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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  November 18, 2016 3:12am-4:01am PST

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position today, scott. newt gingrich said he wants to be free to plan strategically at all levels of government. >> nancy cordes. thanks so much, nancy. tonight a new and sinister picture is emerging in the shooting deaths of three american soldiers this month in jordan. an important u.s. ally in the middle east. david martin is following this. >> reporter: as army sergeant james moriarty's body came home, u.s. officials said a video of the incident in which he and two other american soldiers were killed appears to show a deliberate terrorist attack, not as was first believed a tragic accident. the three soldiers were all green berets working for the cia in jordan, training syrian rebels. u.s. officials say security camera video shows several american vehicles stopped in broad daylight at the entrance to the jordanian airfield where the green berets were based.
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the first was allowed to pass through the gate, but then a guard suddenly opened fire on the second vehicle, killing both americans inside. the americans in the third and fourth vehicles jumped out and started returning fire. the jordanian guard shot and killed one of them before he was wounded by the other. jordanian officials originally blamed the americans for failing to stop at gate. but the u.s. embassy in jordan said in a statement, "there is absolutely no credible evidence they did not follow proper procedures." the fbi is leading the investigation, but so far has been unable to question the shooter because he is in a medically induced coma. john? >> david martin at the pentagon. thank you, david. in morocco today nearly 200 countries reaffirmed their support for the global climate agreement reached in paris last year. many are worried president-elect trump will pull out of the deal. further south in africa climate change is taking a toll own dajd
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mountain gorillas. mark phillips has more in his ongoing series "the climate diaries." >> reporter: there's a population up there on the slopes of these volcanic peaks in central africa that knows nothing of arguments in washington about climate change. but the famous gorillas in the mist do know something is going on. they know the bamboo chutes that make up a major part of their diet and which used to sprout like clockwork are now less predictable. the rains that produced them were a month late this year. the gorillas have had to adapt their roaming and foraging path patterns because the old seasonal rhythms of food production have altered. their world is changing. these guys are the 800-pound gorillas in the room except of course they really weigh in at about 400 pounds and they're not in control of event, they're the potential victims of them.
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the gorilla's problems are made worse by the troubles of their distant cousins and close neighbors, people. because the late rains have also made the water supply down in the valleys less reliable, local villagers have been going up into gorilla country where they're not supposed to go to bring that good mountain water home. and park ranger abel musana says water isn't the only thing people are after. >> when there is that kind of change and -- drought 37. >> reporter: drought? >> drought, yes. the harrest will be impacted and people are coming to invade the habitat which is for gorillas. >> when people are low on food they come into the park looking for food. >> yes. >> reporter: the human population has ballooned in the areas surrounding the park and when these people are forced up the mountains, david grier of the world wildlife fund's great
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apes program says they bring disease and other dangers with them. >> they have to enterritory park to get action to this clean water. in the mean time they might want to set a snare for kafg an ungulate for food. >> an antelope or something. >> right. >> but some poor ape steps in it p. >> exactly. >> reporter: that's what happened to this gorilla films bay "60 minutes" team a few months ago. the snare was removed by a vet who has helped the ape population increase lately. still there are only about 880 mountain gorillas left in the world all here, confined to these mountain tops. they're already considered critically endangered. and as their world changes, they have nowhere to go. mark phillips, cbs news in volcano national park, r wapdwa. coming up next, how facebook and twitter are changing after the lekelection.
