime suspicion, that the russian jet in the sinai was caused by a bomb. the fact that the wreckage from the plane was spread over such a large area had always indicated the plane broken up at altitude. the question was whether that was due to explosion or structural failure. now, the head of the main russian security agency, the fsd, has told vladamir putin that tests on the wreckage proved that a homemade explosive device, as he described it, blew the plane up. the continuing suspicion is that the bomb was placed on board at sharm el sheikh.
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a lapse in security, the egyptians resisted admitting to. reports that two airport workers have been arrested haven't been confirmed. but the responsibility of the deaths of those on board has long been claimed by the islamic state, saying it was retaliating for the russian bombing campaign against them. vladamir putin has vowed to find them and to punish them. the russian navy has warships in the even mediterranean conducting cruise missile attacks. vladamir putin ordered his commanders to cooperate with the french military in their assaults. in paris, scott pelley sat down with secretary of state john kerry to ask him about this new alliance. >> the secretary outlined for us today a dramatic, and if it works, historic alliance. he said he can imagine in the next few weeks the united states, russia, and france cooperatig militarily against
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isis, or as he prefers to call it, daesh, in syria. the idea of u.s. and russian forces fighting together, working together against this terrible enemy is a remarkable idea. but that is exactly what they're trying to do. you know, it seems to me that the americans can't say they're supporting the russians and the russians can't say they're supporting the americans. but both can say they're supporting france. in two weeks' time, isis brought down the russian jetliner, attacked their enemies in lebanon and now attacked paris. it doesn't feel like it's working. >> well, the strategy is to contain isis within iraq and syria, and diminish their hold and destroy their headquarters and them fundamentally. because that's where all of this has emanated from. slowly but surely, that is working. but yes, they have foreign
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that remains a challenge, and we've known all along that challenge is there. the basic strategy of destroying daesh's center, its core, which is what we did with al qaeda, is working. and that's -- daesh sort of filled their void. >> we did that with an enormous land invasion of afghanistan. you know better than anyone that never in history has an air campaign accomplished the goals that you just set out in this interview. >> correct, and that's no pretense here. president obama has never suggested. >> how do you root them out of syria? >> which is exact think what is beginning to happen now, as the syrian arabs, the kurds and others move and earn back their capacity to be able to fight. one of the lessons of iraq is, that it doesn't have to be american soldiers who are on the ground in order to be able to fight the fight, that they can
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have to have the people that live there vested in that fight. president obama's strategy is to continue to empower them, which is what we're doing. they are currently full square in the fight to liberate ramadi. and it's a tough fight. they've lost over 200 people and 1200 wounded, but they're fighting. they're doing it. and that's exactly what the strategy is. it may take a little longer. it's tougher. who knows? but if we don't empower them to have the control of their communities, then daesh will move right back in. and you wind up in this cycle. that's not where we want to go and i think the president is on the right track to be able to take out daesh in a methodical, systematic way, which is now frankly going to increase through the help of obviously the russians, the french are now upping their involvement. and that's all to the better in terms of speeding up the process of taking them out.
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a hope that the russians will come along. secretary kerry seemed to think it would just be in the next few weeks, if it was indeed possible at all. president hollande of france is going to be meeting with president obama in washington next week and then going directly to moscow to meet with president putin. the hunt for isis terror cells is not limited to france and belgium. kurdish forces are also rooting them out in northern iraq. charlie d'agata was embedded with kurdish special forces and reports now from irbil. >> reporter: here they hunt down terror suspects every day, mostly at night. last night we spent the night with a squad going after suspects from one of the worst isis acrosstrocityies this country has seen. we met the general at a secret location south of kircut. he told us they were after four isis suspects. a sleeper cell lying low among
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the local population, plotting terror attacks in iraq. down a muddy road, they nab the first one. he didn't put up any resistance. but in the back of the truck, it's starting to sink in. the targets, men suspected of taking part in a massacre of as many as 1700 army recruits when isis overran a military base in tikrit last year. lined up by the hundreds, shot dead in shallow graves. who is this young man? the general said the men they were after are among those who pulled the trigger. the next location is a warehouse where they hoped to find three other suspects. they only found one. he too is blind folded and taken away for interrogation. two more men from the suspected terror cell are still at large. now they know their cohorts are already been taken in.
