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tv   NBC Nightly News With Lester Holt  NBC  July 29, 2017 5:30pm-6:01pm PDT

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>> all right. nbc "nightly news" is next. we're back here at 6:00. >> announcer: from nbc news, world headquarters in new york, this is "nbc nightly news" with jose diaz-balart. good evening, we begin with new, dangerous provocations from north korea. two missile launches by the country this month, the latest yesterday, have sparked what appears to be an arms race. rival south korea saying the latest launch of a missile which could reach the u.s., may trigger fundamental change in the security of the entire region. our correspondent is in seoul tonight with the very latest. >> reporter: tonight, striking new images released by north korea. allegedly showing the intercontinental ballistic missile that could put major u.s. cities in striking range. cameras in northern japan
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capturing video of the missile. falling into the sea just 230 miles off the coast. the videos have not been independently verified by nbc news. the late night launch supervise called the missile t could h as peopl streets of p weeks, there is new n deliver a nuclear because he his technology in yesterday, have sparked what appears to be an arms race. rival south korea saying the latest launch of a missile which could reach the u.s., may trigger fundamental change in the security of the entire region. our correspondent is in seoul tonight with the very latest. >> reporter: tonight, striking new images released by north korea. allegedly showing the intercontinental ballistic missile that could put major u.s. cities in striking range. cameras in northern japan capturing video of the missile. falling into the sea just 230 miles off the coast. the videos have not been independently verified by nbc news.
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the late night launch was supervised by kim jung-unwho called the missile test a serious warning that the weapons could hit the entire u.s. mainland. as people in the streets of pyongyang cheered the second successful launch in three weeks, there is new urgency that north korea can soon deliver a nuclear warhead to the u.s. >> kim jung-un, is dangerous because he is unpredictable. his technology in developing this missile cyst -- developing this missile system which might hit the u.s., mainland, is advancing. and we don't appear to have a strategy to deal with him. and, he is taking advantage of that. >> reporter: the crisis is now triggering an arms build-up in asia, with south korea confirming
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talks with the u.s. for stronger missiles. the president ordered rapid deployment of the u.s. missile defense system here that was suspended in may. japan may also boost its missile defenses and consider preemptive strikes. and the u.s. has been testing missile interceptors in alaska with more launches planned for this weekend. experts concede, missile defense is not foolproof. and the trump administration has had no diplomatic progress in stopping or even slowing the regime. the arms build-up here suggests south korea is nervous about its alliance with the u.s. though more arms are sure to infuriate china. so there is instability across the region and no clear u.s. strategy to deal with it. jose. >> thank you very much. australian counterterrorism police raided four homes in sydney suburbs tuesday. taking one man in custody. the prime minister says it is part of an ongoing terror investigation and is calling this a major operation. he said raids related to a bomb plot aimed at bringing down an
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airplane. australia has been on heightened alert for attacks by home grown militants since 2014. president trump took to twitter again today, faulting fellow republicans for their failure to pass a health care bill this week. meanwhile, there is more tonight on the latest white house shake-up. the departure of chief of staff, reince preibus, we get the latest from kelly o'donnell. >> reporter: under new management. the builder president is remodeling his senior team. installing a new chief of staff beginning monday. the reality tv president gave his choice rave reviews. >> one of our real stars. truly one of our stars. john kelly is one of our great stars. >> john kelly switches chairs in the cabinet room. going from homeland security secretary -- >> a long way to facilitate the improve the legal movement of people and progress across our borders. >> reporter: to oval office gatekeeper.
