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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  December 30, 2015 1:37am-4:30am CST

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at the governor's school of government. law school ethics class-- that's where they should teach it, counselor. captioning sponsored by universal studios domestic television
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star wars the force awakens continues to break box office records. it sold $1 billion worth of ticks faster than any movie and doing it without crater george lucas. he has had no role in this film. lucas sat down with charlie rose to discuss life, love and what it means to be a director. >> well, a director is just somebody who's got a fetish with making an the world to be the way he wants it to be, sort of narcissistic. >> that's you? >> all director, there's no different. >> and you're a director. >> all directors are vaguely lime emperors which is i want to build the society to reflect me and what i want. but a director can do it with a
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going to create a world where people can fly. >> george lucas didn't create a new society. he constructed an entire galaxy. >> on its surface, the "star wars" series is a sci-fi space odyssey with odd creatures and epic space battles. but its genius lies in the simple story beneath all of that. >> he told me you killed him. >> timeless elements like family. >> i am your father. >> is the darkside stronger. >> no, no. >> reporter: and the fight between good and evil. >> i felt a great disturbance in the force. >> reporter: as its crater lucas has been called one of the most innovative fifimakers in history but in his heart he considers himself a story teller.
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three movies when you started? and then you decided only to take one part of that life story. >> yeah, i took the first act but then the first act didn't really work so i said okay, what i'm going to have to do is take the ending of the third film and put it on the first film. what you do, you've got a bunch stuff sitting on your desk as you're creating. lets me stick that in here and make it. so i wasn't worried that much about the sequels when i was actually making it because i have to make this the best film. then when i moved onto the other onesesi said behnken know by is now dead. i killed him. how am i going to fix that. and what am i going to do about the fact that blew the death star up and that's what the ending is? but part of it was simply when i got down to some of the other movies i was able too create an environmenenand a world that
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so to me, getting yoda to do a sword fight which i'd always wanted to do but could never do it because he was a muppet. >> lucas became a pioneer in the world of special effects. >> general command ship is dead ahead. >> reporter: his work forever changed the way films are made. and he changed how they sound, too. one in his 1973 hit american graffiti, lucas opted out of a traditional composer -- >> he narrated the entire story with popular songs. make a lovely night >> that's the clearest end point for a teenager is the music. half of what a teenager is is music. you know, and the other half is trouble or raging hormones. but at the same time, it's -- that's what the movie's about.
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>> yeah, i should have called it that. we were looking for a title and you finally figured it out. >> yes. >> studio wanted to call it another slow night in modesto, but cars, music and raging hormones would have been -- it could have been a hit. let's go surfing now the low budget film was one of the most commercially successful films of its time. before he was 40, lucas went on to make the first three "star wars" and indiana jones raiders of the lost arc". and then he walked away. >> i mean i gave up directing in order to become a dad. for 15 years. i just ran a company and was an innovateor innovator, but it was not doing what i really liked to do which is actually make movies. >> because you wanted to be a dad.
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never was one of those things where you don't expect it to happen but once i was a dad, it was like a bolt of lightning struck me. >> reporter: lucas adopted his first daughter with his wife marsha in 19 1 after they divorced, , adopted two moree children and raised them as a single dad. >> everybody says the following things -- they're so very different. then in 2013, he married mel dil hop son an investment executive and cbs news contributor. >> the thing we discovered which we call a miracle is the fact we're exactly the same. >> together thehe have a 2-year-o-o daughter. >> it's a miracle. that's how i see it. it shouldn't have happened and somehow it did. >> reporter: here at skywalker ranch north of san francisco, george is once again able to concentrate on being a father. three years ago, he sold his company lucas films to disney for $4 billion. >> who are you? >>.
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about the "force awakens." >> probably needs this. >> reporter: how do you feel about it? >> well, it's -- you know, i made the decision to selll the company. with "star wars." i made that decision because i looked at the future, i thought that i was going to have a baby, i looked at the fact that i was married and wanted to build a museum. and i looked at the fact that i wanted to make experimental films. so my life was going on a different track. so that started that ball rolling. and so in the end, whenn i sold it, they hired jay jay to come in. >> are you at peace with this. >> yeah. >> as much as you can be? >> yeah, no, i said look, i'm fine. fortunately i'm old enough to have been through all this stuff before. and i'm sure it will do magnificent business. i'm sure they'll do a great job. you know, it will be different from what i would have done.
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earned him a prestigious kennedy center honor. >> george lucas. he's a pathfinder and a pioneer. >> at the awards his good friends steven spielberg explained the lucas legegy best. >> george lucas changed movies forever. >> i was successful because i made one movie every three years. he makes three movies every year. i said when are you going to retire? he said i'm not going to retire. my ultimate dream is to die on a set. i said gee, my ambition is to die in bed watching one of your movies on television. >> reporter: but that doesn't mean he's slowing down anytime soon. >> because you have worn all of these hats though, filmmaker, director, story teller, writer, technological innovator, what do you want the f fst line of your
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i worked with a girl named hayes spelled haze and my chinese teacher is named echo. >> on the streets of shong high, we met chen yinge and wang jing. their nick names. >> ellen. >> that's nice and your name? >> my name is jean. >> zhou peng goes by vic. >> why do you have an english name? everyone has one at work, he told us. but many nicknames do not exactly translate well to native english speakers. we've met a girl named king and at starbucks a ghost and a right as in mr. right. >> a lot of expats and international restaurants around. >> reporter: lindsay jernigan was introduced to the phenomenon when she moved from washington, d.c. to shanghai and started meeting people. >> and their names were boat, yo-yo, 11, apple and there are normal once that didn't fit like edison, eddy for short.
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these names? >> at first i was sort of confused. i was more curious. why is this your english name. >> reporter: in all of this, the 26-year-old jernigan saw an opportunity and launched a website to help chinese find an english name. >> here we have the name. we have the origin, meaning. our target audience is really 18 to abobo 30. it's people that are kind of getting a little bit more serious about their job or studying abroad or going abroad or even working in china in a multinational company. >> reporter: users can take a quiz or for $45 get a 30-minute one-on-one consultation. jernigan explains the meaning of names and says chihise often want one that's uncommon and similar to their chinese name. >> i always kind of like when chinese people say i don't have an english name. i'm going to stick with my chinese name. we're in china. >> yeah, totally. on our website, we never say chinese people have to have an english name.
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people activelyy already looking for an english name. almost all of my friends have their english name. >> reporter: meet this 28-year-old, formerly known as 11. the number of her favorite soccer player. is 11. >> uh-huh. >> what did they say? >> that's my trouble. they always say where is seven. china. seven. >> where is seven? >> i don't know. >> you'd say gosh, another 7-eleven joke. >> of an working with jern ing withing g th ing withing with govererr jernigan become kiera. >> kiera is not that common. it sounds smart and keira knightley. >> sure. >> jernigan says it can hard to explain why some names just don't work. >> you run into people here named green or yellow but you
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i totally understand why it's confusing. there's a learning curve for all involved. this juice store manager was formerly known as ding. his knew name courtesy of jernigan took some practice for his father. >> evan. >> evan. >> evan? evan? >> that's what your dad said? >> yeah. >> he couldn't pronounce it when you u ld hihi >> yeah. >> reporter: now, this goes both ways. in japan, they have a hard time pronouncing the th in my name seth so they call me sees sue. here in china, the ministry of foreign affairs has given me a chinese name. that's do an. 2 palestiniansnsuch kindndss. for cbs morning, i'm seth doane in shanghai.
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2015 is coming to a close and charles osgood looks back on the year that was. >> reporter: january brought the terrorist attack on the french magazine "charlie hebdo." it had lampooned islam. 13 people were killed. millions would soon rally in paris saying charlie. in february, isis shocked the world again. posting online videos of a captured jordanian pilot being burned alive and later the mass beheading of 21 coptic christians. we remember march for the crash of the germanwings jetliner. 150 lives were lost. when the co-pilot deliberately apriled the plane into the
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in april, a boston jury convict marathon bomber. may saw the duke and duchess present princess charlotte elizabeth diana to the world. >> i'm always going to be your da >> in june caitlyn jenner formerly known as bruce jenner made her debut. and the supreme court made same-sex marriage a right nationwide. a mile long tunnel provided mexico's powerful drug lord el chapo an escape from prison in july. that same month, pluto was revealed in spectacular photos snapped by a nasa spacecraft. in august, news that minnesota dentist walter palmer had killed zimbabwe's beloved cecil the lion for sport triggered global outrage. the photo of 3-year-old alan's
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in september quickly became a symbol of the world's indifference to the apply the of syrian refugees. october broughgh an official end to china's controversial one-child policy. allowing families now to have two children. islamic terrorists targeted paris again in november. 10 people would die in multiple attacks. leaving the heartrtf the french and this month, radicalized husband and wife killers would take 14 lives in san bernardino, california. and two weeks ago, 2g 00 nations met in paris to adopt the first global pact to combat climate change. >> that's the overnight news" for this wednesday. for some of you, the news continues. for others collect back with us a little bit later for the morning news and "cbs this morning."
