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tv   Full Measure With Sharyl Attkisson  CBS  January 24, 2016 10:30pm-11:00pm CST

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surgeries, and overcoming so many odds, i'm just so very grateful. it took a village." the months have been grueling the hours spent waiting and praying prayers mom believes paid off.ajshay expects her daughter will continue to do amazing things with each passing day.ajshay"i'm so proud of her, it's not about me, it's not about us, it's all about her, and just the racle that she is." 3 still ahead on siouxland news, kayla's got sports highlights in tonight's games...we'll be right back. 3 hello. i'm mark 3 hyman.just recently, it was learned the white house directed the national security agency to spy on israeli leader benjamin netanyahu.no one should react with shock and alarm. most nations spy on each other. even friendlies. it's how businessis done. but generally, the very closest of allies don't spy on one another. for example, the us, . . . uk . . . and canada collaborate on espionage operations.however, the us and israel spy on each other. and then there's france. it spies
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and so forth.the bigger shock was that nsa ininuded its intelligence haul netanyahu's private communications with members of congress 3 and american citizens.this isn't just ungentlemanly. or simply a violation of the separation of the legislative and executive branches. it's unconstitutional. it's illegal. federal law explicitlylyforbids the government from spying on its citizens. no president has the authority to waive the law. the constitution requires the president to enforce the law. the other troubling aspect is the reaction of many members of congress. they're comfortable with nsa conducting widespread collection of citizen communications. but they're outraged upon n learning they've been spied upon.these politicians aren't loyal to the constitution. they're okay
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violations of federal law. just as long as they're exempt
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s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s ps s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s 3 3 3 number 9 iowa has been unstoppable with 8 straight wins and today they go for the ninth... against number 22 purdue...its first half... purdue leading 31 30.... vince edwards drives for lay-up.. extending that lead d - 30... iowa trails at the end of the half 35-33in the second jarod uthoff gets iowa back in the game with the pass to mike gesell for the 3 pointer.... 38-35 iowa .. later uthoff drives and throws it down with the left hand.... 47-39 iowa
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steal...takes it all the way for the lay-up and the foul... he misses free throw... but iowa didn't need it for this comeback win... 83-71 3 now for some nfl.... its the 17th time in their storied careers, peyton manning and tom brady face offas the patriots and broncos look for the super bowl0!!!!2nd quarter.... after brady threw an interception...the broncos convert it to points as manning finds daniels for the 12-yard touchdown14-6 broncosthen 4th quarter.... with just over 90 seconds to play...on 4th & 10, brady going deep for the patriots' b gronkowski and he hauls it in for the 40-yard gain......now 17 seconds left, patriots now with 4th & goal and brady finds gronkowski for the 4-yard touchdown...20-18 broncosso the patriots go for the 2 point conversion.... brady throws over the middle and its deflected and intercepted by the broncos' bradley roby...final score
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are going to the super bowl 3 now lets find who they will play as heisn trophy winning quarterbacks square off...the panthers' cam newton and the cardinals' carson palmer...for the first time in nfl history ..1st quarter..newton fakes the handoff, then he flips it to the panthers' ted ginn on the reverse...ginn breaks a tackle, then cuts back and takes it across the field and into theendzone for the 22-yard touchdown.n.panthers lead 10 to nothing....later... panthers 3rd & 8 on their own 14...newton back to pass and rifles one down the middleto the panthers' corey brown who breaks a tackle and brown will take it 86-yardsfor the touchdown...cardinals have yet to score... its 17 nothing.. 2nd quarter now....cardinals finally showing some life as david johnson powers up the middle forthe 1-yard touchdown...finally on the board.. 17 7 panthers.... cardinals just continue with
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down the cardinals defense.. to win it 49 to 15... the panthers are joining the broncos in the superbowl 50. 3 3 3
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3 3 3 winter weather advisories go into effect tonight through tomorrow evening for southern
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sharyl: hello. i'm sharyl attkisson. welcome to "full measure." today we begin with a story of charity and excess. there are more than 1.5 million nonprofits or public charities in the u.s. in 2013 they report a collective $1.74 trillion in revenue and $3 trillion in assets. you don't have to pay normal taxes. the i.r.s. exempts them because of the public good they do. but for some nonprofits, it appears charity bebens at home. with big executive salaries that seem belie the altruistic nature of their mission. in 2012, roger goodell earned a handsome $44 million as commissioner of what was one of the most unlikely nonprofits around. the nfl. >> it was almost laughable that the nfl wawastructured, its corporate offices as a not for profit organization. sharyl: congressman jason chaffetz heads the house oversight committee. he says the irs exempts the
