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tv   Up to the Minute  CBS  October 15, 2015 3:12am-4:01am PDT

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i look forward to having you at i look forward to having you at the event.
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part of the huge hunting fees they pay is to go to conservation and community projects. he told us it rarely does. blaming corrupt government officials. >> it is a problem. it is a real menace. people are in dire straits. and people can do almost anything in terms of selling their souls for a bit of silver. rancher
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. >> reporter: one district council received $150,000 in hunting fees, eight times the average salary. but villagers said they haven't seen any of it. what do you live on? how many dollars? >> nothing. >> reporter: nothing. not one cent. >> nothing. >> reporter: he wants to sell his goats for food. for now he lives off the meager crops he grows. unlike the villagers, it has running water and he showed us his thriving sun flowers. we were there today, with the sun and everything, the crops aren't doing there so well. they're really battling. >> you need to water them. >> reporter: really? but they didn't have water? >> unfortunately. >> reporter: yeah. in addition to schools and clinics, he told us the hunting fees also go to buy food. so why does everybody say they didn't have food? so are you saying they're lying to us? >> yeah, of course they are.
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>> reporter: they're lying to us? >> they are. because there's no one go hungry in this country. >> reporter: it is rare for illegal hunting to be prosecuted. this time the international outcry over cecil the lion resulted in not only a trial but partial ban of big game hunting on some of the farms bordering the national park. >> thank you, deborah. after a deadly outbreak of listeria, we have turned up more red flags about our food supply. and this church had londoners praying for peace and quiet. well, things in the bedroom have always been pretty good.
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right here on monday we reported former blue bell creamery workers complained about filthy conditions at a texas factory linked to an outbreak of listeria. turns out the outbreak had been going on for years. ten people got sick from the bacteria. three died. tonight, jim axelrod continues his investigation. >> reporter: richard porter and tina ettiger were patients at via christie saint francis hospital in wichita, kansas when
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they were both infected with listeria. they were treated by dr. tom moore and his colleagues. >> i think the public has an expectation, i think a reasonable expectation, that when they come to the hospital, that the food that's given to them is safe. >> reporter: they had been sickened by contaminated blue bell ice cream. porter survived the infection, ettiger did not. >> did our food safety system fail richard porter and tina ettiger? >> i believe it did. >> reporter: fda record show blue bell's own testing found listeria in its oklahoma plant as far back as 2013. the laws at the time did not require blue bell to share that information with regulators. michael taylor is the fda deputy commissioner for foods. do the current laws do enough to protect the most vulnerable americans. >> we don't think they do enough to protect all americans. that's why we have the 3,000 deaths annually from a wide
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range of pathogens. >> reporter: taylor says that will change with the implay men taegs of the food safety modernization act, the first overall of u.s. food safety laws in more than 70 years. the kind of practices we saw in the facility are what the new food safety law is intended to prevent. >> reporter: you are going from reactivity to prevention. >> exactly. that's the shift. >> reporter: the shift started this fall when the fda began implementing rules. with 1,000 inspectors for 100,000 facilities. taylor says they can't do it alone. >> the companies have to take responsibility for understanding the hazard in their facilities. >> reporter: you will never have the resources to be in every production facility every day. >> we have got to have a system that creates real accountability on the companies for doing the right thing for prevention every day. >> of course, the fda need money to make this all work. so far, congress has authorized
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just about 28% of what it's estimated they will need to fully implement the new law. >> we have learned so much in the series, jim. thank you very much. >> there was a close call at los angeles international airport. an airport worker drove onto a runway just as a jetliner carrying 78 people was cleared for takeoff. an alarm sounded in the tower, the pilot hit the brakes. nobody was hurt. a new warning about the potential dangers of dietary supplements coming next.
