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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  January 25, 2016 2:00am-4:30am CST

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>> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the overnight news. i'm vinita nair. the monster blizzard that hit the east this weekend continues to claim lives. eight states and washington, d.c. some were in car accidents. others suffered heart attacks while shoveling. a growing number have died from carbon monoxide poisoning in their homes and cars. notable snow totals include 42 inches in glengary, west virginia and 26.8 inches in new york's central park, just a tenth of an inch short of the record. we have several reports on the cleanup, beginning in washington, d.c. w wh kris van cleave. >> reporter: the storm has stopped, and so has much othe nation's capital. there's no way a car could drive down side streets like this. snowed in cars and feet of snow block the way. pedestrians are still using main
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iced-over sidewalks. the airports are closed. so is d.c.'s metro. schools and the city government will be closed tomorrow. mayor muriel bowser. >> while we have made some progress, there is still a lot more to do. >> reporter: the city brought in 400 pieces of extra equipment to dig out and continues to receive help from the national guard to move first responders. 69-year-old raymond tollson is part of d.c.'s volunteer snow team. the city asked him to help shovel steps at the homes of two elderly neighbors. >> senior citizens can't get out here and walk in the snow like this. >> reporter: so he dug them out, then cleared the steps and sidewalks for eight more neighbors. you have to be the hero of the neighborhood. >> mm. i don't know. that's up to them totoecide. >> reporter: huge amountntof snow are being removed from freeways. in some areas suburbs are buried under more than three feet of snow. the airports are working around the clock to clear more th 1,000 miles of pavement make up the runways, taxiways, and
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so far the storm is responsible for more than 11,000 cancellations. chris polino i iwith washington's airports. >> the storm of this magnitude affecting sosoany airports across the country, it's going to take a while for the air travel system as a whole to get back to normal. >> reporter: in what's become a huge d.c. tradition, when the snow stops hundreds gather and the snowballs fly. >> who wouldn't come to a big snowball fight? >> reporter: d.c.'s snowfall total comes from reagan national airport. it recorded 17.8 inches of snow. but vinita, cbs news has learned the national weather service is launching an internal investigation over reports that it got the total wrong. the nearby national zoo recorded much more, 22.4 inches of snow, and we're just learning the federal government has decided to s sy closed again tomororw. >> kririvan cleave, thank you. well, new york got more than two feet of snow and is moving forward like it was little more than a dusting. here's jamie yuccas.
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dawn the shoveling started. by midday some started to move. >> what are you doing? >> going to work. >> reporter: just six hours after the snow stopped all major roads were cleared. broadway reopened and trains and buses are back in service. governor andrew cuomo lifted a travel ban at 7:00 this morning. >> we survived, and then some. >> reporter: about 300 accidents kept new york officers busy, but none were fatal. jfk k d laguardia are back pen after canceling almost 300 flights saturday and today. mayor bill de blasio. >> sanitation did an extraordinary job even though the storm came early and was obviously in some ways greater than anyone expected. >> reporter: there is still in queens they're still working >> even if people can get out they first have to find their and then they're going to have
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oh, my goodness. >> reporter: the mayor is asking people to keep their cars parked so plows can clear the roads. but kevin valdez says not one had touched his street by noon. >> what did you think yesterday when the snow started coming down two, three inches an hour? >> first i thought it was kind of beautiful. it looked d tistic. it w w kind of nice. but then i thought wow, the cleaning process is going to be a long process for me. >> reporter: but for the majority of new yorkers it was a good old-fashioned snow day. well, families had so much fun with all this snow in central park. the mayor says students are headededack to class tomorroro and vinita, more than 850 plows are still out, targesing the hardest-hit areas. >> jamie yuccas tonight. thank you. on the jersey shore, full
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flowing through the streets. jericka duncan is in wildwood, new jersey. >> repororr: the water in wildwood is so high in some places cars can't get through. >> this gets to be a real mess in here. >> reporter: mayor ernie troiano drove us through the neighborhoods hit the hardest. he says this storm's tides were higher than super storm sandy's. >> there's hundreds and hundreds of cars that were caught in these tides. >> reporter: marisa rigby returned today and found her car not working. >> we had beautiful snow for all of a few hours before it just became a river of icebergs. >> reporter: restaurant owner dave bannon spent sunday drying out. he says the water was up to a foot during the height of the storm. >> as you can see, the sign's gone. when i came in, the water was about up to here. >> reporter: at one point more than 18,000 customers lost power along the jersey shore. most shore towns saw minor to moderate flooding and new jersey governor chris christie said overall his state did well. regular workweek starting
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time. >> reporter: but for people in southern new jersey forced to trudge through flood waters the orm was another remimier of how vulnerable c cstal communities still are. >id he do better up there? because we didn't do so good down here. >> reporter: the mayor of wildwood says about 100 people were forced to evacuate from this neighborhood. he's hoping that by tomorrow, vinita, most of those people will be able to return home. >> jericka duncan, thank you.
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right back. almost sixty million americans are affected by mental illness. together we can help them with three simple words. my name is chris noth and i will listen. from maine to maui, thousands of high school students across the country are getting in on the action by volunteering in their communities. chris young: action teams of high school students are joining volunteers of america and major league baseball players to help train and inspire the next generation of volunteers. carlos pea: it's easy to start an action team at your school
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if you were a hippie in the '60s, you need to know. it's the dawning of the age of aquarius. yeah, and something else that's cool. what? osteoporosis is preventable. all: osteo's preventable? right on! if you dig your bones, protect them. all: cbs cares! well, now to the presidential race, which was dominated today by the talk of another name brand new york billionaire who may just in as an independent. here's julianna goldman. >> as of now he's just a private citizen who owns a big company. >> reporter: with michael bloomberg exploring a third-party bid, presidential candidates dismissed what would be the latest curveball in the 2016 race. >> if that takes place, i am confident that we will win it. >> reporter: the former new york
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he wants to run as a centrist. if the election comes down to donald trump or ted cruz versus bernie sanders. >> well, i'm going to relieve him of that and get the nomination so he doesn't have to. >> reporter: trump encouraged his fellow new yorker to get in. >> then i'm going to have to deal against hillary if she doesn't go to jail or i'm going to have to deal ainst bernie. or somebody. or bloomberg comes in, which would be great. i'd love to have him come in because i love the competition. >> reporter: with the caucuses just eight days away candidates blanketed iowa where trump and texas senator ted cruz are battling for conservative voters. the republican front-runner attended church on sunday and ntinued to raise questions ababt cruz's eligibilitytyo be president. >> he'll run for president. then he'll run for prime minister of canada. >> and so we have an opportunity once again to make america great again. >> reporter: over the weekend iowa senator charles grassley appeared at a rally with trump. while it wasn't an endorsement
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establishment is warming to the idea of trump as its nominee. even as he doubles down on yet another controversial comment. >> y said yesterday you could shoot someone on 5th avenue and wouldn't lose voters. is you're that confident, huh? >> well, i have a very great group of people, john. i have people that are so loyal. >> reporter: over the weekend the "des moines register" endorsed senator marco rubio and hillary clinton. it could give rubio a boost, but the endorsement is probably less influential than it once was in iowa. vinita, over the summer the paper's editorial board called for trump to get out of the race. didn't exactly hurt his poll numbers. >> julianna goldman, thank you. just over a weekekefore the iowa caucuses, a new cbs battlegroundndracker poll shows donald trump has regained his ad over ted cruz in n wa and now hahaa five-point lead. here with more on the pridential race is elections director anthony salvanto. what is behind trump's surge? >> he's made gains with key groups in iowa. evangelicals, tea party voters.
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existing support, which he's retained over this campaign better than any other candidate. his voters tell us they want two things -- shake up the system and fix the economy. and then almost 80% of iowans say they feel like trump just gets, it understands how they feel. that may be the kind of emotional connection that explains why the recent attacks on him just aren't working. >> well, the emotions and the numbers are two very different ththgs. so when you look at those numbers and the polls, do you see anything that could derail him? >> turnout is always a question. his voters do say, though, that they're strongly committed to him and ready to caucus. but he may have a hard time convincing those on the fence. people who aren't already with him largely say in the poll that they won't consider him. so his challenge is really to grow support beyond that base, vinita, as we get deeper into the primaries. >> on the democratic side right now hillary clinton is one point behind bernie sanders in iowa. what does she need to do? >> well, sanders has been making gains by trying to tie clinton to big donor money.
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over regular people. but her supporters see her as electable and her plans more realistic. i think that's the argument she'll continue to press in this final week. >> one of the big headlines today was certainly the possibility that formenew york city mayar michael bloomberg could be running, could be running as an independent. is that realistic, to run as an independent? >> it's a challenge for any independent candidate. remember, the presidency is won state by state and the hurdle is getting to 270. that candidate needs to win states that are reliably democratic or reliably republican. places like texas and california. it's not jususabout swinging the battlegrounds fromomhe middle, vinita. >> cbs news elections director anthony salvanto. anthony, thank you. >> thank you. a powerful earthquake rattled anchorage, alaska overnight. it was a magnitude 7.1 centered about 160 miles west of the city. one home near the epicenter was damaged by a gas explosion that followed the quake, but there are no r rorts of injuries. a community ininanada is in
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rare for that country. a teenager killed four people in the remote village of la loche, saskatchewan. with more details here's jonathan vigliotti. >> reporter: residents of la loche are doing something they've never done before. mourning a mass shooting. the e mote aboriginal community of 2,600 has long been known for its rampant drug abuse and long-standing poverty. until now the town has remained immune to american-style gun violence. on friday scenes once thought foreign shattered the already fragile town. it began at this house around noon. police say the 17-year-old attacker, whose e me is being withheld, shot open the front door and killed two teenage brothers. don herman is their uncle. >> it's hard. it's hard for me to talk about this right now. it's hard. >> reporter: the violence continued at the suspect's local high school, where he shot through the front door and opened fire.