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spent his teens as a cadet in military school but did not serve, has chosen generals for key roles. after 45 years in marine uniform and four stars on his shoulder, kelly said in april he wanted no part of politics. >> my biggest fear at the time was to be offered another full time job. particularly in the government. reince preibus leaves after serving fewer days than any white house chief of staff in history. a tenure hobbled by failure to deliver on health care reform and staff infighting so vicious that anthony scaramucci remains in favor despite bashing reince preibus with vulgar language. >> i think it is an annoying distraction that it is not, not right for people to talk about, especially
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employees of the west wing. >> kelly's combat experience instead of political connections, may bring new structure to the president's team. if he is given enough authority. >> reporter: if the president's behavior goes unchanged then it suggests no staff change can improve things for his white house. >> reporter: and the shake-up shows the president wants to surround himself with advisers trained in the military and business worlds. with his new chief of staff and new communications director. and not more veterans from republican politics. today, hitting his own party on twitter saying senate republicans would be "total quitters" if they do not vote again to overhaul the health care law. jose. >> kelly o'donnell at the white house. thank you. an emergency unfolding
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tonight in the outer banks of north carolina where a power failure forced evacuation of tens of thousands of people at the height of summer tourist season. nbc's correspondent has more tonight. >> reporter: the timing couldn't be worse. at the height of the summer tourism season, parts of north carolina's outer banks without power. after construction crews accidentally cut a transmission line thursday while working on a bridge. mandatory evacuations are now in place for at least 50,000 visitors. everyone except residents, being ordered off two islands. >> the national highway traffic safety administration, says there have been more than 2700 complaints and 41 reported injuries. though, the agency says it does not have any proof the injuries were caused by carbon monoxide. ford says drivers of
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the nonpolice explorers should not be worried. >> we have not found elevated levels of carbon monoxide in any ford explorer. there have been reports of exhaust odors in some explorers, those instances are unrelated to carbon monoxide which is odorless. >> as for the police suvs, ford says it has found holes in unsealed spaces in the back of some of the vehicles. it says police departments routinely install emergency lighting, radios and equipment in the suvs. ford now says it will cover the cost of specific repairs to those vehicles. >> this was not a decision anyone made lightly. >> tonight the city of austin is planning to dip into reserve fleet of unmarked cars and most officers will now double up on patrol. gabe gutierrez, nbc news. an emergency is unfolding to night on the outer banks of north carolina where a power failure forced evacuation of tens of thousands of people, at the height of the summer tourist season. nbc's maya rodriguez has more to night. >> reporter: the timing couldn't be worse. at the height of the summer tourism season, parts of north carolina's outer banks
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without power. after construction crews accidentally cut a transmission line thursday while working on a bridge. mandatory evacuations are now in place for at least 50,000 visitors. everyone except residents, being ordered off two islands. >> we slept in the parking lot last night in the camper, waiting for, so we can get on the 7:00 ferry this morning. >> reporter: for now, relying on portable generators until power is restored. businesses on the outer bank whose rely on summer tourism to get them through the rest of the year are worried. >> it is like a -- having a hurricane without the tumultuous side of it. >> i really feel for the people that run the business here, i am just, on vacation, and you know, and granted they're trying to survive through the season. so i really feel for those folks. >> reporter: meanwhile, crews are working on fixing the transmission line which could take days or even weeks. maya rodriguez, nbc news. authorities in hamburg, germany, say
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a deadly knife attack in a supermarket yesterday carried out by a suspected islamic psychologically unstable. subdued by bystanders after allegedly killing one and wounding six others. officials say there is no indication he had links to any network and is believed to have acted alone. >> in barcelona, spain, a fire broke out at a music festival, turning into a frightening experience. more than 20,000 people were evacuated from the concert held in a park. the fire broke out near a bank of speakers. no injuries were reported. as the trump administration cracks down on undocumented immigrants living in the united states, the complexity of the issue was highlighted this past week by the case of one woman who has lived here for decades. when she faced deportation and family separation, she decided to seek refuge in a church in
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connecticut. we get more now from nbc's morgan radford. >> can you show it to me? >> reporter: for 40 days, this woman has worn an ankle monitor like a criminal. >> it is embarrassing. >> for more than a week this connecticut room in the church was the family refuge. 9-year-old, haley is the youngest of her four kids all born in the u.s. she was there when immigration officials told her mom to leave the country. >> do you remember that day? >> yep. june 20th, seven days before my birthday. say like you were like me, or younger, or, any age, even the age you are today, you were getting separated by your mother or father how would you feel? >> reporter: undocumented, haley's mom fled to the u.s. in 1993. seeking political asylum amid unrest in guatemala. her application was denied. but she continued to work as a housekeeper. so she paid taxes and in accordance with i.c.e. rules checked in with immigration every year to keep her deportation at bay. that is until last month. >> i don't know what changed.
