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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  January 18, 2016 2:00am-4:30am CST

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trust me. >> this is the cbs overnight news. >> welcome to the overnight news, i'm jeff glor. three americans released by iran are now in germany. president obama said this weekend's prisoner swap with iran was a victory for american diplomacy. a fourth american was freed as part of the exchange but was not on the same plane with the others. a fifth american, a student, was released separately. following the exchange the united states and five other world powers lifted economic sanctions on iran and freed billions in frozen assets. implememting the landmark nuclear deal reached last july. we begin with elizabeth palmer in landstuhl, germany. >> reporter: arriving in geneva on a swiss air force plane late today the three americans were safe at last. here's jason rezaian, reporter for "the washington post," shaking hands with the state
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release. rezaian was arrested charged with spying. pastor saeed abedini, arrested in 2012, alleged to have organized d derground christian churches in iran. amir hekmati, former u.s. marine, picked up in 2011 while visiting his grandmother, and charged with espionage. cbs' adriana diaz caught up with hekmati's sister in detroit as she was boarding a plane to be reunited with her brother. >> i'm in a fog. this is like surreal. i am still in disbelief. d honestly, everything just happened so quickly that i don't think it will hit me until i am hugging him. >> reporter: all three americans were released from tehran's infamous prison after 14 months of top-secret diplomatic bargaining that started on the sidelines of the nuclear talks. today president obama waited until the americans were out of anian air space before
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>> today we're united in welcoming home sons and husbands and brothers who in lonely prison cells have endured an absolute nightmare. >> reporter: also free are baro mechanic and kasaro, two of the seven prisoners the u.s. released from its jails as part of the swap. all were accused of selling technology to iran in violation of american sanctions. finally, there's a mystery man, the fourth american prisoner who was released along with the others but apparently stayed in iran. all we know is his name, nosratoliah khoshawi. the three other americans will spend their first night of freedom at thehe landstuhl military hospital in germany, which has long offered a warm welcome and medical care to u.s. hostages and prisoners on their way home. as you saw some members of hekmati's family are on the way to germany right now. jason rez zayian's family is
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the hospital will offer them refuge so they can reconnect with both peace and privacy. >> liz palmer, thank you very much. from the white house to the campaign trail the prisoner swap is getting mixed reviews. here's julianna goldman. >> this is a good day. >> reporter: speaking just hours after the american prisoners began their journey home, president obama hailed their release as a result of smart and disciplined diplomacy. >> the united states has never been afraid to pursue diplomacy with our adversaries. as president i decided a strong, confident america could advance our national security by engage engaging directly with the iranian government. we've seen the results. >> reporter: his remarks stand in stark contrast to republican presidential candidates who today argued that negotiating with iran n kes the u.s. less secure. whether it's over the release of american civilians -- >> this should have happened years ago. we're giving them $150 billion, this shouldn't be happening now. >> reporter: american sailors --
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but only after achieving what they wanted, that is to prove if they wanted to, they can grab american sailors and subject them to mistreatment. >> reporter: or a deal to curb iran's nuclear program. >> it reflects a pattern we've seen in the obama administration over and over again of negotiating with terrorists. and making deals and trades that endanger u.s. safety and security. >> reporter: democratic presidential candidate and former secretary of state hillary clinton said talking to iran makes the woror a safer place. >> this is the kind of smart diplomacy i was proud to be a part of in the first administration of president obama that we're just going to have to be persistent with. >> reporter: the president said profound differences remain between the u.s. and iran and the administration today announced new penalties on 11 individuals and entititi involved in tehran's ballistic missile e ogram. most iranians would never feel those sanctions and they're tiny compared to the $100 billion in frozen funds it released with
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>> julianna, thank you. the lifting of sanctions will bring millions of gallons of iranian oil into an already flooded market. the price of crude fell below $30 friday to o 12-year low. the dow dropped another 390 points. for more on all of this our business analyst jill schlessinger joins us. first iran, what's the immediate impacts now? >> they are already pumping and bringing oil to market. it is expected that there will be 300,000 to 500,000 barrels a day from iran. that's on top of the 1 million barrels right now that is in surplus. more oil than we need. that's why crude oil is down so dramatically. down 10.5% this year. that comes after 30% last year, 46% the year before. >> meaning cheaper gas prices but also a lot of questions. middle eastern markets plunged overnight. american markets had a terrible week last week. are closed on monday bututeopen on tuesday.
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territory now. what are we expecting? >> we're going to have a lot more volatility and the big question is whether this 10% down correction turns into a full-blown bear market. that's a 20% slide. we haven't been in a bear market in seven years. it's a long time. some parts of the market already in a bear market. the small companies, the transportation index. so what ararinvestors looking for? they're looking for data to confirm, is the world slowing down? is that impacting the united states? is that impacting earnings of corporate america? we don't know yet but what we do know is that with the world in turmoil, hang on, it is going to be a bumpy ride. >> even though the fundamentals are still generally good for the u.s. economy? >> so far, so good. but again, this can be more emotional than data-based. we have to remember that markets are usually rational over the long-term, short-term, not so much. >> when people are scared they sell scared. >> indeed. >> thanks, jill. we are learning that three american contractors are missing in iraq. reportedly abducted by a militia. a state department source tells
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baghdad received a warning last week that an iranian-backed militia wanted to abduct an american contractor. almost sixty million americans are affected by mental illness. together we can help them with three simple words. my name is chris noth and i will listen. from maine to maui, thousands of high school students across the country are getting in on the action by volunteteing in their communities. chris young: action teams of high school students are joining volunteers of america and major league baseball players to help train and inspire the next generation of volunteers. carlos pea: it's easy to start an action team at your school
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if you were a hippie in the '60s, you need to know. it's the dawning of the age of aquarius. yeah, and something else that's cool. what? osteoporosis is preventable. all: osteo's preventable? right on! if you dig your bones, protect them. all: cbs cares! first votes are cast in the 2016 race for president. a new poll has hillary clinton 25 points ahead of bernie sanders in the democratic race. martin o'mally a distant third. the democrats held their fourth debate last night in charleston. here is some of what they said. >> right before the debate you changed your position on immunity from lawsuits for gun manufacturers. can you tell us why? >> well, i think secretary clinton knows what she says is very disingenuous.
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from the nra. i was -- in 1988, there were three candidates running for congress in the state of vermont. i stood up to the gun lobby and came out and maintained the position that in this country, we should not be selling military-style assault weapons. and i think it should be a federal crime if people act as strawmen. we have seen in this city a horrendous tragedy. of a crazed person praying with people, then coming out and shooting nine people. this should not be a political issue. what we should be doing is working together. and by the way, as a senator from a rural state that has virtually no gun control, i believe that i am in an excellent position to bring people together to fight for gun legislation -- >> you didn't answer the question that you did change your position on immunity for gun manufacturers so can you
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>> what i have said is that the gun manufacturers liability bill had some good provisions. among other things we prohibited ammunition that would have killed cops who had protection on. we had child safety protection on guns in that legislation. and what we also said is that a small mom and pop gun shop who sells a gun legally to somebody should not be held lble if somebody does something terrible with that gun. so what i said is i would relook at it. we are going to relook at it. and i will support stronger provisions. >> secretary clinton, would you like to respond to senator sanders? >> yes. look, i have made it clear based on senator sanders' own record that he has voted with the nra, with the gun lobby, numerous times. he voted against the brady bill five times. he voted for what we call the charleston loophole. he voted for immunity from
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nra said was the most important piece of gun legislation in 20 years. he voted to let guns go onto amtrak, guns go into national parks. he voted against doing research to figure out how we can save lives. let's not forget what this is about. 90 people a day die from gun violence in our country. that's 33,000 people a year. one of the most horrific examples not a block from here, where we had nine people murdered. now, i am pleased to hear that senator sanders has reversed his position on immunity and i look forward to him joining with those members of congress who have already introduced legislation. there is no other industry in america that was given the total
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be reversed. at least two people were killed by tornados overnight in central florida. the couple was killed in manatee county when their mobile home was hit. another tornado in the beach town of siesta key caused widespread destruction leaving 17,000 without power. the search continues for 12 marines after two helicopters collided off hawaii. three days after the crash, hope of finding survivors is fading. here's maria villarreal. >> reporter: rough seas, waves up to 20 feet high, are hampering search efforts. overnight a coast guard air crew had to briefly change course when a laser was pointed at them. searchers have scoured nearly 14,000 square miles off the north shore of oahu looking for any trace of the missing marines somewhere in these waters. they've found small amounts of debris, says lieutenant scott carr. >> i know a lot of people focus on debris but we're focused on hopefully finding survivors. >> reporter: the marines have
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board. the oldest, 41. the youngest, just 21. last night, hundreds packed a high school field in statin, oregon, where 21-year-old lance corporal ty hart attended. >> it gives you goosebumps, like you're on this field for a game. just as many people are out here right now showing support. who knows how many of these people know him directly. >> reporter: major sean campbell from college station, texas, has a wife and four children. the family of ptain kevin roche of st. louis writes, we believe the marines and coast guard are doing everything they can to bring kevin and his fellow marines home safely. all 12 remain the target of a desperate search. maria villarreal, cbs news, los angeles. still ahead, an american reveals how he survived a deadly terror attack in africa. and a flower rooted in space for
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tonight we're learning more about the victims and survivors of a terror attack in west africa. at least 28 people were killed on friday when gunmen opened fire at a hotel and cafe in the nation of burkina faso. here's jonathan vigliotti. >> reporter: as security forces surrrrnded the splendid hohol and neighboring cappuccino cafe,
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amy riddering tried desperately to reach her husband mike. he was at the cafe when the assault began friday night. i still have no news about mike, she wrote on her facebook page saturday morning, as military forces were still trying to regain control. florida native mike riddering moved with amy and tir two daughters to burkina faso in 2011 to start an orphanage. mike and a pastor were at the cafe in the country's capital walking ga ouagadougou to meet new volunteers. the pastor called amy after escaping. gunmen came into the restaurant shooting and everyone ran to hide. the pastor somehow had mike's phone and called, wrote amy. it was still unclear if mike survived. another american, edward bunker, emerged from his room to a deserted hotel lobby. >> there was someone with a gun going down the street. and this was really the moment when i kind of realized that
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amiss. >> reporter: the 12-hour siege began when heavily armed al qaeda militants, two of them women, stormed the buildings and set off car bombs. in all, 28 people were killed, including a canadian family of four who were on a humanitarian trip. 11 americans, including edward bunker, madedet out alive. mike riddering did not. you left quite a legacy here, i can only imagine the adventures you're having now, wrote amy's final post. jonathan vigliotti, cbs news, london. up next, candidates court
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voting bloc. less than ten months to election day, some presidential can dates are seeking support from the nation's fastest-growing voting bloc. here's carter evans. >> reporter: when hillary clinton held this rally in san gabriel, california, home to the country's largest asian-american community, she also launched a campaign to target what may be a key vote in november. >> i'm very proud to have so many asian-americans and pacific islanders working with me. >> reporter: they are the country's fastest-growing political constituency whose registered voters doubled to. 4 million between the 2008 and 2012 elections. >> we've gone from being marginalized to becoming the margin of viory.