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killed. canadian media identified 35-year-r-d teacher adam wood and 21-year-old educational assistant marie genvier as the two victims. kalisha janvier is marie's cousin. i walked past her, said hi. at was the last timeme gunman at the scscol. classmates described him as a silent guy who usually kept to himself. it's still unclear what fueled his attack. jonathan vigliotti, cbs news, london. an intense manhunt is under way for three escaped prisoners. officials reveal how they broke out. and an officer calls for
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the manhunt continues for three escaped inmates in southern california. they broke out of a maximum security jail in santa ana on friday. as mireya villarreal reports they are considered armed and dangerous. >> we will not stop ununl these individudus are back in our custody. reporter: authorities say jonathan tieu, bac duong, and hossein nayeri may have spent @ months plotting their daring escape from the orange county jail. sheriff sandra hutchins.
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sophisticated operation. >> reporter: the planning was meticulous, says sheriff lieutenant jeff halleck. >t seems that the inmates cut ththr way through half-inch steel bars, cut their way through the plumbing tunnels and ultimately gained access to an unsecured area of the roof. from the roof the inmates rappelled down to the ground. >> reporter: authorities say it's likely they used bed sheets and other clothing to fashion a makeshift roro. as to what tools they usededo escaca, how they got them m if they had help, all those questions got the same response. >> we are still looking into that. >> reporter: they're also look at whether a disturbance inside the jail just prior to the nightly head count may have been a ruse by other inmates to help the three men escape. and now, says sheriff hutchins, there's a more immediate concern. >> we have notified the victims some of these crimemeand the people that investigated thoho crimes to ensure that everybody who was involved in these cases is safe.
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believe they've left the country. they say tips have poured in but so far no confirmed sightings. mireya villarreal, cbs news, los angeles. up next, airlines are making
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passengers a break? can lower fuel price have airline profits soaring to record highs. for example, this past week united airlines reported profits of $4.5 billion for 2015. southwest airlines reported
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both airlines at least doubled what they y de in 2014. so does this mean ticket prices will come down? here is cbs news business analyst jill schlesinger with all answers. we all hopefully think they'll come down. is there a chance? >> think about this. the major airlines saved $46 year. of that gets passed along to the passengers. according to the transportation statistics bureau, we know that the average dodostic flight last ar, $385. that was down 2.8% from the year before. so a little bit. it seems pretty good, though, compared to the peak. 1999, the highest airfare inflation adjusted, 473 bucks. >> what about the little fees? we've all gotten so used to paying them. do you think t tse will come down? >> i think we'll continue to get nickelled and dimed unfortunutely. some of the numbers are pretty remarkable. we've got the six largest u.s. airlines making $18 billion in
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and that's a 19% increase from 2014. it's up 163% from 2010. now, globally all airlines make about t 9 billion from these ancillary revenue sources. so i don't think those fees are going away anytime soon. it's such an important component to the airline. >> with all that profit how are their stocks performing? >> amazingly. profits soaring. stocks not so much. the airline index down 23% from a year ago. investors fear that these regional airlines are trying to eat into the big guys' business and it could cause a price war. good news for consumers, though. go out and get yourself a cheap fare right now. >> all right. cbs news business analyst jill schlesinger. thank you so much. >> thanks. a pickup game in gainesville, florida had a surprise visitor this weekend. nba great shaquille o'neal. he showed up as a guest of local police after seeing a viral video of an officer who played with kids instead of yelling at them aftft a noise complaint.. the seven-foot big man was rusty but as you can see he still had some moves. still ahead, an officer who
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pick a new partner. woman: what does it feel like when a woman is having a heart attack? chest pain, like there's a ton of weight on your chest. severe shortness of breath. unexplained nausea. cold sweats. there's an unusual tiredness and fatigue. ere's unfamiliar dizziness or light-headedness. usual pain in your back, neck, jaw, one or both arms, even your upper stomach, are signs you're having a heart attack. don't make excuses. make the call to 9-1-1 immediately. learn more at womenshealth.gov/heartattack. while i was on a combat patrol in baqubah, iraq, a rocket-propelled grenade took my arm off at the shoulder. i was didiharged from the armymy and i've been working with
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warriors, you don't have to be severely wounded to be with the wounded warrior project. we do have a lot of guys that have post-traumatic stress disorder. being able to share your story, i guess it kind of helps you wrap your mind aund what did happen over there. my name is norbie, and yes, i do suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder,
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we close tonight in texas, where a policeman is trying to do the impossible. he is looking for a replacement for his best friend, a k-9 officer killed in the line of duty. here's contessa brewer. >> shots fired. shots fired. my partner's been shot. >> reporter: officer ryan davis was devastated. his k-9 jethro was shot three times and killed earlier this month responding to a burglary in canton, ohio. he talked about it to our steve hartman. >> he's left a hole that will
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he gave his life for me. >> reporter: the k-9 officer received a aull police funeral at the civic center on what would have been jethro's third birthday. despite the tragedy the work of the police goes on, and so it's time for officer davis to get a new partner. he's choosing among three candidates at this k-9 training center in houston.n. >> they go t tough a very intense seleleion testing. they have to pass certain things for us. >> reporter: it will be different. jethro came into the davis family as an 8-week-old puppy. and davis trained the k-9 for policework by day. by night he was a beloved family pet. the new k-9 is grown, fully trained, and doesn't understand english. so davis will spend the next few days in training himself,
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hungarian commands and working he was a hero. >> reporter: no matter how big for others check back with us a little later for the morning
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york city i'm vinita nair. this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the "overnight news." i'm vinita nair. tens of millions of americans who live along the eastern seaboard will spend much of this week digging out after the deadly blizzard of 2016. but the weather is not getting in the way of the presidential campaign. in just one week the people of iowa will cast votes in the first in the nation caucuses. the "des moines register" came out with its endorsements. hillary clinton is the paper's choice for the democrarac nomination, and marco rubio gets
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in the republican race our battleground tracker shows donald trump back on top in iowa with 39% of the vote. ted cruz is second with 34%, followed by marco rubio at 13%. in new hampshire trump has a big lead with 34%, compared to 16% for cruz and 14% f f rubio. and on to south carolina, where trump holds his biggest lead. he gets 40%. cruz is at 21% and rubio 13%. but one name that does not yet show up in the polls, former new york city mayor michael bloomberg. he is seriously considering a run as an independent. julianna goldman has more on that from washington. >> reporter: mike bloomberg feels this campaign has been dominated by the extremes in each party, and he wants to jump in if it@looks like the election is going to come down to donald trump or ted cruz versus bernie sanders. he's not ruling out running against hillary clinton if she emerges from iowa and new hampshire seriously wounded, but it's an even less likely scenario. bloomberg will do a round of polling after the new hampshire primary on february 9th, and
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the deadline for a final decision in early march. his advisers believe that would give him enough time to qualify as an independent and get on the ballot in all 50 states. the electoral map would be a huge challenge for him, but one area where he is okay, on the money front. he's indicated that he's prepared to spend at least $1 billion. how will a possible bloomberg run affect the race for the gop nomination? john dickerson spoke with front-runner donald trump for "face the nation." >> thanks for joining us. you said yesterday you could shoot someone on 5th avenue and wouldn't lose voters. you're that confident, huh? >> well, i have a very great group of people, john. i have people that are so loyal and it's been so reported. even in your poll. but in a lot of the polls they do that. the loyalty factor. and my factor's up, when you add it all up, it's pretty much close to 90%. these are people that just won't leave. they will not leave. i love my people. and it's a great thing. it's a great thing. far greater loyalty than any other candidate by double,
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and i love my people. >> and on the one hand you have your people, and then this week on the other hand you have the "national review" putting out a special issutrying to convince people not to support you, not to vote you. why do you think they did that? what was their reasoning, do you think? >> well, it's a failing magazine, number one. they need publicity. they are people that, you know, most of whom i don't know. most of whom -- don't forget, i've been in business. i've made a lot of money, which i'm going to do for the country now. i've been focused on jobs and money and deals. that's what i do. and that's what the country needs. these are people for the most part i don't know. i don't even know who most of them are. i don't want to know who most of them are. they're just people that are i guess trying to save a magazine that's close to closing up. they're going to get publicity. and i actually think it plays into what i'm saying because it shows the divisiveness. they backed romney, he lost. they backed mccain, he lost. they lose and they don't know how to win. and i'm not even sure they want to win.