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the environmental group is wrapping up its first-ever shark tagging expedition in the gulf of mexico. cbs news has been following this group of fishermen and soin scientists were there. we were there when they tagged and reloosed the first great white shark. >> reporter: the gulf of mexico has received enormous attention, mostly for what went wrong. the deep water horizon to start. but five years later, parts of the gulf are teeming with life, providing research evers a chance to study how many sharks are there and where they're going.
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meet finley, a 10-foot long tiger shark. the first gulf shark to be spot tagged. >> here it is, finley the tiger shark for you to enjoy following across the gulf of mexico. >> reporter: this group of scientists just wrapped an expedition off the coast of texas. tiger sharks, sort of the white shark of the gulf? >> yes. tiger sharks love to come in to beaches and estuaries. >> reporter: during their expedition, they tagged four sharks, two tigers and two hammerheads. they're posting all of their data to their websites, bringing global attention to a body of watt with an often muddy reputation. a lot of people think of the gulf as a mess, largely because of the spill. what kind of shape is the gulf in? >> i think the gulf is in pretty good shape. it's rebounding and full of life.
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>> reporter: and he hopes full of sharks. remove too many and second tier predators would roam, throwing the ecosystem off balance. in the gulf, they're optimistic. fit over the past few decades, the influx of oil rigs has created just as many artificial reefs. we are 30 miles offshore. there are about 4,000 active oil rigs in the gulf of mexico. above water, they are steel, stark, industrial. but underwater, an explosion of life. >> you have to keep in mind they have been here for decades. no one realized the great ecosystems that would be formed around them. >> reporter: greg is one of the scientists working with o-search
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in the gulf. when you first saw one of these undersea worlds, what was your reaction? >> one, it's just the sheer size is amazing. on the surface, it's flat and looks like nothing. but when you dive down just a few feet and you see the size of a building under water, and then the next thing you see is just the abundance of marine life, particularly fish that are just everywhere. >> reporter: over time, man made structures like oil rigs become artificial reefs by attracting an entire food chain. microscopic organisms, coral, schools of fish and the lions of the ocean, sharks. they also attract controversy. usually when a rig is retired and a decision needs to be made. should parts of it stay or go? this is a tricky issue. everybody agrees that there are environmental benefits to it. but some say listen, we're against reefing, regardless of where it is or when it is, because it just encourages the oil companies to drill more.
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true? >> yeah. well, yes and no. believe it or not, the oil and gas companies don't necessarily want to do this. the scrap value of the steel is worth way more to bring it in. a lot of concern in the general public is that it's oil and gas and oil and gas doesn't always have the best reputation. look, ocean first. great grandchildren first. if you want an abundant future for the gulf of mexico, it would be an absolute catastrophe to not reef every single one of those rigs you can. >> reporter: for now, big oil's trash is fisher's treasure. finley and her friends will provide data scientists have never had. where gulf sharks are mating, breeding, and traveling. what role artificial reefs play, and what threats are real versus imagined. >> it's kind of crazy to be pioneering this work in 2015.
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we've been changing things up with k-y love. oh yeah. it's a pleasure gel that magnifies both our sensations. it gives us chills in places we've never gotten chills before. yeah, it makes us feel like... dare to feel more with new k-y love. >> >> there are hundreds of species on the endangered list. and one photographer has made it his life's work to capture them all. martha teichner reports for
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>> reporter: they haunt you. these eyes. as intended. you're supposed to regard the greatest and the tiniest. the lowliest. equally. >> if we could get there and look these species in the eye, really get down low and look them in the eye and you see how lovely they are and how much intelligence there is there. they're telling us something. i mean, they're shouting it to me. >> reporter: for ten years now, our friend, national geographic photographer joel sartori, has made it his life's mission to be their messenger. and he hopes their protector. their noah building a photographic ark. >> this is the ark room we call
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we have 5002 species in here. at this rate, it would take two hours to see them all. it's supposed to overwhelm people with what life looks like on earth. >> reporter: and what might soon be extinct. >> the very last, that's the very last of its kind, of this tree frog. he's like nine years old at least. when he's gone, that's it. they will be extinct. >> reporter: his photo ark will be at the national geographic museum in washington, d.c. until april. >> this is the northern white rhino that i photographed at the zoo this summer in the czech republic. there were five at the time. this is a very old female, and she died one week to the day after we photographed her. now there are four. this is the pygmy rabbit. that animal has gone extinct.
