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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  December 9, 2015 1:37am-4:30am CST

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it's vitamin c. i watched you very carefully, detective, but i missed you slipping them into his pocket. maybe because you watched the wrong detective. captioning sponsored by universal studios domestic television captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org
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overseas beijing remains under an environmental red alert. the smog is so thick that schools are closed and residents can only drive thehe cars on alternatedays. seth stone is in beijing. >> reporter: you should be able to see a line of skyscrapers along the highway behind me. they're covered by the smog. visibility is less than a mile. you can smell the pollution. you can even taste it in the back of your throat. the familiar blanket of s sg enveloped beijing, but this time a red alert which closed school, shut construction sites and took
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it was busy outside this children's hospital where we met parents worried about his kid's respiratory problem. how is he feeling? >> really bad, actually, for a few days. >> reporter: several doctors suggested this seven-year-old's lung ailment may be related to the smog. yourself. do you feel your government is doing its part? >> i think they are doing it. >> reporter: people do what they can to try to protect themselves. we have three air p pifiers here at home. we changed the filter today. this is the new white one. take a look at the one from two months ago. ijing's pollution was improving in the first ten months of this year, but still this fifth grader couldn't go to school today. what do you think about that. >> so bad.
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red alert was issued. here's the straight talk of a 10-year-old. just last week the pollution was worse, but there was no red alert. >> yes. >> reporter: what do you think of that? >> kind of weird. >> reporter: kind of weird? >> uh-huh. >> reporter: of course, last week china's president was in paris for the climate conference, and the government here was widely criticized for not sounding the pollution alarm. schools and factories are expected to remain closedd for two more days until a cold snap comes in and hopefully pushes out the pollution. former daily show host jon stewart returned to his old set. it wasn't all fun and games. stewart is trying to draw attention to what he calls a national disgrace. the expiring health care benefits for first responders who got sick after the 9/11 attacks. >> it's jon stewart, everybody.
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dressed jon stewart returned home last night, not to check up on the new tenants in the house, but to advocate for a cause close to his heart. >> back in 2010 after far more lobbying than should have been necessary, congress funded health care for firsrs responders at ground zero. >> reporter: that eired months ago. >> it's soon going to be out of money. these first responders, many of them sick, have had to travel at their own expense to washington d.c., hundreds of times to plead for the government to do the right thing. >> reporter: at the center of the crew said, the first respond responders responders. >> even by stupid senate and house math, they have more than enough to do thax. >> reporter: for years he's been
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the terror attacks. providing a set of shoulders to stand on. in 2010, stewart took up their cause, dedicicing an entire show to the issue. five years later, things are visibly different. >> out of curiosity, where is everybody? >> it's you and i. five and a half years ago, we did a show. 75% of the panel is no longer here. two of the people have illnesses, and john devlin who sat at the last chair, passed away since our show. so i think we brought the statistics to show that when we did the show five and a half years ago, four men sat here. it's you and i. >> reporter: first responder, kenny told stewart that mitch mcconnell gave him his word that congress would fully fund the health care benefits.
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it to a bill voted on this week. everyone, house and senate j is working very hard to get this done, and it will get done. >> an dry bosa has a knew title, hero. he's been credited with saving the life of a surfer knocked unconscious during a competition sunday in hawaii.. >> reporter: this man is seen taking off on a wave, but the barrel collapses around him and he disappears. >> yeah. he's out. >> reporter: unconscious, he reappears. now with a body boarding champion. bosa tries to keep the head above the surface and performs cpr. >> the first thing that went to my mind was that he was dead. his face was like a dark blue, almost purple. >> reporter: powerful currents threatened to sweep them away. life guards jumped in to assist.
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and help until we got there, and got to him. it was amazing. >> reporter: once on shore, the man regained consciousness and was rushed to the hospital in critical condndion. mondayay he posted a picture sitting up in his hospital. in a message he thanked bosa and the rescuers. >> from my point of view, i was at the right place at the right time. there are so many people saving lives every day that don't really get the recognition that they deserve. >> reporter: the man is in stable condition at the hospital and is expected to make a full recovery. the cbs overnight news will be right back. enough pressure in here for ya? i'm gonna take mucinex sinus-m-x. too late, we're about to take off. these dissolve fast. they're new liquid gels. and you're coming with me...
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the man who founded lululemon and ushered into the era of the yoga pant has a new mission. his comments cost his company money in market share. now he's singing a different tune. >> after that interview, i mean, the media piled on. and wilson withdrew from the blic eye. he called that time personally devastating not only for him but his family and his company. now with his wife and son at his side, he's reengaged with a new company that he says will revolutionize the retail industry again. >> reporter: this is kitten a.
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kind fabric. the company belelves it will change the way we dress and live. that's an audacious claim, but this family has done it before. >> we love coming to work and partners and feeding off of each other's creativity. >> reporter: the founder of lululemon, and his wife was lead designer. they turned the yoga pant into a multimimlion dollar industry. >> the concept, function with fashion, using a high-end washable fabric called technical cashmere. >> that was the trick in creating the recipe, being able to retain that incredible soft luxurious feel of cashmere, and then adding the benefits of stretch and recovery and wash and dry. >> kitten a is built on the success of lululemon, from a
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created a new segment in retail, workout clothes worn casually in everyday life. >> my lawyer, when i went to register the name, and i told him what he was doing, he said yeah, like yoga will work. >> reporter: it made wilson a billionaire billionaire. >> i have my own drive, and i never really agree with other people. ion't think it's possible to be creating a future that would otherwise not have existed without being controversial. >> reporter: but those qualities that fuelled his success also caused trouble. he clashed with the board, stepped back from the company. the board asked him to return to help lululemon through a crisis, and then a six minute interview two years ago, this edidid sound bite rewrote his story. >> some women's body don't work for it. it's about the rubbing through the thighs, how much pressure is there.
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women were buying them too small which compromised the design. in the same interview, he emphasized all women can wear the pants, but thahas not whaha people heard. women across the country calling the comments insensitive and irresponsible. >> my word were wrong. >> reporter: you can see how women hear the clip of that and we're sensitive about our thighs. and be like, this is terrible. what he's saying. >> certainly. i mean, there is probably -- one of the most successful women's companies i ithe world. i don't think there's any way i could have built that with that kind of support behind me from those people unless -- if i had been that kind of person that didn't understand women. but obviously i didn't. i didn't. >> reporter: after the interview, wilson recorded an apology for employees. >> i'm sad for the repercussions
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>> reporter: it was posted on facebook, and triggered a new round of criticism that he didn't apologize to customers. >> reporter: did you feel like you should apologize to the women? >> deep in my heart, i knew that that was never my intent to make them feel bad, and i still didn't really have a real grasp on what i said, and how it affected them. it wasn't -- i didn't really understand it. i mean, now i get it. >> reporter: would you want to apologize? >> i thihi i have to, because i said it, and, again, i'm responsible for what comes out of my mouth. and if that's what was interpreted, then i fully apologize. i'm sorry. >> reporter: when all was said and done, lululemon lost $6 billion in market share. >> reporter: you built this company. that must have been devastating in a way. >> it was. it hurt for a while, for sure. >> it is sad seeeeg him hurt,
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most resilient people i know. >> reporter: wilson went back to work with his family, he opened the first kitten a store last year. they say the new fabric, technical cashmere, is ideal for a busy lifestyle. >> it was about looking at how people were living in these full contact lives and how we could save them a little bit of time not havingng to take what was emingly so precious, to thee dry cleanerer every time they wanted to wear it. >> reporter: for chip wilson, it was more than a way to make money. it's a chance to see success with the people who stood by him. >> i can't think of anything more rewarding than being able to be with family and trading ideas and feed off each other, what more would a person want? >> reporter: like the yoga
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the basic t shirt is about 80$80. they are fully engaged. they now have 58 stores worldwide with plans for many more. >> embarrassed by a prostate exam in imagine how your doctor feels. because i get paid. und... on this sisi of the glove i i ow prostate exams n save lives. so, if you are a man over 50, talk t tyou doctor to see if a prostate exam is right for you. if we can do it, so can you.
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u2 wrapped up concerts with the eagles of death metal. the eagles were playing the concert hall last month when terrorists turned it into a killing ground. we have more on thee band's emotional returnrn >> reporter: u2 had cancelled the paris concert in the aftermath of the attacks, but they were determined to make good on their promiseto return, and boy, did they return with a surprise finale. this was never going to be an ordinary rock concert. it was a statement that life would go on, and the it was a a trtrute tohose whose lives had
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u2 lead singer sung a classic. the song, ne me quitte pas, don't leave me. and if the evening needed more emotion, it got it in the end when bono called onto the stage, e band whose concert at the hall had been turned into a massacre where so many for murdered. u2 brought the eagles of death metal back to paris. >> they were robbed of their stage three weeks ago, and we would like to offer them ours tonight. would you welcome the eagles of death metal. >> reporter: no one was in doubt that the lyric of the band's first number, people have the power, meant something extra here. people have the power >> reporter: it was the first time the band had performed since the paris attack. its front man, explained why
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>> we love u2 so. for giving us this opportunity. i look around and i see -- how do i say it, our frien. >> reporter: the eagles of death metal were a popular but cult band before the attacks. now they're forever a part of bloody history and an effort to heal that's followed. that's the cbs overnight news this wednesday. fofosome of you, the news continues. for others, chehe back with us.