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and they're very irrelevant. >> let me ask you about ted cruz. you said yesterday you wouldn't vote for ted cruz if he were the nominee. but you pledged to support the party's nononee. >> well, it depends on where he's from. in other words, he's got a problem. he -- in my opinion. i mean, it's looking more and more -- as you noticed, a number of very top constitutional lawyers have come and said he was born in canada. he didn't tell people. he said he didn't know about it until 15 months ago. he wasas canadian citizen. he was joint with the united states. but he was a canadian citizen until 15 months ago. he was a united states senator, i guess nobody figured this out, and he was a citizen of canada. and there are a lot of people now that are saying he was born in canada, he was born on canada's soil, on canadian soil, and he cannot run. and as you knono i guess you probably heard last night, illinois is looking at it very seriously. they might not even let him run
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they feel strongly about it. >> let me ask you about somebody else who's thinking about getting in the race. michael bloomberg. you said yesterday, "i love it," speaking about him getting in the race. why would you love it? >> well, i would love it. i know michael very well. i'd love to compete against michael. and i know him very well. and i think he might very well get in the race. and i would love to have him get in the race. >> one of the reasons -- >> he's very opposite on me with guns and he's opposite on pro life and he's opposite on a lot of things. so i would love to have michael get in the race. but i don't know if he's going to do it, but i hope he does. i would love to compete against michael. as for the democrats, iowa has tightened to a tossup. our battleground tracker shows bernie sanders is up over hillary clinton 47% to 46%. in new hampshire sanders has a comfortable lead, 57% to 38% for clinton. but in south carolina it's all clinton. she leads sanders 60% to 38%. sanders sat down with john dickerson for "face the nation." >> the cook political report looked at the rest of the states after iowa and new hampshire and found they didn't have as many
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states. so t question can you go the distance even if you win in iowa and new hampshire? >> well, john, let me just say that the poll in south carolina was 60-38. if that's the case, it is showing us making huge, huge gains. and i feel confident that if we can win here in iowa, if we can win in new hampshire, and those are going to be tough races, i think [e stand an excellent chance to win in south carolina and in nevada. but if you look at the polling recently, and i can tell you because i have been to south carolina. we have a lot of momentum on the ground. i think we're picking up more and more african-american support. frankly, i think we can win there. >> you have a new ad out this week which is you and the simon & garfunkel song "america." what does that ad mean for you? >> what that ad is about is to talk about the fact that as we come together as a country, and we have so much strength, so many extraordinary people, that
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there is nothing we cannot accomplish. we are the wealthiest country in the history of the world. we should not have massive levels of income and wealth inequality, the highest rate of childhood povertiy, the only country on earth that doesn't guarantee paid family and medical leave. and when we come together -- that is what it is. it's a beautiful song, and i think the photography is beautiful. let us stand together and tackle the real problems facing our nation, and we can accomplish enormous things. >> here's how bill clinton characterized your campaign. he said, "this other guy's madder than she is," referring to his wife, "and that feels authentic. and besides, his slogans are easier to say." your reaction. >> well, i am angry. and the american people are angry, john. people are angry because they don't understand why they have to work longer hours for lower
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and wealth is going to the top 1%. they are angry because their kids are leaving school $40,000 or $50,000 in debt. and they're angry because they are seeing the united states having a nation in which elderly people are trying to make it on $12,000, $13,000 a year on social security. people are asking why. the country is angry and i share that anger. >> the cbs overnight news will be right back. laundry can wreak havoc on our clothes, ruining t tm forever. sweaears stretch into muumuus. and pilled cardigans become pets. but it's not you, it's the laundry. protect your clothes from stretching, fading, and fuzz. ...with downy fabric conditioner... it not only softens and freshens, it helps protect clothes from the damage of the wash. so your favorite clothes stay your favorite clothes. downwnfabric conditioner. wash in the wow. when heartburn hits fight back fast tums smoothies starts dissolving the instant it touches your tongue
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hello! here's the keys. and, uh, go easy on my ride, mate. hm, wouldn't mind some of that beef wellington... to see how much you could save on car insurance, go to geico.com. ah! (car alarm sounds) it's ok! as president obama enters his final year in office, he is also looking back. lee cowan covered mr. obama's first run for the white house and sat down with the president for "sunday morning." >> it is such an extraordinary privilege to have this job. and look, there are times where you get tired. there are times where you're frustrated. >> you wonder why you did this? >> absolutely.
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that i he not walked into the oval office and understood that at no point in my life will i ever have the chance to do as much good and make as much of a difference in the lives of people as i do right now. and thatat precious. so i'm going to try to squeeze every last little bit of good work that i can while i still have the chance. >> if you're looking for the world's best cars and the workers who make those cars, you need to be in detroit, michigan! >> reporter: the presisint's visit to detroit, we are toured the north american international auto show this past week, came exactly a year to the day before his successor, whoever he or she may be, will move into the white house and the obamas will move out. >> so did they sell you on one of these things? >> i tell you what. this is a spiffy car. >> repororr: the president seems
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calendar. he joked that the reason he came here was to browse for a new car. after all, he'll soon have to say good-bye to the one he's been using, which is a far cry, by the way, from any car, let alone the one he used to drive. >> do you remember the first car you had? what did you have? >> the first car i drove was my grandfather's granada, which was not a shining moment for detroit. it was not a great car. >> not a great date car either. >> it was not cool. i had to compensate in my coolness given the fact that i was picking girls up in the granada. >> reporter: although he was all smiles, the trips had a serious message. >> i could not be prouder of this industry and the road that we've traveled together. >> reporter: mr. obama has been struggling to communicate his successes heading into his last year in office. and the u.s. auto industry is one example. both gm and chrysler had record sales last year.
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the result of the government bailout during the first year of his administration. >> we caot and we must not a we will not let our auto industry simply vanish. >> reporter: it wasn't a popular idea. critics thought the new president was ovovreaching, even cocky. but in hindsight, he says, that's just what the economic crisis demanded. >> i might have benefited from being young and a little brash and not being as scared as i probably should have been. there was probably some benefit to me thinking we can fix this. and we'll figureret out. >> reporter: by some measures mr. obama did figure it out. he's overseen shrinking unemployment, a growing job market. >> we are done. [ applause ] >> reporter: a reduction in the number of americans without
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and diplomatic breakthroughs on both climate policy and relations with cuba. but his foes say those gains have been overshadowed by the rise of isis, the trouble in syria -- >> active shooter situation is still under way. >> reporter: -- and terrorism at home. and what stands out even to his supporters has been his inability to be the unifying force that he had promised. >> the one thing that gnaws on me is the degree of continued polarization. this has gotten worse over the last several years. and i think that in those early months my expectation was that we could pull the partrts together a little more effectively. >> reporter: do you wish in hindsight that maybe campaigning on that notion of changing the tone in washington, do you wish you hadn't campaigned as hard on that promise? >> well, here's the thing. that's what the american people believe.
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>> i believe in change because i believe in you. the american people. and that's why i stand here as confident as i have ever been that the state of our union is strong. >> reporter: his final state of the union seemed an attempt to remind america that despite the exasperating negativity the last seven years has not been as dismal or dysfunctional or as racially divided as his critics maintain. >> hands up, don't shoot! >> when i hear people say, for example, in the aftermath of ferguson and some of the other cases that race relations have deteriorated, they're terrible, i have to say, well, maybe it's just because i'm getting older, but they're not worse than they were after the rodney king incident in l.a. and they're certainly not worse
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or the '60s. >> but we forget. if you could run for a third term, would you? >> no, i wouldn't. number one, michelle wouldn't let me. this is a great sacrifice and a great privilege, but it takes a toll on family life. this is a process in which the office should be continually renewed by new energy and new ideas and new insights. and although i think i am as good of a president as i have ever been right now, i also think there comes a point where you don't have fresh legs and that's when you start making mistakes or that's when you start thinking that you are what's important as opposed to the mission being more important. to say that things are a lot better now than they were when i came into office. and you know, that's a pretty
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a new exhibit at the natural history museum of london invites visitors to explore other worlds. the artist took raw data from nasa and the european space agency and transformed it t to the art of the solar system. jonathan vigliotti took a spin around the show. >> reporter: explosions in the sky light years away are coming into focus never seen before, from the very active volcanoes
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of saturn. they are spectacular interstellar aspects of our solar system usually reserved fofospace missions, now w display for all to see at london's natural history museum. american photographer and writer michael benson gave us a preview of his other worlds exhibition before opening it to the public. >> i'm quite proud of this one because saturn is just a show stopper. >> it is. >> and it's right at the end of the show. so i hope people will leave on a high note. >> reportete a show stopper not just for the unbelievable clarity and detail but also for the unusual process that gave benson an up close and personal glimpse of worlds often cloaked in mystery. each photo is actually a composite of a series of specialized images capturing different details. this series of photos are taken not by benson or any human for that matter but snapped by nasa spacecraft over the span of the
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>> that's part of the fun of it, of course. putting together a jigsaw puzzle of images. so typically you'll see an even more astonishing thing as you assemble it. >> reporter: it's a jigsaw puzzle that took benson years to complete. ththend result is an exhibit of 77 stunning composites. a perfect fusion of art and science. >> reporter: dr. joe makowsky is a scientist at the natural history museum. >> in a technical sense this is very clearly an art exhibition for the natural history museum. we hope that people who appreciate art will come here for that. we hope people whohoome here for science will be pleaeantly surprised by the art. >> reporter: and with all things art there is some interpretation. many of the original photos are received at nasa in black and white. benson uses historical and scientific data to determine the most accurate tones. >> sometimes i say oh, darn, i have to reprint this? >> reporter: benson's work is casting new light on space, much
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parks. >> obviously i didn't haul my box camera on a tripod to saturn, and i wish i had that possibility. >> reporter: as a kid benson grew up wanting to go to space. instead he's bringing the solar system back to earth. >> i think it's part of growing up as a species to recognize where we are in the universe. that's part of what i'm doing, you know, i think, is trying to bring the message. or with the help, a little bit of help from nasa and the european space agency. >> reporter: jonathan vigliotti, london. 2016 is still young, but already some of the biggest names s rock music have pasasd away. anthony mason sat down with rock and roll hall of famer graham nash to talk about the loss of two contemporaries. >> reporter: january's been a cold month for music lovers. the eagles' glenn frey suddenly gone.
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heartbreaking it was for their fans, imagine how it hit their fellow musicians. because who's next? >> reporter: talking with graham nash about another topic this shock of it. >> there was something particularly jarring about both i don't know what. unexpected. >> yeah. >> i mean, glenn was what, 67? >> yeah. >> wow. bowie's 69. >> are you feeling the clock any more after this month? >> i've been feeling the clock a lot in this last six months. teach your children well >> reporter: nash has had a 50-year career in music. hey, cherry ann starting with the hollies. are you thinking and then with crosby stills & nash. and young. >> i mean with all due respect, anthony, we have talked many times and you know my next birthday, in less than two weeks
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still feel like this kid in a candy store with this passion that i still have for communicating. it's amazing to me. and i'm just going to go right along with it until it, you know, comes to an end. look up here >> reporter: bowie's end, and just days after he released his latest album, "blackstar." but after a while glenn frey died just months after the eagles had wrapped up a two-year tour. >> it's really weird. i listen to cbs news a lot, you know, on the hour in my car. >> yep. >> and you hear, you know, co-founder of the eagles glenn frey died today and ba-daba-da-bada. and then i put myself in there, rock and roll hall of famer graham nash died today. and it will be gone and in five minutes it will all be over. it's kind of interesting. so what do you do with the time
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i think you owe it to yourself as an artist and as a human being to have the best time you can. >> yeah. >> as we face our future. >> right. don't even try >> reporter: artists hope their music lives forever. but rock stars don't. we've been reminded of that this month, when an eagle left us and a starman took to the heavens. and the stars look very different today when the engines failed on the plane i was flying, i knew what to do to save my passengers. but when my father sank into depression, i didn't know how to help him.