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and later, there's no slowing down this old cowboy at roundup time. i'm here in bristol, virginia. and now...i'm in bristol, tennessee. on this side of the road is virginia... and on this side it's tennessee. no matter which state in the country you live in, you could save hundreds on car insurance by switching to geico. look, i'm in virginia... i'm in tennessee... virginia... tennessee... and now i'm in virginessee. see how much you could save on car insurance. or am i in tennaginia? hmmm... mthat stuff only lasts a few hours. or, take mucinex. one pill fights congestion for 12 hours. guess i won't be seeing you for a while. why take medicines that only last 4 hours, when just one mucinex
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in germany today president obama called the spread of fake news online a threat to democracy. facebook and other social media sites are being criticized for not doing enough to stop bogus stories that seem to dominate the election cycle. jericka duncan has more on this. >> reporter: when a satirical website headlined a story "pope francis shocks the world, backs trump," the fake news went viral. waves of false headlines on social media have turned readers into believers. this week social media giants facebook and google said they will go after hoax websites by restricting ad revenue. facebook is also planning to launch a program allowing users to flag fake news. journalism professor jeff jarvis. >> the slope is very slick, if we try to make facebook and google and company into censors. you can't find a position that just because somebody doesn't like it and doesn't trust it it gets killed. it would be very dangerous to
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have blacklists and to ban sites, i think. >> reporter: twitter is taking a different approach. a new feature rolling out this week allows users to mute key words, phrases and even entire conversations. tuesday it suspended several accounts supported by white nationalists, including richard spencer's, a leader of the alt-right movement, which is based on white identity. >> are you an advocate for an all-white united states of america? >> no. i don't think that is going to happen. i want to first raise consciousness of who we are amongst europeans in the united states. and second, i want to promote policies that really have a realistic chance of being implemented by the donald trump administration. >> reporter: twitter's rules prohibit violence, threats, harassment and hateful conduct. a spokesperson from twitter says they don't comment on accounts they've suspended for privacy and security reasons.
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john? >> thank you, jericka. coming up, the first flakes in a city that was sweltering one day ago. it's judgment day. back seat chefs peer inside your oven. but you've cleaned all baked-on business from meals past with easy-off, so the only thing they see is
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illinois is recovering from a tremendous gas explosion last night. surveillance cameras captured the moment it happened. a worker repairing a gas leak was killed. about a dozen other people were hurt. windows were shattered blocks away. across the southeast 50 large wildfires have destroyed about 120,000 acres from alabama to virginia. arson is suspected in many of them. arrests have been made in tennessee and kentucky. a large fire in georgia was sparked by lightning. in the west snow is finally falling in colorado, utah, and wyoming. some areas could get eight inches or more tonight. it had been unusually warm in the rockies, 80 degrees yesterday in denver. up next, hoofs pounding, hearts racing. it's roundup time.
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our final stop tonight is home on the range, where hundreds of the nation's most treasured animals will be auctioned off over the weekend. of course, you can't sell them till you round them up. and chip reid got to ride with the trail boss. >> reporter: the earth rumbles
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as 1,100 buffalo stampede across the south dakota prairie while about 60 volunteer cowboys and cowgirls ride herd, including -- >> okay, i want somebody to sit right here. >> reporter: -- 81-year-old bob lantis. >> i don't care who. two people. if you ain't in there and charging you're about right. >> reporter: this spur-jingling, chaps-wearing buck arao has participated in the nation's biggest buffalo roundup of its kind for the past 45 years. so what's the best part of the roundup, bob? >> well, to me it's the run. when you're actually pushing the buffalo and they're running just as hard as they can run, we're running as hard as we can run, it's an adrenaline-kicking son of a gun, i'll tell you that for a fact. >> reporter: a lot of fun, yes, but a buffalo can weigh 2,000 pounds, and some of them have an altitude. just ask first-timer chris richgels. >> well, i had a bull turn and come at me on my horse and we had to boogie out of there
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pretty quick. it made for a memorable event. >> reporter: more than 30 million buffalo once roamed the u.s., but in the 1800s they were slaughtered by pioneers almost to extinction. today one of the country's largest wild herds calls custer state park home. there's a purpose to this roundup. >> yes, very definitely. >> it's for the health of the herd. >> health of the herd, to hold the herd in a manageable number so that they don't overgraze the land. >> ready. >> reporter: after the roundup they're vaccinated, calves are branded and some cows are sold. for landis it never gets old. >> when you quit doing your thing you that like to do, you're going to die. >> team, spread out across here. >> reporter: for this cowboy living a good long life means making your home where the buffalo roam. chip reid, cbs news, in the black hills of south dakota. that's the "overnight news" for this friday. for some of you the news continues.