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york city. the front runner for the republican presidential nomination calls for a ban on all muslims entering the united stat. also tonight, the san bernardino killers practiced at a shooting range. survivors tell their stories. >> i kept thinking why won't he stop. >> and the investigation of the chicago's pd's use of force against minorities. a queen praises a king and brings the president to tears. >> this is the cbs overnight news. the front runner for the republican presidential nomination drew heavy fire over his proposal to ban muslims from coming into the united states. much of the fire from his own
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donald trump did not back down. he says he doesn't care about the criticism because he insists he's right. trump is not without his supporters. here's major garrett. >> donald trump is calling for a total and complete shut down of muslims entering the united states until our country's representatives can figure representatives can figure out what is going on. >> reporter: campaigning in south carolina, trump suggested muslim animosity was widespread and conjured feelings from 9/11. this morning trump was asked how the ban would work. >> a customs agent would ask the religion? >> they would say, are you muslim. >> and if they said yes, they would not be allowed in the country? >> that's correct.
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were quick to denounce trump. >> this is not conservatism. what was proposed yesterday is not what this party stands for, and more importantly, it's not what this country stands for. >> reporter: reince priebus said fighting terrorism should not come, quote, at the expense of our american values. trump's gop rival, ted cruz, a lawyer himself, refused to say whether trump's proposal was constitutional. >> i recognize people in the media would prefer that anyone running for president engage in an ongoing, as an ongoing theater critic, criticizing the proposals of others. i don't agree with it or think it's the right solution. >> reporter: legal scholars say the ban would violate international treaties.
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>> it's wholly unconstitutional. i wish our law school exams were like this. what's the problem with this statement, you can't treat people differently based on religion. you can't discriminate on that basis. case closed. >> reporter: candee parker backed the gop front runner. >> he's okay with saying what he believes and not being afraid and having a backbone to say it. i'm okay with that. >> reporter: to demonstrate just how little he cares about criticism from his own party, he touted a national poll showing 68% of his followers would follow him if he ran as an independent. >> major garrett, thank you. trump also bolstered his
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claimed that 25% of muslims in this country believe violence against america is justified. but one of the leading trackers of hate groups, the southern poverty law center, describes the head of the center for security policy, frank gaffney, as one of america's most notorious islamaphobes. one tweeted mr. trump stokes hatred. the mayor of london called it utter nonsense. johnson said the only reason i wouldn't go to some parts of new york is the real risk of meeting donald trump. the controversy, of course, follows the san bernardino attack in which tashfeen malik and her american husband, syed farook murdered 14 people. there was a custody hearing for the couple's six month old
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farook's sister wants to adopt her from state custody. we've learned that farook took out a $28,000 loan before the massacre. carter evans has found the gun violence is sending many in san bernardino to the gun store. >> more than two dozen people lined up outside when a gun store opened. it's a similar story at the gun range where there was target practice two days before farook killed 14 co-workers. business there is up 60% since the attack. >> reporter: you didn't want a gun in the house before. why is that changed now? >> the reason it's changed now is because it's in our neighborhood. >> reporter: desiree is a single mother of three. >> i've had multiple conversations with women who have never shot guns who are looking at buying one to protect themselves.
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throughout this community. on sunday night, there was panic when reports of gunfire at a nearby shopping mall led to more than 300 law enforcement officers circling the property. it turned out to be a robbery where people mistook the sound of smashing glass for gunshots. the police chief. >> people are on edge and extra cautious, which is good. that's what we're asking people to do. >> reporter: being extra cautious now means owning a gun for this woman. >> 9-1-1 is not that quick of a response, and in 2.5 seconds they're not going to be there. >> reporter: gun and ammunition manufacturing is a $13.5 billion a year business in the u.s. according to fbi data, the number of requests for applications for background checks to buy guns spikes after high profile mass shootings like this one. >> carter evans at the site of the scene last week. boston college said today 80
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men's basketball team got sick after eating at a chipotle restaurant. it was neurovirus and not
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we'll be right back. almost sixty million americans are affected by mental illness. together we can help them with three simple words. my name is chris noth and i will listen. from maine to maui, thousands of high school students across the country are getting in on the action by volunteering in their communities. chris young: action teams of high school students are joining volunteers of america and major league baseball players to help train and inspire the next generation of volunteers. carlos pea: it's easy to start an action team at your school so you, too, can get in on the actiti.
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some countries with no second amendment have banned certain firearms after massacres. can that work? holly williams found out in australia. >> reporter: anthony winchcombe told us he started hunting with his father wheh he was just five years old. >> i enjoy it. i enjoy tinkering around with firearms. >> reporter: but to own a fun in australia you need a license, and it takes at least 28 years and sometimes months, all semi automatic long arm weapons are banned and it's illegal to carry a gun for personal protection.
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prior to the laws changing and i complied with the law. do i miss them? not particularly. >> reporter: the ban, after 35 people massacred in 1996 by a lone gunman. >> i had the authority of an enormous majority, and i had to do something. >> reporter: john howard was the prime minister and fought off opposition from his own party to push the ban through. >> i don't regard this thing as a civil liberties issue. the largest civil right is staying alive. staying alive and being safe from random attack is a more precious civil right than owning a gun. >> reporter: there's a buyback program, confiscating guns. since then the number of deaths by firearm has fallen by about
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it was in decline before 1996. the ban hasn't stopped gun violence. often with illegal weapons, including a siege in sydney last year by a mentally disturbed gunman who claimed to be inspired by isis. but even steve ballas, a gun shop owner, believes australia's laws are saving lives. >> no doubt. a lot of firearms have been taken out of undesirable hands. there's still a lot out there, but they're thinning them out. >> reporter: if you were in america, you'd probably sell a lot more guns and make a lot more money. >> i suppose sometimes it's not all about the money. >> there are too many guns lying around, and you lose your temper, even rational people pick up a gun and shoot somebody. it's harder if i can put it bluntly, to kill ten people with a knife than with h gun. >> reporter: 85% of auststlians
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think they should be even tougher according to a recent opinion poll. what australia does not have a is powerful and wealthy gun lobby like the one that exists in the u.s. >> holly williams reporting. thank you. in another important story, chicago police already underer federal l vestigation for theiei use of force are tonight facing questions over a suspect who died in custody. and, again, there is a video of the incident. here's dean reynolds. >> reporter: when the chicago mayor saw this tape of a detainee being tasered and beaten by chicago police in 2012, he said someththg is wrong here. eieier the actions of thth officers or the policies of the department. 28-year-old philip coleman soon died from what police said was a fatal drug reaction at the hospital. an autopsy said he had more than 50 bruises and abrasions.
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his father and a former police chief. >> chicago police have 007 badges to kill whoever they want to, and most of them get away from it. >> reporter: a aeview authority initially found no fault, but with the tape out, it's reopened the case. lawsuits and official attempts at transparency have led to the release of other videos showing chicago cops shooting suspects. there are questions about police accountability. of the 400 police shootings since 2007, they found two unjustified. the university of chicago has stududd the intersection of police misconduct and a lack of punishment. >> it starts with the lack of political will to address the underlying, the underlying reasons. >> reporter: law professor, craig futterman led the study
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that protects bad cops are a pattern and practice that needs reviewed. >> 75% of the people shot in chicago are back by police. >> reporter: this is a bad time for the city to lose confidence in its police officers. murders here are up 17% this year. and chicago needs every good cop it can find. >> dean reynolds reporting tonight. thank you. the northwest is bracing for round d o of a week-long soaking. much of portland was flooded yeyeerday. the national weather service said it looked like a fire hose coming in off the pacific. ben tracy is there. >> reporter: more than three inches in 24 hours, a new december record. streets became streams and a giant sink hole ended up in the middle of one road in gresham. it's thought to bebe5 feet deep.
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people from the water. >> i can't get anywhere i want to go. >> entire neighborhoods were cut off. >> i left at 6:00, and it hadn't rained. now i come back and it's a river. >> reporter: on the coast, 22 foot waves ravaged boats. the coast guard rescued this sailor. the wet weather is a change from drought conditions in the northwest. the regions being battered by an atmospheric river where the jetstream funnels a series of storms one after another. this week's rain could bring the area back to normal rainfall for the year. the sink hole behind me has grown to 20 feet deep. it's done so much damage they say the roadway would be closed for up to 20 days. heavy rain in the forecast today and more flooding. >> drought relief. ben, thank you. for the first time cars will be graded on how well they avoid
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they announced today that top safety ratings will be much harder to get. kris van cleave on what you can expect. >> reporter:r:he newly proposed standards are so strict there's not a car on the roads today that would earn five or even four stars. secretary of transportation, anthony foxx. >> our goal is not to just protect people in the event an accident occurs. we ultimately want to eliminate crashes altogether. >> reporter: among the changes are adding new crash tests, including one on angled front crashes and new dummies to better reflect the injuries people suffer from head to foot how much safer do you think cars are going to get because of this rating change? >> we think as auto makers get to five stars, we're talking about some of the most significant life-saving opportunities that we've ever
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>> reporter: the national highway safety administration began ththprogram overall when he took over the agency. >> every time the bar is raised, auto makers get there. it's about saving lives. there have been discussions. incentive, prevent injuries and don't let crashes happen. >> reporter: starting with 2019, there are three rankings. it wililalso include an overall rating. accident avoidance technology is making its way into cars. the trade association representing car makers says the members will review the proposal, but it was generally supportive of the changes. >> kris, thanks.