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steve hahaman stopped at a roadside restaurant and brought us back a story as sweet as honey. >> reporter: what makes tim's place restaurant in albuquerque, new mexico so special is that it is indeed tim's place. >> hello. how are you doing today? welcome to my place. >> reporter: tim harris was the first restaurant owner in the country with down syndrome. for the last five years he has lived for his business. which is why his customers were shococd when tim announceded rececely that he was closing. my customers cried a lot. into my arms.
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>> reporter: so what drives a man to give up a job he loves more than anything? >> oh, yeah. >> reporter: a girl he loves more than anything. >> i cannot wait. >> reporter: that blur in the "i"i love tim" t-shirt is tiffafa johnhnn. they met at a down syndrome convention. >> i was like oh, my god, he's like -- oh, my god. >> did you go up to him and say something? >> i was too scared to. >> too scared to? >> because i never met a guy like tim. >> reporter: tiffany says it was the weirdest feeling. >> i got hit by the love bug. >> r rorter: eventually titigot bit bybyt too. >> will you be my girlfriend? >> you know i will. yes. >> reporter: he made her his steady and decided to move to denver to be closer to her. tim plans to open a new restaurant there. but it's still going to be hard leaving what he knows. in fact, he cries every time he thinks about it.
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really sad. >> it's incredible to watch. he's deeply grieving about the idea of this transition. >> reporter: tim's father, keith. >> while at the same time being as excited as i've ever seen him about the possibility of being with tiffany. >> i'm lucky to have someone that loves me. >> every time i feel sad my girlfriend makes me a lot happier. >> i'm trying not to start crying. >> when you look her in the eye what do you see? >> i see love. i see joy. and i see that i have a future. >> reporter: why on earth do we call them disabled? >> i just love him. >> reporter: when on the important things thehecan be so much more able than us. >> i love you. >> reporter: steve hartman, on the road in albuquerque, new mexico. >> that is the overnight news for this monday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the "morning news" and "cbs this morning."
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york city i'm vinita nair.r. ed after a weekend whiteout comes the big dig in the east. the nation's capital takes an extra day to recover. closing schools tomorrow. the house shuts down for the week. new york's mayor tells people not to clean up their cars and chill.l. a week before the first vote the new cbs poll shows two new front-runners in iowa. also tonight, the manhunt for three escaped prisoners in california. plus new details on how they made their jail break. and this officer's best friend was irreplaceable. today he met his new partner.
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>> that's a good boy. >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the overnight news. i'm vinita nair. the monster blizzard that hit the east this weekend continues to claim lives. at least 26 people have died in eight states and washington, d.c. some were in car accidents. others suffered heart attacks whilil shoveling. a growing number have died from carbon monoxide poisoning in their homes and cars. notable snow totals include 42 inches in glen garry, west virginia and 26.8 inches in new york's central park, just a tenth of an inch short of the record. we have several reports on the cleanup, beginning in washington, d.c. with kris van cleave. >> reporter: the storm has stopped, and sooas much of the nation's capital. there's no way a car could drive down side streets like this. snowed in cars and feet of snow block the way. pedestrians are still using main thoroughfares instead of
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the airports are closed. so is d.c.'s metro. schools and the city government will be c csed tomorrow. mayor muriel bowser. >> while we have made some progress, there is still a lot more to do. >> reporter: the city brought in 400 pieces of extra equipment to dig out and continues to receive help from the national guard to move first responders. 69-year-old raymond tollson is part of d.c.'s volunteer snow team. the city asked him to help shovel steps at the homes of two elderly neighbors. >> senior r tizens can't get out here and walk in the snow like this. >> reporter: so he dug them out, then cleared the steps and sidewalks for eight more neighboror you have to be the hero of the neighborhood. >> mm. i don't know. that's up to them to decide. >> reporter: huge amounts of snow are being removed from freeways. in some areas suburbs are buried under more thaha three feet of snow. the airports are working around the ock to clear more than 1,000 miles of pavement make up
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tarmacs before reopening. so far the storm is responsible for more than 11,000 cancellations. chris pollino is with washington's airports. >> the storm of this magnitude affectininso many airports across the country, it's going to take a while for the air travel system as whole to get back to normal. >> reporter: in what's become a huge d.c. tradition, when the snow stops hundreds gather and the snowballs fly. >> who wouldn't come to a big snowball fight? >> reporter: d.c.'s snowfall total comes from reagan national airport. it recorded 17.8 inches of snow. but vinita,, cbs news has learned the national weather service is launching an internal investigation over reports that it got the total wrong. the nearby national zoo recorded much more, 22.4 inches of snow, and we're just learning the federal government has decided to stay closed again tomorrow. >> kris van cleave, thank you. well, new york got more than two feet of snow and is moving rward like it was littlee more than a dusting.
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>> reporter: at the crack of dawn the shoveling started. by midday some started to move. >> what are you doing? >> going to work. >> reporter: just six hours after the snow stopped all major roads were cleared. buses are back in service. governor andrew cuomo lifted a travel ban at 7:00 this morning. >> we survived, and then some. >> reporter: about 300 accidents kept new york officers busy, but none were fatal. jfk and lagardia are back open after canceling almost 300 flights saturday and today. mayor bill de blasio. >> sanitation did an extraordinary job even though the storm came early and was obviously in some ways greater than anyone expected. >> reporter: there is still cleanup in some spots. in queens they're still working to clear streets. >> even if people can get out they first have to find their car.r. and then they're going to haveve
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oh, my goodness. >> reporter: the mayor is asking people to keep their cars parked so plows can clear the roads. but kevin valdez says not one had touched his street by noon. >> what did you think yesterday when the snow started coming down two, three inches an hour? >> first i thought it was kind ofofbeautifufu it looked artistic. it was kind of nice. but then i thought wow, the cleaning process is going to be a long process for me. >> reporter: but for the majority of new yorkers it was a good old-fashioned snow day. well, families had so much fun with all this snow in central rk. the mayoyo says students are headed back to class tomorrow. and vinita, more than 850 plows are still out, targetsing the hardest-hit areas. >> jamie yuccas tonight. thank you. on the jersey shore, full moon high tides sent sea water and chunks of snow and ice
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jericka duncan is in wildwood, new jersey. >> reporter: t t water inn wildwood is so high in some places cars can't get through. >> this gets to be a real mess in here. >> reporter: mayor ernie troiano drove us through the neighborhoods hit the hardest. he says this storm's tides were >> there's hundreds and hundreds of cars that were caught in these tides. >> repororr: marisa rigbyby returnrn today and found hererar not working. >> we hadeautiful snow for all of a few hours before it just became a river of icebergs. >> reporter: restaurant owner dave bannon spent sunday drying out. he says the water was up to a foot during the height of the storm. >> as you can see, the sign's gone. when i came in, the water was ababt up to here. >> r rorter: at one pointntore than 18,000 customers lost power along the jersey shore. most shore towns saw minor to moderate flooding and new jersey governor chris christie said overall his state did well. >> we look forward to a normal
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>> yeah, we got some water this time. >> reporter: but for people in southern new jersey forced to trudge through flood waters the storm was another reminder of how vulnerable coastal communities still are. >> did he do better up there? because we didn't do so good down here. >> reporter: the mayor of wildwood says about 100 people were forced to evacuate from this neighborhood. he's hoping that by tomorrow, vinita, most of those people will be able to return home. >> jericka duncan, t tnk you.
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right back. [ vocalizing ] [ buzzing ] [ tree crashes ] [ wind howling ]
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well, now to the presidential race, which was dominated today by the talk of another name brand new york billionaire who may just in as an independent. here's julianna goldman. >> as of now he's just a private citizen who owns a big company.y. >> reporter: with michael bloomberg exploring a third-party bid, presidential candidates dismissed what would be the latest curveball in the 2016 race. >> if that takes place, i am confident that we will win it. >> reporter: the former new york city mayor has told associates
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donald trump or ted cruz versus bernie sanders. >> well, i'm going to relieve him of that and get the nomination so he doesn't have to. >> reporter: trump encouraged his fellow new yorker to get in. >> then i'm going to have to deal against hillary if she doesn't go to jail or i'm going to have to deal against bernie. or somebody. or bloomberg comes in, which would be great. i'd love to have him come in because i love the competition. >> reporter: with the caucuses just eight days away candidates blanketed iowa where trump and texas senator ted cruz are battling for conservative voters. the republican front-runner attended church on suny and coinued to raise queions about cruz's eligibility to be president. >> he'll run for president. then he'll run for prime minister of canada. >> and so we have an opportunity once again to make america great again. >> reporter: over the weekend iowa senator charles grassley appeared at a rally with trump. while it wasn't an endorsement it is a sign that the establishment is warming to the
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even as he doubles down on yet another controversial comment. >> you said yesterday you could shoot someone on 5th avenue and wouldn't lose voters. you're that confident, huh? >> well, i have a very great group of people, john. i have people that are so loyal. >> reporter: over the weekend the des moines rister endorsed senator marco rubio and hillary clinton. it could give rubio a boost, but the endorsement is probably less influential than it once was in iowa. vinita, over the summer the paper's editorial board called for trump to get out of the race. didn't exactly hurt his poll numbers. >> julianna goldman, thank you. just over a week before the iowa caucuses, a new cbs battleground tracker poll shows donald trump has regained his lead over ted cruz in iowa and now has a five-point lead. here with more on the presidential race is elections director anthony salvanto. what is behind trump's surge? >> he's made gains with key groups in iowa. evangelicals, tea party voters. and then added that to his
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retained over this campaign better than anyther candidate. his voters tell us they want two things -- shake up the system and fix the economy. and then almost 80% of iowans say they feel like trump just gets, it understands how they feel. that may be the kind of emotional connection that explains why the recent attacks on him just aren't working. >> well, the emotions and the things. when you look athose numbers and the polls, do you him? >> turnout is always a question. his voters do say, though, that they're strongly committed to him and ready to caucus. but he may have a hard time convincing those on the fence. people who aren't already with him largely say in the poll that they won't consider him. so his challenge is really to growdsupport beyond that base, vinita, as we get deeper into the primaries. >> on the democratic side right now hillary clinton is one point behind bernie sanders in iowa. what does she need to do? >> well, sanders has been making gains by trying to tie clinton to big donor money.