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>> reporter: it has? >> yeah, yeah. you can see her from thor end of the exhibit. we wanted people to be able to see her, come into this room and have the experience of, well, this is what we're talking about. this is the consequence if we ignore the world around us. this is the consequence of that. >> scientists over the past 500, well, half a million years, we've seen five mass extinction shuns. you think of volcanos and astroids. scientists describe the current loss of plants and animals as the sixth extinction. >> reporter: catherine workman is senior director of national geographic's protecting wildlife initiative. >> we're losing animates at 1,000 times the rate. we have hunting, climate change, habitat loss and the combination of all these changes is really
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hammering the planet's biodiversity. >> reporter: joel didn't set out to create a photo ark. it began as an act of desperation, when his wife, cathy, was diagnosed with breast cancer and he needed to stay home in lincoln, nebraska. >> i just thought i need to shoot something. cathy's going to be sick for a long time, and on the days when she felt better through the chemo cycles, i just needed something to shoot. >> reporter: so this world traveler, who shot 35 stories for national geographic -- >> that's what i came here for. >> reporter: including six covers, drove to the lincoln children's zoo a mile from his house and asked if he could photograph the animals. >> they let me take a naked mole rat and put it on a white background and i did a couple of blue and black poison dart
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that was 5400 species ago. >> reporter: he's not quite halfway through photographing all 12,000 animal species in captivity, endangered or not. he figures it will take him the rest of his life to finish. he's taken pictures at more than 200 zoos in the united states alone. the how-to part can be tricky. >> there he goes. we're just standing here as living fences. >> reporter: wrangling flamingos. not quite like getting your ducks in a row. >> doesn't this look nice? perfect for chimps. >> reporter: on the other hand, success is not always guarantied. >> not a bashful bird.
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>> reporter: ouch! and there can be hazards. you've heard of angry birds? >> this is like a $6,000 camera. doesn't he know that? this bird is the nastiest, most bad-ass bird i've ever had to do. got it, got it, nice. >> reporter: why zoo animals? >> zoos have the only populations of these animals. >> reporter: he accepts that people fall in love with fuzzy, cute animals. like the fennic fox. these at the st. louis zoo. but he wantstous appreciate the importance of the uncuddly ones. the ones we've never heard of. >> this is often the only voice they'll ever have before they go away. this is their only chance to
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>> reporter: his animals have been projected on the empire state building. and at the u.n. soon, they'll be shown on the vatican. >> this has gone extinct, and this. >> reporter: anywhere he can, as often as he can. joel sartori pleads for their lives. >> this is the best time ever to be alive to save species, because there's so many species that need our help. >> reporter: he hopes his photographs will get people to help, and he likes to hook them young. >> what grade are you guys in? >> fourth. >> reporter: i do take comfort in the fact that all is not lost, by any means. in this country, the whooping crane, black footed ferret, the california condor, mexican wolf, all of those animals all got down to two dozen. they're all stable now. and that just speaks volumes to the fact that people do care, but we have to let them know
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in trouble and what the need is. >> reporter: the ark is his
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eye, to look hard. the national museum of african-american history and culture doesn't officially open until next year. but the museum's first exhibit was put on display a little early. jan crawford reports. >> reporter: the building on the national mall may not be ready for sitors, but it proved a fine canvas for the first exhibition at the national museum of african-american history and culture. >> we felt that history couldn't wait. it's important this museum contribute today. >> reporter: this is the museum director. >> all of us, regardless of race, are shaped in profound ways by the african-american experience. our goal is to make sure that we can tell a rich and complicated
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>> reporter: the live event included a musical performance and film to commemorate and celebrate freedom, 150 years of the african-american n perience reachihi five stories high. documentary filmmaker stanley nelson produced the display with his wife, marsha smith. >> i think the smith is inspiring, that african-american history is all about history, but that it's an inspiring history. it's a history that has ups and downs,s,ut when you take it all together, you know,, it tells an incredible story of the american people. >> each of these boxes has a story. >> reporter: the museum had already collected more than 30,000 pieces when we visited curators in a warehouse last year. there are gogo medals from ympian carl lewis, the jacket of a tuskegee airman, and even a
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ahead of world war ii. triumphs will be celebrated here remembered. but not every collection has a focus on the past, because history is happening now. >> p pase keep your hands up. >> reporter: museum curators were in baltimore to document this year's riots following the death of freddie gray while in police custody. amazing grace >> reporter: they were in charleston, too, after a pastor and hisis bible study group, were all murdered in their house of worship. the film concludes with images of the black lives matter movement. >> and that's the "overnight news" for this wednesday. for some of you, the news continues.