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that's next. jon stewart returned to the daily show on a serious campaign. >> it's jon stewart. >> it had been four months since he was on the set. he was here to shame congress into reauthorizing health care funds for the men and women who responded to 9/11. >> the first responders, many sick with disease have had to travel at their own expense to washington d.c., hundreds of times, to plead for our government to do the right thing. >> five years ago, stewart had four first responders on his show. last night, only one returned. >ut of curiosity, whehe is everybody? >> 75% of the panel is no longer here. two of the people have illnesses, and john devlin passed away. four men sat here. it's you and i. >> this is the reality of people's lives that are affected by this. and the idea that you had to
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ago to plead your case on national television to get this done was insulting and embarrassing for us as a nation. >> the health care money is expected to run out by next summer. republican leaders in the house and senate say it will be reauthorized, but they haven't said where or when. >> a glee club burst into song. the conductor decided they needed a conductor.
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>> and we'll be right back. woman: what does it feel like when a woman is having a heart attack? chest pain, like there's a ton of weight on your chest. severe shortness of breath. unexplained nausea. cold sweats. there's an unusual tiredness and fatigue. there's unfamiliar dizziness or light-headedness. unusual pain in your back, neck, jaw, one or both arms, even your upper stomach, are signs you're having a heart attack. don't make excuses. make the call to 9-1-1 immediately. learn more at womenshealth.gov/heartattack. while i was on a combat patrol in baqubah, iraq, a rocket-propelled grenade took my arm off at the shoulder. i was discharged from the army, and i've been working with the wounded warrior project since 2007. warriors, you don't have to be severely wounded to be with the wounund warrior project. we do have a lot of guys that have post-traumatic stress disorder. being able to share your story, i guess it kind of helps you wrap your mind around what did happen over there. my name is norbie, and yes, i do suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder,
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the legendary rock band u2 won't let the attackers have the last word in paris. they answered the bombs and bullets with guns, drums, and harmony. >> we are all here tonight. >> reporter: it was much more than a concert. >> reporter: it was an affirmation that life goes on. and it was a tribute to those whose lives had been ended. the victim's names were projected overhead to form the french flag. bono departing from the usual
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fitting, classic, ne me quitte pas, don't leave me. it was an emotional evening, and there was more to come. one band more than any other has been sucked into the bloody history of that night. it was the california band, , e eagles of death metal who were on stage at the concert hall when the killers murdered 90 of their fans. >> welcome the eagles of death metal. >> reporter: now the band was back in town. they hadn't played since the night of the attack, and their first number, people have the power had a new and special meaning here. the power ofrock and roll. the band's lead singer, jessie hughes. >> we love you for giving us
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i look around and i see, how do i say it? our friends. >> reporter: the band that found itself in the middle of a tragedy now part of the healing process that followed. a process that more than three weeks later took them back. there's more healing still to come. mark phillips, cbs news, london. >> that's the cbs overnight news this wednesday. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back for morning news and cbs this
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i'm scott pelley. this is the cbs overnight news. >> welcome to the overnight news. gop presidential front runner donald trump is not backing down. he's demanding a ban on all muslims entering the united states. trump says we are atatar with muslim extremists and says his plan is no different from president franklin roosevelt's internment of japanese in world war ii. >> donald trump is calling for a shut down of muslims entering the united states until our country's representatives can figure out what the heck is going g . >> reporter: campaigning in south carolina last night, trump suggested muslim animosity toward america was widespread
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>> you're going to have more world trade senors. >> reporter: this morning trump was asked how the ban would work. >> they would ask the religion? >> they would say, are you muslim. >> and if they said yes, they would not be allowed in the country? >> that's correct. >> top republicans like paul ryan were quick to denounce trump. >> this is not conservative. it's not what this party stands for, and it's not what this country stands for. >> reportete reince priebus who o s remained neutral in the race said fighting terrorism should not come at the expense of our american values. ted cruz, a lawyer himself, refused to say whether trump's proposal was constitutional. >> i recognize a great many folks in the media would prefer
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president engage in an ongoing, as an ongoing theater critic, criticizing the proposals of others. i don't agree with his proposal. i don't think it's the right solution. >> reporter: legal scholars say the ban would violate numerous treaties, and ilyas shapiro says the proposal is -- >> wholly unconstitutional. i wish our law school exams were like this. what i ithe problem with thihi statement? ou can't treat p pple differently on the basis of religion. you can't discriminate against them on that basis. case closed. >> reporter: despite the uproar, candee parker backed the gop front runner. >> the idea that he is okay with being out there and saying what he believes and not being afraid, and having a backbone to say it, i'm okay with that. >> reporter: to demonstrate how
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from his own party he touted a national poll showing 68% of his followers would follow him if he ran as an independent. >> the husband and wife killers behind the massacre had amassed an arsenal of guns, ammunition and pipe bombs valued at over $15,000. investigators may now know where the couple got the money. reports say syed farook took out a $28,000 loan weeks before the attack. carter evans has more. >> reporter: we know they had taken target practice leading up to the attack, and it appears they visited a gun range days before the rampage. syed farook visited a range to practice firing his semi
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he and his wife, tashfeen malik killed 14 people in san bernardino. >> he came in like a normal guy. he was quiet. he was to himself. d he shot well. >> reporter: he'd had some training? >> apparently, yes. >> reporter: before he came here? >> apparently, yes. >> reporter: at one point the rifle started smoking when he shot it. he approached the employee. >> what does that tell you about his experience? >> it told me it was a new rifle he wasn't familiar with it. >> reporter: the company has turned over information. the rifles were purchased by a man who lived next door to farook. sources well cbs news that fbi agents questioned him on monday. he has not been arrested and is now providing them with information. investigators have conducted
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but they're still trying to determine a motiti. >> we have learned and believe that both subjects were radicalized and have been for quite some time. how did that happen? the question we're trying to get at, is how did that happen, and by whom, and where did that happen? >> reporter: federal authorities also continue to search the couple's digital trail. they're looking for any evidence of contact with known extremists or any outside financial support. >> we want to find out everyone who profited from it, financed it. and i'm not saying there is anything like that. but we will leave no stone unturned. >> reporter:arook's co-workers had active shooter training one year ago. in a chilling twist, it was in the very room where the attack occurred, but it's unknown if farook attended. >> one of the victims of the massacre is being rememberededs a hero. 45-year-old shannon johnson of los angeles shielded a wounded
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she survived but johnson was killed. we spoke to the long time girlfriend. he reports from a memorial. >> reporter: you are about to see what happened when the girlfriend showed up relatively unknown. this is a crisis counselor, but on the morning massacre, the crisis was hers. >> the text i sent was hey, mass shooting out that way. i hope you're okay. and no response. >> reporter: what did it elevate to? >> why the f isn't anybody answering me, in all caps. >> reporter: it took more than 12 hours before she received confirmation of his death. >> reporter: what was the grief like for you in the moment they said he's gone? >> it was unbearable, and i
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right now, but there's -- it's like a dam. >> reporter: it sounds like shannon in being a victim was also a hero, and he put his arms her. he died and she surviviv. >> he would have gone down. he would not have left her to go after anybody. for sure, yeah. not a surprise. >> reporter: in a statement, a survivor says shannon johnson was an amazing man who told her, i got you as he huddled under a table, his arm around here. >> the i got you, that's so shannon. >> reporter: she wanted to see the crime scene. >> i've been able to walk under that police tape and just go. this is really strange. >> reporter: you're used to helping other people deal with their grief. that grief led her to a memorial around the corner from the crime scene. >> it could have been anyone in
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ovovseas beijing remainsns under an environmental red alert. the smog is so thick that schools are closed and residents can only drive their cars on alternate days. seth stone is in beijing. >> reporter: you should be able to see a line of skyscrapers along the highway behind me. they're covered by the smog. visibility is less than a mile. you can smell the pollution. you can even taste it in the back of your throat.t. the familiar blanket of smog enveloped beijing, but this time a red alert which closed school, shut construction sites and took some cars off the road.
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children's hospital where we met parents worried about his kid's rereiratory problem. how is he feeling? >> really bad, actually, for a few days. >> reporter: several doctors suggested this seven-year-old's lung ailment may be related to the smog. you're wearing a mask to protect yourself. do you feel your government is doing its part? >> i think they are doing it. >> reporter: people do what they can to try to protect themselves. we have three air purifiers here at home. we changed the filter today. this is the new white one. take a look at t t one from two months ago. beijing's pollution was improving in the first ten months of this year, but still this fifth grader couldn't go to school today. what do you think about that. >> so bad. >> reporter: and as to why the red alert was s sued.