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for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and of course "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm john dickerson. >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the overnight news. i'm michelle miller. world leaders meeting at the u.n. climate change summit in morocco called on all nations to make the highest political commitment to addressing the rise in global temperatures. many at the meeting are concerned that president-elect donald trump will pull the u.s. out of the paris climate treaty. mr. trump has called climate change a hoax and several of the names being mentioned to head the environmental protection agency agree with him. here's the president-elect on the campaign trail last may. >> we're going to cancel the paris climate agreement and stop -- [ applause ]
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unbelievable. and stop all payments of the united states tax dollars to u.n. global warming programs. >> reporter: scientists say climate change is melting glaciers as well as the snow caps of the north and south pole, leading to a rise in sea levels. but the effects can also be felt in the heart of africa. as mark phillips found out in his series "the climate diaries." >> reporter: there's a population up there on the slopes of these volcanic peaks in central africa that knows nothing of arguments in washington about climate change. but the famous gorillas in the mist do know something is going on. they know the bamboo shoots that make up a major part of their diet and which used to sprout like clockwork are now less predictable. the rains that produced them were a month late this year. the gorillas have had to adapt their roaming and foraging patterns because the old seasonal rhythms of food production have altered.
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their world is changing. these guys are the 800-pound gorillas in the room except of course they really weigh in at about 400 pounds and they're not in control of events. they're the potential victims of them. ♪ the gorillas' problems are made worse by the troubles of their distant cousins and close neighbors, people. because the late rains have also made the water supply down in the valleys less reliable, local villagers have been going up into gorilla country where they're not supposed to go to bring that good mountain water home. and park ranger abu musana says water isn't the only thing people are after. >> that's kind of change in when drought. >> yes. drought. >> drought. they will be impacted and the people are coming between the habitat for gorillas -- >> when the people are low on food they come into the park
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looking for food. >> yeah. >> reporter: the human population has ballooned in the area surrounding the park. and when these people are forced up the mountains, david grier of the world wildlife fund's great apes program says they bring disease and other dangers with them. >> they have to enterritory the park to access this clean water. in the meantime they might want to set a snare to catch a ungulate or something. >> an antelope. >> exactly. >> but an ape might step in it. >> reporter: that's what happened to this gorilla a few months ago. the snare was removed by one of the vets whose work is to help the ape population increase lately. still there are only about 880 mountain gorillas left. in the world. all here, confined to these mountaintops. they're already considered critically endangered. and as their world changes they
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have nowhere to go. mark phillips, cbs news, in volcano national park, rwanda. believe it or not, it's the pentagon that leads the way in green technology. america's most advanced jet fighter can take to the skies without using a drop of oil for fuel. and the navy has an entire green fleet. don dahler reports. >> reporter: this ea-18 growler can go over 1,100 miles an hour. it cost $68 million. and it's flying on 100% sbo fuel, made from things like kitchen grease and plant seeds. secretary of the navy, ray mavis. >> the engine doesn't function any differently with bio fuels? >> it may burn a little cleaner. but no. otherwise, the engine doesn't notice a different. >> reporter: in 2009 mavis committed the navy to 50% usage of alternative fuels by the year 2020. >> why has thi been such a 50 c
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being brought into afghanistan. that's too high a price to pay. >> until reechtly petroleum had to be added to bio fuel to pack enough punch to be feasible but a panama city company a.r.a. was working on a process to make sterile waters in remote areas when they stumbled on a way to make bio fuel identical to petroleum. >> we make jet and'll. >> all the same molecules as petroleum crude but from a feed stock. >> one of those feed stocks is ethiopian mustard seeds that can be grown in arid ground and be useds a rotation crop. also waste grease from water treatment plants and kitchens. ara's senior vice president glen mcdonald saw an opportunity for his company and the world. >> i lope that one day all diesel vehicles are operated with our fuel. i hope that all commercial jets are operated with our fuel.