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vote initiative is congresswoman judy chew who brought in supporters from around the country. >> certain states will have a huge effect on the outcome of the presidential election, such as nevada, such as virginia. >> you're from?? >> las vegas, nevada. >> we have votes. we know how to deliver those votes. >> reporter: shakir, a banker, points to the 2014 senate election in his state, virginia. >> thank you, virginia! >> reporter: where asian-american voters made the difference for democrat mark warner, who won by less than 1% of the vote. >> republicans used to enjoy the jority of asian-american support back in the 1990s. >> reporter: university of california professor kartha runs the nonpartisan asian-american survey which shows a political shift after the 1992 election when 31% of asian-americans voted for democrat bill clinton. by 2012, 73% voted for b bdy barack obama. >> what changed? >> one is the clintons. this is where llary clinton
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from what she and her husband did in the 1990s in terms of doing outreach to these populations. another part that's changed is the republican party's rhetoric on immigration has turned off a lot of voters. >> we are a country built by the haha work of generations of immigrants. and we are stronger because of our diversity and our openness. >> reporter: something asian-americans like to hear, because nearly two-thirds of their population was born outside the u.s. carter evans, cbs news, san gabriel, california. still ahead, everyry
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fun as this. david bowie's last albums now his first number one album in the u.s. one week after bowie's death "black star" debuted on top the billboard 200 today. the album was released two days before bowie died. spacex launched a new satellite into space after california today. the jason 3, a weather satellite monitoring el nino conditions, lifted into the stratosphere using the company's falcon 9 rocket. the hope was to land the falcon 9 on a barge in the pacific. that did not work. the landing was too hard. a beautiful breakthrough on the international space station, the first flfler ever grown in space. it's an orange zinnia chosen because it's pretty and edible. astronauts taste tested lettuce grown on the space station last year and say it was pretty good. presidential ambitions on mascot tryouts for the nationals
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here they are. candidates had to literally run for the job.b. challenging enengh as you can see. they also had to do a freestyle dance routine. the winners will run a presidential race during every nationals home game. coming up, meet the monks who are selling a lot of albums and beer. woman: what does it feel like when a woman is having a heart attack? chest pain, like there's a ton of weight on your chest. severe shortness of breath. explained nausea. cold sweats. there's an unusual tirness and fatigue. there's unfamiliar dizziness or light-headedness. unusual pain in your back, neck, jaw, one or both arms, even your upper stomach, are signs you're having a heart attack. don't make excuses. make the call to 9-1-1 immediately. learn more at womenshealth.gov/heartattack. while i was on a combat patrol in baqubah, iraq, a rocket-propelled grenade took my arm off at the shoulder. i was discharged from the army, and i've been working with
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warriors, you don't have to be severely wounded to be with the wounded warrior project. we do have a lot of guys that have post-traumatic stress disorder. being able to share your story, i guess it kind of helps you ap your mind around what did happen over there. my name is norbie, and yes, i do suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder,
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we close tonight at a centuries-old monastery in italy where american monks are making heavenly harmonies as they tap into history. >> reporter: close your eyes and you could be back in the 11th century. that's when the chants were written and when st. augustine founded the benedictine order of monks in this basilica. father folsom, graduate of the indiana school of music, came here in 2000 with the simple aim of rejuvenating ththmonastery
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life. >> if monks come, candidates come and they don't sing or think they can't sing, we give them voice lessons because it's so much part of our life. if you can't sing you're going to be pretty bored here, i think. >> reporter: the voice lessons are so good that a music company asked them to cut a cd. it ended up at the top of billboarars classical charts. the recording sessions had to be slotted into a daily schedule of work and prayers that start at 3:45 in the morning. the monk on the album cover, connecticut-born father benedict nivikof,f,igured it would have less than limited appeal. >> music and beer can get where words often can't. >> they're both good for the soul? >> good for the soul, especially the beer. >> reporter: it turns out that beer is another monastic specialty that has roots in medieval times. brother francis, the brewmaster from dallas, says ancient brewing was a kind of public
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boiling process sterilized often dirty water. >> it's really an act of creation, just like god. all things god may be glorified is one of the mottos in the benedictine order. >> reporter: the monks brew and sell a blond beer that's 6% alcohol and a dark version that's 10%. >> we don't want it watery, we don't want it light. it's something that grabs your attention. >> reporter: it certainly does thth. if you thought the music was divine divine, you should try the beer, trust me. and given the quality of the music, that's saying something. the legacy of st. augustine and his monks, two wonderful ways to soothe the soul. >> cheers. >> that is the overnight news for this sunday. for some of you the news continues. for others check b bk with us a little later for the morning
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york city, i'm jeff glor. this is the "cbs overnight news." >welcome to the overnrnht news. i'm jeff glor. the democratic presidential candidates gathered in charleston, south carolina, for their fourth and final debate before the iowa caucuses. here's some of what the candidates had to say. >> right before the debate you changed your position on immunity from lawsuits for gun manufacturers. can you tell us why? >> well, i think secretary clinton knowowthat what she says is very disingenuous. i have a d-minus voting record
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i was in 1988, there were three candidates running for congress in the state of vermont. i stood up to the gun lobby and came out and maintained the position that in this country, we should not be selling litary-style assault weapons. and i think it should be a federal crime if people act as strawmen. we have seen in this city a horrendous tragedy. of a crazed person praying with people, then coming out and this should not be a political issue. what we should be doing is working totother. and by the way, asas senator from a rural state that has virtually no gun control, i believe that i am in an excellent position to bring people together to fight for gun legislation -- >> you didn't answer the question that you did change your position on immunity for gun manufacturers so can you answer the question -- >> what i have said is that the
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had some good provisions. among other things we prohibited ammunition that would have killed cops who had protection on. we had child safety protection on guns in that legislation. and what we also said is that a small mom and pop gun shop who sells a gun legally to somebody should not be held liabe if somebody does something terrible with that gun. so what i said is i would relook at it. we are going to relook at it. and i will support stronger provisions. >> secretary clinton, would you like to respond to senator sanders? >> yes. look, i have made it clear based on senator sanders' own record that he has voted with t t nra, with the gun lobby, numerous times. he voted against the brady bill five times. he voted for what we call the charleston loophole. he voted for immunity from gunmakers and sellers which the
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piece of gun legislation in 20 years. he voted to let guns go onto amtrak, guns go into national parks. he voted against doing research to figure out how we can save lives. let's not forget what this is about. 90 people a day die from gun violence in our country. that's 33,000 people a year. one of the most t rrific examples not a block from here, where we had nine people murdered. now, i am pleased to hear that senator sanders has reversed his position on immunity and i look forward to him joining with those members of congress who have already introduced legislation. there is no other ininstry in america that was given the total pass that the gunmakers and dealers were -- >> and that's the -- >> -- and that needs to be reversed. >> secretary clinton, is it
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sanders wants to kill obamacare? >> well, andrea, i am absolutely committed to universal health care. i've worked on this for a long time. people may remember that i took on the health insurance industry back in the '90s. and i didn't quit until we got the children's health insurance program that insures 8 million kids. and i certainly respect senator sanders' intentions. but when you're talking about health care the details really matter, and therefore we have been raising questions about the nine bills that he introduced over 20 years as to how they would work and what would be the impact on people's health care. he didn't like that. his campaign didn't like it either. and tonight he's come out with a new health care plan. and again, we need to get into the details. but here's what i believe. the democratic party andndhe united states worked since harry truman to get the affordable care act passed.