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10-year-old. just last week the pollution was worse, but there was no red alert. >> yes. >> reporter: what do you think of that? >> kind of weird. >> reporter: kind of weird? >> uh-huh. >> reporter: of course, last week china's president was in paris for the climate conference, and the government here was widely criticized for not sounding the pollution alarm. schools and fafaories are pected to remain clolod for two more days until a coco snap comes in and hopefully pushes out the pollution. former daily show host jon stewart returned to his old set. it wasn't all fun and games. stewart is trying to draw attention to what he calls a national disgrace. the expiring health care benefits for first responders who got sick after the 9/11 attacks. >> it's jon stewart, everybody. >> reporter: a bearded, casually dressed jon stewart returned
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on the new tenants in the house, but to advocate for a cause close to his heart. >> back in 2010 after far more lobbying than should have been necessary, congress funded health care for first responders at ground zero. >> reporter: that expired months ago. >> it's soon going to be out of money. these first responders, many of them sick, have had to travel at their own expense to washington d.c., hundreds of times to plead for the government to do the right thing. >> reporter: at the center of the crusade, the first responders. >> e en by stupid senate and house math, they have more than enough to do that. >> reporter: for years he's been a voice for those who helped in the terror attacks.
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stand on. in 2010, stewart took up their cause, dedicating an entire show to the issue. five years later, things are visibly different. >> out of curiosity, where is erybody? >> it's you and i. five and a half years ago, we did a show. 75% of the panel is no longer here. two of the people have illnesses, and john devlin who sat at the last chair, passed away since our show. so i think we brought the statistics to show that when we did the show five and a half years ago, four men sat here. it's you and i. >> reporter: first responder, kenny told stewart that mitch mcconnell gave him his word that congress would fully fund the health care benefits. they say it's planned to attach it to a bill voted on this week. everyone, house and senate j is
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done, and it will get done. >ndre botha has a knenetitle, hero. he's been credited with saving the life of a surfer knocked unconscious during a competition sunday in hawaii. >> reporter: geiselman is seen taking off on a wave, but the barrel collapses around him and he disappears. >> yeah. he's out. >> reporter: unconscious, he reappears. now with a body boarding ampion. botha tries to keep the e ad above the surface and performs cpr. >> the first thing that went to my mind was that he was dead. his face was like a dark blue, almost purple. >> reporter: powerful currents threatened to sweep them away. life guards jumped in to assist. >> hold onto the surfer's body, and help until we got there, and
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it was amazing.. >> reporter: once on shore, geiselman regained consciousness and was rushed to the hospital in critical condition. on monday, he posted a picture sitting up in his hospital. in a message he thanked botha and the rescuers. >> from my point of view, i was at the right place at the right time. there are so many people saving lives every day that don't really get the recognition that they deserve. >> reporter: the man is in stable condition at the hospital and is expected to make a full recovery. the cbs overnight news will be right back.ryl's wife started using gain flings, their laundry smells more amazing than ever. (sniff) uh honey, isn't that the dog's towel? (dog noise) hey, mi towel, su towel. morereain scent, plus oxi boost
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the man who founded lululemon and ushered into the era of the yoga pant has a new mission. his comments cost his company money in market share. now he's singing a different tune. >> after that interview, i mean, the media piled on. and wilson withdrew from the public eye. he called that time personally devastating not only for him but his family and his company. now with his wife and son at his side, he's reengaged with a new company that he says will revolutionize the retail industry again. >> reporter: this is kit and ace. it's a new brand with a one of a kind fabric. the company believes it will
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live. that's an n dacious claim, but this family has done it before. >> we love coming to work and partners and feeding off of each other's creativity. >> reporter: the founder of lululemon, and h wife was lead designer. they turned the yoga pant into a multimillion dollar industry. >> the concept, function with fafaion, using a high-enen wawaable fabric called t thnical cashmere. >> that was the trick in creating the recipe, being able to retain that incredible soft luxurious feel of cashmere, and then adding the benefits of stretch and recovery and wash and dry. >> kit and ace is built on the success of lululemon, from a small design studio, the company created a new segment in retail,
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everyday life. >> my lawyer, when i went to register the name, and i told him what i was doing, he said yeah, like yoga will work. >> reporter: it made wilson a billionaire. >> i have my own drive, and i never really agree with other people. i don't think it's possible to be creating a future that would otherwise not have existed without being controversial. >> reporter: but those qualities that fuelled his success also caused trouble. he clashed with the board, stepped back from the company. the board asked him to return to help lululemon through a crisis, and then a six minute interview two years ago, this edited sound bite rewrote his story. >> some women's body don't work for it. it's aboututhe rubbing through the thigig, how much pressure is there. >> reporter: the point was that women were buying them too small which compromised the design.
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emphasized all women can wear the pants, but that's not what people heard. >> women across the country calling the comments insensitive and irresponsible. >> my word were wrong. >> reporter: you can see how men hear the clip ofofhat and we're sensitive about our thighs. and be like, this is terrible. what he's saying. >> certainly. i mean, there is probably -- one of the most successful women's companies in the world. i don't think there's any way i could have built that with that kind of support behind me from those people unless -- if i had been that kind of person that didn't understand women. but obviously i didn't. i didn't. >> reporter: after the interview, wilson recorded an apology for employees. >> i'm sad for the repercussions of my actions. >> reporter: it was posted on facebook, and triggered a new
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didn't apologize to customers. >> reporter: did you feel like you should apologize to the women? >> deep in my heart, i knew that that was never my intent to make them feel bad, and i still didn't really have a real grasp on what i said, and how w affected them. it wasn't -- i didn't really understand it. i mean, now i get it. >> reporter: would you want to apologize? >> i think i have to, because i said it, and, again, i'm responsible for what comes out of my mouth. and if that's what was interpreted, then i fully apologize. i'm sorry. >> reporter: when all was said and done, , lulemon lost $6 billion in market share. >> reporter: you built this company. that must have been devastating in a way. >> it was. it hurt for a while, for sure. >> it is sad seeing him hurt, but chip is probably one of the most resilient people i know.
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work with his family, he opened the first kit and ace store last year. they say the new fabric, technical cashmere, is ideal for a busy lifesesle. >> it was about looking at how people were living in these full contact lives and how we could save them a little bit of time not having to take what was seemingly so precious, to the dry cleaners every time they wanted to wear it. >> reporter: for chip wilson, it was more than a way to make money. it's a chance to see success with the people who stood by him. >> i can't think of anything more rewarding than being able to be with family and trading ideas and feed off each other, what more would a person want? >> rerorter: like the yoga pants, these clothes aren't cheap. the basic t shirt is about $80. they are fully engaged. they now have 58 stores
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more. when the enginin failed on the pne i was flying, i knew what to do to save my passengers. but when my father sank into depression, i didn't know how to help him. when he ultimately shot himself, he left our family devastated. don't let this happen to you. if you or a loved one is suicidal, call the national suicide prevention lifeline. no matter how hopeless or helpless you feel,
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u2 wrapped up concerts with the eagles of death metal. the eagles were playing the concert hall last month when terrorists turned it into a killing ground. we have more on the band's emotional return. >> reporter: u2 had cancelled the paris concert in the aftermath of the attacks, but they were determined to make good on their promise to return, and boy, did they return with a surprise finale. this was never going to be an ordinary rock concert. it was a statement that life would go on, and the it was a tribute to those whose lives had
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u2 lead singer sung a classic. the song, ne me quitte pas, don't leave me. and if the evening needed more emotion, it got it in the end when bono called onto the stage, the band whose concert at the hall had been turned into a massacre where so many for murdered. u2 brought the eagles of death metal back to paris. >> they were robbed of their would like to offer them ours tonight. would you welcome the eagles of death metal. >> reporter: no one was in doubt that the lyric of the band's first number, people have the power, meant something extra here. people have the power >> reporter: it was the first time the band had performed since the paris attack. its front man, explained why they had come.
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for giving us this opportunity. i look around and i see -- how do i say it, our friends. >> reporter: the eagles of death metal were a popular but cult band before the attacks. now they're forever a part of bloody history and an effort to heal that's followed. that's the cbs overnight news this wednesday. for some of you, the news continues.