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for the morning news and "cbs this morning." tonight from parisisthe manhunt widens. the search is on for a second terrorist who got away. france launches more bombing raids against isis. secretary kerry tells us the u.s. and russia may join forces against the terror group. and how do you explain evil to the most innocent among us? a dad's tender words of wisdom. this is the "cbs overnight news." the president of france ordered a third round of attacks
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on isis targets tonight. inspired, he says, by the faces that don't leave his mind. the faces of the 129 killed in the terror attacks, most of them under the age of 30. youth, he said, in all its diversity. the violinist from a aeria, studying music at the sorbonne. the french advertising executive who once attended the university of north texas. the architect from germany. the romanians who immigrated to paris to find a better life and found each other. tonight, france celebrates who they were and weeps fofowhat they might have been. the search for the terrorists widened today, and elizabeth palmer is following the investigation. liz. >> reporter: scott, the police say that tonight they're looking for a second man who got away. that would make him the ninth terrorist, and they say they spotted him inside a car on surveillance camera video very near the place where the clients of the restaurants and cafes were gunned down.
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first, a police robot moved in to examine this car abandoned on a paris street. then an officer broke in, searching for links to the terrorists. police are scouring europe foror evidencecehat might lead them m salah abdeslam, ththattacker who got away. but in brussels, his brother mohammed appealed to him directly. "my advice to him is to turn himself in to the police," he said, "so justice can shed light on what happened." at this hotel in the paris suburbs, another piece of the puzzle fell into place. it's where salah abdeslam and his co-conspirators are believed to have spent the two days before the attacks. police discovered it and dusted it for fingerprints on the weekend. when salah abdeslam reserved two rooms in this hotel, he did it with his own credit card and he used his own name, which suggests he wasn't the least bit concerned about t aving a trail for investigators. knowing what they were about to do, he probably didn't think
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he'd survive. and it's unclear why he did. but incredibly, in the pandemonium following the massacre, he called some friends to come and pick him up. they drove him back to belgium, where he vanished. e police have also a aed for help in identifying this man, one of the suicide bombers at the football stadium who came to france on a false syrian passport with a fake name. the picture, though, is accurate, and so the police say somebody's got to know who he is. >> elizabeth palmer, thank you, liz. in belgium, the hunt is focused on molenbeek, a suburb of brussels, there was a raid there tonight and allen pizzey is there. >> reporter: police say the operation tonight was not directly targeting anyone connected to the paris attacks. but it's clear they're intent on not letting anything slip through the net. ey closed this bar for drug offenseseshree weeks ago, and d now one of the owners, salah abdeslam, is the subject of an
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international arrest warrant for the paris attacks. his older brother was a suicide bomber there. this woman, who only agreed to talk if her identity and voice were heavily disguised, knew them well. "there is no way i would have thought they were terrorists," she said. "quitetehe opposite. they ran a cafe where drugs were taken. they defended women who were dressed provocatively." how could they go from that to launching a terrorist attack? the suburb of molenbeek with it's mix of languages and cultures, is opaque to outsiders, a place where strangers and police are viewed with suspicion. it also has connections to many ofofhe major terrorist a aacks in europe. the gunmen in the "charlie hebdo" massacre are believed to have bought guns here. so is the man who attacked the belgium jewish museum. and a gunman who was stopped by three americans for murdering passengers on a high-speed train to paris lived here for a while. for the police, figuring out how and why momonbeek breeds extremists i ias important as tracking them down a in the case of ones who committed the ris massacres, perhaps even
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harder. scott? >> allen pizzey, in belgium, thank you, allen. tonight, the u.s. is working to put together a military alliance with russia and france in the war on isis in its syrian homeland. secretary of s ste john kerry told us hehean foresee u.s. and russian forces fighting alongside one another. kerry visited french president francois hollande today. hollande will meet in washington with president obama next week, and then with russian president putin.n. after meeting hollanan today, kerry sat down with us. he calls isis by its arabic acronym, daesh. >> the basic strategy of destroying daesh's center, its core, which is what we did with al qaeda, is working, and al qaeda was diminished as an entity that had the ability to do what it did in 9/1111hrough the protracted effort inin afghanistan and pakistan and