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from income taxes because of their philanthroanpic missions. not to pad executives' fat salaries. why do you think these groups thth want to pay executives so much, or feel that they need to, structure themselves as non-profits? rep. chaffetz: oh, it can save them millions. untold millionons of dollars are saved and not paid into the federal treasury by structuring as a not for profit organization. i think a lot of people would be surprised by how much money the executives are bringing home putting in their own pocket. sharyl: experts estimate the nfl's non-n-ofit status cost taxpayers over $15 million in lost tax revenue its most recent tax filing year, $100 million in the past decade. chaffetz raised the issue of -- >> dour away the testimony -- chaffetz raised the issue of exorbitant nonprofit salaries last september at a fifiy heheing into controversies over planned parenthood: a nonprofit women's health and abortion provider. cecile richards is the group's
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in 2013, your compensation went up some $240,000. compensation baseline we're showing based on tax returns is $590,000. correct? cecile richardrd that's not my annual compensation. actually my annual compensation is $520,000 a year sharyl: it's not just planned parenthood and the nfl. there are eyebrow-raising salaries in nearly every sector of the nonprofit universe. the humane society's ceo wayne pacelle can "put on the dog" with income upwards of $400,000 in 2013.3. american civil liberties union ceo anthony romero earnea very civilized $497,000. franklin graham, ceo of f the christian aid group samaritan's purse and son of evangelist preacher billy graham received a divine $880,000 for his wallet. in 2012, goodwill's then-president john miller pulled in a bountiful $3.5
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compensationn and in higher education, u.s. public college presidents averaged salaries of $428,000 last year. what about public universities and colleges? are there similar concerns with thosos rep. chaffetz: when the american taxpayers are having to subsidize and fund these organizations, at the same time parents are struggling, myself included, i've got two in college, to pay these high tuition rates, why should the university be making millions of dollars? sharyl: in a class of his own: ohio state university outgoing president gordon gee, whwho chalked up $6 million in compensation in 2013, the year he departed. when it comes to health care nonprofits: kaiser health plan has 20 executives who make over a million dollars. chairman george halvorson took in a healthy $10 million in 2013. and half thehebamacare nonprofit co-op insurers, including the louisiana health cooperative, are going belly
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salaries are farrom anemic. the louisiana co-op managed to find $1.3 million for interim ceo terry shilling in 2013. various nonprofits have argued they mususpay big salaries to "attract top-notch talent" to "stay profitable" and "preserve management stability" nonprofit quarterly says salaries less than average might leave an organization "concerned about attracting and retaining the highly skilled and motivated staff members needed to achieve the goals." but chaffetz argues there's no bigger job t tn managing the coununy. so he has a bold new idea -- nonprofit executives shouldn't have a bigger salary than the president of the united states -- $400,000 a year. what if they say we're gonna get far less talent if we start limiting our salaries? rep. chaffetz: if you can be the president of the united states, managing a $3.9 trillion dollar budget and all the headaches s at goes with it, for $400,000 a year,o can
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organizations. sharyl: at that planned parenthood hearing, democrat elijah cummings said for profit companies also get tax break, even those convicted of crimes, and called republican criticism of nonprofits hypocritical. rep cummings: these are hugege companies thth are actually guilty of breaking the law and their ceos make millions of dollars. republicans never criticize the salaries of their ceos. republicans targeted planned parenthood which provides essential high quality care to millions of american women more aggressisily than all these companies combined! sharylz but there's at least one case of outrageous pay where many democrats and republicans see eye to eye: the mortgage loan firms fannie mae and freddie mac. in july, mel watt, who heads the federal agency overseeing them, approved a scandalous hike for ceos timothy
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layton. they were making $600,000 apiece. their raise? 650% to $4 million each. congress moved quickly to block the increase. rep. chaffetz: if you want to change your structure and be a for profit organization, make all you want. i'm not trying to dictate this. i'm just saying if you're taking the advantage of the subsidy that comes from being a not for profit, then you're not necessarily going to bring home a seven figure paycheck. sharyl: tired of all the criticism, the nfl gave up its nonprofit status last april after 73 years. they'll lose millions in tax benefits. but theyon't have to publicly sclose goodell's big salary, anymore. the week of thanksgiving, president obama signed the bill into law suspending the controversial compensation packages for nonprofits fannie mae and freddie mac. those ceo's are rolled back from millions to $600,000 a year.