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york city. republican presidential nomination calls for a ban on all muslims entering the united states. also tonight, the san bernrndino killers practiced at a shooting range. survivors tell their stories. >> i wept thinking why won't he stop. >> and the investigation of the chicago's pd's use of force against minorities,. a queen praises a king and brings the president to tears. >> this is the cbs overnight news. the front runner for the republican presidential nomination drew heavy fire over
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coming into the united states. much of the fire from his own party. donald trump did not back down. he says he doesn't care about the kritcriticism because he insists he's right. trump is not without his supporters. here's major garrett. >> donald trump is calling for a total and complete shut down of muslims entering the united states until our country's representatives can figure without what is going on. >> reporter: campaigning in south carolina, trump suggested muslim animosity was widespread and conjured feelings from 9/11. this morning tump was asked how the ban would work. >> a customs agent would ask the religion? >> they would say, are you muslim. >> and if they said yes, they would not be allowed in the
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>> reporter: top republicans were quick to denounce trump. >> this is not conservetism. what was proposed yesterday is not what this party stands for, and more importantly, it's not what this country stands for. >> reporter: reince priebus said fighting terrorism should not come, quote, at the expense of our american values. trump's gop rival, ted cruz, a lawyer himself, refused to say whether trump's proposal was constitutional. >> i recognize people in the media would prefer that anyone running for president engage in an ongoing, as an ongoing theater critic, criticizing the proposals of others. i don't agree with it or think it's the right solution. >> reporter: legal scholars say the ban would violate
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ill yas ilyas shapiro says -- >> it's wholly unconstitutional. i wish our law school exams were like this. what's the problem with this statement in you can't treat people differently based on religion. you can't discriminate on that basis. case closed. >> reporter: candee parker pack backed the gop front runner. >> he's okay with saying what he believes and not being afraid and having a backbone to say it. i'm okay with that. >> reporter: to demonstrate just how little he cares about criticism from his own paert, he touted a national poll showing 68% of his followers would follow him if he ran as an independent.
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trump also bolstered his argument with another poll which claimed that 25% of muslims in this country believe violence against america is justified. but one of the leading trackers of hate groups, the southern poverty law center, describes the head of the center for security policy, frank gaffney, as one of america's most notorious islam phonesislamaphobes. one tweeted mr. trump stokes hatred. the mayor of london called it utter nonsense. johnson said the only reason i wouldn't go to some parts of new york is the real risk of meeting donald trump. the controversy, of course, follows the san bernardino attack in which tash feen mallic and her american husband, syed farook murdered 14 people.
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the couple's six month old daughter. farook's sister wants to adopt her from state custody. we've learned that farook took out a $28,000 loan before the massacre. carter evans has found the gun violence is sending many in san bern dee know to the gun store. >> more than two dozen people lined up outside when a gun store opened. it's a similar story at the gun range where there was target practice two days before farook killed 14 co-workers. business there is up 60 % since the attack. >> reporter: you didn't want a gun in the house before. why is that changed now? >> the reason it's changed now is because it's in our neighborhood. >> reporter: desiree is a single mother of three. >> i've had multiple conversations with women who have never shotguns who are
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themselves. >> reporter: nerves are frayed throughout this community. on sunday night, there was panic when reports of gunfire at a nearby shopping mall led to more than 3 00 law enforcement officers circling the property. it turned out to be a robbery where people mistook the sound of smashing glass for gunshots. the police chief. >> people are on edge and extra cautious, which is good. that's what we're asking people to do. >> reporter: being extra cautious now means owning a gun for this woman. >> 9-1-1 is not that quick of a response, and in 2.5 seconds they're not going to be there. >> reporter: gun and ammunition manufacturing is a $13.5 billion a year business in the u.s. according to fbi data, the number of requests for applications for background checks to b b guns spikes after high ofile mass shootings like this one. >> carter evans at the site of
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boston college said today 80 students, including most of the men's basketball team got sick after eating at a chipotle restaurant. it was neurovirus and not
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we'll be right back. [ vocalizing ] [ buzzing ] [ tree crashes ] ] [ wind howling ]
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some countriri with no second amendmentnt have banned certain firearms after massacres. can that work holly williams found out in australia. >> reporter: anthony winchcombe told us he started hunting with his father when he was just five years old. >> i enjoy it. i enjoy tinkekeng around withh firems. >> reporter: but to own a fun in australia you need a license, and it takes at least 28 years and sometimes months, all semi automatic long arm weapons are banned and it's illegal to carry
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>> i had semi automatic firearms prior to the laws changing and i come plied with the law. do i miss them? not particularly. >> reporter: the ban, after 35 people massacred in 1996 by a lone gunman. >> i had the authority of an enormous majority, and i had to do something. >> reporter: john howard was the prime minister and fought off opposition from his own party to push the ban through. >> i don't regard this thing as a civil liberties issue. the largest civil right is staying alive. staying alive and being safe from random attack is a more precious civil right than owning a gun. >> reporter: there's a buyback program, confiscating guns.
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by firearm has fallen by about half. it was in decline before 1996. the ban hasn't stopped gun violence. often with illegal weapons, including a siege in sydney last year by a mentally disturbed gunman who claimed to be inspired by isis. butven steve ballas, a gun shop owner, believes australia's laws are saving lives. >> no doubt. a lot of firearms have been taken out of undesirable hands. there's still a lot out there, but they're thinning them out. >> reporter: if you were in america, you'd probably sell a lot more guns and make a lot more money. >> i suppose sometimes it's not all about the money. >> there are too many gunsying around, and you lose your temper, even rational people pick up a gun and shoot somebody. it's harder if i can put it bluntly, to kill ten people with
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>> reporter: 85% of australians either support the gun laws or think they should be even tougher according to a recent opinion poll. what australiaoes not have a is powerful and wealthy gun lobby like that one that exists in the u.s. >> holly williams reporting. thank you. in another important story, chicago police already under federal investigation for their use of force are tonight facing questions over a suspect who died in custody. and, again, there is a video of the incident. here's dean reynolds. >> reporter: when thth chicago mayor saw this tape of a detainee being tasers and beaten by chicago police in 2012, he said something is wrong here. either the actions of the officers or the policies of the department. 28-year-old philip coleman soon died from what police said was a fatal drug reaction at the hospital. an autopsy said he had more than
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>> this is happening too much. >> reporter: per si coleman is his father and a former police chief. >> chicago police have 007 badges to kill whoever they want to, and most of them get away from it. >> reporter: a review authority initially found no fault, but with the tape out, it's reopened the case. lawsuits and official athe tempts at transparency have led to the release of other v veos showing chicago cops shooting suspects. there are questions about police accountability. of the 400 police shootings since 2007, they found two unjustified. the university of chicago has studied the intersection of police misconduct and a lack of punishment. >> it starts with the lack of politicacawill to addrere the underlying, the underlying reasons. >> reporter: law professor,
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and said the code of silence that protects bad cops are a reviewed. >> 75% of the people shot in chicago are back by police. >> reporter: thihiis a bad time for the city to lose confidence in its police officers. murders here are up 17% this year. and chicago needs every good cop it can find. >> dean reynolds reporting tonight. thank you. the northwest is bracing for round two of a week-long soaking. much of portland was flooded yesterday. the national weather service said it looked like a fire hose coming in off the pacific. ben tracy is there. >> reporter: more than three inches in 24 hours, a new december record. streets became streams and a giant sink hole ended up in the
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it's thought to be 15 feet deep. e fire department rescued people from the water. to go. off. >> i left at 6:00, and it hadn't rained. river. >> reporter: on the coast, 22 foot waves ravaged boats. the coast guard rescued this sailor. the wet weather is a change from drought conditions in the northwest. the region is being battered by an atmospheric river where the jetstream funnels a series of storms one after another. this week's rain could bring the area back to normal rainfall for the year. the sink hole behind me has grown to 20 feet deep. it's done so much damage they say the roadway would be closed for up to 20 days. heavy rain in the f fecast today and more flooding. >> drought relief.
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zbljsds r zbljtsds they announced today that top safety ratings will be much harder to get. is van cleave on what you can expect. >> reporter: the newly proposed standards are so strict there's not a car on the roads today that would earn five or even four stars. secretary of transportation, anthony foxx. >> our goal is not to just protect people in the event an accident occurs. we ultimately want to eliminate crashes altogether. >> r rorter: among the changes are adding new crash tests, including one on angled front crashes and new dummies to better reflect the injuries people suffer from head to foot how much safer do you think cars are going to get because of this rating change? >> we think as auto makers get to five stars, we're talking about some of the most
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opportunities that w wve ever seen in automotive industries. >> reporter: the national highway safety matter dpan the program overall when he took over the agency. >> every time the bar is raised, auto makers get there. it's about saving lives. there have been discussions. incentive incentive, prevent injuries and don't let crashes happen. >> reporter: starting with 2019, there e three rankings. it will also include an overall rating. accident avoidance technology is making its way into cars. the trade association representing car makers says the members will review the proposal, but it was generally supportive of the changes. >> kris, thanks.
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that's next. zbljtsds jon stewart returned to the daily show on a serious campaign. >> it's jon stewart. >> it had been four months since he was on the set. he was here to shame congress into reauthorizing health care funds for the men and women who responded to 9/11. >> the first responders, many sick with disease have had to travel at their own expense to washington d.c., hundreds of times, to plead for our government to do the right thing. >> five years ago, stewart had four first responders on his show. last night, only one returned. >> out of curiosity, where is everybody? >> 75% of the panel is no longer here. two of the people have illnesses, and john def len passed away. four men sat here. it's you and i.
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people's lives that are affected by this. and the idea that you had to come here five and a half years ago to plead your case on national television to get this done was insulting and embarrassing for us as a nation. >> the health care money is expected to run out by next summer. republican leaders in the house and senate say it will be reauthorized, but they haven't said where or when. >> a glee club burst into song. the kun duck or the decided they needed a conductor.