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today the government blamed dietary supplements for sending 23,000 people to the emergency room each year, and putting more than 2,000 of them in the hospital. dr. jon lapook is looking into this. >> reporter: two years ago when chris herrera was 15, he lost 56
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pound while taking a green tea extract build as a fat burner. his mom, lourdes gonzalez. >> him seeing the difference what one pill was doing, he probably decided to take more on his own without letting me know. >> but then his eyes turned yellow. medical tests showed his liver was failing. doctors blame the green tea extract. >> having to hear the doctor tell me every day that christopher had a 50% chance of dying and not making it was hurtful. >> reporter: herrera recovered. half of american adults use at least one supplement, so 23,000 emergency visits a year reflects a relatively low complication rate. but since these product don't need fda approval, the cdc says it is important to monitor their safety. weight loss and energy product accounted for 50% of visits. 5 to 34. most typical patients young adults. most common symptoms were
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cardiac. chest pain. elevated heart rate. dr. andrew geller of the cdc its the report's lead author. >> some dietary supplements may have benefits. but there are risks. we encourage patients to tell their physicians that they're taking dietary supplements and which ones. >> reporter: scott, patients don't tell doctors they're taking supplements they don't kid them real medications. supplements can have interact actions with med. bring your medicines to the doctor's office. throw them on the table. one by one go over what you are taking. >> thananan, doc. in london they asked not for whom the bell tolled, they asked if anyone could stop it. a technical glitch caused the bell at saint george to ring nonstop for 24 hours. the residents went nuts. one chimed in, have you tried turning it off and then on again. we don't know who finally fixed
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it. but he is our candidate for the nobel prize.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
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we end it we power couple into new media and old. here's chip reid. >> reporter: it is 4:30 a.m. when the first boat docks at martha's vineyard. every morning jan and his wife, moira load 2,000 pounds of newspapers into two beat up vans and hit the road. >> good morning. >> reporter: after losing their six-figure incomes in architecture and software during the recession, it was a way to make just enough money to stay on the island they loved. their friend on the mainland thought they had gone mad. >> i said, you know what, you should see the science, this place, in the morning. it's fantastic. i said you know what i will take a picture every day. send it to you.
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>> reporter: that's how it started. today they have 2,000 e-mail followers and 13,000 on facebook. >> the way the light strikes something. you think, i have to stop right now. take that picture. >> reporter: you are preoccupied. not even thinking about the paper route? >> no. sometimes, 25 minutes go by. i think maybe i should deliver some papers now. >> reporter: demand for their photos is so great they expanded into cards, calendars, even art exhibits. still they earn a fraction of what they used to make in their high pressure corporate jobs. >> 20%. >> you make 20% now. >> yeah. >> maybe. >> reporter: are you happier now? >> yeah. >> here. take this out. >> reporter: wow. beautiful. you were worried it would be too gray to get a photograph. >> there's always something. >> reporter: in the morning light here there is always something. >> i love that little boat.
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>> reporter: to brighten the day for thousand of their closest friends. chip reid, cbs news, martha's vineyard, massachusetts. and that's the "cbs overnight news" for this thursday. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm scott pelley.
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welcome to the overnight news. i'm jim axelrod. zimbabwe has decided not to bring charges against the dentist from minnesota who killed cecil the lion earlier this year on a big game hunt. cecil was the star attraction at a game park and was fitted with an electronic collar. walter palmer paid $55,000 for the hunt. the paperwork was in order. but the lion was illegally lured out of the park. the commercial hunter in charge of the safari will be in court today facing up to ten years in jail. the incident has triggered a fierce debate over trophy hunting in zimbabwe. deborah patta is there. >> reporter: behind me victoria
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falls together with zimbabwe's game reserves are major tourist attractions here. the riches are not shared, after 35 years of oppressive rule, the government is broke and the economy in ruins. the national park, former home to cecil the lion is being ravaged by zimbabwe's dire conditions. as a result conservation relies primarily on hunting. we spoke to a man who oversees the industry. how much money does the government give to the parks? >> nothing. zei zero. >> reporter: the parks turn to hunting. when the dentist was on a private hunt. 30% of fees for private hunts are supposed to be paid to the national parks. >> in most cases you find because of the bureaucratic natures of organization, most money may be consumed to a large extent through administration
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costs directly to conservation. >> reporter: if a hunt is on land owned by indigenous communities the community is to receive 100% of trophy hunting fees. this money administered by rural district council. we met its ceo near his thriving sunflower crops. >> we were there today with the sun and everything the crops aren't doing so well. they're battling. >> you need to water them. >> reporter: really. >> yeah. >> reporter: but they're out of walter. >> unfortunately. >> reporter: yeah, uh-huh. unlike the rural poor, he has running water. his council made over $600,000 in trophy fees over the past year. he claims that money is used to provide infrastructure and feeding schemes for local communities. but the villagers we spoke to say they haven't received a cent from the council. like this man who has not had a