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more than the president makes. still ahead on "full measure," billions of dollars have been released to iran. some fear it will be spent to both support terrorism and fuel a growing fight among arab states. and, we'll visit the only state capital in the u.s. to file for bankrurucy. what brought down harrisburg
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across america. aryl: in the last few weeks a
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involving the u.s. and iran. u.s. sailors captured and released. u.s. hostages,ome held for years, also released. nuclear guidelines met and sanctions ended. iran has emerged as a new entity free to engage in world trade and with around a hundred billion dollars released by y e u.s.s. the questiti is, does giving that kind of money to the world's largest state sponsor of terrorism make the u.s. and world safer or more dangerous? we spoke with juan zarate, a terror financing expert and senior aisor at the center for strategic & international studies. he was deputy national security advisor during the george w. bush administration and is authorf "treasury's war: the unleashing of a new erera of financial warfare." i looked on the state department website and iran is still listed as the largest state sponsor of terrorism in the world. in the u.s. view. isn't there some concern that some of that money we're releasing can go saight into e terrorism fununl? mr. zarata: it's a huge
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the fact that iran, the regime itself, which is unrepentant in its policies, and c certainly continues to support terrorist groups around the world, as well as regimes like t the assad regime in syria, will now have a windfall. this is an economic windfall. the world bank has said so. the iranians have said so. and they're going to o e that money to support theiei proxies. to s sport their allies. and we've already heard from hasan nisrala, hezbollah secretary general and president assad of syria, that they expect capital. they expect funding. they expect support from iran at this point. sharyl: in your personal viewpoint, what does that mean for us? mr. zarata: that meansnsot only have we taken theheilitary option off the table, we've taken on -- our most if i have economic pressure and financial measures off the table as well. we may designate certain individuals or entities here or there for other sanctions but we have now in this agreement
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-- reinjenthing the iranians into the financial system. sharyl: is there a downside to the hostages' release and in the regional for all this happening? mr. zarata: i think everyone is incredibly happy. and certainly pleased for the families of hostages that were returned. i think the problem, though, is the perceptiti that the ministration has now made it a practice of prisoner swaps or sws of hostages for other things that the hostage takers want. and though it seems to be an isolated case, it's now become a bit of a practice. you've had the bergdahl case and the cuban negotiations. you've -- you've had other instances with iran where the hostage takers are in essence rewarded and given something in return for what they're doing. and that has enormous policy implications and certainly creates incentives for regimes like iran or even north korea
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americans, if in fact they think they can getet something valuab in return. and it's not a surprise that the day that that prisoner swap happened, you had three americans taken hostage in baghdad. from what appears to be iranian-backed militias in that country. sharyl: the administration believes it's made a great deal and helped make the u.s. and world safer. and the analysis you give is a different picture. how could they be so opposite from one another? mr. zarata: well, i think everyone hopes that the deal is a positive step. and not only constraining the iranian nuclear program. but perhaps a window into a new relationship between the u.s. and iran. that's the great hope that this administration has had with this deal. that it's a cornerstone for the are a approachment -- raprochment or new relationship with iran. i don't see evidence that that is going to happen and i worry at what we've done to front load these benefits of this
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giving thengm so much of the capital back early, giving them so much say as to how this then progresses, given them a say as to how the regime actually unfolds on the ground doesn't do much to ensure our leverage long term. and at the end of the day, best case scenario, iran can simply have a patient path to a nuclear progogram that's more legitimate, that's better funded, with a regime that hasn't really changed but is more emboldened and enriched and able to disrupt u.s. interests around the world. that's where i have trouble with where we're headed with this deal. especially a time when iran seems more aggressive, more blagojevich rant and certainly -- more blagojevich rent and more willing to attack u.s. -- more belligerant and more willing to attack u.s. interests. sharyl: has the iranian deal made the u.s. safer? mr. zarata: this is not a moment where the iranian regime will transform itself and become a good citizen of the world.