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>> and we'll be right back. every day it's getting closer going faster than a roller coaster a love like yours will surely come my way hey, hey, hey babies aren't fully developed until at least 39 weeks. if your pregnancy is healthy, wait for labor to begin on its own.
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o0 c1 travel is part of the american way of life. when we're on vacation, we keep an eye out for anything that looks out of place. [ indistinct conversations ] miss, your bag. when we travel from city to city, we pay attention to our surroundings. [ cheering ] everyone plays a role in keeping our community safe. whether you're traveling for business or pleasure, be aware of your surroundings. if you see something suspicious,
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won't let the attackers have the last word in paris. they answered the bombs and bullets with guns, drums, and harmony. >> we are all here tonight. >> reporter: it was much more than a concert. >> reporter: it was an affirmation that life goes on. and it was a tribute to those whose lives had been ended. the victim's names were projected overhead to form the french flag.
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materialing saying the never more fitting, classic, ne me quitte pas, don'leave me. it was an emotional evening, and there was more to come. one band more than any other has been sucked into the bloody history of that night. it was the california band, the eagles of death metal who were on stage at the concert hall when the killers murdered 90 of their fans. >> welcome the eagles of death metal. >> reporter: now the band was back in town. they hadn't played since the night of the attack, and their first number, people have the power had a new and special meaning here. the power of rock and roll. the band's lead singer, jessie hughes. >> we love you for giving us
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i look around and i see, how do i see it? our friends. >> reporter: the band that found itself in the middle of a tragedy now part of the healing process that followed. a process that more than three weeks later took them back. there's more healing still to come. mark phillips, cbs news, london. >> that's the cbs overnight news this wednesday. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back for
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i'm scott pelley. this is the cbs overnight news. >> welcome to the overnight news. gop presidential front runner donald trump is not backing down. he's demanding a ban on all muslims entering the united states. trump says we are at war with muslim extremists and says his plan is no different from president franklin roosevelts in internment of japanese in world war ii. >> donald trump is calling for a shut down of muslims entering the united states until our country's representatives can figure out what the heck is going on. >> reporter: campaigning in
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suggested muslim animosity toward america was widespread and conjured memories of 9/11. >> you're going to have more world trade senors. >> reporter: this morning trump was asked how the ban would work. >> they would ask the religion? >> they would say, are you muslim. >> and if they said yes, they would not be allowed in the country? >> that's correct. >> top republicans like paul ryan were quick to denounce trump. >> this is not conservative. it's not what this party stands for, and it's not what this country stands for. >> reporter: reince peeb us who has remained neutral in the race said fighting terrorism should not come at the expense of our american values. ted cruz, a lawyer himself, refused to say whether trump's proposal was constitutional.
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folks in the media would prefer that anyone running for president engage in an ongoing, as an ongoing theater critic, criticizing the proposals of others. i don't agree with his proposal. i don't think it's the right solution. >> reporter: legal scholars say the ban would violate numerous treaties, and ilyas shapiro says the proposal is -- >> wholly unconstitutional. i wish our law school exams were like this. what is the problem with this statement? you can't treat people differently on the basis of religion. you can't discriminate against them on that basis. case closed. >> reporter: despite the uproar, candee parker backed the gop front runner. >> the idea that he is okay with being out there and saying what he believes and not being afraid, and having a backbone to
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>> reporter: to demonstrate how little he cares about criticism from his own party he touted a national poll showing 68% of his followers would follow him if he han as an independent. >> the husband and wife killers behind the massacre had amassed an arsenal of guns, ammunition and pipe bombs valued at over $15,000. investigators may now know where the couple got the money. reports say syed farook took out a 28$,000 loan weeks before the attack. carter carter evans has more. >> reporter: we know they had taken target practice leading up to the attack, and it appears they visited a gun range days before the rampage.
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practice firing his semi automatic rifle two days before he and his wife, tashfeen malik killed 14 people in san bernardino. >> he came in like a normal guy. he was quiet. he was to himself. and he shot well. >> reporter: he'd had some training? >> apparently, yes. >> reporter: before he came here? >> apparently, yes. >> reporter: at one point the rifle started smoking when he shot it. he approached the employee. >> what does that tell you about his experience? >> it told me it was a new rifle he wasn't familiar with it. >> reporter: the company has turned over information. the rifles were purchased by a man who lived next door to farook. sources well cbs news that fbi agents questioned him on monday. he has not been arrested and is now providing them with
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more than 4 00 interviews so far. but they're still trying to determine a motive. >> we have learned and believe that both subjects were radicalized and have been for quite some time. how did that happen? the question we're trying to get at, is how did that happen, and by whom, and where did that happen? >> reporter: federal authorities also continue to search the couple's digital trail. they're looking for any evidence of contact with known extremists or any outside financial support. >> we want to find out everyone who profited from it, financed it. and i'm not saying there is anything like that. but we will leave no stone unturned. >> reporter: farook's co-workers had active shooter training one year ago. in a chilling twist, it was in the very room where the attack occurred, but it's unknown if farook attended. >> one of the victims of the massacre is being remembered as
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45-year-old shannon johnson of los angeles shielded a wounded colleague during the attack. she survived but johnson was killed. we spoke to the long time girlfriend. he reports from a memorial. >> reporter: you are about to see what happened when the girlfriend showed up relatively unknown. this is a crisis counselor, but on the morning massacre, the crisis was hers. >> the text i sent was hey, mass shooting out that way. i hope you're okay. and no response. >> reporter: what did it elevate to? >> why the f isn't anybody answering me, in all caps. >> reporter: it took more than 12 hours before she received confirmation of his death. >> reporter: what was the grief like for you in the moment they said he's gone?
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stopped it, and i have a wall up right now, but there's -- it's like a dam. >> reporter: it sounds like shannon in being a victim was also a hero, and he put his arms around a co-worker and shielded her. he died and she survived. >> he would have gone down. he would not have left her to go after anybody. for sure, yeah. not a surprise. >> reporter: in a statement, a survivor says shannon johnson was an amazing man who told her, i got you as he huddled under a table, his arm around here. >> the i got you, that's so shannon. >> reporter: she wanted to see the crime scene. >> i've been able to walk under that police tape and just go. this is really strange. >> reporter: you're used to helping other people deal with their grief. that grief led her to a memorial around the corner from the crime
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overseas beijing remains under an environmental red alert. the smog is so thick that schools are closed and residents can only drive their cars on alternate days. seth stone is in beijing. >> reporter: you should be able to see a line of skyscrapers along the highway behind me. they're covered by the smog. visibility is less than a mile. you can smell the pollution. you can even taste it in the back of your throat. the familiar blanket of smog enveloped beijing, but this time a red alert which closed school, shut construction sites and took
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it was busy outside this children's hospital where we met parents worried about his kid's respiratory problem. how is he feeling? >> really bad, actually, for a few days. >> reporter: several doctors suggested this seven-year-old's lung ailment may be related to the smog. you're wearing a mask to protect yourself. do you feel your government is doing its part? >> i think they are doing it. >> reporter: people do what they can to try to protect themselves. we have three air purifiers here at home. we changed the filter today. this is the new white one. take a look at the one from two months ago. beijing's pollution was improving in the first ten months of this year, but still this fifth grader couldn't go to school today. what do you think about that. >> so bad.
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red alert was issued. here's the straight talk of a 10-year-old. just last week the pollution was worse, but there was no red alert. >> yes. >> reporter: what do you think of that? >> kind of weird. >> reporter: kind of weird? >> uh-huh. >> reporter: of course, last week china's president was in paris for the climate conference, and the government here was widely criticized for not sounding the pollution alarm. schools and factories are expected to remain closed for two more days until a cold snap comes in and hopefully pushes out the pollution. former daily show host jon stewart returned to his old set. it wasn't all fun and games. stewart is trying to draw attention to what he calls a national disgrace. the expiring health care benefits for first responders who got sick after the 9/11 attacks. >> it's jon stewart, everybody.
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dressed jon stewart returned home last night, not to check up on the new tenants in the house, but to advocate for a cause close to his heart. >> back in 2010 after far more lobbying than should have been necessary, congress funded health care for first responders at ground zero. >> reporter: that expired months ago. >> it's soon going to be out of money. these first responders, many of them sick, have had to travel at their own expense to washington d.c., hundreds of times to plead for the government to do the right thing. >> reporter: at the center of the crew said, the first respond responders responders. >> even by stupid senate and house math, they have more than enough to do that. >> reporter: for years he's been a voice for those who helped in
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providing a set of shoulders to stand on. in 2010, stewart took up their cause, dedicating an entire show to the issue. five years later, things are visibly different. >> out of curiosity, where is everybody? >> it's you and i. five and a half years ago, we did a show. 75% of the panel is no longer here. two of the people have illnesses, and john devlin who sat at the last chair, passed away since our show. so i think we brought the statistics to show that when we did the show five and a half years ago, four men sat here. it's you and i. >> reporter: first responder, kenny told stewart that mitch mcconnell gave him his word that congress would fully fund the health care benefits.