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job for decades and does not have one dom lllar to his name. so where do you get your food from? >> from agriculture. >> reporter: by agriculture he means the few meager crops he is able to grow in a country that is facing a drought. why does everybody say they don't hatch food? are you saying they're look to us? >> yeah, of course they tar. >> reporter: they're league to us? >> they are. they are. yes. >> reporter: it is rare for illegal hunting to be prosecuted in zimbabwe. this time the international outcry over the shooting of cecil the lion resulted not only in a trial but a partial ban of big game hunting on some of the farms bordering the national park. sheriff in nevada want to court seeking a warrant to get a blood sample from lamar odom, former basketball player and reality tv star was found unconscious in a local brothel. he is hospitalized on life
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support. authority want to know what drugs he was taking. michelle miller has the story. >> reporter: according to the brothel's owner, odom had been partying for days. he said odom was looking to get away from everybody and having a good time. >> flipped it up. odom comes in. >> reporter: former los angeles laker star, lamar odom found unconscious at a brothel tuesday. rushed to sunrise hospital in las vegas. his nearly 7 foot frame too tall to be air lifted by helicopter. saturday, odom checked in at dennis hoff's love ranch south in crystal, nevada, dennis hoff is the brothel's owner. hoff says odom was drinking cognac and had taken herbal viagra like supplement, discovered unresponsive in his room by two women. off awe he was throwing up, terrible. the girls of course, were
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traumatized. >> odom, the winner of two of nba championships with the los angeles lakers, last played in the nba two years ago. his off the court struggles included an arrest in 2013 for driving under the influence. >> lamar, you do have to go to the dentist, baby. >> reporter: odom featured on reality tv show "keeping up with the kardashians" throughout his four year marriage to khloe. the two filed for divorce in 2013. several nba players have turned to socialed me y to show their support. miami heat star dwayne wade tweeted, prayers all the way up for my brother. odom's representatives have not responded to cbs this morning's request for comment. the nye county sheriff in nevada is investigating. our investigation into the deadly listeria outbreak linked to blue bell ice cream revealed the company may have been selling tainted product for years. the question now -- why did it
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take so long for the fda to discover this. >> reporter: richard porter and tina ettiger were patients at via christie saint francis hospital in wichita, kansas when they were both infected with listeria. they were treated by dr. tom moore and his colleagues. >> i think the public has an expectation, i think a reasonable expectation, that when they come to the hospital, that the food that's given to them is safe. >> reporter: they had been sickened by contaminated blue bell ice cream. porter survived the infection, ettiger did not. >> did our food safety system fail richard porter and tina ettiger? >> i believe it did. >> reporter: fda record show blue bell's own testing found listeria in its oklahoma plant as far back as 2013. the laws at the time did not require blue bell to share that information with regulators. michael taylor is the fda deputy commissioner for foods. do the current laws do enough to protect the most vulnerable
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americans. >> we don't think they do enough to protect all americans. that's why we have the 3,000 deaths annually from a wide range of pathogens. >> reporter: taylor says that will change with the implementation of the food safety modernization act, the first overall of u.s. food safety laws in more than 70 years. the kind of practices we saw in the facility are what the new food safety law is intended to prevent. >> reporter: you are going from reactivity to prevention. >> exactly. that's the shift. >> reporter: the shift started this fall when the fda began implementing rules. with 1,000 inspectors for 100,000 facilities. taylor says they can't do it alone. >> the companies have to take responsibility for understanding the hazard in their facilities. >> reporter: you will never have the resources to be in every production facility every day.
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it has been more than 40 years since richard nixon became the only president in u.s. history to resign from office. watergate was his undoing. now all these years later, new details of the scandal are emerging. david martin reports for "sunday morning." >> subcommittee will come to order. >> reporter: it was the biggest bombshell of the biggest political scandal in american history. >> mr. butterfield are you aware of the installation of any listening devices in the oval office of the president? >> i was aware of listening devices, yes, sir. >> reporter: white house aide alexander butterfield revealing
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the existence of the white house taping system to the senate watergate committee. >> when butterfield gave that dramatic testimony in july, 1973, it was a pivot point in watergate. >> reporter: reporter bob woodward along with carl bernstein famously exposed the machinations of the white house, tried and failed to interview butterfield. he passed the name on to the committee. >> do you think the tapes had ever been revealed had it not been for butterfield? >> probably would not have. >> reporter: turned out butterfield was sitting on a lot more secrets. 20 boxes full of them. >> this is the year, 1971. and each of these is a month. >> reporter: two years ago he turned over to woodward. >> reporter: did you ever, in your wildest dreams, think that you would one day collaborating with bob woodward of all people? >> no, not at all. >> reporter: what did you think
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when you walked into his apartment and you see the 20 boxes? >> i thought -- wow. let's start looking. >> reporter: the result is the last of the president's men, published by simon and schuster, a division of cbs. in adiagnosis to the documents. woodward spent 40 hours interviewing butterfield who for three years occupied the office next to the president's. >> first one to see hem every day. last one to see him every night. attending to all the need. >> reporter: when butterfield left he took his files with him. >> some of the documents are classified top secret. how did you just walk away with them from the white house? >> it was easy. i just walked away with them. i did the wrong thing. no one is supposed to do that. but i felt to tell you the truth, that, those papers were safer with me than with anyone. i had been around classified.