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>> reporter: as for the u.s. navy that goal is well under way. alternative fuels now power 30% of naval ships and 50% of its bases. don dahler, cbs news, panama city, florida. facebook's plan to remove fake news stories from its site is raising some questions about whether that amounts to a violation of free speech. but a new study shows that people who get their news from facebook are looking at more fake stories than real ones. jericka duncan reports. >> reporter: when a satirical website headlined a story "pope francis shocks the world, backs trump," the fake news went viral. waves of false headlines on social media have turned readers into believers. this week social media giant facebook and google said they will go after hoax websites by restricting ad revenue. facebook is also planning to launch a program allowing users to flag fake news. journalism professor jeff
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jarvis. >> the slope is very slick if we try to make facebook and google and company into censors. you can't find a position that just because somebody doesn't like it and doesn't trust it it gets killed. it would be very dangerous to have blacklists and to fan sites i think. >> twitter is taking a different approach. a new feature rolling out this week allows users to mute key words, phrases and en entire conversations. tuesday it suspended several accounts supported by white nationalists including richard spencer's, a leader of the alt-right movement which is based on white identity. are you an advocate for an all-white united states of america? >> no. i don't think that is going to happen. i want to first raise consciousness of who we are amongst europeans in the united states. and second i want to promote po ♪ silent night ♪ holy night
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♪ sleep in heavenly peace ♪ sleep in heavenly peace mthat stuff only lasts a few hours. or, take mucinex. one pill fights congestion for 12 hours. guess i won't be seeing you for a while. why take medicines that only last 4 hours, when just one mucinex lasts 12 hours? let's end this.
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presidential election just was not the same without jon stewart. he left "the daily show" last summer, just as the campaign was heating up. turns out he spent the past few months writing a book about his 16 years on comedy central. charlie rose sat down with him for a post-election analysis. >> we just went through an election. >> what? >> yes. your reaction to this election? surprise? >> surprise -- >> fear? >> it all ties together. well, fear. you know, here's what i would honestly say. i don't believe we are a fundamentally different country today than we were two weeks ago. the same country, with all its grace and flaws and volatility and insecurity and strength and resilience exists today as
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existed two weeks ago. the same country that elected donald trump elected barack obama. i feel badly for the people for whom this election will mean more uncertainty and insecurity. but i also feel like this fight has never been easy and the ultimate irony of this election is the cynical strategy of the republicans, which is our position is government doesn't work, we are going to make sure that it doesn't -- >> drain the swamp. >> but they're not draining the swamp. mcconnell and ryan, those guys are the swamp. and what they decided to do was i'm going to make sure government doesn't work and then i'm going to use its lack of working as evidence of it. donald trump is a reaction not just to democrats but to republicans. he's not a republican. he's a repudiation of republicans. but they will reap the benefit of his victory.
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in all of their cynicism and all of their -- i will guarantee you republicans are going to come to jesus now about the power of government. i think i would rather have this conversation openly and honestly than in dog whistles. somebody was saying there might be an anti-semite that's working in the white house. and i'm like have you listened to the nixon tapes? forget about advising the president. the president. like have you read lbj? do you know our history? you know, this is -- and we also have to caution ourselves to the complexity of that history. i thought donald trump disqualified himself at numerous points. but there is now this idea that anyone who voted for him is -- has to be defined by the worst of his rhetoric. while there are guys in my neighborhood like that i love, that i respect that i think have incredible qualities who are not afraid of mexicans and not afraid of muslims and not afraid of blacks, they're afraid of their insurance premiums.
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in the legal community you hate this idea of creating people as a monolith. don't look at muslims as a monolith. they are individuals. it would be ignorance. but everybody who voted for trump is a monolith, is a racist. that hypocrisy is also real in our country. and so this is the fight that we wage against ourselves and each other because america's not natural. natural is tribal. we're fighting against thousands of years of human behavior and history to create something that no one's ever -- that's what's exceptional about america, and that's what's -- like this ain't easy. it's an incredible thing. >> well, words of wisdom from jon stewart. well, there's a teenager in rochester, new york who is wise beyond his years. jeffrey rogers is a self-made freelance journalist, and he's overcome a lot for an eighth-grader. demarco morgan has his story. >> i get out of school. if i have any homework i'll try to do it at least. and i go downstairs to my office
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in the basement. i listen to the scanner and follow up on any stories that i have. this is my little newsroom. >> you've got a newsroom in your home? >> reporter: jeffrey rogers spends his time after school here, looking for answers in his hometown. when you show up to a fire, you show up to a scene, what's the first thing you do? >> well, i actually stand back because i don't want to get yelled at by officers and stuff, and i ask people around did they see anything, what happened. >> breaking news. a car crashed right here -- >> reporter: the 14-year-old cub reporter, who taught himself how to operate a camera and audio equipment created his own news broadcasts, jeffrey show live, last year. >> a the bus is 20 minutes late. we have cars, streets, multiple accidents today. >> reporter: when did you say i want to become a reporter? >> it was about three years ago when i seen a car crash right up there. i just seen three news teams pull up. i started asking questions and stuff. a year or two later i got an iphone and that's where it just
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hit off. >> can you explain to me what happened today? >> sure. we responded here about 2:37. >> are they ever intimidated by your hard questions? do you ask hard questions or do you go easy on them? >> sometimes they can't answer some of my questions. that makes me mad. by just keep going, go around the question trying to be slick with it and just make sure i get that question. >> so you've already learned how to be slick. >> yeah. >> like a real journalist. how to get it. >> yeah, i'm slick. >> he was so into covering his news beat that he knew when the new police chief is coming on for the day. >> reporter: michael simonelli rochester's police chief gave the eighth-grader working police credentials. >> he's formed a bond with the police in that neighborhood. >> reporter: in this canadian border he says people want to see their neighbors succeed and police are there to help. >> we're very impressed, i'm always looking for him out there, and we're really hoping he pursues his passion and we're going to do everything we can to support that. >> i am very proud. >> reporter: jeffrey's mom, lacarla carter. >> don't be out too late.