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it to a bill voted on this week. everyone, house and senate j is working very hard to get this done, and it will get done. >> an dry bosa has a knew title, hero. he's been credited with saving the life of a surfer knocked unconscious during a competition sunday in hawaii. >> reporter: this man is seen taking off on a wave, but the barrel collapses around him and he disappears. >> yeah. he's out. >> reporter: unconscious, he reappears. now with a body boarding champion. bosa tries to keep the head above the surface and performs cpr. >> the first thing that went to my mind was that he was dead. his face was like a dark blue, almost purple. >> reporter: powerful currents threatened to sweep them away. life guards jumped in to assist.
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and help until we got there, and got to him. it was amazing. >> reporter: once on shore, the man regained consciousness and was rushed to the hospital in critical condition. on monday, he posted a picture sitting up in his hospital. in a message he thanked bosa and the rescuers. >> from my point of view, i was at the right place at the right time. there are so many people saving lives every day that don't really get the recognition that they deserve. >> reporter: the man is in stable condition at the hospital and is expected to make enough pressure in here for ya? i'm gonna take mucinex sinus-max. too late, we're about to take off. these dissolve fast. they're new liquid gels. and you're coming with me... you realize i have gold status?
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the man who founded lululemon and ushered into the era of the yoga pant has a new mission. his comments cost his company money in market share. now he's singing a different tune. >> after that interview, i mean, the media piled on. and wilson withdrew from the public eye. he called that time personally devastating not only for him but his family and his company. now with his wife and son at his side, he's reengaged with a new company that he says will revolutionize the retail industry again. >> reporter: this is kitten a.
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kind fabric. the company believes it will change the way we dress and live. that's an audacious claim, but this family has done it before. >> we love coming to work and partners and feeding off of each other's creativity. >> reporter: the founder of lululemon, and his wife was lead designer. they turned the yoga pant into a multimillion dollar industry. >> the concept, function with fashion, using a high-end washable fabric called technical cashmere. >> that was the trick in creating the recipe, being able to retain that incredible soft luxurious feel of cashmere, and then adding the benefits of stretch and recovery and wash and dry. >> kitten a is built on the success of lululemon, from a
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created a new segment in retail, workout clothes worn casually in everyday life. >> my lawyer, when i went to register the name, and i told him what he was doing, he said yeah, like yoga will work. >> reporter: it made wilson a billionaire billionaire. >> i have my own drive, and i never really agree with other people. i don't think it's possible to be creating a future that would otherwise not have existed without being controversial. >> reporter: but those qualities that fuelled his success also caused trouble. he clashed with the board, stepped back from the company. the board asked him to return to help lululemon through a crisis, and then a six minute interview two years ago, this edited sound bite rewrote his story. >> some women's body don't work for it. it's about the rubbing through the thighs, how much pressure is there.
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women were buying them too small which compromised the design. in the same interview, he emphasized all women can wear the pants, but that's not what people heard. >> women across the country calling the comments insensitive and irresponsible. >> my word were wrong. >> reporter: you can see how women hear the clip of that and we're sensitive about our thighs. and be like, this is terrible. what he's saying. >> certainly. i mean, there is probably -- one of the most successful women's companies in the world. i don't think there's any way i could have built that with that kind of support behind me from those people unless -- if i had been that kind of person that didn't understand women. but obviously i didn't. i didn't. >> reporter: after the interview, wilson recorded an apology for employees. >> i'm sad for the repercussions
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>> reporter: it was posted on facebook, and triggered a new round of criticism that he didn't apologize to customers. >> reporter: did you feel like you should apologize to the women? >> deep in my heart, i knew that that was never my intent to make them feel bad, and i still didn't really have a real grasp on what i said, and how it affected them. it wasn't -- i didn't really understand it. i mean, now i get it. >> reporter: would you want to apologize? >> i think i have to, because i said it, and, again, i'm responsible for what comes out of my mouth. and if that's what was interpreted, then i fully apologize. i'm sorry. >> reporter: when all was said and done, lululemon lost $6 billion in market share. >> reporter: you built this company. that must have been devastating in a way. >> it was. it hurt for a while, for sure. >> it is sad seeing him hurt,
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most resilient people i know. >> reporter: wilson went back to work with his family, he opened the first kitten a store last year. they say the new fabric, technical cashmere, is ideal for a busy lifestyle. >> it was about looking at how people were living in these full contact lives and how we could save them a little bit of time not having to take what was seemingly so precious, to the dry cleaners every time they wanted to wear it. >> reporter: for chip wilson, it was more than a way to make money. it's a chance to see success with the people who stood by him. >> i can't think of anything more rewarding than being able to be with family and trading ideas and feed off each other, what more would a person want? >> reporter: like the yoga pants, these clothes aren't cheap.
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u2 wrapped up concerts with the eagles of death metal. the eagles were playing the concert hall last month when terrorists turned it into a killing ground. we have more on the band's emotional return. >> reporter: u2 had cancelled the paris concert in the aftermath of the attacks, but they were determined to make good on their promiseto return, and boy, did they return with a surprise finale. this was never going to be an ordinary rock concert. it was a statement that life would go on, and the it was a tribute to those whose lives had
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u2 lead singer sung a classic. the song, ne me quitte pas, don't leave me. and if the evening needed more emotion, it got it in the end when bono called onto the stage, the band whose concert at the hall had been turned into a massacre where so many for murdered. u2 brought the eagles of death metal back to paris. >> they were robbed of their stage three weeks ago, and we would like to offer them ours tonight. would you welcome the eagles of death metal. >> reporter: no one was in doubt that the lyric of the band's first number, people have the power, meant something extra here. people have the power >> reporter: it was the first time the band had performed since the paris attack. its front man, explained why
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>> we love u2 so. for giving us this opportunity. i look around and i see -- how do i say it, our friends. >> reporter: the eagles of death metal were a popular but cult band before the attacks. now they're forever a part of bloody history and an effort to heal that's followed. that's the cbs overnight news this wednesday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back with us.
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york city. the front runner for the republican presidential nomination calls for a ban on all muslims entering the united states. also tonight, the san bernardino killers practiced at a shooting range. survivors tell their stories. >> i kept thinking why won't he stop. >> and the investigation of the chicago's pd's use of force against minorities. a queen praises a king and brings the president to tears. >> this is the cbs overnight news. the front runner for the republican presidential nomination drew heavy fire over his proposal to ban muslims from coming into the united states. much of the fire from his own
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donald trump did not back down. he says he doesn't care about the criticism because he insists he's right. trump is not without his supporters. here's major garrett. >> donald trump is calling for a total and complete shut down of muslims entering the united states until our country's representatives can figure representatives can figure out what is going on. >> reporter: campaigning in south carolina, trump suggested muslim animosity was widespread and conjured feelings from 9/11. this morning trump was asked how the ban would work. >> a customs agent would ask the religion? >> they would say, are you muslim. >> and if they said yes, they would not be allowed in the country? >> that's correct.
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were quick to denounce trump. >> this is not conservatism. what was proposed yesterday is not what this party stands for, and more importantly, it's not what this country stands for. >> reporter: reince priebus said fighting terrorism should not come, quote, at the expense of our american values. trump's gop rival, ted cruz, a lawyer himself, refused to say whether trump's proposal was constitutional. >> i recognize people in the media would prefer that anyone running for president engage in an ongoing, as an ongoing theater critic, criticizing the proposals of others. i don't agree with it or think it's the right solution. >> reporter: legal scholars say the ban would violate international treaties. ilyas shapiro says --
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i wish our law school exams were like this. what's the problem with this statement, you can't treat people differently based on religion. you can't discriminate on that basis. case closed. >> reporter: candee parker backed the gop front runner. >> he's okay with saying what he believes and not being afraid and having a backbone to say it. i'm okay with that. >> reporter: to demonstrate just how little he cares about criticism from his own party, he touted a national poll showing 68% of his followers would follow him if he ran as an independent. >> major garrett, thank you. trump also bolstered his
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claimed that 25% of muslims in this country believe violence against america is justified. but one of the leading trackers of hate groups, the southern poverty law center, describes the head of the center for security policy, frank gaffney, as one of america's most notorious islamaphobes. one tweeted mr. trump stokes hatred. the mayor of london called it utter nonsense. johnson said the only reason i wouldn't go to some parts of new york is the real risk of meeting donald trump. the controversy, of course, follows the san bernardino attack in which tashfeen malik and her american husband, syed farook murdered 14 people. there was a custody hearing for the couple's six month old daughter.
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her from state custody. we've learned that farook took out a $28,000 loan before the massacre. carter evans has found the gun violence is sending many in san bernardino to the gun store. >> more than two dozen people lined up outside when a gun store opened. it's a similar story at the gun range where there was target practice two days before farook killed 14 co-workers. business there is up 60% since the attack. >> reporter: you didn't want a gun in the house before. why is that changed now? >> the reason it's changed now is because it's in our neighborhood. >> reporter: desiree is a single mother of three. >> i've had multiple conversations with women who have never shot guns who are looking at buying one to protect themselves.