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that's no excuse. i am saying i wasn't going to show these to the wrong person. i was going to take good care of them. >> reporter: one top secret document reveals nixon's candid handwritten opinion of the bombing of vietnam. an angry scrawl across a report from henry kissinger. we have had ten years of total control of the air and laos and vietnam. the result zilch. and just the day before nextson told dan rather of cbs news, exactly the opposite. >> the results have been very, very effective. >> surely, nixon was not the first and won't be the last president to privately say things he would never say public. >> yeah, the level of contradiction and the depth of the fraud. >> reporter: according to woodward's research nixon ordered the military to drop nearly 3 million tons tough bombs and would order another million dropped in the year
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after the zilch memo. >> it send you to, send you into your heart and soul about, you know what are we doing? how did this happen? how could we have been led this way? it takes the concept of military leadership by a president turns it on its head. >> reporter: another document, this one in butterfield's handwriting details nixon's reaction to the massacre in which 504 vietnamese sill -- civilianed were slaughtered. >> get background of all involved. almost be disclosed. does credit witnesses. >> diskrez it rings a bell. we went to great lengths. >> reporter: butterfield wrote a memo about left wing affiliations of the soldier who
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first blue the whistle. and another aboutsy more hearst the reporter who broke the story. according to the memo. hearst received a grant from the edgar b. stern family fund which is clearly left wing and anti-administration. another vulnerable spot according to butterfield's notes, is the possible involvement of a lib jew. >> if the guy was a liberal jew, that was, material with which to, to discredit somebody. >> you are asking me things that are very difficult to explain about a very complicated man. >> reporter: a president who on a christmas eve tour of the old executive office building next to the white house, made a discovery that sparked a witch-hunt. >> some of the staff people, bureaucrats, civil servants had pictures of john f. kennedy on their desks. or on the wall. nixon said we have to get rid of
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that infestation, as if it was some sort of disease that somebody would have a picture of j.f.k. in their office. >> what were you supposed to do about these pictures of other presidents on the walls? >> get them all take ebb down. >> get them all taken down? >> yes. he made that an express order. roy in particular, white house chief of staff told butterfield the president would like you to find out who the woman is who has the two kennedy pictures. adding he asked about it once a week at least. butterfield reported back the cia secret service and fbi and house committee on unamerican activities all found the woman, a civil servant named edna rosenberg was a completely royal american. >> what's surprised is you go through all of this, the amount of energy that was devoted to
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these kind of maneuvers. this was a subversion of what the job of the presidency is. >> all of it documenteden butterfield's files. >> that's to holdeman. this is to the treasury secretary. this is to the social secretary for the white house. >> they really are sort of a record of what the president is thinking about on -- on any given day. >> yeah. >> some of them at least 40 years after, seem very, very strange. >> yes, they do. >> did they? did they seem strange at the time? >> in this strange environment, no. >> nothing of course was stranger than the break in at democratic national committee headquarters in the watergate. that third rate burglary which brought down the president. butterfield was not in on it but knew about the taping system
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that could answer the question, what did the president know? when did he know it? >> listen, the last thing i wanted to do was be the person who gave away the secret. holdeman and i told the president we would never tell. >> reporter: then a retired fbi agent, donald sanders, a member of the watergate committee staff, wound up an otherwise routine interview by asking exactly the right question. >> do you remember the question? >> exactly. >> how did it go? >> was there ever any other listening device in the oval office? that was the, and i said, i think i said, my, i'm ser you asked that question. i'm sorry you asked that question. >> history flips right there. >> i knew what i was saying, getting into. i really knew what it meant. >> when you look back at at now. would you have done anything differently in the way you handled that explosive secret of the taping system? >> no, i thought of that a lot.