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say she might side with donors over regular people but her supporters see her as electable and her plans more realistic. i think that's the argument she'll continue to press in this final week. >> one of the big headlines today was certainly the possibility that former new york city mayor michael bloomberg could be running, could be running as an independent. is that realistic, to run as an independent? >> it's a challenge for any independent candidate. remember, the presidency is won state by state and the hurdle is getting to 270. that candidate needs to win states that are reliably democratic or reliably republican. places like texas and california. it's not just about swinging the battlegrounds from the middle, vinita. >> cbs news elections director anthony salvanto. anthony, thank you. >> thank you. a powerful earthquake rattled anchorage, alaska overnight. it was a mag tooutd 7.1 centered about 160 miles west of the city. one home near the epicenter was damaged by a gas explosion that followed the quake, but there are no reports of injuries. a community in canada is in
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rare for that country. a teenager killed four people in the remote village of la loche, saskatchewan. with more details here's jonathan vigliotti. >> reporter: residents of la loche are doing something they've never done before. mourning a mass shooting. the remote aboriginal community of 2,600 has long been known for its rampant drug abuse and long-standing poverty. until now the town has remained immune to american-style gun violence. on friday scenes once thought foreign shattered the already fragile town. it began at this house around noon. police say the 17-year-old attacker, whose name is being withheld, shot open the front door and killed two teenage brothers. don herman is their uncle. >> it's hard. it's hard for me to talk about this right now.. it's hard. >> reporter: the violence continued at the suspect's local high school, where he shot through the front door and
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killed. canadian media identified 35-year-old teacher adam wood and 21-year-old educational assistant marie genvier as the two victims. callisha genvier is marie's 'causepin cousin. >> she seemed so happy. i walked past her, said hi. that was the last time. >> reporter: police arrested the gunman at the school. classmates described him as a silent guy who usually kept to himself. it's still unclear what fueled his attack. jonathan vigliotti, cbs news, london. an intense manhunt is under way for three escaped prisoners. officials reveal how they broke living well your immune system works hard to keep you on top of your game. you can support it by eating healthy, drinking fluids, and getting some rest. and you can combine these simple remedies with airborne.
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the manhunt continues for three escaped inmates in southern california. they broke out of a maximum security jail in santa ana on friday. as mireya villarreal reports they are considered armed and dangerous. >> we will not stop until thesese individuals are backckn our custody. >> reporter: authorities say jonathan tieu, bac duong, and hossein nayeri may have spent months plotting their daring escape from the orange county jail. sheriff sandra hutchins.
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sophisticated operation. >> reporter: the planning was meticulous, says sheriff lieutenant jeff halleck. >> it seems the inmates cut their way through half-inch steel bars, cutheir way through the plumbing tunnels and ultimately gained access to an unsecured area of the roof. from the roof the inmates rappelled down to the ground. >> reporter: authorities say it's likely they used bed sheets and other clothing to fashion a makeshift rope. as to what tools they used to escape, how they g g them or if they had help, all those questions got the same response. >> we are still looking into that. >> reporter: they're also look at whether a disturbance inside the jail just prior to the nightly head count may have been a ruse by other inmates to help the three men escape. and now, says sheriff hutchins, there's a more immediate concern. >> we have notified the v vtims of some of t tse crimes and the people that investigated those crimes to ensure that everybody who was involved in these cases is safe.
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believe they've left the country. they say tips have poured in but so far no confirmed sightings. mireya villarreal, cbs news, los angeles. > up next, airlilis are making more money than ever.
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passengers a break? lower fuel price have airline profits soaring to record highs. for example, this past week united airlines reported profits of $4.5 billion for 2015. southwest airlines reported nearly 2.5 billion in profits.
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what they made in 2014. so does this mean ticket prices will come down? here is cbs news business analyst jill schlesinger with all answers. we all hopefully think they'll come down. is there a chance? >> think about this. the major airlines save $46 billion on jet fuel costs last year. unfortunately, just a fraction of that gets passed along to the passengers. according tthe transportation statistics bureau, we know that the average domestic flight last year, $385. that was down 2.8% from the year before. so a little bit. it seems pretty good, though, compared to the peak. 1999, the highest airfare inflation adjujued, 473 bucks. >> what about the little fees? we've all gotten so used to paying them. do you think those will come down? >> i think we'll continue to get nickelled and dimed unfortunately. some of the numbers are pretty remarkable. the six largest u.s. airlines making $18 billion in fees.
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it's up 163% from 2010. now, globally all airlines make about $59 billion from these ancillary revenue sources. so i don't think those fees are going away anytime soon. it's such an important component to the airline. >> with all that profit how are their stocks performing? >> amazingly. profits soaring. stocks not so much. the airline index down 23% from a year ago. investors fear that these regional airlines are trying to eat into the big guys' business and it could cause a price war. good news for consumers, though. go out and get yourself a cheap fare right now. >> all right. cbs news business analyst jill schlesinger. thank you so much. thanks. a pickup game in gainesville, florida had a surprise visitor this weekend. nba great shaquille o'neal. he showed up as a guest of local police after seeing a viral video of an officer who played with kids instead of yelling at them inafter a noise complaint. the seven-foot big man was rusty but as you can see he still had
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still ahead, an officer who lost his best friend now gets to pick a new partner. every day it getting closer
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a love like yours will surely come my way hey, hey, hey babies aren't fully developed until at leastst9 weeks. if your pregnancy is healthy, wait for labor to begin on its own. a healthy baby is worth the wait. o0 c1 travel is part of the american way of life. when we're on vacation, we keep an eye out for anything that looks out of place. [ indistinct conversations ] miss, your bag. when we travel from city to city, we pay attention to our surroundings. [ cheering ] everyone plays a role in keeping our community safe. whether you're traveling for business or pleasure, be aware of your surroundings. if you see something suspicious,
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we close tonight in texas, where a policeman is trying to do the impossible. he is looking for a replacement for his best frieie, a k-9 officer killed in the line of duty. here's contess brewer. >> shots fired. shots fired. my partner's been shot. >> reporter: officer ryan davis was devastated. his k-9 jethro was shot three times and killed earlier this month responding to a burglary in canton, ohio. he talked about it to our steve hartma
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never be filled. he gave his life for me. >> reporter: the k-9 officer received a full police funeral at the civic center on what would have been jethro's third birthday. despite the tragedy the work of the police goes on, and so it's time for officer davis to get a new partner. he's choosing among three candidates at this canine traini center in houston. >> they go through a very intense selection testing. they have to pass certain things for us. different. jethro came into the davis family as an 8-week-old puppy. and davis trained the canine for policework by day. by night he was a beloved family pet. the new k-9 is grown, fully trained, and doesn't understand english. so davis will spend the next few days in training himself, learning either german or
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>> it's bittersweet. a little nervous, anxious, excited all in all. >> reporter: it's just the beginning. a true partnership takes time. the new dog can't heal the hurt or fill the hole left by jethro. >> he was unconditionally loyal, loving, supportive. he was a hero. >> reporter: no matter how big the hole, officer davis may learn there's always more room in the heart for love. contessa brewer, cbs news, new york. that is the overnight news for this monday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning."