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universal health care. we've accomplished so much already. i do not want to see the republicans repeal it, and i don't want to see us start over again with a contentious debate. i want us to defend and build on the affordable care act and improve it. >> senator sanders? >> secretary, secretary clinton didn't answer your question. because what her campaign was saying, bernie sanders who has fought for universal health care for my entire life, he wants to enenmedicare, end medicaid, end the children's health insurance program. that is nonsense. what a medicare for all program does is finally provide in this country health care for every man, woman and child as a right. now the truth is that franklin delano roosevelt, harry truman, you know what they believed in? they believed that health care
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our people. i'm on the committee that wrote the affordable care act. i made the affordable care act along with jim clyburn a better piece of legislation. i voted for it. but right now what we have to deal with is the fact that 29 million people still have no health insurance. we are paying the hiest prices in the world for prescription drugs. getting ripped off. and here's the important point. we are spending far more per person on health care than the people of any other country. my proposal, provide health care to all people, get private insurance out of health insurance, lower the cost of health care for mimile class families by 5,000 0 cks. that's the vision we need to take. >> you know, i have to say i'm not sure whether we're talking about the plan you just introduced tonight or we're talking about the plan you introduced nine times in the congress. but the fact is, we have the
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that is one of the greatest t accomplishments of president obama, of the democratic party, and of our country. and we have already seen 19 million americans get insurance. we have seen the end of pre-existing conditions keeping people from getting insurance. we have seen women no longer paying more for our insurance than m m. and we have seen young people up to the age of 26 being able to stay on their parents' policy. >> i'm not -- >> there are things we can do to improve it, but to tear it up and start over again, pushing our country back into that kind of a contentious debate i think is the wrong direction. >> it is absolutely -- >> i have to talk about something that's actually wowoing in our state -- >> governor -- >> no onons saying tearing this up, we're going to go forward. but what the secretary neglected to mention, not just the 29 million still have no health insurance, that even more are underinsured with huge
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tell me why we are spending almost three times more than the british, who guarantee health care to all of their people. 50% more than the french. more than the canadians. the vision from fdr and harry truman was health care for all people as a right in a cost-effective way. we're not going to tear up the affordable care act. i helped write it. olay regenerist renews from within, plumping surface cells for a dramatic transformationn without the need for fillers your concert tee might show your age... your skin never will. olay regenerist. olay. ageless. today you can do everything in just one click, even keep your toilet clean and fresh. introducing lysol click gel. click it in to enjoy clean freshness
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ditch the misery. let's end this. americans released as part of a prisoner swap with iran are one step closer to home. it's been a year of rapid developments between the u.s. and iran. iran is now allowed to sell oil on the open market after sanctions were lifted. it will have access to the global banking system and will gain access to more than $100 billion in frozen assets in banks around the world. president obama called it a victory for smart diplomacy. >> this is a good day. because once again we're seeing what's possible with strong
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as i saiaiin my state of the union address, ensuring the security of the united states and the safety of our people demands a smart, patient, and disciplined approach to the world. that includes our diplomacy with the islamic republic of iran. for decades our differences with iran meant that our governments almost never spoke to each other. ultimately that did not advance america's interests. over the years iran moved closer and closer to having the ability to build a nuclear weapon. but from presidents franklin roosevelt to john f. kennedy to ronald reagan, the united states has never been afraid to pursue diplomacy with our adversaries. as president i decided that a strong, confident america could advance our national security by engaging directly with the iranian government. we've seen the results. under the nuclear deal that we,
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with iran last year, iran will not get a chance on a nuear bombmb the region, the united states and the world will be more secure. as i've said many times, the nuclear deal was never intended to resolve all of our differences with iran, but still, engaging directly with the iranian government on a sustained basis for the first time in decades has created a unique opportunity, a window to try to resolve important issues. and today i can report progress on a number of fronts. first, yesterday marked a milestone in preventing iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon. iran has now fulfilled key commitments under the nuclear deal. i want to take a moment to explain why this i iso important. over more than a decade iran had moved ahead with its nuclear program and before the deal it had installed nearly 20,000 centrifuges that could enrich uranium for a nuclear bomb. today iran has removed two-thirds of those machines.
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steadily increasing its stockpile of enriched uranium. enengh for up to ten nuclear bombs. today, more than 98% of that stockpile has been shipped out of iran, meaning iran now doesn't have enough material for even one bomb. before, iran was nearing completion of a new reactor capable of producing plutonium for a bomb. today the core of that reactor has been pulled out and fified with concrete so it cannot be used again. before the deal, the world had relatively little visibility into iran's nuclear program. today, international inspectors are on the ground and iran is being subjected to the most comprehensive, intrusive inspection regime ever negotiated to o nitor a nuclear program. inspectors will monitor iran's key nuclear facilities 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.
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will have access to iran's entire nuclear supply chain. in other words, if iran tries to cheat and they try to build a bomb covertly, we will catch them. so the bottom line is this. whereas iran was steadily expanding its nuclear program, we have now cut off every single path that iran could have used to build a bomb. whereas it would have taken iran two to three months to break out with enough material to rush to a bomb, we've now extended that breakout time to a year. and wiwi the world's unprecedented inspections and access to iran's program, we'll know if iran ever tries to break out. now that iran's actions have been verified, it can begin to receive relief from certain nuclear sanctions and gain access to its own money that had been frozen. and perhaps most important of all, we've achieved this historic progress through diplomacy.
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in the middle east. i want to also point out that by working with iran on this nuclear deal, we were better able to address other issues. when our saiairs in the persian gulf accidentally strayed into iranian waters, that could have sparked a major international incident. some folks here in washington rushed to declare that it was the start of another hostage crisis. instead we worked directly with the iranian government and secured the release of our sailors in less than 24 hours. this brings me to a second major development. several americans unjustly detained by iran are finally coming home. in some cases these americans faced years of continued detention. and i've met with some of their families. i've seen teir anguish. how they ache for their sons and husbands. i gave these families my word. i made a vow that we would do everything in our power to win
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and we have been tireless. on the sidelines of the nuclear negotiations our diplomats at the highest level, including secretary kerry, used every meeting to push iran to release our americans. i did so myself in my conversation with president rouhani. after the nuclear deal was completed, the discussions between our governments accelerated. yesterday these families finally got the news they had been waiting for. in a reciprocal humanitarian gesture, six iranian americans and one iranian serving sentences or awaiting trial in the united states are granted clemency. ththe individuals were n charged with terrorism or violent offenses. they're civilians and their release is a one-time gesture to iran given the unique opportunity offered by this moment and the larger circumstances at play. and it reflects our willingness to engage with iran to advance our mutual interests even n we
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the united states. so nuclear deal, implemented. american families, reunited. the third piece of this work that we got done this weekend involved the united states and iran resolving a financial dispute that dated back more than three decades. of course, even as we implement the nuclear deal and welcome our americans home, we recognize that there remain profound differences between the united states and iran. we remain steadfast in opposing iran's destabilizing b bavior elsewhere, inclulung its threats against israel and our gulf partners and its support for ziolent proxies in places like syria and yemen. we still have sanctions on iran for its violations of human rights, for its support of terrorism, and for its ballistic missile program. and we will continue to enforce these sanctions vigorously.
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example, was a violatiti of its international obligations. and as a result, the united states is imposing sanctions on individuals and companies working to advance iran's ballistic missile program. and we are going to remain vigilant about it. we're not going to waver in defense of our security or that of our allies and partners. but i do want to once again speak directly to the iranian people. yours is a great civilization with a vibrant culture that has so much to contribute to the world. in commerce, in science, in arts. for decades your government's threats and actions to destabilize your region have isolated iran from much of the world. and now our governments are talking with one another. following the nuclear deal, you, especially young iranians, have the opportunity to begin building new ties with the world. we have a rare chance to pursue a new path, a different, better
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for both our peoples and the wider world. that's the opportunity before the iranian people. we need to take advantage of that. so my fellow americans, today we're united in welcoming home sons and husbands and brothers who in lonely prison cells have endured an absolute nightmare. but they never gave in and they never gave up. at long last they can stand tall and breathe deep the fresh air of freedom. as a nation, we face real challenges. around the world and here at many of them will not be resolved quickly or easily. but today's progress, americans coming home, an iran that has rolled back ititnuclear program and accepted unprecedented monitoring of that program, these things are a reminder of what we can achieve when we lead with strength and with wisdom. thank you so much.
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paris is known as the city of light. over the weekend london made a strong claim to that title. here's jonathan vigliotti. >> reporter: as night fell, london transformed into a spectacle of light. westminster abbey dazzled in a kaleidoscope of color, bringing ancient carvings to life. in st. james square, perched performers looked like sparkling gargoyles. others dangling precariously overhead from wires. in mayfair an iconic red phone booth turned into a home for goldfish. this weeeend the capital is a a cathedral for the absurd and otherworldly. equal parts alice in wonderland and "avatar." all of it the wild imagination of a group of artists with lumiere london, the city's first festival of light. for four days streets, buildings and statues become a canvas for light installations, videos and performance.
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circus as her canvas. >> london is the most kinetic international hub in the world. we're standing in oxford circus which is the busiest pedestrian spot in all of london. >> reporter: the audience did turn out, fighting back the winter chill to bask in the glow. >> we're privileged to be allowed to play in all the great iconic places in central london. and it provides us with a giant gallery, if you like. a huge outdoor gallery which allows as many people as possible to enjoy this incredible work. >> reporter: art installations light up 30 different locations across the city. projected images turn king's cross station into a performing circus of light. londoners can create their own vision using the light on their phone to change the colors in the light graffiti installation. the event was designed as an antidote of sorts to the post-holiday blues and is the first major light show in the city, hoping to rival
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vivid sydney, berlin's festival of lights, and fetch de lumie in france. >> i hope people go away with a new sense of london, its vibrancy, its ability to transform itself in a remarkable way. >> reporter: the spectacular lights in all their vibrant colors. jonathan v vliotti, london. when the engines failed on the plane i was flying, i knew what to do to save my passengers. but when my father sank into depression, i didn't know how to help him.