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michele miller. hell at the airports. high watat along the mississippi. flooding, snow and ice from a storm that won't quit. also tonight, caught in mexico. the teen who once beat a prison term by claiming to be too spoiled to know right from wrong. walking into danger. the consequences of paying too much attention to the cell phone. and music should be color blind and to make it that way, you have to infuse in it all of the colors. >> reporter: a maestro on a mission. captioning funded by cbs >> scott pelley is off. i'm jim axelrod. >> the deadly storm system that swept through the south and midwest is now dumping snow on
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half a foot has fallen in maine. it's also producing hick flooding in missouri where they're filling and stacking sandbags to hold back the surging mississippi river. bad weather is blamed for more than 10,000 flight delays over two days and more than 4,000 cancellations. we have a team of correspondents deployed beginning with adriana diaz at chicago's o'hare airport. adriana? >> reporter: all day long, we've seen lines stretchchcross the length of the term naal as passengers try to get through security to their gates. many flights were canceled or delays. crowded chaos took over the terminals here. check-in lines six rose deep. security checkpoints packed with passengers running out of patient. >> i don't even know what to think. >> reporter: 800 flights were canceled or delayed by lat this afternoon on top of a nearly 1400 canceled yesterday. with an estimated 80,000 trying
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through o'hare today, emotions were high. i want to speak to someone. this is such [ bleep ]. it's such [ bleep ]. >> reporter: hundreds were stranded last night with no place to go. 850 were able to get cots but scott mill man and his girlfriend hope slept on the cold hard floor after their flight to portland, oregon, was cancelled. >> i've been using my coat as a blanket or a mattress. >> yeah, this is my pillow right here. >> reporter: flightaware said o'hare's location is critical to air travel nationwide. >> it's a large hub for american airlines and united airlines, as well. chicago is a vital artery for the united states air traffic system. >> reporter: as the wintry mix moved east dumpingng as much as a foot of snow from new york to maine, delays moved with it. more than 800 flights at new york's three area airports were canceled or delayed and another
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back here at o'hare, american airlines rebooked scott and hope on another flight but it leaves next year on new year's day. >> is the airline paying for your hotel? >> no, they won't pay for anything. >> reporter: it will take at least one more day for flights to return to normal here at o'hare. part of the problem is flights are mostly full because of the holidays leaving few seats for rebooking. > adrdrna diaz with the stranded travels at o'hare. tror recollectional rains have swollen rivers in illinois and missouri. the mississippi river is expected to crest on thursday south of st. louis at levels that could exceed the historic 1993 flood. union, missouri, has already flooded. russell kinsaul of kmov is there. russell? >> reporter: yeah, jim, at least two dozen homes are underwater and a number of businesses, as well. this mcdonald's a gas station, a hotel and a jimmy john's sandwich shop opened up a week
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there have been 13 deaths most from people driving through water rushing across roadways. emergency. he was in the st. louis area today touring some hard hit areas in st. charles county. all of this heavy rain has created what is beak ten extra vertical feet of water. there have been mandatory evacuations and requests forevolunteers to fill sandbags. in st. louis today, they needed volunteers to fill 20 thousand bags and some of those volunteers that showed up today were children on their holiday break. in some places water is up to the rooftops of homes and some businesses are underwater. the burbis river is causing all of the flooding and they're saying it will reach an all-time high when it crests later day. > russell kinsaul with the devastating floodwaters in missouri, thank you. let's bring in eric fisher from our cbs boston station wbz. eric, the flooding is already bad.
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>> we're watching a widespread area of 8 to 14 inch rainfall. just over the last seven days alone creating the huge issues we've beenen seeing g this mississippi river basin. we look across 20 different states here. all these rivers that all feed into the mississippi reaching at least major flooding if not a record flooding. a lot of these crests the highest in at least several decades. all this water feeds into the mississippi river at st. louis crest ong thursday at 44 feeee 14 feet more to rise. arkansas river at little rock will be cresting on friday at 26 feet. very high water levels. now, the good news is here that as we look over the next seven days, a much drier pattern sets up an all across the region. it won't stop the flooding expected but at least it won't exacerbate the problem anymore. >> garland texas has begun the clean-up after tornadoes damaged or destroyed nearly 800 homes there. tonight, david begnaud has a
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property can be replaced but lives cannot. >> reporter: in bad shape. i lost my wife. she was my best friend. >> reporter: ruben porras and petra ruiz were married for ten years with four young children. he had both worked as paralegals. for christmas, ruben surprised his wife with a special hair appointment. she was on her way home saturday night when she connected with her husband on facetime. >> we were just talking about dinner. and all of a sudden, she just started screaming. >> reporter: she starts screaming. >> and she -- all i said was babe, what's wronging? the image just became black. >> reporter: using a mobile app and gps, ruben tracked his wife's phone to the crash site and asked his brother-in-law to drive him there. blocked by fire trucks and debris, he ran the last mile and b half to find his wife >> and i looked to my right and
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it was really -- it was crushed. i was hoping she would still be alive in there, you know? >> reporter: you crawled into the car? >> i crawled into the car to try to help her. >> reporter: about five hours later, porras came home and called his children together. >> i said mommy was in a terrible accident. and she's left us. but she will be watching over. >> reporter: petra ruiz was one of eight people who died in the city of garland. all of those victims died in their vehicles. >> david begnaud with the heart breaking story. thank you. the "cbs overnight news"
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almost sixty million americans are affected by mental illness. together we can help them with three simple words. my name is chris noth and i will listen. from maine to maui, thousands of high school students across the country are getting in on the action by volunteering in their communities. chris young: action teams of high school students are joining volunteers of america and major league baseball players to help train and inspire the next generation of volunteers. carlos pea: it's easy to start an action team at your school so you, too, can get in on the action.
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now to ethan couch, the -called affluenza kid. couch was wanted for possibly violating probation in texas after beating prison time in a fatal drunk driving crash with a defense that left many people shaking their heads. after a three-week manhunt, omar villafranca a ports couch has been arrested in mexico. >> ethan couch's newly dyed black hair didn't fool mexican authorities who caught the texas teenager on monday despite looking very different than he did two years ago when he was first charge in the deadly drunkiving accident. >> we worked a tremendous amount of leads and learned through some interviews that they had planned to disappear, that they even had something that was almost akin to a going away party.
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couch and his mother tonya drove a pickup truck into mexico and ended up more than 1200 miles from north texas in the coastal resort town of puerto vallarta. they fled shortly after this video surfaced which appeared to show couch at a party with alcohol. which might have violated his juvenile probation. even though he's 18, tarrant county district attorney sharen wilson says couch is only facing juvenile justice. >> i'm not satisfied with four months in a juvenile facility. we're asking for him to be moved to adult court. >> reporter: couch was only 16 when he avoided jail time and was sentenced to ten years probation for killing four people in a drunk driving accident. his defense team argued that the teen suffered from something they termed affluenza, arguing that his rich parents never taught him right from wrong. >> sheriff, now that he is in custody, what do you want to happen to ethan couch this time around? >> well, i'd like for him to be held accountable.
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probation was appropriate for killing four innocent people. >> reporter: even if couch's case is transferred to adult court, he only faces four months in jail because he was convicted as a minor. jim, mexican officials tell cbs news couch and his mother will be flown back to texas tomorrow. >> omar, thank you. chicago police officer jason van dyke pled not guilty today in the shooting death of laquan mcdonald. van dyke faces first degree murder charges after shooting the teenager 16 times. dashcam video of the confrontation sparked days of protests when it was released last month. van dyke's lawyer says he may ask for a change of venue. the last day of the year is always among the most challenging days of the year for the new york city police department. and two days away, paris and san bernardino have only raised the stakes. here's don dahler. >> reporter: with over a million
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manhattan and a billion more watching on tv, new york officials are determined to make times square the safest place on earth. mayor bill deblasio. >> we're the best prepared city in the country. we know how to do big events. we've shown it time and time again. >> reporter: 5,000 uniformed and undercover officers will be in times square. snipers will be on rooftops garbage cans removed, manhole covers sealed shut, radiation detectors deployed. this year the nypd established a 500-person special response unit that holds regular drills. at a new operation center in downtown manhattan, officers monitor thousands of camera feeds. on new year's eve the room will be staffed with members of governmental and private agencies. last month, chief james o'neill gave us a tour. >> do you think people should feel safe? >> you know what, i'm not going to tell people not to be
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tell them to feel safe. i don't think anyone does this work better than the nypd, along with our federal partners. >> reporter: but memories of the paris and california terror attacks are fresh. commissioner bill bratton. >> the pattern this year has been terror attacks on relatively small soft targets with all the focus on times square, what aboututhe thousands of businesses outside this area? >> both through capabilities on the threat analysis beforehand, the prevention side of it as well as the capability to respond very quickly, we believe we are as prepared as anybody can be. >> reporter: spectators coming into this area will all be searched and reqeqred to get to their places early and stay there. jim, they will also not be allowed to bring in large bags, backpacks or alcohol. >> don dahler in times square where it will be even busier in two nights. thanks you. now to new information about the federal government's handling of the texas ice cream maker blue bell, the subject of a cbs news investigation this s fall. cbs news has learned the department of justice has
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blue bell after their ice cream was linked to a deadly listeria outbreak earlier this year. three people died. an fda investigation found listeria in three of blue bell's oklahoma, and texas, as well as records indicating the company knew one plant was contaminated at least as early as 2013. the fda investigation uncovered other troubling problems. including condensation dripping directly into ice cream and unsanitary equipment. in april, blue bell shut down all three production facilities and recalled all its ice cream. sources tell cbs news, the justice department is trying to determine what blue bell management knew about potentially deadly hazards in their plants and when they knew it. in october, gerald bland who worked at the blue bell factory in brenham, texas, described to cbs news unsanitary coiions on the factory floor.
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>> on the wall by the three gallon machine, if it would rain real hard and water sat on the roof, it would just trickle down that wall. >> reporter: rain water from the roof. >> from the roof. >> reporter: would get into the factory? >> yeah. >> reporter: another worker terry schultz told us his complaints to management about unclean conditions went nowhere. >> the response i got at one point was, is that all you're going to do is come in here and bitch every afternoon? >> what do you think his message to you was? >> production was probably more important than cleanliness. >> all three of blue bell's plants are now back up and running and by the end of next month, its ice cream will be back on the shelves in 15 states. blue bell did not respond to our requests for comment today. this investigation into blue bell is being led by the same justice department lawyer who prosecuted the peanut corporation of america. the company's owner stewart parnell got 28 years for shipping salmonella contaminated peanut products. that is the longest sentence
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crime. coming up next, walking while distracted is sending hundreds to hospitals. a former star of "glee" is arrested for child pornography. and mike tyson loses to a hoverboard.
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distraction turned deadly for a man who fell off a cliff in san diego on christmas day. he had been staring at his phone or camama completely unaware of the looming danger. as kris van cleave reports, this type of thing happens all the time. >> reporter: investigators believe joshua burwell may have been trying to take a picture of the sunset when he made the deadly 40-foot fall. san diego lifeguard sergeant bill bender. >> wasn't watching where he was walking looking more down at the device. >> reporter: research shows so-called distracted walking
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problem. the number of er visits for related injuries most often due to falling doubled between 2005 and 2010 to more than 1500 with millennials ages 21 to 25 the most likely to get hurt. >> it's s portant to recognize this as a problem. >> reporter: surgeon dr. claudette lajam believes the true number of injuries is even higher. when they come intoy office, for instance, they'll have an injury and they'll say they tripped over the curb but they'll never admit na they were looking down at their phone instead of looking in front of them. >> mall security cameras captured this woman who was so focused on her phone, she walked into a fountain. this man fell right off the train platform. we spotted jordan videochatting while crossing a busy new york street. >> i know i shouldn't. >> kelly davis was working away on her phone as she walked to lunch. >> have you ever had a moment where you've walked into something or fallen or - - >> absolutely,y, walked into one of the very short like light posts.