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>> i bet. >> i regret nothing. i didn't do everything right. but i satisfied myself that -- that i didn't tell a lie. >> reporter: it was of course the tapes that revealed the president had obstructed justice by ordering the cover-up of the water gaergate break in. nixon resigned. butterfield faded into retirement in california. >> the meeting presidents have before they go up to the capital to -- be sworn in as the new president. >> reporter: now he is back to teach us all one of the basic lessons of journalism. there is always more to the story. >> there is the preside your clever moves won't stop the cold and flu.
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an infant is one of the latest and youngest faces of the ep d epidemic of gun violence. laid to rest one week after hit by a stray bullet riding in a car in cleveland. police have no suspect or motive. her father spoke to us for our series "voices against violence." >> reporter: it was a crime so unimaginable it left cleveland police chief calvin williams at a loss for word. >> it's tough.
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this should not be happening. >> reporter: 5-month-old avielle wakefield is the third child killed by a gun in cleveland in the last month. charles wakefield is her father. >> never did i wake up thinking that was going to be my last day seeing her. >> reporter: what do you think that says about this city? >> i'm speechless. i'm going to strive for my baby's justice for cleveland and this nation. we need it. >> reporter: her death adds to a spiking gun homicide rate in cleveland up 22%. a dozen other cities have seen an increase in homicides including st. louis. jennifer joyce is the top prosecutor and says murders by guns are up 51%. this is a very complex problem. there is no, you know, silver
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bullet pardon the pun to solve gun violence not in st. louis not anywhere. >> reporter: her office launched this website to tell the stories of the victims and also the offenders. >> i think the mass shootings as concerning and troubling as they are they get a lot of the focus when we talk about gun violence opposed to the day-to-day shootings in our cities that are really piling up a lot more in terms of body count than the mass shootings are. >> do you think there will be other parents like you? >> i hate to say this, but yeah. yep. there is going to be somebody else. >> reporter: the other two children who were killed here in cleveland in the last month were ages 3 and 5. scott, in the last four years, more than 500 children under the age of 12 were killed by guns in this country. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
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the latest e craze in office furniture. the standing desk. companies are ordering them for employees and the white house wants them for presidential staff. the trend is moving from the office to the classroom. maria villareal reports. >> down. >> reporter: at this elementary school in san rafael, california. >> our hand are here, my friend. >> reporter: motivating students to move is more than just their morning routine. it's an all-day commitment that starts with these standing desks. >> gets your legs working so you are not like i can't move. because you get stiff. >> reporter: their favorite feature is the aptly named fidget bar. >> how does it help you focus? >> it burns off lots of my
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energy so i can concentrate without wiggling around in the chairs. >> reporter: 19 of the 22 classrooms have standing des ticks. the last three will be converted by the end of the year. >> i'm so excited for them and thrilled we found a way to make them more excited about school. >> reporter: principal tracy smith says initially students got tired from standing all day. within a few months they were focused, confident and productive in the classroom. studies show allowing kids to move during the day can improve grade up to 15% and helps kids burn 25% more calories. the doctor says there isn't data on the long term effects of kids using standing desks but the physical benefits are immediate. >> you increase the muscle tone in your legs. seems to be an improvement in actually circulation and arterial function and expending a few calories extra every hour
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can lead to big changes. >> reporter: but those big changes can come with a big price tag. it can cost up to $6,000 to convert a single classroom. that's why some schools are experimenting with alternatives like yoga balls to increase core stability, exercise bikes for read/ride programs, or bands like these to keep kids active. >> my ultimate goal is to have the federal government take notice at a minimum when a new school is built, a given standing desks will be the norm. >> reporter: while it may take time to catch on around the country. these kids are proud to be taking a stand. >> and sitting for too long is the new smoking. >> reporter: for cbs this morning, maria villareal, california. >> that's the "cbs overnight news" for this thursday. for some of you the news continue thousands. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new
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york city, i'm jim axelrod. captioning funded by cbs captioning funded by cbs it's thursday, october 15th, 2015. this is the "cbs morning news." travel slows down at some of the nation's busiest airports. computers used to manager terror watch lists go down. no sanctuary. a teenager is beaten to death and his brother badly injured. authorities say the attack was carried out by relatives trying to get them to confess to their sins. a major restaurant group is leaving gratuity off the check. why it will no longer ask signers to leave a tip for the wait staff. and blue jay fans are flipping

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