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don't let this happen to you. if you or a loved one is suicidal, call the national suicide prevention lifeline. no matter how hopeless or helpless you feel, with the right help, you can get well. (fraralin d. roosevelt) the inherent right t twork is one of the elemental privileges of a free people. endowed, as our nation is, with abundant physicacaresources... ...and inspired as it should be to make those resources and opportunities available for the enjoyment of all... ...we approach reemployment with real hope of finding a better answer than we have now. narrator: donateteo goodwill where your donations help fufu
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ththe may be no greater r ve than the love at the heart of this next story. steve hartman found it "on the road." >> reporter: officer ryan davis is returning to the scene of the crime. reluctantly. >> it's getting very difficult right now. >> reporter: last weweend he and his partner r re investigating an alarmt this grocery store in canton, ohio. it was the middle of the night. >> 1:49 a.m. >> reporter: there were signs of a break-in. >> we just started working our way through the grocery store.
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>> the roof door is completely off. >> 10-4. >> shots fired, shots fired! my partner's been shot. >> reporter: ryan's partner was a germananhepherd named jethro. he was more than just a police dog. the davis family got jethro at 8 weeks. he grew up as both a family pet and a k-9 officer. every day seamlessly transitioning from pillow to police work and back again. until last weekend. whenene charged at that bubular and took three bullets. >> i'm here because he did what he did. >> reporter: ryan says the dog saved his life. but remarkably, he says he wishes it was the other way around. >> i would trade places with him in a heartbeat. >> do you mean that? >> absolutely. because i wouldn't have to sit here and suffer over the losof him. he's left a hole that will never
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he gave his life for me. amazing grace >> reporter: it's hard to imagine owing such a debt with no way to pay it back. but this week the city of canton tried. they filled their civic center, invited police officers from across the country, and honored jethro on what would have been his 3rd birthday. as for the killer, police do have a suspect in custody. but that's of little consolation to ryan, who says the only thing that will make this better is making certain his partner is never forgotten. >> so how do you want him remembered? >> the one word that comes to mind is, unconditional. heheas unconditionally loyal, loving, supportive. he was a hero. >> reporter: he was a hero. as is any officer who can be this devoted.
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canton, ohio. >> that is the overnight news for this sunday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs thth morning." one big step close towing home. americans freed from iran arrive in germany to be reunited with their families. an american killed in south africa, the story of another's harrowing escape. in south carolina presidential candidates clinton, sanders and o'mally face off tonight. global margts sink further as wall street prepares for another queasy week. >> heaeanly harmony. monks bring music back to a monastery while tapping into
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>> if you thought the music was divine you should try the beer, trust me. >> this is the cbs overnight news. >> welcome to the overnight news, i'm jeff glor. three americans released by iran are now in germany. president obama said this weekend's prisoner swap with iran was a victory for american diplomacy. a fourth american was freed as part of the exchange but was not on the same plane with the others. a fifth american, a student, was released separately. following the exchange the united states and five other world powers lifted economic sanction on this iran and freed billions in frozen assets. implementing the landmark nuclear deal reached last july. we begin with elizabeth palmer in landstuhl, germany. >> reporter: arriving g geneva late today the three americans were safe at last. here's jason rezaian, reporter for "the washington post,"
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department's brett mcgirk. he was jailed a year and a half ago, charged with spying. pastor saeed abedini, arrested in 2012, alleged to have organized underground christian churches in iran. amir hekmati, former u.s. marine, picked up in 2011 while visiting his grandmother, and charged with espionage. cbs' adriana diaz caught up with hekmati's sister in detroit as she was boarding a plane to be reunited with her brother. >> i'm in a fog. this is like surreal. i am still in disbelief. and honestly, everything just happened so quickly that i don't think it will hit me until i am hugging him. >> reporter: all three americans were released from tehran's infamous prison after 14 months of top secret diplomatic bargaining that started on the sidelines of the nuclear talks. today president obama waited until the americans were out of iranian air space before
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>> today we're united in welcoming home sons and husbands and brothers who in lonely prison cells have endured an absotute nightmare. >> reporter: also free are baro mechanic and two prisoners the u.s. released from its jails at part of the swap. all were accused of selling technology to iran in violation of american sanctions. finally, there's a mystery man, the fourth american prisoner who was released along with the others but apparently stayed in iran. all we know is his name, nosratoliah khoshawi. the three others will spend their first night of freedom in the landstuhl hospital in germany, which has long offered welcome hospital care to u.s. hostages and prisoners on their way home. as you saw some members of hekmati hekmati's family are on the way to germany right now. jason rezaian's family is or
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the hospital will offer them refew so they can reconnect with both peace and privacy. >> liz palmer, thank you very much. from the white house to the campaign trail the prisoner swap is getting mixed reviews. >> this is a good day. >> reporter: speaking just hours after the american prisoners began their journey home, president obama hailed their release as a result of smart and disciplined diplomacy. >> the united states has never been afraid to pursue diplomacy with their adversaries. as president i decided a strong, confident america could advance our national security by engage didding directly with the iranian government. we've seen the results. >> reporter: his remarks stand in stark contrast to republican presidential candidates who today argued that negotiating secure. whether it's over the release of american civilians -- >> this should have happened years ago. we're giving them $150 billion, this hadn't beshouldn't be happening now.
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>> ultimately they released them but only after achieving what they wanted, that is to prove if they wanted to, they can grab american sailors and subject them to mistreatment. >> reporter: or a deal to curb iran's nuclear program. >> it reflects a pattern we've seen in the obama administration over and over again of negotiating with terrorists. and making deals and trades that endanger u.s. safety and security. >> reporter: democratic presidential candidate and former secretary of state hillary clinton said talking to iran makes the world a safer place. >> this is the kind of smart diplomacy i was proud to be a part of in the first administration of president obama that we're just going to have to be persistent with. >> reporter: the president said profound differences remain between the u.s. and iran and the administration today announced new penalties on 11 individuals and entities involved in tehran's ballistic missile program. most iranimns would never feel those sanctions and they're tiny compared to the $100 billion in
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the iran deal's implementation. >> julianna, thank you. the lifting of sanctions will bring millions of gallons of iranian oil into an already flooded market. the price of crude fell below $30 friday to a 12-year low. the dow dropped another 390 points. for more on all of this our business analyst jill schlessinger joins us. first iran, what's the immediate impacts now? >> they are already pumping and bringing oil to market. it is expected that there will be00 to 500,000 barrels a day from iran, that's on top of the 1 million barrels right now that is in surplus. more oil than we need. that's why crude oil is down so dramatically. down 10.5% this year. that comes after 30% last year, 46% the year before. >> meaning cheaper gas prices but also a lot of questions. middle eastern markets plunged overnight. american markets had a terrible week last week. are closed on monday but reopen on tuesday. they're all in correction
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>> we're going to have a lot more volatility and the big question is whether this 10% down correction turns into a full-blown bear market. that's a 20% slide. we haven't been in a bear market in seven years. it's a long time. some partsf the market already in a bear market. the small companies, the transportation index. so what are investors looking for? they're looking for data to confirm, is the world slowing down? is that impacting the united states? is that impacting earnings of corporate america? we don't know yet but what we do know is that with the world in turmoil, hang on, it is going to be a a bumpyride. >> even though the funmentals are still generally good for the u.s. economy? >> so far, so good. but again, this can be more emotional than data-based. we have to remember that markets are usually rational over the long-term, short-term, not so much. >> when people are scared they sell scared. >> indeed. we are learning that three american contractors are misisng ininraq. reportedly abducted by a militia. a state department source tells
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baghdad received a warning last week that an iranian-backed militi wanted to abduct an american contractor. [ vocalizing ] [ buzzing ] [ tree crashes ] [ wind howling ]
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two weeks ago, until the first votes are cast in the 2016 race for president. a new poll has hillary clinton 25 points ahead of bernie sanders in the democratic rara. martin o'mally a distant third. the democrats held their fourth debate last night in charleston. here is some of what they said. >> right before the debate you changed your position on immunity from lawsuits for gun manufacturers. can you tell us why? >> well, i think secretary clinton knows what she says is
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i have a d-minus voting record from the nra. i was in 1988, there were three candidates running for congress in the state of vermont. i stood up to the gun lobby and came out and maintained the position that in this country, we should not be selling military-style assault weapons. and i think it should be a federal crime if people act as strawmen. we have seen in this city a horrendous tragedy. of a crazed person praying with people, then coming out and shooting nine people. this should not be a political issue. what we should be doing is working together. and by the way, as a senator from a rural state that has virtually no gun control, i believe that i am in an excellent position to bring people together to fight for gun legislation -- >> you didn't answer the question that you did change your position on immunity for gun manufacturers so can you
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>> what i have said is that the gun manufacturers liability bill had some good provisions. among other things we prohibited ammunition that would have kill the cops who had protection on. we had trial safety protection on guns in that legislation. and what we also said is that a small mom and pop gun shop who sells a gun legally to somebody should not be held l lble if somebody does something terrible with that gun. so what i said is i would relook at it. we are going to relook at it. and i will support stronger provisions. >> secretary clinton, would you like to respond to senator sanders? >> yes. look, i have made it clear based on senator sanders' own record that he hasoted with the nra, with the gun lobby, numerous types. he voted against the brady bill five times. he voted for what we call the charleston loophole.