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>> reporter: you feel look you did everything right? >> i made my life here. i have my kids here. >> reporter: there are at least a dozen other cases of undocumented immigrants, currently taking refuge in u.s. churches. customs agents typically don't carry out raids. many of the people who are seeking sanctuary in churches or trying to avoid deportation, i'm sure, are fine people. they have been hard working people. but that's not the way our legal immigration system works. >> reporter: despite a record number of deportations under president obama, officials say his administration often exercised discretion in cases like nuri's where families could be torn apart. since president trump took office the number of deportations has dropped slightly. but undocumented immigrant arrests have gone up. >> in the trump administration, some individuals who may have been allowed informal discretion in the past now have become priorities for deportation. >> reporter: the community rallied behind her.
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and this week, immigration officials gave haley's mom a temporary reprieve. >> oh, my god. you know, yeah, i'm happy. >> reporter: buying time for one family. >> right. >> reporter: to hopefully face their future together. it's unclear how long nuri will be allowed to remain here under the temporary reprieve. her lawyers are firing paperwork for permanent stay since her ultimate goal ties live here in the united states with her children, jose. >> morgan radford, thank you so much. still ahead, why one of the country's biggest banks is paying back tens of millions to some of the customers for selling them something they didn't need. also how near tragedy drove one mother on a crusade how to save lives.
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we are back with a new issue involving wells fargo again facing accusations of sales malpractice and widespread consumer abuse. the report showing practices similar to the ones that affected a million and a half customers who got unwanted credit cards. this time, the issue is car insurance. here's nbc's steve pas. >> reporter: resulted in 48,000 people who got an auto loan from
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widespread according to the report. pushed 274,000 into delinquency, racking up fees, damaging credit scores and resulting in 25,000 wrongful vehicle repossessions. while the company says 600,000 were affected. it admitted in a statement to nbc news, customers were negatively impacted. apologized and promised to make things right. this is the type of thing that forces customers some times to leave the bank and look for better service elsewhere. so i think right now, it is hard to tell what the immediate and longer term impact will be. former wells fargo customer christine morgan took out auto loan in 20006. while not a victim of the practices cited here she says she got a series of letters asking for proof of insurance she says she provided. >> the letters were very aggressive. and if you did not provide proof, then they would automatically, insure the vehicle on your behalf and add that to your monthly bill. we were so angry about the way we were treated. >> the company says it plans to pay out $80 million to customers who qualify for a
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refund. letters including refund checks should start going out to customers in august. in the meantime, the bank announced today that around 70 executives with the retail bank operation were being let go. not a direct result of the latest scandal. but an ongoing restructuring of a bank dealing with wave after wave of controversy. steve patterson, nbc news, los angeles. we are back in a moment with a party where they have fun while they learn to save lives.