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surprised by the findings of a 2014 study that estimated nearly 10% of all pedestrian injuries are due to distraction. jim, i know it sounds obvious, but if you're looking down at your phone, you may not see an obstacle right in front of you in time. >> chris, thank you. an unlikely pedestrian was
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that is just ahead. one of the stars of the fox
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today for possession o ochild pornography. mark salling played puck on the program. police say they served a warrant at salling's home and took the 33-year-old actor into custody. "glee" aired its final episode earlier this year. mike tyson was once one of the most feared men on the planet, but the heavyweight became a aeavy weight on a hoverboard. >> oh, my. >> that could be the hardest he's ever hit the floor. tyson's daughter got him the hoverboard for christmas and clearly, it won this round. in northern california, this question. why did the elephant seal want to cross the road? she tried several times to cross highway 37. wildlife teams shoot her back into san pablo bay each time, but she kept coming back. they believe she may be pregnant. late today, they tranquilized her and planned to take her to a national seashore. some of this country's top concert musicians have a
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that's next. what does it feel likee when a woman is having a heart attack? chest pain, like there's a ton of weight on your chest. severe shortness of breath. unexplained nausea cold sweats. there's an unusual tiredness and fatigue. there's unfamiliar dizziness or light-headedness. unusual pain in your back, neck, jaw, one or both arms, even your upper stomach, are signs you're having a heart attack. don't make excuses. make the call to 9-1-1 immediately. learn more at womenshealth.gov/heartattack. while i was on a combat patrol in baqubah, iraq, a rocket-propelled grenade took my arm off at the shoulder. i was discharged from the army, and i've been working with the wounded warrior project since 2007. warriors, you don't have to be severely wounded to be with the wounded warrior project. we do have a lot of guys that have post-traumatic stress disorder. being able to share your story, i guess it kind of helps you wrap your mind around what did happen over there. my name is norbie, and yes, i do suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder,
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we close tonight with a mission to change the composition of classical music. not the sound, but the color. fewer than 4% of symphony musicians in this country are black. lee cowan found it's not for lack of talent. >> reporter: rachmaninoff was seamless on this night in charleston, south carolina. remarkable because this was the very first time many of these musicians had ever played together. maestro marlin daniel conducts not only the orchestra but this festival called the color of music now in its third year. >> you know a lot of musicians
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jazz and hip-hop and all these things. >> reporter: it's a stereotype. >> a big stereotype. a lot of people find there are not any musicians of color out there doing classical music when there are actually in reality tons of us. >> reporter: clarinettist robert davis says in most symphonies he sticks out as a black classical artist but not here. >> you usually see the same ones. but then i came down here, and there's a whole other group. where are they coming from? so i was very, very shocked about that. >> reporter: the festival highlights black classical composers. on this night, it was adolphus hail stark and his serenade performed one block from the historic black church where in june a gunman opened fire, killing nine. >> we're very lucky. >> reporter: businessman lee
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hopes sites like this will help diversify other orchestras. >> i think that most orchestras want to change. they just don't know how to change. >> reporter: and how do they change? >> by having people at the table who look like me. >> reporter: music should be color blind and to make it that way, you have to infuse in it all of the colors. >> reporter: a unique unity that for a few days at least makes for an especially powerful sound. [ applause ] >> lee cowan, cbs news, charleston, south carolina. and that's the overnight news" for this wednesday. for some of you, the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new
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>> this is the "cbs overnight news." >> welcome to the overnight news". i'm michele miller. police in mexico have captured the so-called affluenza teen, ethan couch and his mother tonya. the pair had been on the run for weeks after a video surfaced that could send the teen to prison for years. at 16 years old, couch killed four people in a drunk driving accident but he avoided jail time by claiming he was so rich and pampered that he didn't know right from wrong. his next lesson will come in fort worth, texas. omar villafranca is at at tarrant county courthouse. >> a bizarre international search for the so-called affluenza teen and his mother is now over. but the question of why they were running, that's just getting started. ethan and tonya couch, mother and son, are now in the hands of
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pair was apprehended in puerto vallarta on the pacific coast of mexico. this new image released by mexican officials shows the 18-year-old couch with an altered appearance, his blonde hair now a dark brown. >> ethan couou who is being saw the now by the u.s. marshal service. >> reporter: earlier this month, the two disappeared after couch missed a meeting with his probation officer. ethan couch made headlines two years ago when he eluded jail time after killing four people in a drunk driving crash. during the trial, a psychologist testified on behalf of couch saying the teen suffered from affluenza, suggesting his parents' wealth left him without a sense of responsibility. officials believe the pair may have fled because of this video. it surfaced earlier this month and appears to show couch at a party where a drinking game was being played. this could have violated his probation.
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case hasn't been moved over to adult court and thateans at worst he will face sentencing in front of a juvenile judge and it could only go to juvenile detention. the pentagon says coalition air strikes in iraq and syria over the past month have killed ten top leaders of the islamic state. one of the dead has been linked to last month's terror attacks in paris. inside the war zone, the iraqi military is fighting to drives the last remaining pockets of isis gunmen out of the city of ramadi. elizabeth palmer reports from london. >> reporter: finally, the symbol of victory. for the first time since may, iraqaq flag was hoisted over government buildings. all week, iraq special forces had led the fight to retake ramadi. they won, thanks to better equipment and more than 600 air strikes by coalition planes on isis targets. but the iraqis also won because they've been learning on the
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in ferocious battles in tikrit earlier this year, they managed to push isis out. in ramadi, they did it without major help from irregular shiite militias. for these soldiers, that was a big morale boost. cbs news national security analyst juan xerotot >> they're better trained and enabled in part through the u.s. and coalition partnership but also they have greater will and capacity. they are clearly fighting with more strategic intent and capability. >> reporter: the battle to retake ramadi important though it was, is just preamble for what's coming in 2016. on national television, iraq's ime minister warned we are coming to liberate mosul next and deal isis a fatal blow. first though, the government will have to repair the damage and restore services in ramadi to lure residents back
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stays on the run. and the iraqi army is warning that operations in ramadi aren't entirely over yet. there are still pockets of isis fighters in at least one suburb, and the city is heavily booby trapped. >> officials at the southern california gas company say they finally located the source of a gas leak that t rced thousands of people from theiriromes. maria villareal has the story from los angeles. >> reporter: an underground well at the natural gas facility in the hills of porter ranch is leaking. this is infrared camera shows methane gas billowing into the air. it was shot by the environmental defense fund. a law firm representing several homeowners filing suits agagnst southern california's gas utility company shared these images. >> you could smell the gas inside the house with the windows closed. and when you walked outside, it
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>> reporter: robin shapiro moved her family into her parents' home after she claims the gas made them sick. >> i was getting heaeaches that were lasting days and days, migraine-like headaches. then my son started getting bloody noses and respiratory issues for both of my children. >> reporter: the leak started in october. so far, more than 6500 families have filed for help. but the gas s mpany admits there's a backlog and only 2200 have been relocated. students at two schools will move to other schools when classes are back isession next week. >> once the leak is stopped, we'll be able to evaluate what caused the leak and we will be able to evaluate how much natural gas escaped as a result t of the incident. >> reporter: the state agency that monitors air quality estimates nearly 70,000 pounds of gas is released every hour, but health officials say methane
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risks. to fix the leak, the gas company drilled a relief well nearby using magnetic technology workers have located the leaking well some 4,000 feet below ground. they have to drill another 4,000 feet where they'll intersect the faulty well, then fill it with cement to seal it. a solution that can't come soon enough for homeowners like robin shapiro. >> we feel like this is never going to end and we have nobody to thank but the gas company. >> reporter: fans of heavy metal are mourning the death of lemmy kilmister, the lead singer and bassist of motorhead. lemmy as he was known to just about everyone turned 70 christmas eve and had recently been diagnosed with cancer. anthony mason has his story. >> bring on motorhead. we play rock 'n' roll. >> reporter: with his gravelly vocals and signature style, the
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generations of performers. >> reporter: lemmy formed motorhead in the mid-70s and the band produced music with a hard gutteral sound. in 1980, the ace of spades cracked the charts in britain and the u.s. and became a heavy metal anthem. >> have a drink. >> reporter: with his heavy drinking and wild antics, lemmy's lifestyle appeared to live up to the lyrics in the songs he wrote. mama, i'm coming home >> he penned hits for other performers such as mama i'm coming home for ozzy osbourne. last night osbourne tweeted lost one of my best friends lemmy today. he was a warrior andnd legend. fans say lemmy will be remembered for staying true to himself and his music. >> i did it right, you know. that's about as much as i can say.
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can say, that you did it right. >> "star wars: the force awakens"s"ontinues to break bobo office records. it sold $1 billion worth of tickets faster than any other movie and is doing it without crater george lucas. he has had no role in this film. lucas sat down with charlie rose to discuss life, love and what it means to be a director. >> well, a director is just somebody who's got a fetish with making the world to be what he wants it to be, sort of narcissistic. >> that's you? >> all directors. they're no different. >> and you're a director. >> all directors are vaguely like emperors which is i want to build the society to reflect me and what i want. but a director can do it with a
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people can fly. >> george lucas didn't create a new society. he constructed an entire galaxy. >> on its surface, the "star wars" series is a sci-fi space odyssey with odd creatures and epic space battles. but its genius lies in the simple story beneath all of that. >> he told me you killed him. >> timeleseselements like family. >> i am your father. >> is the darkside stronger? >> no, no. >> reporter: and the fight between good and evil. >> i felt a great disturbance in the force. >> reporter: as its crater lucas has been called one of the most innovative filmmakers in history, but in his heart he considids himself a story teller. >> didn't you intend to create
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and then you decided only to take one part of that life story? >> yeah, i took the first act but then the first act didn't really work so i said okay, what i'm going to have to do is take the ending of the third film and put it on the first film. what you do, you've got a bunch of stuff sitting on your desk as you're creating. let me take that and stick that in here and make i so i wasn't worried that much about the sequels when i was actually making it because i have to make this the best film. then when i moved onto the other ones, i say kenobi is now dead. i killed him. how am i going to fix that. and what am i going to do ababt the fact that t blew the death star up and that's what the ending is? but part of it was simply when i got down to some of the other movies i was able to create an environment and a world that wasn't possible when i started the first one.