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gunmakers and sellers which the nra said was the most important piece of gun legislation in 20 years. he voted to let guns go onto amtrak, guns go into national parks. he voted against doing research to figure out how we can save lives. let's not forget what this is about. 90 people a day die from gun violence in our country. that's 33,000 people a year. one of the most horrific examples not a block from here, where we had nine peoplee murdered. now, i am pleased to hear that senator sanders has reversed his position on immunity and i look forward to him joining with those members of congress who have already introduced legislation. there is no other industry in america that was given the total pass that the gunmakers and dealers were --
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>> -- and that needs to be reversed. >> at least two people were killed by tornados overnight in central florida. the couple was killed in manatee county when their mobile home was hit. another tornado in the beach town of siesta key caused widespread destruction leaving 17,000 without popor. the search continues for 12 marineneafter two helicopters collided off hawaii. three days after the crash, hope of finding survivors is fading. here's maria villarreal. >> reporter: rough seas, waves up to 20 feet high, are hampering search efforts. overnight a coast guard air crew had to briefly change course when a laser was pointed at them. searchers have scoured nearly 14,000 square miles off the north shore oahu looking for any trace of the missing marines somewhere in these waters. they've found small amounts of debris, says lieutenant scott carr. >> i know a lot of people focus on debris but we're focused on
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>> repororr: the marines have releleed the names of the 12 on board. the oldest, 41. the youngest, just 21. last night, hundreds packed a high school field in statin, oregon, where 21-year-old lance corporal hart attended. >> it gives you goosebumps, like you're on this field for a game. just as many people are out here right now showing support. >> reporter: major sean campbell from college station, texas, has a wife and four children. the family of captain kevin roche of st. louis writes, we believe the marines and coast guard are doing everything they can to bring kevin and his fellow marines home safely. all 12 remain the target of a desperate arch. maria villarreal, cbs news, los angeles. still ahead, an american reveals how he survived a deadly terror attack in africa. and a flower rooted in space for an earthly purpose. seriously? where do you think you're going? to work, with you.
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you're not coming. i took mucinex to help get rid of my mucusy congestion. oh, right then i'll swing by in like 4 hours. fofoet the tacos! one e ll lasts 12 hours. i'm good all day. wait! your loss. i was going to wear a sombrero. only mucinex has a bi-layer tablet that starts fast, and keeps working. not 4, not 6, but 12 full hours. start the relief. ditch the misery. let's end this. it's not always as easy for me as it is for him... it's easy for me cause look at her. aw... so we use k-y ultragel. it enhances my body's natural moisisre so i can get into the swing of it a bit quicicr. and when i know she's feeling like that,
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when she enjoys it, we enjoy it even more. and i enjoy it. feel the difference with k-y ultragel. (cell phone rings) well the squirrels are back in the attic. mom? your dad won't call an exterminator... can i call you back, mom? he says it's personal this time... if you're a mom, you call at the worst time. it's what you do. if you want to save fifteeeepercent or more on car insururce, you switch to geico. it's what you do. where are you? it's very loud there. are you taking a zumba class? your clever moves won't stop the cold and flu. but disinfecting with lysol can. lysol wipes and spray are approved to kill more types of germs than clorox. to help keep your family healthy,
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tonight we're learning more about theeictims and survivors of a terror attack in west africa. at least 28 people were killed on friday when gunmen opened fire at a hotel and cafe in the nation of burkina faso. here's jonathan vigliotti. >> reporter: as security forces surrounded the splendid hotel
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both under siege by terrorists, amy riddering tried desperately to reach her husband mike. he was at the cafe when the assault began friday night. i still have no news about mike, she wrote on her facebook page saturday morning, as military forces were still trying to regain control. florida native mike riddering moved with amy and their two daughters to burkina faso in 2011 to start an orphanage. mike and a pastor were at the cafe in ouagadougou to meet new volunteers. the pastor called amy after escaping. gunmen came into the restaurant shooting and everyone ran to hide. the pastor somehow had mike's phphe and called, wrote amy. it was still unclear if mike survived. another american, edward bunker, emerged from his room to a deserted hotel lobby. >> there was someone with a gun going down the street.
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when i kind of realized that there was something majorly amiss. >> reporter: the 12-hour siege began when h hvily armed al qaeda militants, two of them women, stormed the buildings and set off car bombs. in all, 28 people were killed, including a canadian family of four who were on a humanitarian trip. 11 americans, including edward bunker, made it out alive. mike riddering did not. you left quite a legacy here, i can only imagine the adventures you're having now, wrote amy's final post. jonathan vigliotti, cbs news, london. up next, candidates court
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voting bloc. less than ten months to election day, some presidential candidates are psyching support from the nation's fastest-growing voting bloc. here's carter evans. >> reporter: when hillary clinton held this rally in san gabriel, california, home to the country's largest asian-american community, she also launched a campaign to target what may be a key vote in november. >> i'm very proud to have so many asian-americans and pacific islanders working with me. >> reporter: they are the country's fastest-growing political constituency whose registered voters doubled to 4 million between the 2008 and 2012lections. >> we'veone from being marginalized to becoming the margin of victory.
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vote initiative is congresswoman judy chew who brought in supporters from around the country. >> certain states will have a huge effect on the outcome of the presidential election, such as nevada, such as virginia. >> you're from? >> las vegas, nevada. >> we have votes. we know how to deliver those votes. >> reporter: shakir, a banker, points to the 2014 senate election in his state, virginia. >> thank you, virginia! >> reporter: where asian-american voters made the difference for democrat mark warner, who won by less than 1% of the vote. >> republicans used to enjoy the majority of asian-american support back in the 1990s. >> reporter: university of california professor kartha runs the nonpartisan asian-american survey which shows a political shift after the 1992 election when 31% of asian-americans voted for democrat bill clinton. by 2012, 73% voted for brady quinn. >> what changed? >> one is the clintons.
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can draw on a lot of support from what she and her husband did in the 1990s in terms of doing outreach to these populations. another part that's changed is the republican party's rhetoric on immigration has turned off a lot of voters. >> we are a country built by the hard work of generations of immigrants. and we are stronger because of our diversity and our openness. >> reporter: something asian-americans like to hear, because nearly two-thirds of their population was born outside the u.s. carter evans, cbs news, san gabriel, california. still ahead, every
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fun as this. david bowie's last album is now his first number one album in the u.s. one week after bowie's death "black star" debuted on top the billboard 200 today. the album was released two days before bowie died. spacex launched a new satellite into space after california today. the jason 3, a weather satellite monitoring el nino conditions, lifted into the stratosphere using the company's falcon 9 rocket. the hope was to land the falcon 9 on a barge in the pacific. that did not work. the landing was too hard. a beautiful brake breakthrough on the international space station, the first flower ever grown in space. it's an orange zinha zinnia chosen because it's pretty and edible. astronauts say it's pretty good. presidential ambitions on display in washington today at
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here they are. candidates had to literally run for the job. challenging enough as you can see. they also had to do a freestyle dance routine. the winners will run a presidential race during every nationals home game. coming up, meet the monks who are selling a lot of albums and beer. every day it's getting closer
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a love like yours will surely come my way hey, hey, hey babies aren't fully developed until at least 39 weeks. if your pregnancy is healthy, wait for labor to begin on its own. a healthy baby is worth the wait. o0 c1 travel is part of the american way of life. when we're on vacation, we keep an eye out for anything that looks out of place. [ indistinct conversations ] miss, your bag. when we travel from cititto city, we pay attention totour surroundings. [ cheering ] everyone plays a role in keeping our community safe. whether you're traveling for business or pleasure, be aware of your surroundings. if you see something suspicious,
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a centuries-old monastery in italy where american monks are making heavenly harmonies as they tap into history. >> reporter: close your eyes and century. that's when the chants were written and when st. augustine founded the benedictine order of monks in this basilica. father folsom, graduate of the indiana school of musisi came
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of rejuvenating the monastery and bringing its music back to life. >> if monks come, candidates come and they don't sing or think they can't sing, we give them voice lessons because it's so much part of our life. if you can't sing you're going to be pretty bored here, i think. >> reporter: the voioi lessons are so good that a music company asked them to cut a cd. it ended up at the top of billboard's classical charts. the recording sessions had to be slotted into a daily schedule of work and prayers that start at 3:45 in the morning. the monk on the album cover, connecticut-born father benedict nivikof,ing if the itt would have less than limited appeal. > music and beer can get where words often can't. >> they're both good for the soul? >> good for the soul, especially the beer. >> reporter: it turns out that beer is another monastic specialty that has roots in medieval times. brother francis, the brewmaster from dallas, says ancient
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health servivi because the boiling process sterilized often dirty water. >> it's really an act of creation, just like god. all things god may be glorified is one of the mottos in the benedictine order. >> reporter: the monks brew and sell a blond beer that's 6% alcohol and a dark versionon that's 10%. >> we don't want it watery, we don't want it light. it's something that grabs your attention. >> reporter: it certainly does that. >> you thought the music was divine, you should try the beer, trust me. >> reporter: given the quality of the music, that's saying something. the legacy of st. augustine and his monks, two wonderful ways toto soothe the soul. >> cheers. >> that is the overnht news for this sunday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning."
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york city, i'm jeff glor. this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the overnight news. i'm jeff glor. the democratic presidential candidates gathered in charleston, south carolina, for their fourth and final debate before the iowa caucuses. here's some of what the candidates had to say. >> right before the debate you changed yourr position on immunity from lawsuits for gun manufacturers. can you tell us why? >> well, i think secretary clinton knows that what she says is very disingenuous.