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york city i'm vinita nair. this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the "overnight news." i'm vinita nair. tens of millions of americans who live along the eastern seaboard will spend much of this week digging out after the deadly blizzard of 2016. but the weather is not getting in the way of the presidential campaign. in just one week the people of iowa will cast votes in the first in the nation caucuses. the "des moines register" came out with its endorsements. hillary clinton is the paper's choice for the democratic
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the gop endorsement. in the republican race our battleground tracker shows donald trump back on top in iowa with 39% of the vote. ted cruz is second with 34%, followed by marco rubio at 13%. in new hampshire trump has a big lead with 34%, compared to 16% for cruz and 14% for rubio. and on to south carolina, where trump holds his biggest lead. he gets 40%. cruz is at 21% and rubio 13%. but one name that does not yet show up in the polls, former new york city mayor michael bloomberg. he is seriously considering a run as an independent. julianna goldman has more on that from washington. >> mike bloomberg feels this campaign has been dominated by the extremes in each party, and he wants to jump in if it looks like the election is going to come down to donald trump or ted cruz. first is bernie sanders. he's not ruling out running against hillary clinton if she emerges from iowa and new hampshire seriously wounded, but it's an even less likely scenario. bloomberg will do a round of
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primary on february 9th, and from there he's given himself the deadline for a final decision in early march. his advisers believe that would give him enough time to qualify as an independent and get on the ballot in all 50 states. the electoral map would be a huge challenge for him, but one area where he is okay, on the money front. he's indicated that he's prepared to spend at least $1 billion. how will a possible bloomberg run affect the race for the gop nomination? john dickerson spoke with front-runner donald trump for "face the nation." >> thanks for joining us. you said yesterday you could shoot someone on 5th avenue and wouldn't lose voters. you're that confident, huh? >> well, i have a very great group of people, john. i have people that are so loyal and it's been so reported. even in your poll. but in a lot of the polls they do that. the loyalty factor. and my factor's up, when you add it all up, it's pretty much close to 90%. these are people that just won't leave. they will not leave. i love my people. and it's a great thing. it's a great thing. far greater loyalty than any
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triple, quadruple. and i love my people. >> and on the one hand you have your people, and then on the other hand you have the "national review" putting out a special issue trying to convince people not to support you, not to vote you. why do you think they did that? what was their reasoning, do you think? >> well, it's a failing magazine, number one. they need publicity. they are people that, you know, most of whom i don't know. most of whom -- don't forget, i've been in business. i've made a lot of money which i'm going to do for the country now. i've been focused on jobs and money and deals. that's what i do. and that's what the country needs. these are people for the most part i don't know. i don't even know who most of them are. i don't want t/ know who most of them are. they're just people that are i guess trying to save a magazine that's close to closing up. they're going to get publicity. and i actually think it plays into what i'm saying because it shows the divisiveness. they bakds romney, he lost. they backed mccain, he lost. they lose and they don't know
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they justant to stay relevant. they're very irrelevant. >> let me ask you about ted cruz. you said yesterday you wouldn't vote for ted cruz if he were the nominee. but you pledged to support the party's nominee. >> well, it depends on where he's from. in other words, he's got a problem. he -- in my opinion. it's looking more and more -- as you noticed, a number of very top constitutiwnal lawyers have come and said he was born in canada, he didn't tell people. he said he didn't know about it until 15 months ago. he was a canadian citizen. he was joint with the united states. but he was a canadian citizen until 15 months ago. he was a united states senator, i guess nobody figured this out, and he was a citizen of canada. and there are a lot of people now that are saying he was born in canada, he was born on canada's soil, on canadian soil, and he cannot run. and as you know, i guess you probably heard last night, illinois is looking at it very seriously. they might not even let him run in illinois. they feel strongly about it. >> let me ask but somebody else
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the race. michael bloomberg. you said yesterday, "i love it," speaking about him getting in the race. why would you love it? >> well, i would love it. i know michael very well. i'd love to compete against michael. and i know him very well. and i think he might very well get in the race. and i wowod love to have him get in the race. >> one of the reasons -- >> he's very opposite on me with guns and he's opposite on pro life and he's opposite on a lot of things. so i would love to have michael get in the race. but i don't know if he's going to do it, but i hope he does. i would love to compete against michael. as for the democrats, iowa has tight toend a tossup. our battleground tracker shows bernie sanders is up over hillary clinton 47% to 46%. in new hampshire sanders has a comfortable lead, 57% to 38% to clinton. with you in south carolina it's all clinton. she leads sanders 60% to 38%. sanders sat down with john dickerson for "face the nation." the cook political report looked at the rest of thehetates after
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liberals as in those first two states. the question can you go the distance even if you win in iowa and new hampshire? >> well, john, let me just say that the poll in south carolina was 60-38. if that's the case, it is showing us making huge, huge gains. and i feel confident that if we can win here in iowa, if we can win in new hampshire, and those are going to be tough races, i think we stand an excellent chance to win in south carolina and in nevada. but if you look at the polling recently, and i can tell you because i have been to south carolina. we have a lot of momentum on the ground. i think we're picking up more and more african-american support. frankly, i think we can win there. >> you have a new ad out this week which is you and the simon & garfunkel song "america." what does that ad mean for you? >> what that ad is about is to talk about the fact that as we come together as a country, and we have so much strength, so
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as we come together ass a people there is nothing we cannot accomplish. we are the wealthiest country in the history of the world. we should not have massive levels of income and wealth inequality inequality, the highest rate of childhood povertiy, the only country on earth that doesn't guarantee paid family and medical leave. and when we come together -- that is what it is. it's a beautiful song, and i think thth photography is beautiful. let us stand together and tackle the real problems facing our nation, and we can accomplish enormous things. >> here's how bill clinton characterized your campaign. he said, "this other guy's madder than she is," referring to his wife, "and that feels authentic. and besides, his slogans are easier to say." your reactionon >> well, i am angry. anthe american people are angry, john. people are angry because they don't understand why they have to work longer hours for lower wages and almost all new income and wealth is going to the top 1%. they are angry because their
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or $50,000 in debt. and they're angry because they are seeing the united states having a nation in which elderly people are trying to make it on $12,000, 3,000 a year on social security. people are asking why. the country is angry and i share that anger. the more you move the more you sweat degrgr's motionsense technhnogy keeps you freseswith every move. it has unique microcapsules that contaiaifragrances. friction breaks the capsules... ...releasing bursts of freshness all day. whether you're meeting a deadline... ...grabbing a bite... ...or heading out for the night. motionsense, protection to keep you moving. degree, it won't let you down. it's not always as easy for me as it is for him... it's easy for me cause look at her. aw... so we use k-y ultragel. it enhances my body's natural moisture
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as president o omanters his final year in office, he is also looking back. lee cowen covered mr. obama's first run for the white house and sat down with the president sunday morning. >> it is such an extraordinarily privilege to have this job. and look, there are times where you get tired. there are times where you're frustrated. >> you wonder why you did this? >> absolutely.
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that i have not walked into the oval office and understood that at no point in my life will i ever have the chance to do as much good and make as much of a difference in the lives of people as i do right now. and that's precious. so'm going to try to squeeze every last little bit of good work that i can while i still have the chance. >> if you're look for the world's best cars and the workers who make those cars, you need to be in detroit, michigan! >> reporter: the president's vivit to detroit, we arar toured the north amemecan international auto show this past week, came exactly a year to the day before his successor, whoever he or she may be, will move into the white house and the obamas will move out. >> so did they sell you on one of these things? >> i tell you what. this is a spiffy car. >> reportete the president seems esescially conscious of that calelear.
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here was to browse for a new car. after all, he'll soon have to say good-bye to the one he's been using, which is a far cry, by the way, from any car, let alone the one he used to drive. >> do you remember the first car you had? what did you have? >> the first car i drove was my andfather's granada, which was not a shining moment for detroit. it was not a great car. >> not a great date car either. >> it was not cool. i had to compensate in my coolness given the fact that i was picking girls up in the granada. >> reporter: althohoh he was allll smiles, the trips had a serious message. >> i could not be prouder of this industry and the road that we traveled together. >> reporter: mr. obama has been struggling to communicate his successes heading into his last year in office. and the u.s. auto industry is one example. both gm and chrysler had record sales last year.
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the result of f e government bailout d during the first year of his administration. >> we cannot and we must not and we will not our auto industries simply vanish. >> reporter: it wasn't a popular idea. critics thought the new president was overreaching, even cocky. but in hindsight, he says, that's just what the economic crisis demandeded >> i might have benefited from being young and a little brash and not bng as scared as i probably should have been. there was probably some benefit to me thinking we can fix this. and we'll figuree it ouou >> reporter: by some measures . obama did figure it out. he's overseen shrinking unemployment, a growing job market. >> we are done. [ applause ] >> reporter: a reduction in the number of americans without
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and diplomatic breakthroughs on both climate policy and relations with cucu. but his foes say those gains have been overshadowed by the rise of isis, the trouble in syria -- >> active shooter situation is still under way. >> reporter: -- and terrorism at home. and what stands out even to his supporters has been his inability to be the unifying fofoe that he had prprised. >> the o o thinghat gnaws on me is the degree of continued polarization. this has gotten worse over the last several years. and i think that in those early months my expectation was that we could pull the parties together a little more effectively. >> r rorter: do you wish i i hindsight that maybe campaigning on that notion of changing the tone in washington, do you wish you hadn't campaigned as hard on that promise? >> well, here's the thing.
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and that's what i still believe. >> i believe in change because i believe in you. the american people. and that's why i stand here as confident as i havav ever been that the state of our union is strong. >> reporter: his final state of the union seemed an attempt to remind america that despite the exasperating negativity the last seven years has not been as dismal or dysfunctional or racially divided as his critics maintains. hands up, don't shoot! >> when i hear people say, for example, in the aftermath of ferguson and some of the other cases that race relations have deteriorated, they're terrible, i have to say, well, maybe it's just because i'm getting older, but they're not worse than they wererefter the rodney king incident in l.a. d they're certainly not worse than they were back in the '50s or the '60s.
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if you could run for a third term, would you? >> no, i wouldn't. number one, michelle wouldn't let me. this is a great sacrifice and a big privilege, but it takes a toll on family life. this is a process in which the office should be continually renewed by new energy and new ideas and new insights. and although i think i am as good of a president as i have ever been right now, i also think there comes a point where you don't have fresh legs and that's when you start making mistakes or that's when you start thinking that you are what's important as opposed to the mission being more important. i'm very confident i'll be able to say that things are a lot when heartburn hits fight back fast
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did you know there's a cough liquid that lasts for twelve hours? try delsym twelve hour cough liquid. its advanced formula releases powerful medicine that acts fast while its extended release medicine lasts for 12 hours. try delsym . a new exhibit at the natural history museum of london invites worlds. the artist took raw data from nasa and the european space agency and transformed it into the art of the solarsystem. jonathan vigliotti took a spin around the show. >> reporter: explosions in the sky light years away are coming into focus never seen before, from the very active volcanoes
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of saturn. they are spectacular interstellar aspects of our solar system usually reserved for space ssions, now on displace for all to see at london's natural history museum. american photographer and writer michael beon gave us a preview of his other worlds exhibition before opening it to the public. >> i'm quite proud of this one because saturn is just a show stopper. >> it is. >> and it's right at the end of the show. so i hope people will leave on high te. >> reporter: a show stopper not just for the unbelievable clarity and detail but also for the unusual process that gave benson an up close and personal glimpse of worlds often cloaked in mystery. each photo is actually a composite of a series of specialized images capturing different details. this series of photos are taken not byenson or any human for that matter but snapped by nasa spacecraft over the span of the agency's 60-year history. >> that's part of the fun of it,
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putting together a jigsaw puzzle of images. so typically you'll see an even more astonishing thing as you assemble it. >> reporter: it's a jigsaw puzzle that took benson years to complete. the end result is an exhibit t stunning composites. science. >> reporter: dr. jo ma kousky is a scientist at the natural history museum. >> in a technical sense this is very clearly an art exhibition for the natural history museum. appreciate art will come here for that. we hope peopleeho comeeereor science wililbe pleasantly surprised by the art. >> reporter: and with all things art there is some interpretation. many of the original photos are received at nasa in black and white. benson uses historical and scientific data to determine the most accurate tones. >ometimes i say oh, darn, i have to o reprintt this? >> reporter: benson's work is casting new light on space, much
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revealed america's wild national parks. >> obviously i didn't haul my box camera on a tripod to saturn, and i wish i had that possibility. >> reporter: as a kid benson grew up wanting to go to space. instead he's bringing the solar system b bk t t eartrt >> i think it't' part of growing up as a species to recognize where we are in the universe. that's part of what i'm doing, you know, i think, is trying to bring the message. or with the help, a little bit of help from nasa and the european space agency. >> reporter: jonathan vigliotti, london. 2016 is still young, but already some of the biggest names in rock music have passed away. anthony mason sat down with rock and roll hall of famer graham nash to talk about the loss of two contemporaries. >> reporter: january's been a cold month for music lovers. the eagles' glenn frey suddenly gone. just a week after david bowie.