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and make sure, you know, other people, other reporters are around to protect you. >> all these officers out here, they've got my back. officer stan kaminsky, he's a good officer. he helped me with everything. he helped me when i was getting bullied. >> police say this was a misunderstanding. >> reporter: turns out jeffrey's curiosity about the police and the neighborhood he cares so much about left him open to bullying. >> now the kids are like oh, he's with the police? oh, let's beat him up. stuff like that. >> reporter: they didn't like you because you were befriending cops. >> yeah. >> reporter: tired of the bullying from his peers, jeffrey took his concerns directly to city hall. >> about two years ago he caught me up and said mayor, i'm getting bullied in my neighborhood and i want to know what you're going to do about it. >> reporter: lovely warren is the city's mayor. >> so he told me he wanted me to come over to his house and he wanted to interview me because he was a -- the youngest reporter and i said i have got to meet this kid. >> they'd hang up on me.
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of course not. i want to accomplish something. >> can i ask you a quick question? >> i see her all the time now. it's so amazing how i got so close to somebody. it's like i just met the president. >> here you have this young kid that was standing up for himself and he was saying, listen, i know that government is supposed to serving me and help me. >> how can we stop crime? >> reporter: by asking questions the teen made the city's elected officials work for him. the chief says he and the mayor have a shared vision for building trust in their community. >> we're trying to incorporate this culture into our police department where part of the working day when time permits for these officers to get out of their cars, anywhere they can interact with people on positive level. >> reporter: two hours a night, one day at a time, jeffrey says he knows progress can be slow and that means keeping his eyes and his camera focused firmly on the future. >> i want to be something big. i want to be actually remembered i want to be actually remembered in this world. i'll take it from here. i'm good. i just took new mucinex clear and cool.
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ah! what's this sudden cooooling thing happening? it's got a menthol burst. you can feel it right away. wow, that sort of blind-sided me. and it clears my terrible cold symptoms. ahh! this is awkward. new mucinex fast-max clear & cool. feel the menthol burst. and clear your worst cold symptoms. start the relief. ditch the misery. let's end this.