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elsewhere, in the arabian peninsula. and daesh sort of filled their void. >> we did that. >> now we have to do it to daesh. >> we did that with an enormous land invasion of afghanistan. you know better than anyone that never in history has an air campaign accomplished the goals that you just set out in this interview. >> correct, and there's no pretense here. president obama has never suggested. >> how do you root them out of syria? >> which is exactly what is beginning to happen now as the syrian arabs, the kurds and others move and d rn back their capacity to be ablblto fight. they are currently full square in the fight to liberate ramadi. it's a tough fight and they've lost over 200 people and 1200 wounded, but they're fighting and doing it. that's exactly what the strategy is. it may take a little longer. it's tougher. who knows? but if we don't empower them to have the control over their
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communities, then when you leave, daesh will move right back in. and you wind up in this cycle. that's not where we want to go, and i think the president's on the right track to be able to take out daesh in a methodical, systematat way, which is going to increase through ththhelp of the russians, the french are now upping their involvement, and that's all to the better in terms of speeding up the process of taking them out. >> after paris, the question becomes do we have time to wait for that strategy work, before we see this kind ofofhing in the united states? >> we are doing everything possible within the framework of homeland security, and what we worry about is that for terrorists, if you're willing to die-- you want to strap a suicide vest around yourself and you want to walk into a crowd and blow yourself up -- you can choose almost anywhere to go do that. and everybody else who is in law
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enforcement trying to prevent it has to get every single thing right all the time, 24/7, 365. that's a much tougher task. >> the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. almost sixty million americans are affected by mental illness. together we can help them with three simple words. my name is chris notot and i will listen. from maine to maui, thousands of high school students across the country are getting in on the action by volunteering in their communinies. chris yoyog: action teams of high schoololtudents are joining lunteers of america and major league baseball players to help train and inspire the next generation of volunteers. carlos pea: it's easy to start an action team at your school so you, too, can gein on the action. get in on the action at actionteam.org. 'cause you'll be ininy heart
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from this day on now and forevermore... narrator: if animals are our best friends, shouldn't we be theirs? visit your l lal shelter, adadt a pet. you'll be in my heart no matter what... cbs cares. if you were e hippie in the '60s, you need to know. it's the dawning of the age of aquarius. yeah, and something else that's cool.
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what? osteoporosis is preventable. all: osteo's preventable? right on! if you dig your bones, protect them. all: cbs cares! one day before the paris attacks, isis struck in lebanon, which is bursting with syrian refugees. twin suicide bombings in beirut killed 43 and wounded more than 200. the victims were mostly from the shiite branch of islam. isis is the sunni branch. holly williams is following this from turkey. holly, how significant was that attack in lebanon? >> reporter: scott, it was very significant. lebanon has been a war-torn country, but this was the worst terror attack in the capital beirut in many years, and it comes at a time when lebanon is especially fragilelend the civil
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border in syria has played into those tensions, destabilizing lebanon. on top of that, lebanon, which has a population of around four million people, has had an influx of over a million syrian refugees since the civil war began. >> paris has demanded thth world's attention, but it's been at the expense of coverage like the story in lebanon. >> reporter: well, scott, that's true. and there's been a lot of criticism on social media coming from inside lebanon and other middle eastern countries asking why there wasn't more coverage of the attack in beirut. and some people have said that it was racist, that what the western media was effectively saying is that european lives matter more than arab lives. and, scott, there is one very important point which is sometimes forgotten but which we have made before and it's this: isis has killed many more muslims thth it has members of any other religiougroup,
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including christians. >> holly williams in turkey for us tonight. holly, thank you. isis has already claimed responsibility for blowing up the russian jetliner over egypt. well, today, the russians confirmed it was a bomb with a force equivalent to about two pounds of t.n.t. that brought the plane down. 224 were killed, mostly vacationing families. in retaliation today, russia fired cruise missiles from ships in the mediterranean and dropped bombs from planes on isis targets in syria. major american cities have been tititening security, and here is our homeland security correspondent jeff pegues. >> reporter: around pennsylvania avenue in washington, it's not just the white house that is a potential terrorist target. it's also the restaurants, coffee shops, and public squares. the area has tight security, but evenent midday, we didn't see any police presence.