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from the nra. i was in 1988, there were three candjdates running for congress in the state of vermont. i stood up to thgun lobby and came out and maintained the position that in this country, we should not be selling military-style assault weapons. and i think it should be a federal crime if people act as strawmen. we have seen in this city a horrendous tragedy. of a crazed person praying with people, then coming out and shooting nine people. this should not be a political issue. what we should be doing is working together. and by the way, as a senator from a rural state that has virtually no gun control, i believe that i am in an excellent position to bring people together to fight for gun legislation -- >> you didn't answer the question that you did change your position on immunity for gun manufacturers so can you answer the question --
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gun manufacturers liability bill had some good provisions. among other things we prohibited ammunition that would have killed cops who had protection on. we had child safety protection on guns in that legislation. and what we also said is that a small mom and pop gun shop who sells a gun legally to somebody should not be held liable if somebody does something terrible with that gun. so what i said is i would relook at it. we are going t trelook at it. and i will support stronger provisions. >> secretary clinton, would you like to respond to senator sanders? >>es. look, i have made it clear based on senator sanders' own record that he has voted with the nra, with the gun lobby, numerous times. he voted against the brady bill five times. heheoted for what we calalthe charleon loophole. he voted for immunity from gunmakers and sellers which the
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piece of gun legislation in 20 years. he voted to let guns go onto amtrak, guns go into national parks. he voted againststoing research to figure out how we can save lives. let's not forget what this is about. 90 people a day die from gun violence in our country. that's 33,000 people a year. one of the most horrific examples not a block from here, where we had nine people murdered. now, i am pleased to hear that senator sanders has reversed his position on immunity and i look forward to him jning with those members of congress who have already introduced legislation. there is no other industry in america that was given the total pass that the gunmakers and dealers were -- >> and that's the -- >> -- and that needs to be
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>> secretary clinton, is it really fair to say that bernie sanders wants to kill obamacare? >> well, andrea, i am absolutely committed to universal health care. time. people may remember that i took on the health insururce industry back in the '90s. and i didn't quit until we got the children's healthnsurance program that insures 8 million kids. and i certainly respect senator sanders' intentions. but when you're talking about health care the details really matter, and therefore we have been raising questions about the nine bills that t introduced over 20 years as to how they would work and what would be the impact on people's health care he didn't like that. his campaign didn't like it either. and tonight he's come out with a new health care plan. and again, we need to get into the details. but here's what i believe. the d docratic partyty and the united states worked since harry truman to get the affordable
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we finally have a path to universal health care. we've accomplished so much already. i do not want to see the republicans repeal it, and i don't want to see us start over again with a contentious debate. i want us to defend and build on the affordable care act and prove it. >> senator sanders? >> secretary, secretary clinton didn't answer your question. because what her campaign was saying, bernie sanders who has fought for universal health care for my entire life, he wants to end medicare, end medicaid, end the children's health insurance program. that is nonsense. what a medicare for all program does is finally provide in this country health care for every man, woman and child as a right. now the truth is that franklin delano roosevelt, harry truman, you know what they believed in?
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should be available to all of our people. i'm on the cmittee that wro the affordable care act. i made the affordable care act along with jim clyburn a better piece of legislation. i voted for it. but right now what we have to deal with is the fact that 29 million people still have no health insurance. we are paying the highest prices in the world for prescription drugs. getting ripped off. and here's the important point. we are spending far more per person on health care than the people of any other country. my proposal, provide health care to all people, get private insurance out of health insurance, lower the cost of health care for middle class families by 5,000 bucks. that's the vision we need to take. >> you know, i have to say i'm not sure whether we're talking about the plan you just introduced tonight or we're talking about the plan you
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but the fact is, we have the affordable care act. that is one of the greatest accomplishments of president obama, of the democratic party, d of our country. and we have already seen 19 million americans get insurance. we have seen the end of pre-existing conditions keeping people from getting insurance. we have seen women no longer paying more for our insurance than men. and we have seen young people up to the age of 26 being able to stay on their parents' policy. >> i'm not -- >> there are things we can do to improve it, but to tear it up and start over again, pushing our country back into that kind of a contentious debate i think is the wrong direction. >> it is absolutely -- >> i have to talk about something that's actually working in our state -- >> governor -- >> no one's saying tearing this up, we're going to go forward. but what the secretary neglected to mention, not just the 29 million still have no health insurance, that even more are underinsured with huge
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tell me why we are spending almost three times more than the british, who guarantee health care to all of their people. 50% more than the french. more than the canadians. the vision from fdr and harry truman was health care for all people as a right in a cost-effective way. we're not going to tear degree motionsense is the world's first deodorant activated by movement. as you move, fragrance capsules burst to release extra freshness all day. motionsense. protection to keep you moving.
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americans released as part of a prisoner swap with iran are one step closer to home. it's been a year of rapid developments between the u.s. and iran. iran is now allowed to sell oil on the open market after sanctions were lifted. it will have access to the global banking system and will gain access to more than $100 billion in frozen assets in banks around the worlrl president obama called it a victory for smart dip plome yes. this is a good day. because once again we're seeing what's possible with strong american diplomacy. as i said in my state of the
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security of the united states and the safety of our people demands a smart, patient, and disciplined approach to the e world. that includes our diplomacy with the islamic republic of iran. for decades our differences with iran meant that our governments almost never spoke to each other. ultimately that did not advance america's interests. over the years iran moved closer and clcler to having the ability to build a nuclear weapon. but from presidents franklin roosevelt to john f. kennedy to ronald reagan, the united states has never been afraid to pursue diplomacy with our adversaries. as president i decided that a strong, confident america could advance our national security by engaging directly w wh the anian government. we've seen the results. under the nuclear deal that we, our allies and partners reached
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not get a chance on a nuclear bomb. the region, the united states secure. as i've said many times, the nuclear deal was never intended to resolve all of our differences with iran, but still, engaging directly with the iranian government on a sustained basis for the first time in decades has created a unique opportunity, a window to try to resolve important issues. and today i can report progreses on a number of fronts. first, yesterday marked a milestone in preventing iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon. iran has now fulfilled key commitments under the nuclear deal. i want to take a moment to explain why this is so important. over more than a decade iran had moved ahead with its nuclear program and b bore the deal i i had installed nearly 20,000 centrifuges that could enrich uranium for a nuclear bomb. today iran has removed
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before the deal, iran was steadily increasing its stockpile of enriched uranium. enough for up to ten nuclear bombs. today, moror than 98% of that stockpile has been shipped out of iran, meaning iran now doesn't have enough material for even one bomb. before, iran was nearing completion of a new reactor capable of producing plutonium for a bomb. today the core of that reactor has been pulled out and filled with concrete so it cannot be used again. before the deal, the world had relatively little visibility into iran's nuclear program. today, international inspectors are on the ground and iran is being subjected to the most comprehensive, intrusive inspection regime ever negotiated to monitor a nuclear program. inspectors will monitor iran's key nuclear facilities 24 hours
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for decades to come, inspectors will have access to iran's entire nuclear supply chain. in other words, if iran tries to cheat and they try to build a bomb covertly, we will catch them. so the bottom line is this. whereas iran was steadily expanding its nuclear program, we have now cut off every single path that iran could have used to build a bomb. whereas it would have taken iran two to three months to break out with enough material to rush to a bomb, we've now extended that breakout time to a year. and with the world's unprecedented inspections and access to iran's program, we'll know if iran ever tries to break out. now that iran's actions have been verified, it can begin to receive relief from certain nuclear sanctions and gain access to its own money that had been frozen. and perhaps most important of all, we've achieved this historic progress through diplomacy.
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in the middle east. i want to also point out that by working with iran on this nuclear deal, we were better able to address other issues. when our sailers in the persian gulf accidentally strayed into iranian waters, that could have incident. some folks here in washington rushed to declare that it was the start of another hostage crisis. instead we worked directly with the iranian government and secured the release of our sailors in less than 24 hours. this brings me to a second major development. several americans unjustly detained by iran are finally coming home. in some cases these americans faced years of continued detention. and i've met with some of their families. i've seen their anguish. how they ache for their sons and husbands. iave these families my word. i made a vow that we would do everything in our power to win
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and we have been tireless. on the sidelines of the nuclear negotiations our diplomats at the highest level, including secretary kerry, used every meeting to push iran to release our americans. i did so myself in my conversation with president rouhani. after the nuclear deal was completed, the discussions between our governments accelerated. yesterday these families finally got the news they had been waiting for. in a reciprocal humanitarian gesture, six iranian americans and one iranian serving sentences or awaiting trial in the united states are granted clemency. these individuals were not charged with terrorism or violent offenses. they're civilians and their release is a one-time gels tour to iran given the unique opportunity offered by this moment and the larger circumstances at play. d it reflects our willingness to engage with iran to advance oumutual interests even as we
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the united states. so nuclear deal, implemented. american families, reunited. the third piece of this work that we gotone this weekend involved t t united states and iran resolving a financial dispute that dated back more th three decades. of course, even as we implement the nuclear deal and welcome our americans home, we recognize that there remain profound differencecebetween the united statat and iran. we remain steadfast in opposing iran's destabilizing behavior elsewhere, including its threats against israel and our gulf partners and its support for violent proxies in places like syria and yemen. we still have sanctions on iran for its violations of human rights, for its support of terrorism, and for its balalstic missile program.
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these sanctions vigorously. iran's recent missile test, for example, was a violation of its international obligations. and as a result, the united states is imposing sanctions on individuals and companies working to advance iran's ballistic missile program. and we are going to remain vigilant about it. we're not going to waver in defense of our security or that of our allies and partners. but i do want to once again speak directly to the iranian people. yours is a great civilization with a vibe brant culture that has so much to contribute to the world. in commerce in science, in arts. for decades your government's threats and actions to destabilize your region have isolated iran from much of the world. and now our governments are talking with one another. following the nuclear deal, you, especially young iranians, have the opportunity to begin buiding new ties with the
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a new path, a dferent, better future that delivers progress for both our peoples and the wider world. that's the opportunity before the iranian people. we need to take advantage of that. so my fellow americans, today we're united in welcoming home sons and husbands and brothers who in lonely prison cells have endured an absolute nightmare. but they never gave in and they never gave up. at long last they can stand tall and breathe deep the fresh air of freedom. as a nation, we face real challenges. around the world and here at home. many of them will not be resolved quickly or easily. but today's progress, americans coming home, an iran that has rolled back its nuclear program and accepted unprecedented monitoring of that program, these things are a reminder of what we can achieve when we lead with strength and with wisdom.