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sword fight which i'd always wanted to do but could never do it because he was a muppet. >> lucas became a pioneer in the world of special effects. >> the general's command ship is dead ahead. >> reporter: his work forever changed the way films are made. and he changed how they sound,d, too. >> one, two, 3:004:00 rock. >> in his 1973 hit "american graffiti," lucas opted out of a traditional composer. >> he narrated the entire story with popular songs. make a lovely night >> that's the clearest end point for a teenager is the music. ha of what a teenager is is music. you know, and the other half is trouble or raging hormones. but at the same time, it's -- that's what the movie's about. >> reporter: cars and music and raging hormones. >> yeah, i should have called it
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weweere looking for a title and you finally figured it out.. >> yes. >> the studio wanted to call it another slow night in modesto, but cars, music and raging hormones would have been -- it could have been a hit let's go surfing now the low budget film was one of the most commercially successful films of its time. before he was 40, lucas went on to make the first three "star wars" and indiana jones "raiders of the lost ark." and then he walked away. >> i mean i gave up directing in order to become a dad. you know for 15 years, i just ran a company and was and i know straighter, but it was not doing what i really liked to do which is actually make movies. >> reporter: because you wanted to be a dad? >> because yeah, i -- and i
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where you don't expect it to happen but once i was a dad, it was like a bolt of lightning struck me. >> reporter: lucas adopted his first daughter with his wife marsha in 1981. after they divorced, he adopted two more children and raised them as a single dad. >> everybody says the following things -- they're so very different. then in 2013, h h married melody hobson an investment executive and cbs news contributor. >> the thing we discovered which we call a miracle is the fact we're exactly the same. >> together they have a 2-year-old daughter. >> it's a miracle. that's how i see it. it shouldn't have happened and somehow it did. >> reporter: here at skywalker ranch north of san francisco, george is once again able to concentrate on being a father. three years ago, he sold his company lucas films to disisy for $4 billion. >> who are you? >> reporter: let me just talk
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>> reporter: how do you feel about it? >> well, it's -- you know, i made the decisioioto sell the company with "star wars." i made that decision because i looked at the future, i thought that i was going to have a baby, i looked at the fact that i was married and i looked at the fact that i wanted to build a museum wanted to make experimental films. so my life was going on a different track. so that started that ball rolling. and so in the end, when i sold it, they hired j.j. to come in. >> are you at peace with this? >> yeah. >> as much as you can be? >> yeah, no, i said look, i'm fine. fortunately i'm old enough to have been through all this stuff before. and i'm sure it will do magnificent business. i'm sure they'll do a great job. you know, it will be different from what i would have done. >> everything he's done has
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>> george lucas. he's a pathfinder and a pioneer. >> at the awards his good friend steven spielberg explained the george lucas legacy best. >> george lucas changed movies forever. >> i was successful because i made one movie every three years. he makes three movies every year. i said when are you going to retire? he said i'm not going to retire. i said, my ultimate dream is to die on a set. and just keel over in the middle of shooting. i said gee, my ambition is to die in bed watching one of your movies on television. >> reporter: but that doesn't an he's slowing down anytime soon. >> because you have worn all of these hats though, filmmaker, director, story teller, writer, technological innovator, what do you want the first line of your obituary to say? >> i was a great dad.
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>> in china, english nicknames are all the rage. seth doane caught up with one american helping people find just the right name. >> to lessen those lost in translation moments, it's common
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nicknames are unusual. i worked with a girl named haze spelled haze and my chinese teacher is named echo. >> on the streets of shanghai, we met chen yinge and wang jing. their nicknames? >> ellen. >> that's nice and your name? >> my name is jean. >> zhou peng goes by vic. >> why do you have an english name? everyone has one at work, he told us. but many nicknames do not exactly translate well to native english speakers. we've met a girl named king and at starbucks a ghost and a right as in mr. right. >> a lot of expats and a lot of different international restaurants around. >eporter: lindsay jerergan was introduced to the phenomenon when she moved from washington, d.c. to shanghai and started meeting people. >> and their names were boat, yo-yo, 11, apple and there are normal ones that just didn't fit
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these names? >> at first i was sort of confused. i was more curious. why is this your english name? >> reporter: in all of this, the 26-year-old jernigan saw an opportunity and launched a website to help chinese find an english name. >> here we have the name. we have the origin, meaning. our target audience is really 18 to about 30. it's people that are kind of getting a little bit more serious about their job or studying abroad or going abrbrd or even working in china in a multinational company. >> reporter: users can take a quiz or for $45 get a 30-minute one-on-one consultation. jernigan explains the meaning of names and says chinese often want one that's uncommon and similar to their chinese name. >> i always kind of like when chinese people say i ion't have an english name. i'm going to stick with my chinese me. we're in china. >> yeah, totally. on our website, we never say chinese people have to have an english name. it's very much a resource for
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for an english name. almost all of my friends have their english name. >> reporter: meet this 28-year-old, formerly known as 11.. the number of her favorite soccer player. >> when you told people my name is 11 -- >> uh-huh. >> -- what did they say? >> that's my trouble. they always say where is seven. 711 eleven is the famous convenience store in china. so they always say where is seven. >> where is seven? >> i don't know. >> you'd say gosh, another 7-eleven joke. >> after working with jern garngs 11 became keera. >> kiera is not that common. it sounds smart and keira knightley. >> sure. >> jernigan says it can be hard to explain why some names just don't work. >> you run into people here named green or yellow but you have the name scarlet and violet.
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confusing. there's a learning curve for all involved. this juice store manager was formerly known as ding. his new name courtesy of jernigan took some practice for his father. >> evan. >> evan. >> evan? evan? >> that's what your dad said? >> yeah. >> he couldn't pronounce it when you told him? >> yeah. >> reporter: now, this goes both ways. in japan, they have a hard time pronouncing the th in my name seth so they call me sess sue. here in china, the ministry of foreign affairs has given me a chinese name. that's do an. it means much kindness. for "cbs this morning," i'm seth doane in shanghai.
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be right back. when the engines failed on the plane i was flying, i knew what totoo to save my pasasngers. but when my father sank into depression, i didn't know how to help him. when he ultimately shot himself, he left our family devastated. don't let this happen to you. if you or a loved one is suicidal, call the national suicide prevention lifeline. no matter how hopeless or helpless you feel,
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(franklin d. roosevelt) the inherent right to work is one of the elemental privileges of a free people. endowed, as our nation is, with abundant physical resources... ...and inspired as it should be to make those resources and opportunities available for the enjoyment of all... ...we approach reemployment with h al hope of finding a better answer than we have now. narrator: donate to goodwill where your donations help fund
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2015 is coming to a close and charles osgood looks back on the year that was. >> reporter: january brought the terrorist attack on the french magazine "charlie hebdo." it had lampooned islam. 13 people were killed. miions would soon rally in paris saying charlie. in february, isis shocked the world again. posting online videos of a captured jordanian pilot being burned alive and later the mass beheading of 21 coptic christians. we remember march for the crash of the germanwings jetliner. 150 lives were lost. when the co-pilot deliberately aimed the plane into the french alps. in april, a boston jury
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dzhokhar tsarnaev. a month later he was sentenced to deathth may saw the duke and duchess of cambridge present their new daughter, princess charlotte elizabeth die and fla to the world. >> i'm always going to be your dad. >> in june caitlyn jenner formerly known as bruce jenner made her debut. and the supreme court made same-sex marriage a right t nationwide. a mile long tunnel provided mexico's powerful drug lord el chapo an escape from prison in july. that same month, pluto was revealed in spectacular photos snapped by a nasa spacecraft. in august, news that minneneta dentist walter palmer had killed zimbabwe's beloved cecil the lion f sport triggered global outrage. the photo of 3-year-old alan
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kurdish beach in september quickly became a symbol of the world's indifference to the plight of syrian refugees. october ought an official end to china's controversial one-ild policy. allowing families now to have two children. islamic terrorists targeted paris again in november. 130 people would die in multiple attacks. leaving the heart ofofhe french nation badly wounded. and this month, radicalized husband and wife killers would take 14 lives in san bernardino, california. and two weeks ago, 200 nations met in paris to adopt the first global pact to combat climate change.
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for this wednesday. their cell phones. >> all day the length of the terminal as the passengers try to get through security and to their gates. many flights were canceled or delays. >> crowded chaos took over the terminals. check in lines six rows deep. security checkpoints packed with passengers running out of patience. >> i don't even know. >> 00 flights were canceled or delayed by late this afternoon. on top of the nearly 1400 canceled yesterday with an estimated 80,000 trying to get
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o'hare today, emotion were high. >> speak to someone. this is such [ bleep ]. >> hundreds were stranded last night with no place to go. 850 were able to get cots but scott mill man and his guy of hope were left on the cold hard floor after their flight to oregon was canceled. >> blanket or a mattress. an that's my pillow right here. >> reporter: flightaware said o'hare is critical to air travel nationwide. >> its and i an large hub. american airlines and united airlines, as well. chicago is a vital artery for the air traffic. >> as the wentry mix dumped as much as a foot of snow, delays moved with it. more than 800 flights from three area airports were canceled or delayed and another 400 or so at
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back here at o'hare, american airlines rebooked scott and hope on another flight but it leaves next year on new year's day. will the airline pay for your hotel? >> they won't pay for anything. >> it will take at least one more day to be normal here at o'hare. part of the problem is that flights on the holidays leave few seats for rebooking. >> adriana diaz with travelers at ho layer. torrential rains. the mississippi river is expected to crest south of st. louis at levels that could exceed historic 1993 flood. yoon, missouri, has already flooded. our st. louis affiliate kmov is there. >> reporter: jim, at least two dozen homes are underwater and a number of businesses, as well. there's a gas station, a hotel, a jimmy john's sandwich shop
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there have been 13 deaths from people rushing through flooded roadways. the governor jay nixon has declared a state of emergency today. all of this heavy rain has created what is basically an extra vertical feet of water. there have been mandatory evacuations. in st. louis today, they needed volunteers to fill 20 thousand bags. volunteers that showed up today were children on their holiday break. in some places, water is up to the roof tops in homes and as i showed you some businesses are underwater. here in union missouri, the river is causing all of the flooding and they're saying it will reach an all-time high when it crests later today. >> thank you. let's bring in eric fisher, chief meteorologist boston station wbz. eric, flooding is already bad.