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former assistant f.b.i. director ron hosko. >> there are simply not enough police, law enforcement on duty, off duty, hired security to cover every potential gathering spot where americans enjoy their liberty. >> reporter: in los angeles, deputy police chief michael downing g ys since the paris attacks, the l.a.p.d. has increased patrols and is working with the community to step up awareness around soft targets. >> there are 45,000 private security guards in the los angeles area alone. there's 10,000 l.a.p.d. when you combine that with community members that are interested a awell, we have some good leverage. >> reporter: but law enforcement officials say the best way to stop a suicide attack is having the right intelligence, and once an attack is under way, cutting down on the response time is key. that involves active shooter training developed after the columbine school massacre. move in and immediately
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neutralili the threat. but hosko says even a huge show of force may not be enough. >> is that going to stop a determined terrorist who sees only one thing -- jihad and martyrdom and mass carnage? i don't know that it's been known n stop that. >> repororr: it is not just lolo angeles that's relying on private security guards. scott, we also spoke with philadelphia's police commissioner who says they are as well. >> jeff pegues reporting. jeff, thank you. today, the republican leaders of the house and senate called on the president to stop accepting syrian refugees. we have momo on that from our congressional correspondent nancy cordes. >> it strikes me that we need to pause or a moratorium. >> reporter: it's no longer just the republican rank and file. senate leader mitch mcconnell and house speaker paul ryan both called for a halt today to the refugegeprogram. >> this s a moment where it's
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better t tbe safe than to be sorry. >> reporter: but the administration isn't wavering from its plan to let in 10,000 syrians over the next year. white house officials insisted today one-on-one interviews are conducted with each potential refugee, something that didn't happen when the refugees arrived in europe earlier this yeaea officials add that just 2% of the 2,300 syrians let in so far are single malesf combat age. >> fnkly, there are probly greater risks with passport- holding europeans. >> reporter: adam schiff is the top democrat on the house intelligence committee. what's wrong with taking a brief pause to make sure that the refugee program is as safe as possible? >> a refugee who is trying to come and find solace here in the united states now, it's still going to be a year and a half before they get through the process. so adding further delay to that i don't think makes sense. >> reporter: but 27 of the
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nation's governors now say they'll l y to deny refugees resettlement assistance. robert bentley is alabama's governor. >> we're not going to allow them into the state of alabama. >> reporter: white house officials are holding a conference call with governors tonight while the f.b.i. director briefs members of congress here on capitol hill. it is a full court press from an administratiti, scott, that has beenenriticized abroad fororot taking in more refugees. >> nancy cordes on the story in washington. nancy, thank you. there's also breaking news tonight in the presidential race. republican bobby jindal, the governor of louisiana, is dropping out. jindal never got out of single digits in the polls. still ahead, the hunt for isis ininraq. the "cbs overnight news" will be right
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isis has captured much of syria and iraq already, and it's using terrorism to expand its reach in those countries. charlie d'd'ata went along as kurdish troops hunted for isis sleeper cells in northern iraq. >> reporter: on the outskirts of kirkuk, the anti-terror squad hoped to find four isis suspects. they've been under surveillance for a while. they are considered d ngerous, and thth don't know what to expectctnce they get there.
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surrounded the house. then they burst through the gate, weapons drawn. but it's not until the next house that they nabbed the first suspect, but he was alone. and the onon information he woululgive them was his nana. general sadar qadir told us the men are suspected of being among the gunmen who massacred as much as 1,700 army recruits when isis overran a military base in tikrit last year. now they're believed to be part of an isis sleeper cell plotting to attack civiliananreas. the e xt location was a warehouse. men were ordered to face the wall and squat on the ground. back at the base, the general told us the tragic events in paris just showed that isis is a global enemy. "it's very sad," he said. "but there have been days where
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seven car bombs went off in kirkuk, and hundredsdsere killed, just like france." and although they captured two isis suspects overnight, there are now two more on the run. these squads are out there day and night, scott, and the general told us because it is the aim of the terrorists to kill civilians, , ey pose a greater ththat than the isis militants his forces face on the battlefield. >> charlie d'agata on the battlefield in northern iraq. charlie, thank you.