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the scene on the jersey shore today hardly a beach day as the area got pounded by a rare summer nor'easter. the storm brought heavy winds and minor flooding after dropping five inches of rain. while the rain was over by this morning. the winds and high surf kept people out of the water. >> that brings us to an important issue as we all enjoy the summer. keeping safe in the water. a close call for one family drove a mother in maryland to do her part to train others and potentially life saving cpr. it's serious business, but as nbc's correspondent reports, learning it can be fun. >> reporter: it is girls day out in bethesda, maryland. a little rose, cheese and crackers, and cpr. >> seven, eight, nine, ten. >> reporter: it is not an emergency but a party where guests
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learn cpr along with socializing. >> made it easy to learn. while still having some fun. >> reporter: laura metro founded cpr party after she almost lost her son clay. >> he was 3 1/2 at the time. and he was laid out on the pool deck. and he was blue. and lifeless. >> they were on vacation when clay fell in a pool. a friend started chest compressions like he had seen on tv. it saved clay, but that helpless feeling, spurred laura to action. >> that's when i realized that it's much better for people to know something than to know nothing at all. >> her idea was to make learning cpr casual and fun. >> i want you guys -- if you could ask any question. >> when people leave they're so relieved. they're so empowered. and they're proud of themselves. and they also realize, oh, my god, what they didn't know. >> the instructors are all certified. and while participants don't get a certification, they get what is most important. >> what do you want people to walk out of here with today? >> we want people to walk out of here feeling knowledgeable and comfortable enough to say you know what i
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can do this? >> it is knowledge that can save a life like clay's. he is now a rambunctious 9-year-old. on a swim team. >> now i really love swimming. >> the parties cost $15 a person. but laura wants them free someday. she says the cost of not knowing is just too high. >> the drowning with sudden cardiac arrest, second that you are dealing with, that are of critical importance. and, people need to know what to do in these scenarios to save the people they love. >> making cpr, more accessible. >> give me a kiss. >> a mission from the heart. and when we come back, we'll listen in on a program that teaches kids to make great music and transforms their lives.
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finally tonight the sound of success heard in concert halls across california. for years, the youth orchestra of los angeles has been helping children who face tough circumstances. mentors including a world famous conductor are teaching kids the classic as they tour the state and the world. and learn life lessons along the way. nbc's miguel almaguire explains. ♪ ♪ >> reporter: when beethoven fills the
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hall -- ♪ ♪ -- it's easy to forget this orchestra is composed of children. >> i get a rush of feelings like this is what i want to do when i grow up. ♪ >> reporter: you will hear 15-year-old vivian trejo on the french horn. the students of youth orchestra of los angeles, yola. famed conductor gustavo dudamel launched into worldwide stardom through a similar program. >> and i was one of them, am one of them. ♪ >> reporter: yola provides free instruments and hundreds of hours of instruction for 800 children from l.a.'s most underserved neighborhoods. >> the concept of inclusion, especially for disadvantaged children is so important when, when, when you share that with them. classical music takes them a world away from their daily lives. ♪ the free program a ticket to a place few
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have dreamed of. japan and the super bowl. halftime with cold play. ♪ oh >> it has helped me become a better person, more responsible, it has opened so many doors. >> reporter: for 16-year-old john gonzalez, the most meaningful stage is disney hall where proud parents fill the seats. students hitting all the right notes. ♪ and that is "nbc nightly news" for this saturday. tomorrow, how the call of the wild helped one man find his own path to success. and inspire others. i'm jose diaz-balart reporting from new york. thank you for the privilege of your time. good night.
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right now at 6:00, a car found in the water and a man found wounded in a popular marina. the news at 6:00 starts right now. good evening everyone thank you for joining us i'm terrie mcsweeney. peggy bunker is off tonight. a violent scene? bergly. gunfire rings out and police
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make a troubling discovery. sergio live at the scene for us. >> reporter: terry we know one man was injured in the shooting. he was inside the vehicle pulled out of the marina a few feet from here. this is a picture that one witness took of that vehicle. you can see it's laying on its side on the rocks. that witness tells us the vehicle was in the water and had just been pulled to the shore by a couple of tow trucks. berkeley police tell us they found one victim at the scene, suffering multiple gunshot wounds was rushed to highland hospital in oakland. another witness described the condition of that car. >> another group apparently shot them out because that car was riddled. all the windows were taken out. and there were bullet holes through, at least 30 bullet holes through the car. >> reporter: now, both the witnesses we talked with were actually at th

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