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>> we're watching here a widespread area of 8 to 14 inch rainfall just over the last -- that is creating huge issues we've been seeing in the mississippi river basins. we're looking across 20 different states and all the rivers eaching at least plornlg flooding if not a record flooding. a lot of these crests highest in decades. saltwater feeds into the mississippi river at st. louis cresting on thursday. 14 feet more to rise. the arkansas river at little rock will be cresting on friday at 26 feet. very high water levels. the good news here is that over the next seven days, the weather pattern is goioi to set up all across the region that will stop the flooding that's expected here but at least it won't exacerbate the problem. garland, texas, has begun to clean up after tornadoes damages or destroyed nearly 800 homes there. david begnaud has a reminder
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but lives cannot. >> bad shape. i lost my wife. she was my best friend. >> ruben porras and petra ruiz were married for ten years with four young children. they both worked as paralegals. for christmas, he surprised his wife with a special hair appopotment. she was on her way home when she connected with her husband on facetime. >> we were just talking about dinner and all of a sudden, she started screaming. >> she starts screaming and she starts saying, babe, babe. >> what's wronging? >>ing. > it just went black. >> using a mobile app, ruben tracked his wife's p pne to the crash site. he asked his brother-in-law to drive him there blocked by fire treks and debris, he ran the
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>> i looked to my right. it was crushed. i was hoping she would s sll be alive in there, you know? >> you crawled into the car? >> i crawled into the car to try to help her. >> about five hours later, porras came home and called his children together. >> i said, mommy was in a terrible accident. and she's left us. shy will be watching over. >> petra ruiz was one of eight people that died in the city of garland, jim, all of those victims died in their v vicles. >> david with the heart breaking story.
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be right back. [ vocalizing ] [ buzzing ] [ tree crashes ] [ wind howling ]
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now to ethan couch, the soalled affluenza kid. couch was wanted for possibly violating probation in texas after beating prison time in a fatal drunk driving crash with a defense that left many people shaking their heads. after a three-week manhunt, o or via frank ca says he has been arrested in mexico. >> ethan couch's newly dyed black hair didn't fool authorities who caught the teenager on monday despite looking very different than he did two years ago when he was first charged in the deadly drunk drying accident. tarrant county deanderson. >> we worked a tremendous amount of leads and learned through some interviews that they had planned to disappear, that they even had something that was
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>> reporter: investigators say couch and his mother tonya drove a pickup truck into mexico and ended up more than 1200 miles from north texas in the coastal resort town of puerto vallarta. they fled shortly after this video surfaced which appeared to show couch at a party with alcohol. even though he's 18, tarrant county district attorney sharen wilson says couch is only facing juvenile justice. >> i'm not satisfied with four months in a juvenile facility. we're e king for him to be moved to adult court. >> reporter: couch was only 16 when he avoided jail time and was sentenced to ten years probation for killing four people in a drunk driving accident. his defense team argued that the teen suffered from something they termed affluenza, arguing that his rich parents never taught him right from wrong. >> sheriff, now that he is in custody, what do you want to happen to ethan couch in time around? >> well, i'd like for him to be
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i don't think ten years probation was appropriate for killing four innocent people. >> reporter: even if couch's case is transferred to adult court, he only faces four months in jail because he was convicted as a minor. jim, mexican officials tell cbs news couch and his mother will be flown back to texas tomorrow. >> omar, thank you. chicago police officer jason van dyke pled not guilty today in the shooting death of laquan mcdonald. van dyke faces first degree murder charges after shooting the teenager 16 times. dashcam video of the confrontntion sparked days of protests when it was released last month. van dyke's lawyer says he may ask for a change of venue. the last day of the year is always among the most challenging days of the year for the new york city police department. and two days away, paris and san bernardino have only raised the stakes. here's don dahler.
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people expected in midtown manhattan and a billion more watching on tv, new york officials are determined to make times square the safest place on earth. mayor bill deblasio. >> we're the best prepared city in the country. we know how to do big events. we've shown it time and time again. >> reporter: 5,000 uniformed and undercover officers will be in the square. garbage cans removed, manhole covers sealed shot, radiation detectors deployed. this year the nypd established a 500-person special response unit that holds regular drills. at a new operation center in down the manhattan, officers nonitor thousands of feeds. on new year's eve the room will be staffed with members of governmental agencies. last week james o'neill gave us a tour. >> do you think people should feel safe? >> i'm not going to tell them to feel safe. i don't think anyone does this work better than the nypd, along
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>> reporter: but memories of the paris and california terror attacks are fresh. commissioner bill bratton. >> the pattern this year has been terror attacks on relatively small soft targets with all the focus on times square, what about the thousands of businesses outside this area? >> capabilities on the threat analysis beforehand the prevention side as well as the capability to respond very quickly, we believe we are as prepared as anybody can be. >> reporter: spectators coming into this area will all be searched and required to get to their places early and stay there. jim, they will also not be allowed to bring in large bags, backpacks or alcohol. >> don dahler in times square where it will be even busier in two nights. new information about the federal government's handling of the texas ice cream maker blue bell, the subject of a cbs news investigation this fall. cbs news has learned the department of justice has
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blue bell after their ice cream was linked to a deadly listeria outbreak earlier this year. three people died. an fda investigation found listeria in three of blue bell's production plants in alabama, oklahoma, and texas. as well as records indicating the company knew one plant was contaminated at least as early as 2013. the fda investigation uncovered other troubling problems. including condensation dripping directly into ice cream and unsanitary equipment. in april, blue bell shut down all three production facilities and recalled all its ice cream. sources tell cbs news,, the justice department is trying to determine what blue bell management knew about potentially deadly hazards in their plants and when they knew it. in october, gerald bland who worked at the blue bell factory in bren am, texas, described to cbs news unsanitary conditions
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>> on the wall by the three gallll machine, if it would rain real hard and water sat on the roof, it would just trickle down that wall. reporter: rain water from the roof. >> from the roof. >> reporter: would get into the factory. >> yeah. >> reporter: another worker terry schultz told us his complaints to management about unclean conditions went nowhere. >> the response i got at one point was, is thaha all you're going to do is come in here and bitch every afternoon? >> what do you think his message to you was? >> production was more importantpthan cleanliness. >> all three plants are now back up and running and by the end of next month, its ice cream will be back on the shelves inn 15 ates. blue bell did not r rpond to our requests for comment today. this investigation into blue bell is being led by the same justice department lawyer who prosecuted the peanut corporation of america. the company's owner stewart parnell got 28 years for shipping salmonella contaminated
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that is the longest sentence ever for a food safety-related crime. coming up next, walking while distracted is sending hundreds to hospitals. a former star of glee" is arrested for child pornography. and mike tyson that's a lot of dishes& no problem. i'll use a lot of detergent. dish issues? get cascade platinum. one pac cleans tough food better than 6 pacs of the bargain brand combined. cascade. let's get these dayquil liquid gels and go. but these liquid gels are new. mucinex fast max. it's the same difference. this one is max strength and fights mucus. mucinex fast max. the only cold and flu liquid gel that's max-strength and fights mucus. let's end this. (cell phone rings) where are you? well the squirrels are back in the attic.
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distraction turn deadly for a man who fell off a cliff in san diego on christmas day. he had been staring at his phone or camera completety unaware of the looming danger. as kris van cleave reports, this type of thing happens all the time. >> reporter: investigators believe joshua burwell may have been trying to take a picture of the sunset when he made the deadly 40-foot fall. san diego lifeguard sergeant bill bender. >> wasn't watching where he was walking looking more down a ahe devicece >> reporter: research shows
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growing problem. the number of er visits for related injuries most often due to falling doubled between 2005 and 2010 to more than 1500 with millennials ages 21 to 25 the most likely to get hurt. >> it's i iortant to recognize this as a problele >> reporter: surgeon dr. claudette la john believes the true number of injuries is even higher. >> when they come into my office, they'll have an injury and say they tripped over the curb but never admit they were looking down at their phone instead of looking in front of them. >> security cameras capture this had woman who was so focused on hehephone she walked into a fountain. this man fell right off the train platform. we spotted jordan video chatting while crossing a busy new york >> i know i shouldn't. >> kelly davis was working away as she walked to lunch. >> have you ever had a moment where you've walked into something or fallen or. >> absolutely, i walked into one
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>> reporter: she may not be surprised by the findings of a 2014 study that estimated nearly 10% of all pedestrian injuries are due to distraction. jim, i know it sounds obvious, but if you're looking down at your phone, you may not see an obstacle right in front of you in time. >> chris, thank you. an unlikely pedestrian was
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one of the stars of the fox tv show "glee" was arrested today for possession of child pornography. mark salling played puck on the program. police say they served a warrant atatis home and took the 33-year-olol actor into custody. "glee" aired its final episode earlier this year. mike tyson was once one of the most feared plen on the planet, but the heavyweight became a heavy weight on a hoverboard. >> oh, my. >> that could be the hardest he's ever hit the floor. tyson's daughter got him the hoverboard for christmas and clearly, it won this round. in northern california, this question. why did the elephant seal want to cross the road? she tried several times to cross highway 37. wildlife teams shoot her back into san pablo bay each time but she kept coming back. they believe she may be pregnant. late today, they tranquililid
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some of this country's top travel is part of the american way of life. when we're on vacation, we keep an eye out for anything that looks out of place. [ indistinct conversations ] miss, your bag. when we travel from city to city, we pay attention to our surroundings. [ cheering ] everyone plays a role in keeping our community safe. whether you're traveling for r siness or pleasure, be aware of your surroundings. if you see something suspicious,
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we close tonight with a mission to change the composition of classical music. not the sound, but the color. fewer than 4% of symphony musicians in this country are black. lee cowan found it's not for lack of talent. >> reporter: rachmaninoff was seamless on this night in charleston, south carolina. remarkable because this was the very first time many of these musicians had ever played together. maestro marlin daniel conducts not only the orchestra but this festival called the color of music now in its third year.