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paris is known as the city of light. over the weekend london made a strong claim to that title. here's jonathan vigliotti. >> reporter: as night fell, london transformed into a spectacle of light. westminster abbey dazzled in a kaleidoscope offcolor, bringngg ancient carvings to life. in st. james square, perched performers looked like sparkling gargoyles. others dangling precariously overhead from wires. in mayfair an iconic red phone booth turned into a home for goldfish. this weekend the capital is a cathedrallor the absurd and otherworldly. equal parts alice in wonderland and "avatar." all of it the wild imagination of a group of artists with lumiere london, the city's first festival of light. for four days streets, buildings and statute ewes become a canvas for light installations, videos
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janet ekelman chose oxford circus as her canvas. >> london is the most kinetic international hub in the world. we're standing in oxford circuit which is the busiest pedestrian spot in all of london. >> reporter: the audience did turn out, fighting back the winter chill to bask in the glow. >> we're privileged to be allowed to play in all the great iconic places in central london. and it provides us with a giant gallery, if you like. a huge outdoor gallery which allows as many people as possible to enjoy this incredible work. >> reporter: art installations light up 30 different locations across the city. projected images turn king's cross station into a performing circus of light. londoners can create their own vision using the light on their phone to change the colors in the light graffiti installation. the event was designed as an antidote of sorts to the post-holiday blues and is the first major light show in the
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international festivals like vivid sydney, berlin's festival of lights, and fetch de lumie in france. >> i hope people go away with a new sense of london, its vibrancy vibrancy, its ability to transform itself in a remarkable way. >> reporter: the spectacular embarrassed by a prostate exam? imagine how your doctor feels. as a urologist, i have performed 9,421 and a half proste exams. so why do i do it? because i get paid. und... on this side of the glove i know prostate exams can save lives. so, if you are a man over 50, talk to you doctor to see if a prostate exam is right for you. if we can do it, so can you.
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there may be no greater love than the love at the heart of this next story. steve hartman found it "on the road." >> reporter: officer ryan davis is returning to the scene of the crime. reluctantly. >> it's getting very difficult right now. >> reporter: last weekend he and his partner were investigating an alarm at this grocery store in canton, ohio. it was the middle of the night. >> 1:49 a.m. >> reporter: there were signs of a break-in. >> we just started working our way through the grocery store. >> 1272 harrison, there's an alarm.
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off. >> 10-4. >> shots fired, shots fired! my partner's been shot. >> reporter: ryan's partner was a german shepherd named jethro. he was more than just a police dog. the davis family got jethro at 8 weeks. he grew up as both a family pet and a k-9 officer. every day seamlessly transitioning from pillow to police work and back again. until last weekend. when he charged at that burglar and took three bullets. >> i'm here because he did what he did. >> reporter: ryan says the dog saved his life. but remarkably, he says he wishes it was the other way around. >> i would trade places with him in a heartbeat. >> do you mean that? >> absolutely. because i wouldn't have to sit here and suffer over the loss of him. he's left a hole that will never
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he gave e s life for me. amazing grace >> reporter: it's hard to imagine owing such a debt with no way to pay it back. but this week the city of canton tried. they filled their civic center, invited police officers from across the country, and honored jethro on what would have been his 3rd birthday. as flr the killer, pice do have a suspect in custody. but that's of little consolation to ryan, who says the only thing that will make this better is making certain his partner is never forgotten. >> so how do you want him remembered? >> the one word that comes to mind is, unconditional. he was unconditionally loyal, loving, supportive. he was a hero. >> reporter: he was a hero. as is any officer who can be
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steve hartman, on the road in canton, ohio. >> that is the overnight news for this sunday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." one big step closer to home. americans freed from iran arrive in germany to be reunited with their families. an american killed in south africa, the story of another's harrowing escape. in south carolina presidential candidates clinton, sanders and o'mally face off tonight. global markets sink further as wall street prepares for another queasy week. >> heavenly harmony. monks bring music back to a centuries life old monastery while tapping into something very special.
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trust me. >> this is the cbs overnight news. >> welcome to the overnight news, i'm jeff glor. three americans released by iran are now in germany. president obama said this weekend's prisoner swap with iran was a victory for american diplomacy. fourth american was freed as part of the exchange but was not on the same plane with the others. a fifth american, a student, was released separately. following the exchange the united states and five other world powers lifted economic sanctions on iran and freed billions in frozen assets. implementing the landmark nuclear deal reached last july. we begin with elizabeth palmer in landstuhl, germany. >> reportete arriving in geneva a on a swiss air force plane late today the three americans were safe at last. here's jason rezaian, reporter for "the washington post," shaking hands with the state department's brett mcgirk.
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release. rezaian was arrested charged with spying. pastor saeed abedini, arrested in 2012, alleged to have organized underground christian churches in iran. amir hekmati, former u.s. marine, picked up in 2011 while visiting his grandmother, and charged with espionage. cbs' adriana diaz caught up with hekmati's sister in detroit as she was boarding a plane to be reunited with her brother. >> i'm in a fog. this is like surreal. i am still in disbelief. and honestly, everything just happened so quickly that i don't think it will hit me until i am hugging him. >> reporter: all three americans were released from t tran's infamous prison after 14 months of top-secret diplomatic bargaining that started on the sidelines of the nuclear talks. today president obama waited until the americans were out of iranian air space before
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>> today we're united in weweoming home sons and husbands and brothers who in lonely prison cells have endured an absolute nightmare. >> reporter: also free are baro mechanic and kasaro, two of the seven prisoners the u.s. released from its jails as part of the swap. all were accused of selling technology to iran in violation of american sanctions. finally, there's a mystery manan the fourth american prisoner who was released along with the others but appartly stayed in iran. all we know is his name, nosratoliah khoshawi. the three other americans will spend their first night of freedom at the landstuhl military hospitatain germany, which has long offered a warm welcome and medical care to u.s. hostages and prisoners on their way home. as you saw some members of hekmati's family are on the way to germany right now. jason rez zayian's family is
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the hospital will offer them refuge so they y n reconnect with both peace and privacy. >> liz palmer, thank you very much. from the white house to the campaign trail the prisoner swap is getting mixed reviews. here's julianna goldman. >> this is a good day. >> reporter: speaking just hours after the american prisoners began their journey home, president obama hailed their release as a result of smart and disciplined diplomacy. >> the united ststes has never en afraid to pursue plomacy with our adversaries. as president i decided a strong, confident america could advance our national security by engage engaging directly with the iranian government. we've seen the results. >> reporter: his remarks stand in stark contrast to republican presidential candidates who today argued that negotiating with iran makes the u.s. less whether it's over the release of american civilians -- >> this should have happened years ago. we're giving them $150 billion, this shouldn't be happening now. >> reporter: american sailors --
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but only after achieving what they wanted, that is to prove if they wanted to, they can grab american sailors and subject them to mistreatment. >> reporter: or a deal to curb iran's nuclear program. >> it reflects a pattern we've seen in the obama administration over and over again of negotiating with terrorists. and making deals and trades that endanger u.s. safety and security. >> reporter: democratic presidential candidate and former secretary of state hillary clinton said talking to iran makes the world a safer place. >> this is the kind of smart diplomacy i was proud to be a part of in the first administration of president obama that we're just going to have to be persistent with. >> reporter: the president said profound differences remain between the u.s. and iran and the administration today announced new penalties on 11 individuals and entities involved in tehran's ballistic missile program. most iranians would never feel those sanctions and they're tiny compared to the $100 billion in frozen funds it released with
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>> julianna, thank you. the lifting of sanctions will bring millions of gallons of iranian oil into an already flooded market. the price of crude fell below $30 friday to a 12-year low. the dow dropped another 390 points. for more on all of this our business analyst jill schlessinger joins us. first iran, what's the immediate impacts now? >> they are already pumping and bringing oil to market. it is expected that there will be 300,000 to 500,000 barrels a day from iran. that's on top of the 1 million barrels right now that is in surplus. more oil than we need. that's why crude oil is down so dramatically. down 10.5% this year. that comes after 30% last year, 46% the year before. >> meaning cheaper gas prices but also a lot of questions. middle eastern markets plunged overnight. american markets had a terrible week last week. are closed on monday but reopen on tuesday.