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will be right back. 2>> back home, storms are heading east tonight through arkansas, louisiana, and mississippi. the system spun off tornadoes yesterday, four in the texas panhandle. as many as ten in kansas where a number of homes were destroyed. and a fierce snowstorm dumped more than a foot of snow in kansas and colorado. there was a bomb scare at a soccer stadium in germany today. turned out to be a false alarm, but the match between germany and the netherlands was canceled. soccer was played in london as two rivals stood together. here's mark phillips. >> viva la france! >> reporter: when is a game more than a game? when the visiting team's anthem is the theme song of the night.
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when the national stadium of england is decorated in the colors and slogan of the old sporting enemy, france. when the game comes just four r days aftereruicide bombers trieded to blow themselves up in the crowd during another game in paris. but had to settle for detonating outside when they couldn't get in. when two members of the french team were directly affected by the attacks, lassana diara's cousin was killed. antoine griezmzmn's sister escaped from the bataclan hall massacre. when the heaviest security anybody can remember is set up around the stadium. it was the french who said they wanted this game to go ahead. the english not only agreed. they turned it into an exercise in solidarity. >> we here t tsupport england, we're here to support france. we're here to say yes to peace and no to terror. >>8reporter: and when itas
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a competition between rivals, there was a singalong, the words to the french "marseillaise" put up on the scoreboard so the english fans could join in. and those two century-old french revolutionary lyrics about resistance to invasion and blood flowing seemed as relevantow as when they were written. the anthem's message of historic defiance resonates today and not just in france. the challenge, though, is how to turn that defiance into effective international action. but what mattered here was t t sentiment. >> i cried, like, for two days, and i was dispirited. and now i'm here to support my country. and know that every country are behind us in this situation. >> reporter: the score in the game, 2-0, england. nobody cared. mark phillips, cbs news, london. >> there's no greater antidote
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reassuring words, next. woman: what does it feel like when a woman is having a heart attack? chest pain, like there's a ton of weight on your chest. severe shortness of breath. unexplained nausea. cold sweats. the's an unusual tiredness and fatigue. there's unfamiliar dizziness or light-headedness. unusual pain in your back, neck, jaw, one or both arms, even your upper stomach, are signs you're having a heart attack. don't make excuses. make the call to 9-1-1 immediately. learn moreret womenshealth.gov/heartattack. bipolar disorder is a brain condition that causes unusual or dramatic mood swings. affects millions of americans and compromises their ability to function. when diagnosed, bipolar disorder can be effectively treated by mood stabilizers. but most people with bipolar disorder suffer for years without help bebeuse the symptoms are missed or confused
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learn how easily you can help keep this from happening to a loved one.
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we don't usually ask you to read our stories, but we will tonight, as a parisian father explains to his young son, in
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here. and that's the "overnight
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news" for this wednesday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back with us a little bit later for the morning news and, of course, " "s this rning." from outside the cathedral of
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pelley. . [ gunshots ] [ gunshots ] breaking news this morning. violence erupts in a paris suburb as police raid the suspected hideout of the mastmind of last week's terror attacks. it's wednesday, november 18, 2015. this is the "cbs morning news." good to be with you.u. i'm anne-marie green. overnight, french police raided an apartment in a suburb of paris where suspects in last
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hold up. the target of the operation was the alleged mastermind of the attacks, abdelhamid abaaoud. scores o oheavily armed policece were involved in the raid north of paris and jonathan vigliotti is in saint-denis with the details. >> reporter: good morning. we're standing about three blocks away from where the early morning raid was carried out around 4:00 local time. it's six hours later and you can still see the active scene behind me. police and militity troops scouring the street for other possible suspects. french prosecutor is confirming one person killeidentified as a female suicide bomber who we're told set off her suicide vest. five other suspects taken into custody, three iide the
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