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of color get pigeon holed into things. >> reporter: it's a stereotype. >> a big stereotype. a lot of people find there are not any musicians of color out there doing clack cal music but there are actually in reality tons of us. >> reporter: clarinettist robert davis says in most symphonies he sticks out as a black classical artist but not here. >> you usually see the same ones. i came down here and there's another group. like where are they coming from. i was shocked about that. >> reporter: the festival highlights black classical composers. on this night, it was a dolphus hail stark performed one block from the historic church where in june a gunman opened fire killing nine. >> we're very lucky. >> reporter: businessman lee
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helps sites liking there will help diversify other orchestras. >> i think that most orchestras want to change. they just don't know how to change. >> reporter: and how do they change? >> by having people at the table who look like me. >> reporter: music should be color blind and to make it that way, you have to infuse in it all of the colors. >> reporter: a unique unity that for a few days at least makes for an especially powerful sound. [ applause ] >> lee cowan, cbs news, charleston, south carolina. and that's the overnight news" for this wednesday. for some of you, the news continues. for others collect back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new
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this is the cbs overnight" news. >> welcome to the overnight news". i'm michele miller. police in mexico have captured the so-called affluenza teen, ethan couch and his mother tonya. the pair had been on the run for weeks after a video surfaced that could send the teen to prison for years. at 16 years old, couch killed four people in a drunk driving accident but he avoided jail time by claiming he was so rich and pampered that he didn't know right from wrong. his next lesson will come in fort worth, texas. omar villal frank ca is at the tarrant county courthouse. >> a bizarre international search for the so-caed affluenza teen and his mother is now over. but the question of why they were running, that's just getting started. ethan and tonya couch, mother
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mexican authorities after the pair was apprehended in puerto val yar ta on the pacific coast of mexico. this new image released by mexican officials shows the 18-year-old couch with an altered appearance, his blonde hair now a dark brown. >> ethan couch who is being south now by the u.s. marshals service. >> reporter: earlier this month, the two disappeared after couch missed a meeting with his probation officer. ethan couch made headlines two years ago when he eluded jail time after killing four people in a drunk drivivi crash. during the trial, a psychologist testified on behalf couch saying the teen suffered from affluenza, suggesting his parents' wealth left him without a sense of responsibility. officials believe the pair may have fled because of this video. it surfaced earlier this month and appears to show couch at a party where a drinking gamam was being played.
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even though he's 18, couch's case hasn't been moved over to adult court and that means at worst he will face sentencing in front of a juvenile judge and it could only go to juvenile detention. the pentagon says coalition air strikes in iraq and syria over the past month have killed ten top leaears of the islamic state. one of the dead linked to last month's terror attacks in paris. inside the war zone, the iraqi military is fighting to drives the last remaining pockets of isis gunmen out of the city of ramadi. elizabeth palmer reports from london. >> reporter: finally, the symbol of victory. for theirst time since may, iraq's flag was hoisted over government buildings. all week, iraq special forces had led the fight to retake ramadi. they won, thanks to better equipment and more than 600 air strikes by coalition planes on isis targets.
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they've been learninin on n e job. in ferocious battles in tikrit earlier this year, they managed to push isis out. in ramadi, they did it without major help from regular shiite militias. for these soldiers, that was a big morale boost. cbs news national security analyst juan xeroti. >> they'y' better trained and enabled in part through the u.s. and coalition partnership but also they have greater will and capacity. they are clearly fighting with more strategic intent and capability. >> reporter: the battle to retake ramadi important though it was, is just preamble for what's coming in 2016. on national television, iraq's prime minister warned we are coming to liberate mosul next and deal isis a fatal blow. first though, the government will have to repair the damage and restore services in ramadi
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and keep them loyal so isis stays on the run. and the iraqi army is warning that operations in ramadi aren't entirely or yet. there are still pockets of isis fighters in at least one suburban the city is heavily bobby trapped. >> officials at the southern california gas company say they finally located the source of a gas leak that forced thousands of people from their homes. we have the story from los angelele >> reporter: an underground welll at the natural gas facility in the hills of porter ranch is leaking. this is infrared camera shows methane gas billowing into the air. it was shot by the environmental defense fund. a law firm representing several homeowners filing suits against southern california's gas utility company shared these ages. >> you could smell t t gas inside the house with the windows closed. and when you walked outside, it
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>> reporter: robin shapiro move her family into her parents' hoe after she claims the gas made them sick. >> i was getting headaches that were lasting days and days. migraine-like headaches. then my son started getetng bloody noses. and respiratory issues for both of my children. >> reporter: the leak started in october. so far, more than 6500 families have filed for help. but the gas company admits there's a backlog and only 2200 have been relocated. students at two schools will move to other schools when classes are back in session next week. >> once the leak is stopped, we'll be able to evaluate what caused the leak and we will be able to evaluate how much natural gas escaped as a result of the incident. >> reporter: the state agency that monitors air quality estimates nearly 70,000 pounds
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doesn't pose long-term health risks. to fix the leak, the gas company drilled a relief well nearby using magnetic technology workers have located the leaking well some 4,000 feet below ground. they have to drill another 4,000 feet where they'll intersect the faulty well, then fill it with cement to seaea . a solution that can't come soon enough for homeowners like robin shapiro. >> we feel like this is never going to end and we have nobody to thank but the gas company. >> reporter: fans of heavy metal are mourning the death of lemmy kilmister, the lead singer and bassist of motorhead. lemmy as he was known to just out everyone turned 7070 christmas eve and had recently been diagnosed wh cancer. anthony mason has his story. >> bring on motorhead. we play rock 'n' roll. >> reporter: with his gravelly vocals and signature style, the
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of heavy metal influencing generations of performers.s. >> reporter: lemmy formed motorhead in the mid-70s and the band produced music with a hard gutteral sound. in 1980, the ace of spades cracked the charts in britain and the u.s. and became a heavy metal anthem. >> havee drink. >> reporter: with his heavy drinking and wild antics, lemmy's lifestyle appeared to live up to the lyrics in the songs he wrote. mama, i'm coming home >> he penned hits for other performers such as mama i'm coming home for ozzy osbourne. last night osbourne tweeted lost one of my best friends lemmy today.y. he was a warrior and a legends.s. fans salemy will be remembered for staying true to himself and his music.
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star wars the force awakens continues to break box office records. it sold $1 billion worth of ticks faster than any movie and doing it without crater george lucas. he has had no role in this film. lucas sat down with charlie rose to discuss life, love and what it means to be a director. >> well, a director is just somebody who's got a fetish with making an the world to be the way he wants it to be, sort of narcissistic. >> that's you? >> all director, there's no different. >> and you're a director. >> all directors are vaguely lime emperors which is i want to build the society to reflect me and what i want. but a director can do it with a
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going to create a world where people can fly. >> george lucas didn't create a new society. he constructed an entire galaxy. >> on its surface, the "star wars" series is a sci-fi space odyssey with odd creatures and epic space battles. but its genius lies in the simple story beneath all of that. >> he told me you killed him. >> timeless elements like family. >> i am your father. >> is the darkside stronger. >> no, no. >> reporter: and the fight between good and evil. >> i felt a great disturbance in the force. >> reporter: as its crater lucas has been called one of the most innovative filmmakers in history but in his heart he considers himself a story teller.
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three movies when you started? and then you decided only to take one part of that life story. >> yeah, i took the first act but then the first act didn't really work so i said okay, what i'm going to have to do is take the ending of the third film and put it on the first film. what you do, you've got a bunch of stuff sitting on your desk as you're creating. lets me stick that in here and make it. so i wasn't worried that much about the sequels when i was actually making it because i have to make this the best film. then when i moved onto the other ones, i said behnken know by is now dead. i killed him. how am i going to fix that. and what am i going to do about the fact that i blew the death star up and that's what the ending is? but part of it was simply when i got down to some of the other movies i was able to create an environment and a world that wasn't possible when i started
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so to me, getting yoda to do a sword fight which i'd always wanted to do but could never do it because he was a muppet. >> lucas became a pioneer in the world of special effects. >> general command ship is dead ahead. >> reporter: his work forever changed the way films are made. and he changed how they sound, too. one in his 1973 hit american graffiti, lucas opted out of a traditional composer -- >> he narrated the entire story with popular songs. make a lovely night >> that's the clearest end point for a teenager is the music. half of what a teenager is is music. you know, and the other half is trouble or raging hormones. but at the same time, it's -- that's what the movie's about. >> reporter: cars and music and
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>> yeah, i should have called it that. we were looking for a title and u finally figured it out. >> yes. >> studio wanted to call it another slow night in modesto, but cars, music and raging hormones would have been -- it could have been a hit. let's go surfing now the low budget film was one of the most commercially successful films of its time. before he was 40, lucas went on to make the first three "star wars" and indiana jones raiders of the lost arc". and then he walked away. >> i mean i gave up directing in order to become a dad. for 15 years. i just ran a company and wawaan innovaor innovator, but it was not doing what i really liked to do which is actually make movies. >> because you wanted to be a dad. >> because yeah, i -- and i
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where you don't expect it to happen but once i was a dad, it was like a bolt of lightning struck me. >> reporter: lucas adopted his first daughter witit his wife marsha in 19 1fter they divorced, he adopted two more children and raised them as a single dad. >> everybody says the following things -- they're so very different. then in 2013, he married mel dil hop son an investment executive and cbs news contributor. >> the thing we discovered which we call a miracle is the fact we're exactly the same. >> t tether they have a 2-year-old daughter. >> it's a miracle. that's how i see it. it shouldn't have happened and somehow it did. >> reporter: here at skywalker ranch north of san francisco, george is once again able to concentrate on being a father. three years ago, he sold his company lucas films to disney for $4 billion. >> who are you? >>.