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throughout this community. on sunday night, there was panic when reports of gunfire at a nearby shopping mall led to more than 300 law enforcement officers circling the property. it turned out to be a robbery where people mistook the sound of smashing glass for gunshots. the police chief. >> people are on edge and extra cautious, which is good. that's what we're asking people to do. >> reporter: being extra cautious now means owning a gun for this woman. >> 9-1-1 is not that quick of a response, and in 2.5 seconds they're not going to be there. >> reporter: gun and ammunition manufacturing is a $13.5 billion a year business in the u.s. according to fbi data, the number of requests for applications for background checks to buy guns spikes after high profile mass shootings like this one. >> carter evans at the site of the scene last week. boston college said today 80
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men's basketball team got sick after eating at a chipotle restaurant. it was neurovirus and not related to an e. coli outbreak.
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almost sixty million americans are affected by mental illness. together we can help them with three simple words. my name is chris noth and i will listen. from maine to maui, thousands of high school students across the country are getting in on the action by volunteering in their communities. chris young: action teams of high school students are joining volunteers of america and major league baseball players to help train and inspire the next generation of volunteers. carlos pea: it's easy to start an action team at your school so you, too, can get in on the action.
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if you were a hippie in the '60s, you need to know. it's the dawning of the age of aquarius. yeah, and something else that's cool. what? osteoporosis is preventable. all: osteo's preventable? right on! if you dig your bones, protect them.
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some countries with no second amendment have banned certain firearms after massacres. can that work? holly williams found out in australia. >> reporter: anthony winchcombe told us he started hunting with his father when he was just five years old. >> i enjoy it. i enjoy tinkering around with firearms. >> reporter: but to own a fun in australia you need a license, and it takes at least 28 years and sometimes months, all semi automatic long arm weapons are banned and it's illegal to carry a gun for personal protection.
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prior to the laws changing and i complied with the law. do i miss them? not particularly. >> reporter: the ban, after 35 people massacred in 1996 by a lone gunman. >> i had the authority of an enormous majority, and i had to do something. >> reporter: john howard was the prime minister and fought off opposition from his own party to push the ban through. >> i don't regard this thing as a civil liberties issue. the largest civil right is staying alive. staying alive and being safe from random attack is a more precious civil right than owning a gun. >> reporter: there's a buyback program, confiscating guns. since then the number of deaths by firearm has fallen by about
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it was in decline before 1996. the ban hasn't stopped gun violence. often with illegal weapons, including a siege in sydney last year by a mentally disturbed gunman who claimed to be inspired by isis. but even steve ballas, a gun shop owner, believes australia's laws are saving lives. >> no doubt. a lot of firearms have been taken out of undesirable hands. there's still a lot out there, but they're thinning them out. >> reporter: if you were in america, you'd probably sell a lot more guns and make a lot more money. >> i suppose sometimes it's not all about the money. >> there are too many guns lying around, and you lose your temper, even rational people pick up a gun and shoot somebody. it's harder if i can put it bluntly, to kill ten people with a knife than with a gun. >> reporter: 85% of australians
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think they should be even tougher according to a recent opinion poll. what australia does not have a is powerful and wealthy gun lobby like the one that exists in the u.s. >> holly williams reporting. thank you. in another important story, chicago police already under federal investigation for their use of force are tonight facing questions over a suspect who died in custody. and, again, there is a video of the incident. here's dean reynolds. >> reporter: when the chicago mayor saw this tape of a detainee being tasered and beaten by chicago police in 2012, he said something is wrong here. either the actions of the officers or the policies of the department. 28-year-old philip coleman soon died from what police said was a fatal drug reaction at the hospital. an autopsy said he had more than 50 bruises and abrasions. >> this is happening too much.
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his father and a former police chief. >> chicago police have 007 badges to kill whoever they want to, and most of them get away from it. >> reporter: a review authority initially found no fault, but with the tape out, it's reopened the case. lawsuits and official attempts at transparency have led to the release of other videos showing chicago cops shooting suspects. there are questions about police accountability. of the 400 police shootings since 2007, they found two unjustified. the university of chicago has studied the intersection of police misconduct and a lack of punishment. >> it starts with the lack of political will to address the underlying, the underlying reasons. >> reporter: law professor, craig futterman led the study
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that protects bad cops are a pattern and practice that needs reviewed. >> 75% of the people shot in chicago are back by police. >> reporter: this is a bad time for the city to lose confidence in its police officers. murders here are up 17% this year. and chicago needs every good cop it can find. >> dean reynolds reporting tonight. thank you. the northwest is bracing for round two of a week-long soaking. much of portland was flooded yesterday. the national weather service said it looked like a fire hose coming in off the pacific. ben tracy is there. >> reporter: more than three inches in 24 hours, a new december record. streets became streams and a giant sink hole ended up in the middle of one road in gresham. it's thought to be 15 feet deep.
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people from the water. >> i can't get anywhere i want to go. >> entire neighborhoods were cut off. >> i left at 6:00, and it hadn't rained. now i come back and it's a river. >> reporter: on the coast, 22 foot waves ravaged boats. the coast guard rescued this sailor. the wet weather is a change from drought conditions in the northwest. the region is being battered by an atmospheric river where the jetstream funnels a series of storms one after another. this week's rain could bring the area back to normal rainfall for the year. the sink hole behind me has grown to 20 feet deep. it's done so much damage they say the roadway would be closed for up to 20 days. heavy rain in the forecast today and more flooding. >> drought relief. ben, thank you. for the first time cars will be graded on how well they avoid
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they announced today that top safety ratings will be much harder to get. kris van cleave on what you can expect. >> reporter: the newly proposed standards are so strict there's not a car on the roads today that would earn five or even four stars. secretary of transportation, anthony foxx. >> our goal is not to just protect people in the event an accident occurs. we ultimately want to eliminate crashes altogether. >> reporter: among the changes are adding new crash tests, including one on angled front crashes and new dummies to better reflect the injuries people suffer from head to foot how much safer do you think cars are going to get because of this rating change? >> we think as auto makers get to five stars, we're talking about some of the most significant life-saving opportunities that we've ever
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>> reporter: the national highway safety administration began the program overall when he took over the agency. >> every time the bar is raised, auto makers get there. it's about saving lives. there have been discussions. incentive, prevent injuries and don't let crashes happen. >> reporter: starting with 2019, there are three rankings. it will also include an overall rating. accident avoidance technology is making its way into cars. the trade association representing car makers says the members will review the proposal, but it was generally supportive of the changes. jon stewart made a surprise
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that's next. jon stewart returned to the daily show on a serious campaign. >> it's jon stewart. >> it had been four months since he was on the set. he was here to shame congress into reauthorizing health care funds for the men and women who responded to 9/11. >> the first responders, many sick with disease have had to travel at their own expense to washington d.c., hundreds of times, to plead for our government to do the right thing. >> five years ago, stewart had four first responders on his show. last night, only one returned. >> out of curiosity, where is everybody? >> 75% of the panel is no longer here. two of the people have illnesses, and john devlin passed away. four men sat here. it's you and i. >> this is the reality of people's lives that are affected by this. and the idea that you had to
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ago to plead your case on national television to get this done was insulting and embarrassing for us as a nation. >> the health care money is expected to run out by next summer. republican leaders in the house and senate say it will be reauthorized, but they haven't said where or when. >> a glee club burst into song. the conductor decided they needed a conductor. he went into action.
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woman: what does it feel like when a woman is having a heart attack? chest pain, like there's a ton of weight on your chest. severe shortness of breath. unexplained nausea. cold sweats. there's an unusual tiredness and fatigue. there's unfamiliar dizziness or light-headedness. unusual pain in your back, neck, jaw, one or both arms, even your upper stomach, are signs you're having a heart attack. don't make excuses. make the call to 9-1-1 immediately. learn more at womenshealth.gov/heartattack. while i was on a combat patrol in baqubah, iraq, a rocket-propelled grenade took my arm off at the shoulder. i was discharged from the army, and i've been working with the wounded warrior project since 2007. warriors, you don't have to be severely wounded to be with the wounded warrior project. we do have a lot of guys that have post-traumatic stress disorder. being able to share your story, i guess it kind of helps you wrap your mind around what did happen over there. my name is norbie, and yes, i do suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder,
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the legendary rock band u2 won't let the attackers have the last word in paris. they answered the bombs and bullets with guns, drums, and harmony. >> we are all here tonight. >> reporter: it was much more than a concert. >> reporter: it was an affirmation that life goes on. and it was a tribute to those whose lives had been ended. the victim's names were projected overhead to form the french flag. bono departing from the usual
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fitting, classic, ne me quitte pas, don't leave me. it was an emotional evening, and there was more to come. one band more than any other has been sucked into the bloody history of that night. it was the california band, the eagles of death metal who were on stage at the concert hall when the killers murdered 90 of their fans. >> welcome the eagles of death metal. >> reporter: now the band was back in town. they hadn't played since the night of the attack, and their first number, people have the power had a new and special meaning here. the power of rock and roll. the band's lead singer, jessie hughes. >> we love you for giving us
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i look around and i see, how do i say it? our friends. >> reporter: the band that found itself in the middle of a tragedy now part of the healing process that followed. a process that more than three weeks later took them back. there's more healing still to come. mark phillips, cbs news, london. >> that's the cbs overnight news this wednesday. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back for morning news and cbs this
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