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what are we expecting? >> we're going to have a lot more volatility and the big question is whether this 10% down correction turns into a full-blown bear market. that's a 20% slide. we haven't been in a bear market in seven years. it's a long time. some parts of the market already in a bear market. the small companies, the transportation index. so what are investors looking for? they're looking for data to confirm, is the world slowing down? is that impacting the united states? is that impacting earnings of corporate america? we don't know yet but what we do know is that with the world in turmoil, hang on, it is going to be a bumpy ride. >> even though the fundamentals are still generally good for the u.s. economy? >> so far, so good. but again, this can be more emotional than data-based. we have to remember that markets are usually rational over the long-term, short-term, not so much. >> when people are scared they sell s sred. >> indeed. >> thanks, jill. we are learning that three american contractors are missing in iraq. reportedly abducted by a militia. a state department source tells cbs news the u.s. embassy in
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week that an iranian-backed militia wanted to abduct an american contractor. almost sixty million americans are affected by mental illness. together we can help them with three simple words. my name is chris noth and i will listen. from maine to maui, thousands of high school students across the country are getting in on the action by volunteering in their comomnities. chririyoung: action teams of high scscol students are joining volunteers of america and major league baseball players to help train and inspire the next generation of volunteers. carlos pea: it's easy to start an action team at your school
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from the nra. i was -- in 1988, there were three candidates running for congress in the state of vermont. i stood up to the gun lobby and came out and maintained the position that in this country, we should not be selling military-style assault weapons. and i think it should be a federal crime if people act as strawmen. we have seen in this city a horrendous tragedy. of a crazed person praying with people, then coming out and shooting nine people. this should not be a political issue. what we should be doing is working together. and by the way, as a senator from a rural state that has virtually no gun control, i believe that i am in an excellent position to bring people together to fight for gun legislation -- >> you didn't answer the question that you did change your position on immunity for gun manufacturers so can you
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>> what i have said is that the gun manufacturers liability bill had some good provisions. among other things we prohibited ammunition that would have killed cops who had protection on. we had child safety protection on guns in that legislation. and what we also said is that a small mom and pop gun shop who sells a gun legally to somebody should not be held liable if somebody does something terrible with that gun. so what i said is i would relook at it. we are going to relook at it. and i will support stronger provisions. >> secretary clinton, would you like to respond to senator sanders? >> yes. look, i have made it clear based on senator sanders' own record that he has voted with the nra, with the gun lobob, numerous times. he voted against the brady bill five times. he voted for what we call the charleston loophole. he voted for immunity from
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nra said was the most important piece of gun legislation in 20 years. he voted to let guns go onto amtrak, , ns go into national parks. he voted against doing research to figure out how we can save lives. let's not forget what this is about. 90 people a day die from gun violence in our country. that's 33,000 people a year. one of the most horrific examples not a block from here, where we had nine people murdered. now, i am pleased to hear that senator sanders has reversed his position on immunity and i look forward to him joining with those members of congress who have already introroced legislation. there is no other industry in america that was given the total pass that the gunmakers and
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be reversed. at least two people were killed by tornados overnight in central florida. the couple was killed in manatee county when their mobile home was hit. another tornado in the beach town of siesta key caused widespread destruction leaving 17,000 without power. the search continues for 12 marines after two helicopters collided off hawaii. three days after the crash, hope of finding survivors is fading. here's maria villarreal. >> reporter: rough seas, waves up to 20 feet high, are hampering search efforts. overnight a coast guard air crew had to briefly change course when a laser was pointed at them. searchers have scoured nearly 14,000 square miles off the north shore of oahu looking for any trace of the missing marines somewhere in these waters. they've found small amounts of debris, says lieutenant scott carr. >> i know a lot of people focus on debris but we're focused on hopefully finding survivors. >> reporter: the marines have
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board. the oldest, 41. the youngest, just 21. last night, hundreds packed a high s sool field in statin,n, oregon, where 21-year-old lance e corporal ty hart attended. >> it gives you goosebumps, like you're on this field for a game. just as many people are out here right now showing support. who knows how many of these people know him directly. >> reporter: major sean campbell from college station, texas, has a wife and four children. the family of captain kevin roche of st. louis writes, we believe the marines and coast guard are doing everything they can to bring kevin and his fellow marines home safely. all 12 remain the target of a desperate search. maria villarreal, cbs news, los angeles. still ahead, an american reveals how he survived a deadly terror attack in africa. and a flower rooted in space for
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tonight we're learning more about the victims and survivors of a terror attack in west africa. at least 28 people were killed on friday when gunmen opened fire at a hotel and cafe in the nation of burkina faso. here's jonathan vigliotti. >> reporter: as secucuty forces surrounded the splendid hotel and neighboring cappuccino cafe,
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amy riddering tried desperately to reach her husband mike. he was at the cafe when the assault began friday night. i still have no news about mike, she wrote on her facebook page saturday morning, as military forces were still trying to regain control. florida native mike riddering moved with amy and their two daughters to burkina faso in 2011 to start an orphanage. mike and a pastor were at the cafe in the country's capital ouagadougou to meet new volunteers. the pastor called amy after escaping. gunmen came into the restaurant shooting and everyone ran to hide. the pastor somehow had mike's phone and called, wrote amy. it was still unclear if mike survived. another american, edward bunker, emerged from his room to a deserted hotel lobby. >> there was someone with a gun going down thetreet. and this was really the moment when i kind of realized that
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>> reporter: the 12-hour siege began when heavily armed al qaeda militants, two of them women, stormed the buildings and set off car bombs. in all, 28 people were killed, including a canadian family of four who were on a humanitarian trip. 11 americans, including edward bunker, made it out alive. mike riddering did not. you left quite a legacy here, i can only imagine the adventures you're having now, wrote amy's final post. jonathan vigliotti, cbs news, london. up next, candidates court
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voting bloc. less than ten months to election day, some presidential can dates are seeking support from the nation's fastest-growing voting bloc. here's carter evans. >> reporter: when hillary clinton held this rally in san gabriel, california, home to the country's largest asian-american community, she also launched a campaign to target what may be a key vote in november. >> i'm very proud to have so many asian-americans and pacific islanders working with me. >> reporter: they are the country's fastest-growing political constituency whose registered voters doubled to. 4 million between the 2008 and 2012 elections. >> we've gone from being marginalized to becoming the margin of victory.
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vote initiative is congresswoman judy chew who brought in supporters from around the country. >> certain states will have a huge effect on the outcome of the presidential election, such as nevada, such as virginia. >> you're from? >> las vegas, nevada. >> we have votes. we know how to deliver those votes. >> reporter: shakir, a banker, points to the 2014 senate election in his state, virginia. >> thank you, virginia! >> reporter: where asian-american voters made the difference for democrat mark warner, who won by less than 1% of the vote. >> republicans used to enjoy the majority of asian-american support back in the 1990s. >> reporter: university of california professor kartha runs the nonpartisan asian-american survey which shows a political shift after the 1992 election when 31% of asian-americans voted for democrat bill clinton. by 2012, 73% voted for brady barack obama. >> what changed? >> one is the clintons. this is where hillary clinton
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from what she and her husband did in the 1990s in terms of doing outreach to these populations. another part that's changed is the republican party's rhetoric on immigration has turned off a lot of voters. >> we are a country built by the hard work of generations of immigrants. and we are stronger because of our diversity and our openness. >> reporter: something asian-americans like to hear, because nearly two-thirds of their population was born outside the u.s. carter evans, cbs news, san gabrbrl, california. still ahead, every
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fun as this. david bowie's last album is now his first number one album in the u.s. one week after bowie's death "black star" debuted on totothe billbobod 200 today. the album was released two days before bowie died. spacex launched a new satellite into space after california today. the jason 3, a weather satellite monitoring el nino conditions, lifted into the stratosphere using the company's falcon 9 rocket. the hope was to land the falcon 9 on a barge in the pacific. thatatid not work. the landing was too hard. a beautiful breakthrough on the international space station, the first flower ever grown in space. it's an orange zinnia chosen because it's pretty and edible. astronauts taste tested lettuce grown on the space station last year and say it was pretty good. presidential ambitions on display in washington today at mascot tryouts for the nationals
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here they are. candidates had to literally run for the job. challenging enough as you can see. they also had to do a freestyle dance routine. the winners will run a presidential race during every nationals home game. coming up, meet the monks who are selling a lot of albums and beer. woman: what does it feel like when a woman is having a heart attack? chest pain, like there's a ton of weight on your chest. severe shortness of breath. unexplained nausea. cold sweats. there's an unusual tiredness and fatigue. there's unfamiliar dizziness or light-headedness. unusual pain in your back, neck,k, jaw, one or both arms, even your upper stomach, are signs you're having a heart attack. don't make excuses. make the call to 9-1-1 immediately. learn more at womenshealth.gov/heartattack. while i was on a combat patrol in baqubah, iraq, a rocket-propelled grenade took my arm off at the shoulder. i was discharged from the army, and i've been workrkg with the wounded warrior project since 2007.
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to be with the wounded warrior project. we do have a lot of guys that have post-traumatic stress disorder. being able to share your story, i guess it kind of helps you wrap your mind around what did happen over there. my name is norbie, and yes, i do suffererrom post-traumatic stress disorder,
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we close tonight at a centuries-old monastery in italy where american monks are making heavenly harmonies as they tap into history. >> reporter: close your eyes and you could be back in the 11th century. that's when the chants were written and when st. augustine founded the benedictine order of monks in this basilica. father folsom, graduate of the indiana school of music, came here in 2000 with the simple aim of rejuvenating the monastery
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life. >> if monks come, candidates come and they don't sing or think they can't sing, we give them voice lessons because it's so much part of our life. if you can't sing you're going to be pretty bored here, i think. >> reporter: the voice lessons are so good that a music company asked them to cut a cd. it ended up at the top of billboard's classical charts. the recording sessions had to be slotted into a daily schedule of work and prayers that start at 3:45 in the morning. the monk on the album cover, connecticut-born father benedict nivikof, figured it would have less than limited appeal. >> music and beer can get where words often can't. >> they're both good for the soul? >> good for the soul, especially the beer. >> reporter: it turns out that beer is another monastic specialty that has roots in medieval times. brother francis, the brewmaster from dallas, says ancient brewing was a kind of public health service because the
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dirty water. >> it's really an act of creation, just like god. all things god may be glorified is one of the mottos in the benedictine order. >> reporter: the monks brew and sell a blond beer that's 6% alcohol and a dark version that's 10%. >> we don't want it watery, we don't want it light. it's something that grabs your attention. >> reporter: it certainly does that. if you thought the music was divine divine, you should try the beer, trust me. and given the quality of the music, that's saying something. the legacy of st. augustine and his monks, two wonderful ways to soothe the soul. >> cheers. >> that is the overnight news for this sunday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning."
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york city, i'm jeff glor. captioning funded by cbs it's monday, january 18th, 2016. this is the "cbs morning news." the u.s. swap prisoners with iran and then impose new sanctions that iran says has no moral or legal illegitimacy. the gloves are off.
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