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about the "force awakens." >> pbably needs this. >> reporte how do you feel about it? >> well, it's -- you know, i made the decision to sell the company. with "star wars." i made that decision because i looked at the future, i i thought that i was going to have a baby, i looked at the fact that i was married and wanted to build a museum. and i looked at the fact that i wanted to make experimental films. so my life was going on a different track. so that started that ball rolling. and so in the end, when i sold it, they hired jay jay to come in. >> are you at peace witit this. >> yeah. . >> as much as you can be? >> yeah, no, i said look, i'm fine. fortunately i'm old enough to have been through all this stuff before. and i'm sure it will do magnificent business. i'm sure they'll do a great job. you know, it will be different from what i would have done.
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nter honor. >> george lucas. he's a pathfinder and a pioneer. >> at t awards his good friends steven spielberg explained the lucas legacy best. forever. >> i was successful because i years. he makes three movies every year. retire? he said i'm not going to retire. my ultimate dream is to die o` a set. i said gee, my ambition is to die in bed watching one of your movies on television. >> reporter: but that doesn't mean he's slowing down anytime soon. >> because you have worn all of these hats though, filmmaker, director, story teller, writer, technological innovator, what do you want the first line of your
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i worked with a girl named hayes spelled haze and my chinese teacher is named echo. >> on the streets of shong high, we met chen yinge and wang jing. eir nick names. >> ellen. >> that's nice and your name? >> my name is jean. >> zhou peng goes by vic. >> why do you have an english name? everyone has one at work, he told us. but many nicknames do not exactly translate well to native english speakers. we've met a girl named king and at starbucks a ghost and a right as in mr. right. >> a lot of expats and international restaurants around. >> reporter: lindsay jernigan was introduced to the phenomenon when she moved from washington, d.c. to shanghai and started meeting people. >> and their names were boat, yo-yo, 11, apple and there are normal once that didn't fit like edison, eddy for short. >> what did you think of all
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>> at first i was sort of confused. i was more curious. why is this your english name. >> reporter: in all of this, the 26-year-old jernigan saw an opportunity and launched a website to help chinese find an english name. >> here we have the name. we have the origin, meaning. our target audience is really 18 to about 30. it's people that are kind of getting a little bit more serious about their job or studying abroad or going abroad or even working in china in a multinational company. >> reporter: users can take a quiz or for $45 get a 30-minute one-on-one consultation. jernigan explains the meaning of names and says chinese often want one that's uncommon and similar to their chinese name. >> i always kind of like when chinese people say i don't have an english name. i'm going to stick with my chinese name. we're in china. >> yeah, totally. on our website, we never say chinese people have to have an english name.
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people actively already looking for an english name. almost all of my friends have their english name. >> reporter: meet this 28-year-old, formerly known as 11. the number of her favorite soccer player. >> when you told people my name is 11. >> uh-huh. >> what did they say? >> that's my trouble. they always say where is seven. the famous convenience store in china. so they always say where is seven. >> where is seven? >> i don't know. >> you'd say gosh, another 7-eleven joke. >> of an working with jern ing withing g th ing withing with goverr jernigan become kiera. >> kiera is not that common. it sounds smart and keira knightley. >> sure. >> jernigan says it can hard to explain why some names just don't work. >> you run into people here named green or yellow but you have the name scarlet and
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i totally understand why it's confusing. there's aearning curve for all involved. this juice store manager was formerly known as ding. his knew name courtesy of jernigan took some practice for his father. >> evan. >> evan. >> evan? evan? >> that's what your dad said? >> yeah. >> he couldn't pronounce it when you told him? >> yeah. >> reporter: now, this goes both ys. in j jan, they have a hard time pronouncing the th in my name seth so they call me sees sue. here in china, the ministry of foreign affairs has given me a chinese name. that's do an. 2 palestinians much kindness. for cbs morning, i'm s sh doane
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2015 is coming to a close and charles osgood looks back on the year that was. >> reporter: january brought the terrorist attack on the french magazine "charlie hebdo." it had lampooned islam. 13 people were killed. millions would soon rally in paris saying charlie. in february, isis shocked the world again. posting online videos of a captured jordanian pilot being burned alive and later the mass beheading of 21 coptic christians. we remember march for the crash of the germanwings jetliner. 150 lives w we lost. when the co-pilot deliberately apriled the plane into the
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in april, a boston jury convict marathon bomber. may saw the duke and d dhess present t incess charlotte elizabeth diana to the world. >> i'm always going to be your dad. >> in june caitlyn jenner formerly known as bruce jenner made her debut. and the supreme court made same-sex marriage a right nationwide. a mile long tunnel provided mexico's powerful drug lord el chapo an escape from prison in july. that same month, pluto was revealed in spectacular photos snapped by a nasa spacecraft. in august, news that minnesota dentist walter palmer had killed zimbabwe's beloved cecil the lion for sport triggered global outrage. the photo of 3-year-old alan's
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in september quickly became a symbol of the world's indifference to the apply the of syrian refugees. october brought an official end to china's controversial one-child policy. allowing families now to have two children. islamic terrorists targeted paris again in november. 10 people would die in multiple attacks. leaving the heart of the french nation badly wounded. and this month, radicalized husband and wife killers would take 14 lives in san bernardino, california. and two weeks ago, 2g 00 nations met in paris to adopt the first global pact to combat climate change. >> that's the overnight news" for this wednesday. for some of you, the news continues. for othersollect back with us a little bit later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center right
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michele miller. hell at the airports. high water along the mississippi. flooding, snow and ice from a storm that won't quit. also tonight, caught in mexico. the teen who once beat a prison term by claiming to be too spoiled to know right from wrong. walking into danger. the consequences of paying too much attention to the cell phone. and music should be color blind and to make it th way, you have to infuse in it all of the colors. >> reporter: a maestro on a mission. captioning funded by cbs >> scott pelley is off. i'm jim axelrod. >> the deadly storm system that swept through the south and
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half a foot has fallen in maine. it's also producing hick flooding in missouri where they're filling and stacking sandbags to hold back the surging mississippi river. bad weather is blamed for more than 10,000 flight delays over two days and more than 4,000 cancellations. we have a team of correspondents deployed beginning with adriana diaz at chicago's o'hare airport. adriana? >> reporter: all day long, we've seen lines stretch across the length of the term naal as passengers try to get through security to their gates. many flights were canceled or delays. crowded chaos took over the terminals here. check-in lines six rose deep. security checkpoints packed with passengers running out of patient. >> i don't even know what to think. >> reporter: 800 flights were canceled or delayed by late this afternoon on top of a nearly 1400 canceled yesterday. with an estimated 80,0,0rying to get to their destination
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were high. i want to speak to someone. this is such [ bleep ]. it's such [ bleep ]. >> reporter: hundreds were stranded last night with no place to go. 850 were able to get cots but scott mill man and his girlfriend hope slele on the cold hard floor after their flight t t portland, oregon, was cancelled. >> i've been using my coat as a blanket or a mattress. >> yeah, this is my pillow right here. >> reporter: flightaware said o'hare's location is critical to air travel nationwide. >> it's a large hub for american airlines and united airlines, as well. chicago is a vitit artery for the united states air traffic system. >> reporter: as the wintry mix moved east dumping as much as a foot of snow from new york to maine, delays moved with it. more than 800 flights at new york's three area airports were canceled or delayed and another
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back here at o'hare, american airlinesebooked scott and hope on another flight b b it leaves next year on new year's day. >> is the airline paying for your hotel? >> no, they won't pay for anything. >> reporter: it will take at least one more day for flights to return to normal here at o'hare. part of the problem is flights are mostly full because of the holidays leaving few seats for rebooking. > adriananaiaz with the stranded travelers at o'hare. tror recollectional rains have swollen rivers in illinois and missouri. the mississippi river is expected to crest on thursday south of st. louis at levels that could exceed the historic 1993 flood. union, missouri, has already flooded. russell kinsaul of kmov is therer russell? >eporter: yeah, jim, at least two dozen homes are underwater and a number of businesses, as well. this mcdonald's a gas station, a hotel and a jimmy john's sandwich shop opened up a week ago is now flooded.
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from people driving through water rushing across roadways. jay nex on declares a state of emergency. he was in the st. louis area today touring some harar hit areas in st. charles county. all of this heavy rain has created what is beak ten extra vertical feet of water. there have been mandatory evacuations and requests forevolunteers to fill sandbags. in st. louis today, they needed volunteers to fill 20 thousand bags and some of those volunteers that showed up today were children on their holiday break. in some places wer is up to the rooftops of homes and some businesses are underwater. the burbis river is causing all of the flooding and they're saying it will reach an all-time high when it crests later today. >> russell kinsaul with the devastating floodwaters in missouri, thank you. let's bring in eric fisher from our cbs boston station wbz. eric,,he flooding is already bad. how much worse is it going to get?
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area of 8 to 14 inch rainfall. just over the last seven days alone creating the huge issues we've been seeing in this mississippi river basin. we look across 20 different states here. all these rivers that all feed into the mississippi reaching at least major flooding if not a a record floooong. a lot of these crests t highest in at least several decades. all this water feeds into the mississippi river at st. louis crest ong thursday at 44 feet. 14 feet more to rise. arkansas river at little rock will be cresting on friday at 26 feet. very high water levels. now, the good news is here that as we look over the next seven days, a much drier pattern sets up annll across the region. it won't stop the flooding expected but at least it won't exacerbate the problem anymore. >> garland texas has begun the clean-up after tornadoes damaged or destroyed nearly 800 homes there. tonight, david begnaud has a
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property can be replaced but livevecannot. >> reporter: i i bad shape. i lost my wife. she was my best friend. >> reporter: ruben porras and petra ruiz were married for ten years with four young children. he had both worked as paragals. for christmas, ruben surprised his wife with a special hair appointment. she was on her way home saturday night when she connected with her husband on facetime. we were just talking about dinner. and all of a sudden, she just started screaming. >> reporter: she starts screaming. >> and she -- all i said was babe, what's wronging? the image just became black. >> reporter: using a mobile app and gps, ruben tracked his wife's phone to the crash site and asked his brother-in-law to drive him there. blocked by fire trucks and debris, he ran the last mile and a half to find his wife. >> and i looked to my right and
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it was really -- it was crushed. i was hoping she would still be alive in there, you know? >> reporter: you crawled into the car? >> i crawled into the car to try to help her. >> reporter: about five hours later, porras came home and called h children together. >> i said mommy was in a terrible accident. and she's left us. but she will be watching over. >> reporter: petra ruiz was one of eight people who died in the city of garland. all of those victims died in their vehicles. >> david begnaud with the heart breaking story. thank you. the "cbs overnight news"
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almost sixty million americans !re affected by mentalllness. together we can help them with three simple words. my name is chris noth and i will listen. from maine to maui, thousands of high school students across the country are getting in on the action by volunteering in their communities. chris young: action teams of high school students are joining volunteers of america and major league baseball players to help train and inspire the next generation of volunteers. carlos pea: it's easy to start an action team at your school so you, too, can get in on the action.