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their fans, imagine how it hit their fellow musicians. >> yeah. because who's next? >> reporter: talking with graham nash about another topic this week, we kept coming back to the shock of it. >> there was something particularly jarring about both of them. i don't know what. >ecause it was completely unexpected. >> yeaea >> i mean, glenn was what, 67? >> yeah. >> wow. bowie's 69. >> are you feeling the clock any more after this month? >> i've been feeling the clock a lot in this last six months. teach your children well >> reporter: nasashas had a 50-year carere in music. hey, cherry ann starting with the hollies. are you thinking and then with crosby stills & nash. and young. anthony, we have talked many times and you know my next birthday, in less than two weeks i'll be 74 years old.
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ststl feel like this kid in a candy store with this passion that i still have for communicating. it's amazing to me. and i'm just going to go right along with it until it, you know, comes to an end. look up here >> reporter: bowie's end, and just days after he releaseddis latest album, "blackstar." but after a while glenn frey died just months after the eagles had wrapped up a two-year tour. >> it's really weird. i listen to cbs news a lot, you know, on the hour in my car. >> yep. >> and you hear co-founder of the eagles glenn frey died today and ba-daba-da-bada. and then i put myself in there, rock and roll hall of famer graham nash died today. and it will be gone and in five minutes it will all be over. it's kind of interesting. so what do you do with the time left?
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as an artist and as a human being to have thehe best time y can. >> yeah. >> as we face our future. >> right. don't even try >> reporter: artists hope their music lives forever. but rock stars don't. we've been reminded of that this month, when an eagle left us and a starman took to embarrassed by a prostate exam? imagininhow your doctor feels. as a urologist, i have performed 9,4242and a half prostate e ams. so why do i do it? because i get paid. und... on this side of the glove i know prostate exams can save lives. so, if you are a man over 50, talk to you doctor to see if a prostate exam is right for you. if we can do it,t,o can you.
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steve hartman stopped at a roadside r rtaurant and brought us back a story as set as honey. >> reporter: what makes tim's place restaurant in albuquerque, new mexico so special is that it is indeed tim's place. >> hello. how are you doing today? welcome to my place. >> reporter: tim harris was the first restaurant owner in the country with down syndrome. for the last five years he has livevefor his business. which is why his customers were shocked when tim announced
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>> my customers cried a lot. into my arms. >> going to miss you. >> reporter: so what drives a man to give up a job he loves more than anything? >> oh, yeah. >> reporter: a girl he loves more than anything. >> i cannot wait. >> reporter: that blur in the "i love tim" t-shirt is tiffany johnson. they met at a down syndrome convention. >> i was like oh, my gosh, he's like -- oh, my god. >> did you go up to him and say something? >> i was too scared to. >> too scared to? >> because i never met a guy like tim. >> reporter: tiffany says it was the weirdest feeling. >> i got hit by the love bug. >> reporter: eventually tim got bit by it too. >> will you be my girlfriend? >> you know i will. yes. >> reporter: he made her his steady and decided to move to denver to be closer to her. tim plans to open a new restaurant there. but it's still going to be hard leaving what he knows. in fact, he cries every time he thinks about it.
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>> it's incredible to watch. he's deeply grieving about the idea of this transition. >> reporter: tim's father, keith. >> while at the same time being as excited as i've ever seen him about the possibility of being with tiffany. >> i'm lucky to have someone that loves me. >> every time i feel sad my girlfriend makes me a lot happier. >> i'm trying not to start crying. >> when you look her in the eye what do you see? >> i see love. i see joy. and i see that i have a future. >> reporter: why on earth do we call them disabled? >> i just love him. >> reporter: when on the much more able than us. >> i love you. >> reporter: steve hartman, on the road in albuquerque, new >> that is the overnight news for this monday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the "morning
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york city i'm vinita nair. after a weekend whiteout comes the big dig in the east. the nation's capital takes an extra day to recover, closing schools tomorrow. the house shuts down for the week. new york's mayor tells people not to clean up their cars and chill. a week before the first vote the new cbs poll shows two new front-runners in iowa. also tonight, the manhunt for three escaped prisoners in california. plus new details on how they made their jail break. and this officer's best friend was irreplaceable. today he met his new partner.
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>> that's a good boy. >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the overnight news. i'm vinita nair. the monster blizzard that hit the east this weekend continues to claim lives. at least 26 people have died in eight states and washington, d.c. some were in car accidents. others suffered heart attacks while shoveling. a growing number have died from carbon monoxide poisoning in their homes and cars. notable snow totals include 42 inches in glengary, west virginia and 26.8 inches in new york's central park, just a tenth of an inch short of the record. we have several reports on the cleanup, beginning in washington, d.c. with kris van cleave. >> reporter: the storm has stopped, and so has much of the nation's capital. there's no way a car could drive down side streets like this. snowed in cars and feet of snow block the way. pedestrians are still using main
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iced-over sidewalks. the airports are closed. so is d.c.'s metro. schools and the city government will be closed tomorrow. mayor muriel bowser. >> while we have made some progress, there is still a lot more to do. >> reporter: the city brought in 400 pieces of extra equipment to dig out and continues to receive help from the national guard to move first responders. 69-year-old raymond tollson is part of d.c.'s volunteer snow team. the city asked him to help shovel steps at the homes of two elderly neighbors. >> senior citizens can't get out here and walk in the snow like this. >> reporter: so he dug them out, then cleared the steps and sidewalks for eight more neighbors. you have to be the hero of the neighborhood. >> mm. i don't know. that's up to them to decide. >> reporter: huge amounts of snow are being removed from freeways. in some areas suburbs are buried under more than three feet of snow. the airports are working around the clock to clear more than 1,000 miles of pavement make up the runways, taxiways, and
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so far the storm is responsible for more than 11,000 cancellations. chris polino is with washington's airports. >> the storm of this magnitude affecting so many airports across the country, it's going to take a while for the air travel system as a whole to get back to normal. >> reporter: in what's become a huge d.c. tradition, when the snow stops hundreds gather and the snowballs fly. >> who wouldn't come to a big snowball fight? >> reporter: d.c.'s snowfall total comes from reagan national airport. it recorded 17.8 inches of snow. but vinita, cbs news has learned the national weather service is launching an internal investigation over reports that it got the total wrong. the nearby national zoo recorded much more, 22.4 inches of snow, and we're just learning the federal government has decided to stay closed again tomorrow. >> kris van cleave, thank you. well, new york got more than two feet of snow and is moving forward like it was little more than a dusting. here's jamie yuccas.
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dawn the shoveling started. by midday some started to move. >> what are you doing? >> going to work. >> reporter: just six hours after the snow stopped all major roads were cleared. broadway reopened and trains and buses are back in service. governor andrew cuomo lifted a travel ban at 7:00 this morning. >> we survived, and then some. >> reporter: about 300 accidents kept new york officers busy, but none were fatal. jfk and laguardia are back pen after canceling almost 300 flights saturday and today. mayor bill de blasio. >> sanitation did an extraordinary job even though the storm came early and was obviously in some ways greater than anyone expected. >> reporter: there is still cleanup in some spots. in queens they're still working to clear streets. >> even if people can get out they first have to find their car. and then they're going to have
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>> reporter: the mayor is asking people to keep their cars parked so plows can clear the roads. but kevin valdez says not one had touched his street by noon. >> what did you think yesterday when the snow started coming down two, three inches an hour? >> first i thought it was kind of beautiful. it looked artistic. it was kind of nice. but then i thought wow, the cleaning process is going to be a long process for me. >> reporter: but for the majority of new yorkers it was a good old-fashioned snow day. well, families had so much fun with all this snow in central park. the mayor says students are headed back to class tomorrow. and vinita, more than 850 plows are still out, targesing the hardest-hit areas. >> jamie yuccas tonight. thank you. on the jersey shore, full moon high tides sent sea water and chunks of snow and ice
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jericka duncan is in wildwood, new jersey. >> reporter: the water in wildwood is so high in some places cars can't get through. >> this gets to be a real mess in here. >> reporter: mayor ernie troiano drove us through the neighborhoods hit the hardest. he says this storm's tides were higher than super storm sandy's. >> there's hundreds and hundreds of cars that were caught in these tides. >> reporter: marisa rigby returned today and found her car not working. >> we had beautiful snow for all of a few hours before it just became a river of icebergs. >> reporter: restaurant owner dave bannon spent sunday drying out. he says the water was up to a foot during the height of the storm. >> as you can see, the sign's gone. when i came in, the water was about up to here. >> reporter: at one point more than 18,000 customers lost power along the jersey shore. most shore towns saw minor to moderate flooding and new jersey governor chris christie said overall his state did well. regular workweek starting tomorrow.
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time. >> reporter: but for people in southern new jersey forced to trudge through flood waters the storm was another reminder of how vulnerable coastal communities still are. >> did he do better up there? because we didn't do so good down here. >> reporter: the mayor of wildwood says about 100 people were forced to evacuate from this neighborhood. he's hoping that by tomorrow, vinita, most of those people will be able to return home. >> jericka duncan, thank you.
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right back. almost sixty million americans are affected by mental illness. together we can help them with three simple words. my name is chris noth and i will listen. from maine to maui, thousands of high school students across the country are getting in on the action by volunteering in their communities. chris young: action teams of high school students are joining volunteers of america and major league baseball players to help train and inspire the next generation of volunteers. carlos pea: it's easy to start an action team at your school
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if you were a hippie in the '60s, you need to know. it's t t dawning of the age of aquarius. yeah, and something else that's cool. what? osteoporosis is preventable. all: osteo's preventable? right on! if you dig your bones, protect them. all: cbs cares! well, now to the presidential race, which was dominated today by the talk of another name brand new york billionaire who may just in as an independent. here's julianna goldman. >> as of now he's just a private citizen who owns a big company. >> reporter: with michael bloomberg exploring a third-party bid, presidential candidates dismissed what would be the latest curveball ininhe 2016 race. >> if that takes place, i am confident that we will win it.