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regime is seen as an openingg to the world to take advantage and enforce -- reinforce and strengthen the power of the regime. sharyl: who advised george w. bush says bush did not oppose making a deal with iran. the question is, will this particular deal succeed in making iran change its behavior? still to come on "full measure" we'll visit one citth may be a canary in a coal mine.
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s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s sharyl: some say the wolves of wall street are circling america's cities. they convince city leaders to use bonds to borrow what looks like easy money for projects. but the cities can end up in ch deep debt they go bankrupt. some of those e ties claim theye the victims and blame the wall street middlemen who make money on the whole deal.
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wjla has our story. chris: you believe wall street took advantage of the city? mayor papenfuse: i think there was no question wall street took advantage of the city. chris: eric c penfuse is the current mayor of harrisburg, pennsylvlvia. in 2011, he watched his city become the first and still only state capital in american history to file for bankruptcy. mayor papenfuse: nobody wanted to stop the gravy train because everyone was profiting off the borrowing. chris: harrisburg's troubles began with, of all things, a broken down incinerator. in 2003 long-time mayay stephen reed decided to borrow money to fix it, by issuing bonds. one way a city can borrow money is by selling bonds. so called muni-bonds are tax free and aractive to some investors. just like a mortgage, the city promises to pay the moneneback on a certain date, with interest. but harrisburg's incinerator burned far more money than trash as the city borrowed, and
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in eight years, the incinerator racked up nearly $400 million in debt, eight times the city's annual budget of $50 million. in 2011, harrisburg went belly up. attorney mark schwartz is a former bond attorney who represented harrisburg during its bankruptcy. mark schwartz: wall street is more liable than h harrisburg. that mayor didn't put a gun to anybody's head. chris: wall street banks make a lot of money on commissions when brokering bond deals between cities and investors. between 2003 and 2007, the harrisburg incineratororonds paid out $16 million in fees, with a big chunk going to wall street bankers, lawyers and consultants. for them harrisburg was a cash cow even as it was going bankrupt. mark schwartz: the motivation is you make a lot of money as an underwriter. i was in the municipal bond business as a bond lawyer and second a as an underwriter. you don't get paid to not do deals." chris: the art of the deal was
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film, "the wolf of wall street," where unscrupulous wall street brokers got filthy rich off the backs of investors. >> move the money from your kwlinets' pocket to your pocket. but make clients money at the same time it is advantageous to everyone, correct? mark schwartz: my clients were part-time councilmen and full-time grandmothers. what kind of financial sophistication is there? they're lucky if they can understand how their home mortgage works let alone the intricacies of the bond stuff. >> to make matters worse bonds issued by cities are not subject to strict federal oversight. making the industry according to schchrtz largely self-policed. >> wall street gets to keep its millions and the people of harrisburg have a broke city? >> yeah. absolutely. same as detroit. same as puerto rico. chris: puerto rico rang in the new year by defaulting on its debt payments. the u.s. territory is struggling with more than $72 billion in debt.
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