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ififou were a hippie in the '60s, you n nd to know. it's the dawning of thehege of aquarius. yeah, and something else that's cool. what? osteoporosis is preventable. all: osteo's preventable? right on! if you dig your bones, protect them.
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> now to ethan couchchthe so-called affluenza kid. couch was wanted for possibly violating probation in texas after beating prison time in a fatal drunk driving crash with a defense that left many people shaking their heads. after a three-week manhunt, omar viviafranca reports coucuchas been arrested in mexico. >> ethanouch's newly dyed black hair didn't fool mexican authorities who caught the texas teenager on monday despite looking very different than he did two years ago when he was first charge in the deadly drunkiving accident. >> we worked a tremendous amount ofofeads and learned thrhrgh some interviewewthat they had anned to disappear, that they even had something that was almost akin to a going away party.
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couch and his mother tonya drove a pickup truck into mexico and ended up more than 1200 miles from north texas in the coastal resort town of puerto vallarta. they fled shortly after this video surfaced which appeared to show couch at a party with alcohol. which mightt have violalad his juvenile probation. even though he's 18, tarrant county district attorney sharen wilson says couch is only facing juvenile justice. >> i'm not satisfied with four months in a juvenile facility. we're asking for him to be moved to adult court. >> reporter: couch was only 16 when he avoided jail time and was sentenced to ten years probation for killing four people in a drunk driving accident.. his defense team argued that the teen suffered from something they termed affluenza, arguing that his rich parents never taught him right from wrong. >> sheriff, now that he is in custody, what do you want to happen to ethan couch this time around? >> well, i'd like for him to be held accountable.
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probation was appropriate for killing four innocent people. >> reporter: even if couch's case is transferred to adult court, he only faces four months in jail because he was convicted as a minor. jim, mexican officials tell cbs news couch and his mother will be flown back to texas tomorrow. >> omar, thank you. chicago police officer jason van dyke p pd not guilty today in the shooting death of laquan mcdonald. van dyke faces first degree murder charges afterhooting the teenager 16 times. dashcam video of the confrontation sparked days of protests when it was released last month. van dyke's lawyer says he may ask for a change of venue. the last day of the year is always among the most challenging days of the year for the new york city policece department. and two days away, paris and san bernardino have only raised the stakes. here's don dahler. >> reporter: with over a million people expected in midtown
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watching on tv, new york officials are determined to make times square the safest place on earth. mayor bill deblasio. >> we're the best prepared city in the cououry. we know how to do big events. we've shown it time and time again. >> reporter: 5,000 uniformed and undercover officers will be in times square. snipers will be on rooftops garbage cans removed, manhole covers sealed shut, radiation detectors deployed. this year the e pd established a 500-person specici response unit that holds regular drills. at a new operation center in downtown manhattan, officers monitor thousands of camera feeds. on new year's eve the room will be staffed with members of governmental and private agencies. last month, chief james o'neill gave us a tour. >> do you think people should feel safe? >> you know what, i'm not going to tell people not to be
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tell them to feel safe. i don't think anyone does this work better than the nypd, along with our federal partners. >> reporter: but memories of the paris and california terror attacks are fresh. commissioner bill bratton. >> the pattern this year has been terror attacks on relatively small soft targets with all the focus on times square, what about the thousands of businesses outside this area? >> both through capabilities on the threat analysis beforehand, the prevention side of it as well as the capability to respond very quickly, we believe we are as prepared as anybody can be. >> reporter: spectators coming into this area will all be their places early and stay there. jim, they will also not be allowed to bring in large bags, backpacks or alcohol. >> don dahler in times square where it will be even busier in two nights. thanks you. now to new information about the federal government's handling of the texas ice cream maker blue bell, the subject of a cbs news investigation this fall. cbs news has learned the department of justice has started an investigation into
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was linked to a deadly listeria outbreak earlier this year. three people died. an fda investigation found listeria in three of blue bell's production plants in alabama, oklahoma, and texas, as well as records indicating the company knew one plant was contaminated at least as early as 2013. the fda investigation uncovered other troubling problems. including condensation dripping directly into ice cream and unsanitary equipment. in april, blue bell shut down all three production facilities and recalled all its ice cream. sources tell cbs news, the justice department is trying to determine what blue bell management knew about potentially deadly hazards in their plants and when they knew it. in october, gerald bland who worked at the blue bell factory in brenham, texas, described to cbs news unsanitary condiions on the factory floor. on the factory floor.
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gallon machine, if it would rain real hard and water sat on the roof, it would just trickle down that wall. >> reporter: rain water from the roof. >> from the roof. >> reporter: would get into the e factory? >> yeah. >> reporter: another worker terry schultz told us his complaints to management about unclean conditions went nowhere. >> the response i got at one point was, is that all you're going to do is come in here and bitch every afternoon? >> what do you think his message to you was? >> productionas probably more important than cleanliness. >> all three of blue bell's plants are now back up and running and by the end of next month, its ice cream will be back on the shelves in 15 states. blue bell did not respond to our requests for comment today. this investigation into blue bell is being led by the same justice department lawyer who prosecuted the peanut corporation of america. the company's owner stewart parnell got 28 years for shipping salmonella contaminated peanut products. that is the longest sentence
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crime. coming up next, walking while distracted is sending hundreds to hospitals. a former star of "glee" is
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distraction turned deadly for a man who fell off a cliff in san diego on christmas day. he had been staring at his phone or camera completely unaware of the looming danger. as kris van cleave reports, this typepef thing happens all l e time. >> reporter: investigators believe joshua burwell may have been trying to take a picture of the sunset when he made the deadly 40-foot fall. san diego lifeguard sergeant bill bender. >> wasn't watching where he was walking looking more down at the device. >> reporter: research shows so-called distracted walking especially from handheld devices
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problem. the number of er visits for related injuries most often due to falling doubled between 2005 and 2010 to more than 1500 with millennials ages 21 to 25 the most likely to get hurt. >> it's important to recognize this as a problem. >> reporter: surgeon dr. claudette lajam believes the true number of injuries is even higher. >> when they come into my office, for instance, they'll have an injury and they'll say they tripped over the curb but they'll never admit na they were looking down at their phone instead of looking in front of them. >> mall security cameras captured this woman who was so focused on her phone, she walked into a fountain. this man fell right off the train platform. we spotted jordan videochatting while crossing a busy new york street. >> i know i shouldn't. >> kelly davis was working away on her phone as she walked to lunch. >> have you ever had a moment where you've walked into something or fallen or -- >> absolutely, i walked into one of the very short like light posts.
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surprised by the findings of a 2014 study that estimated nearly 10% of all pedestrian injujues are due to distraction. jim, i know it sounds obvious, but if you're looking down at your phone, you may not see an obstacle right in front of you in time. >> chris, thank you. an unlikely pedestrian was
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that is just ahead. one of the stars of the fox
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today for possession of child pornography. mark salling played puck on the program. police say they served a warrant at salling's home and took the 33-year-old actor into custody. "glee" aired its final episode earlier this year. mike tyson was once one of the most feared men on the planet, but the heavyweight became a heavy weight on a hoverboard. >> oh, my. >> that could be the hardest he's ever hit the floor. tyson's daughter got him the hoverboard for christmas and clearly, it won this round. in northern california, this question. why did the elephant seal want to cross the road? she tried several times to cross highway 37. wildlife teams shoot her back into san pablo bay each time, but she keptoming back. they believe she may be pregnant. late today, they tranquilized her and planned to take her to a national seashore. some of this country's top concert musicians have a singular goal.
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woman: what does it feel like when a woman is having a heart attack? chest pain, like there's a ton of weight on your chest. severe shortness of f eath. unexplained nausea. cold sweats. there's an unusual tiredness and fatigue. there's unfamiliarizziness or light-headedness. unusual pain in your back, neck, jaw, one or both arms, even your upper stomach, are signs you're having a heart attack. don't make excuses. make the call to 9-1-1 immediately. leararmore at womenshealth.gov/heartrttack. while i was on a combat patrol in baqubah, iraq, a rocket-propelled grenade took my arm off at the shoulder. i was discharged from the my, and i've been working with the wounded warrior project since 2007. warriors, you don't have to be severely wounded to be with the wounded warrior project. we do have a lot of guys that have post-traumatic stress disorder. being able to share your story, i guess it kind of helps you wrap your mind around what did happen over there. my name is norbie, and yes, i do suffer from post-traumatqc stress disorder,
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we close tonight with a mission to change the composition of classical music. not the sound, but the color. fewer than 4% of symphony musicians in this country are black. lee cowan found it's not for lack of talent. >> reporter: rachmaninoff was seamless on this night in charleston, south carolina. remarkable because this was the very first time many of these musicians had ever played together. maestro marlin daniel conducts not only the orchestra but this festival called the color of music now in its third year. >> you know a lot of musicians
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things. >> reporter: it's a stereotype. >> a big steteotype. a lot of people find there are not any musicians of color out there doing classical music when there are actually in reality tons of us. >> reporter: clarinettist robert davis says in most symphonies he sticks out as a black classical artist but not here. >> you usually see the same ones. but then i came down here, and there's a whole other group. where are they coming from? so i was very, very shocked about that. >> reporter: the festival highlights black classical composers. on this night, it was adolphus hail stark and his serenade performed one block from thth historic black church where in june a gunman opened fire, killing nine. >> we're very lucky. >> reporter: businessman lee
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hopes sites like this will help diversify other orchestras. >> i think that most orchestras want to change. they just don't know how to change. >> reporter: and how do they change? >> by having people at the table who look like me. >> reporter: music should be color blind and to make it that way, you have to infuse in it all of the colors. >> reporter: a unique unity that for a few days at least makes for an especially powerful sound. [ applause ] >> lee cowan, cbs news, charleston, south carolina. and that's the overnight news" for this wednesday. for some of you, the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new
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