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he wants to run as a centrist. if the election comes down to donald trump or ted cruz versus bernie sanders. >> well, i'm going to relieve him of that and get the nomination so he doesn't have to. >> reporter: trump encouraged his fellow new yorker to get in. >> then i'm going to have to deal against hillary if she doesn't go to jail or i'm going to have to deal against bernie. or somebody. or bloomberg comes in, which would be great. i'd love to have him come in because i love the competition. >> reporter: with the caucuses just eight days away candidates blanketed iowa where trump and texas senator ted cruz are battling for conservative voters. the republican front-runner attended church on sunday and continued to raise questions about cruz's eligibility to be president. >> he'll run for president. then he'll run for prime minister of canada. >> and so we have an opportunity once again to make america great again. >> reporter: over the weekend iowa senator charles grassley appeared at a rally with trump.
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establishment is warming to the idea of trump as its nominee. even as he doubles down on yet another controversial comment. >> you said yesterday you could shoot someone on 5th avenue and wouldn't lose voters. is you're that confident, huh? >> well, i have a very great group of people, john. i have people that are so loyal. >> reporter: over the weekend the "des moines register" endorsed senator marco rubio and hillary clinton. it could give rubio a boost, but the endorsement is probably less influential than it once was in iowa. vinita, over the summer the paper's editorial board called for trump to get out of the race. didn't exactly hurt his poll numbers. >> julianna goldman, thank you. just over a week before the iowa caucuses, a new cbs battleground tracker poll shows donald trump has regained his lead over ted cruz in iowa and now has a five-point lead. here with more on the presidential race is elections director anthony salvanto. what is behind trump's surge? >> he's made gains with key groups in iowa.
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existing support, which he's retained over this campaign better than any other candidate. his voters tell us they want two things -- shake up the system and fix the economy. and then almost 80% of iowans say they feel like trump just gets, it understands how they feel. that may be the kind of emotional connection that explains why the recent attacks on him just aren't working. >> well, the emotions and the numbers are two very different things. so when you look at those numbers and the polls, do you see anything that could derail him? >> turnout is always a question. his voters do say, though, that they're strongly committed to him and ready to caucus. but he may have a hard time convincing those on the fence. people who aren't already with him largely say in the poll that they won't consider him. so his challenge is really to grow support beyond that base, vinita, as we get deeper into the primaries. >> on the democratic side right now hillary clinton is one point behind bernie sanders in iowa. what does she need to do? >> well, sanders has been making gains by trying to tie clinton
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say she might side with donors over regular people. but her supporters see her as electable and her plans more realistic. i think that's the argument she'll continue to press in this final week. >> one of the big headlines today was certainly the possibility that former new york city mayor michael bloomberg could be running, could be running as an independent. is that realistic, to run as an independent? >> it's a challenge for any independent candidate. remember, the presidency is won state by state and the hurdle is getting to 270. that candidate needs to win states that are reliably democratic or reliably republican. places like texas and california. it's not just about swinging the battlegrounds from the middle, >> cbs news elections director anthony salvanto. anthony, thank you. >> thank you. rattled anchorage, alaska overnight. it was a magnitude 7.1 centered about 160 miles west of the city. one home near the epicenter was damaged by a gas explosion that followed the quake, but there are no reports of injuries. a community in canada is in
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rare for that country. a teenager killed four people in the remote village of la loche, saskatchewan. with more details here's jonathan vigliotti. >> reporter: residents of la loche are doing something they've never done before. mourning a mass shooting. the remote aboriginal community of 2,600 has long been known for its rampant drug abuse and long-standing poverty. until now the town has remained immune to american-style gun violence. on friday scenes once thought foreign shattered the already fragile town. it began at this house around noon. police say the 17-year-old attacker, whose name is being withheld, shot open the front door and killed two teenage brothers. don herman is their uncle. >> it's hard. it's hard for me to talk about this right now. it's hard. >> reporter: the violence continued at the suspect's local high school, where he shot through the front door and opened fire. seven people were injured, two
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canadian media identified 35-year-old teacher adam wood and 21-year-old educational assistant marie genvier as the two victims. kalisha janvier is marie's cousin. >> she seemed so happy. i walked past her, said hi. that was the last time. >> reporter: police arrested the gunman at the school. classmates described him as a silent guy who usually kept to himself. it's still unclear what fueled his attack. jonathan vigliotti, cbs news, london. an intense manhunt is under way for three escaped prisoners. officials reveal how they broke out. and an officer calls for
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the manhunt continues for three escaped inmates in southern california. they broke out of a maximum security jail in santa ana on friday. as mireya villarreal reports they are considered armed and dangerous. >> we will not stop until these individuals are back in our custody. >> reporter: authorities say jonathan tieu, bac duong, and hossein nayeri may have spent months plotting their daring escape from the orange county jail. sheriff sandra hutchins. >> it appears to be a very
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>> reporter: the planning was meticulous, says sheriff lieutenant jeff halleck. >> it seems that the inmates cut their way through half-inch steel bars, cut their way through the plumbing tunnels and ultimately gained access to an unsecured area of the roof. from the roof the inmates rappelled down to the ground. >> reporter: authorities say it's likely they used bed sheets and other clothing to fashion a makeshift rope. as to what tools they used to escape, how they got them or if they had help, all those questions got the same response. >> we are still looking into that. >> reporter: they're also look at whether a disturbance inside the jail just prior to the nightly head count may have been a ruse by other inmates to help the three men escape. and now, says sheriff hutchins, there's a more immediate concern. >> we have notified the victims of some of these crimes and the people that investigated those crimes to ensure that everybody who was involved in these cases
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believe they've left the country. they say tips have poured in but so far no confirmed sightings. mireya villarreal, cbs news, los angeles. up next, airlines are making more money than ever.
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passengers a break? can lower fuel price have airline profits soaring to record highs. for example, this past week united airlines reported profits of $4.5 billion for 2015. southwest airlines reported nearly 2.5 billion in profits.
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what they made in 2014. so does this mean ticket prices will come down? here is cbs news business analyst jill schlesinger with all answers. we all hopefully think they'll come down. is there a chance? >> think about this. the major airlines saved $46 billion on jet fuel costs last year. unfortunately, just a fraction of that gets passed along to the passengers. according to the transportation statistics bureau, we know that the average domestic flight last year, $385. that was down 2.8% from the year before. so a little bit. it seems pretty good, though, compared to the peak. 1999, the highest airfare inflation adjusted, 473 bucks. >> what about the little fees? we've all gotten so used to paying them. do you think those will come down? >> i think we'll continue to get nickelled and dimed unfortunately. some of the numbers are pretty remarkable. we've got the six largest u.s. airlines making $18 billion in
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and that's a 19% increase from 2014. it's up 163% from 2010. now, globally all airlines make about $59 billion from these ancillary revenue sources. so i don't think those fees are going away anytime soon. it's such an important component to the airline. >> with all that profit how are their stocks performing? >> amazingly. profits soaring. stocks not so much. the airline index down 23% from a year ago. investors fear that these regional airlines are trying to eat into the big guys' business and it could cause a price war. good news for consumers, though. go out and get yourself a cheap fare right now. >> all right. cbs news business analyst jill schlesinger. thank you so much. >> thanks. a pickup game in gainesville, florida had a surprise visitor this weekend. nba great shaquille o'neal. he showed up as a guest of local police after seeing a viral video of an officer who played with kids instead of yelling at them after a noise complaint. the seven-foot big man was rusty but as you can see he still had some moves. still ahead, an officer who
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pick a new partner. woman: what does it feel like when a woman is having a heart attack? chest pain, like there's a ton of weight on your chest. severe shortness of breath. unexplained nausea. cold sweats. there's an unusual tiredness and fatigue. there's unfamiliar dizziness or light-headedness. unusual pain in your back, neck, jaw, one or both arms, even your upper stomach, are signs you're having a heart attack. don't make excuses. make the call to 9-1-1 immediately. learn more at womenshealth.gov/heartattack. while i was on a combat patrol in baqubah, iraq, a rocket-propelled grenade took my arm off at the shoulder. i was discharged from the army, and i've been working with the wounded warrior project since 2007.
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to be with the wounded warrior project. we do have a lot of guys that have post-traumatic stress disorder. being able to share your story, i guess it kind of helps you wrap your mind around what did happen over there. my name is norbie, and yes, i do suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder,
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we close tonight in texas, where a policeman is trying to do the impossible. he is looking for a replacement for his best friend, a k-9 officer killed in the line of duty. here's contessa brewer. >> shots fired. shots fired. my partner's been shot. >> reporter: officer ryan davis was devastated. his k-9 jethro was shot three times and killed earlier this month responding to a burglary in canton, ohio. he talked about it to our steve hartman. >> he's left a hole that will
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he gave his life for me. >> reporter: the k-9 officer received a full police funeral at the civic center on what would have been jethro's third birthday. despite the tragedy the work of the police goes on, and so it's time for officer davis to get a new partner. he's choosing among three candidates at this k-9 training center in houston. >> they go through a very intense selection testing. they have to pass certain things for us. >> reporter: it will be different. jethro came into the davis family as an 8-week-old puppy. and davis trained the k-9 for policework by day. by night he was a beloved family pet. the new k-9 is grown, fully trained, and doesn't understand english. so davis will spend the next few days in training himself,
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hungarian commands and working he was a hero. >> reporter: no matter how big for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning."
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york city i'm vinita nair. captioning funded by cbs captioning funded by cbs it's monday, january 25th, 2016. this is the "cbs morning news." digging out. an epic blizzard buries the east and leaving dozens dead and hundreds struggling to dig out of the snow. >> the plane actually dropped.
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everything went flying.
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