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back seat chefs peer inside your oven. but you've cleaned all baked-on
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business from meals past with easy-off, so the only thing they see is that beautiful bird. go ahead. let 'em judge. johnny marr was the guitarist for the groundbreaking band the smiths. but since the band broke up we've heard very little from marr here in the u.s. he's got a new autobiography in the stores, and he sat down for a chat with our own anthony mason. ♪ i used to want it all >> reporter: as a guitarist johnny marr has played with paul mccartney, the talking heads,
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and beck and now fronts his own band. but he's still best known for his five short years with the smiths. ♪ ♪ i am the sun ♪ i am the earth the group he formed in manchester, england in 1982 with lead singer steven morrissey. >> what did you have in common? >> we had desperation we had in common. a lot of desperation. ♪ >> reporter: their success in britain, 18 chart hits, was never equaled here. but many consider the smiths, with marr's jangly git s lly gu morrissey's brooding vocals -- ♪ and heaven knows i'm miserable now ♪ -- the most influential british band of the '80s. ♪ and heaven knows >> it might not be everybody's cup of tea, the smiths, which i understand, and i'm actually quite okay with. it was unique and it was well
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played. >> mm-hmm. why are you okay with it not being some people's cup of tea? >> because then you just turn into kind of one of those vanilla bands. >> and you don't want to be -- >> no. it's nice to be one of those bands that polarize opinion. you know, all my favorite bands, you kind of love them or hate them. >> reporter: but by 1986 marr began to hate the drama in his own band. he was drinking heavily. then came the crash. literally. >> i got out of the car and had to check that i was alive. >> did it clear your head in some way? >> the car crash cleared my head massively because before that i was staying up late, drinking too much, doing drugs. but it was a wake-up call, 100%, yeah. ♪ i know it's over >> reporter: a year later he quit the smiths and the group disbanded. was that painful? >> yeah, it was really painful. it was super painful. >> reporter: but marr moved on,
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playing with the pretenders, the the, and with new order's bernard sumner in electronic. ♪ i love you more than you love me ♪ >> i got to get partners who were really strong mentally. and had a strong enough sense of themselves to deal with the fact that they were harboring a smith. which was -- >> reporter: harboring a smith. that's a great expression. >> in the british music press it was tantamount to treason. >> reporter: marr scored his first number one album in america in 2007. ♪ when he joined the band modest mouse. but fans still root for a reunion of the smiths. what fans get surprised is they assume you've been offered gazillions of dollars to get back together and they can't believe you won't take it. >> we have been offered gazillions of dollars to get babbling together.
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>> reporter: and nearly did. marr writes in his book that he reunited with morrissey at a pub in 2008 and then "suddenly we were talking about the band reforming." but after a few days there was radio silence. >> i'd been enjoying having a catch-up with someone i used to be really close with years ago. a long time. >> steve: y >> reporter: you don't think it's going to happen? >>, i don't think it's going to happen, no. >> reporter: johnny marr may have jumped between bands throughout his career but one thing has remained constant, his partnership with his wife angie. you've been with angie since you were -- >> 15. >> reporter: how have you done that? >> yeah. it's the smartest thing -- see, the one real evidence of intelligence. yeah, very, very unusual and,,
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legendary singer-songwriter bob dylan says he's proud to be awarded the nobel prize for literature but he won't be attending the awards ceremony. it's a white tie affair to be held next month in sweden. dylan claims he has pre-existing commitments. critics say he's just being annoying. after news of the award was released dylan dodged the nobel prize people for two weeks, refusing to take their calls. his website makes no mention of the award. it also shows he will not be on tour next month. so what's up with bob? vladimir duthier has a look. ♪ eclipses both the sun and moon ♪ ♪ to understand you knew too soon ♪ ♪ there's no sense in trying >> reporter: if song lyrics are poetry, then bob dylan is its patron saint. ♪ hey mr. tambourine man the prolific songwriter has produced more than 650 songs in
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his storied career, setting the phone for generations of performers. shawn willentz is the author of "bob dylan in america." >> i don't think you have eminem without bob dylan. ♪ johnny's in the basement mixing up the medicine ♪ >> reporter: dylan now says he plans to accept the nobel prize for literature, just not in person. >> do you think of yourself primarily as a singer or as a poet? >> i think of myself more as a song and dance man, you know. >> reporter: never a stranger to controversy, dylan has carefully managed his image over the decades. often appearing reclusive. >> he wants to live that life the way he wants to live it. he doesn't need anybody else to tell him how to do that. i don't see that as reclusiveness. i see it as mastering fame. ♪ i'm sick of love >> reporter: yet even at 75 dylan still performs more than 100 shows each year as part of his neverending tour. in a rare interview in 2004 he told "60 minutes" correspondent ed bradley why. >> it goes back to the destiny thing. i made a bargain with it, you
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know, a long time ago and i'm holding up my end. >> what was your bargain? >> to get where i am now. >> he told ed bradley that he knew that destiny was looking right at him. >> he says that in his book, destiny was looking right at him and nobody else. ♪ young >> reporter: vladimir duthier, new york. ♪ forever young ♪ may you stay and that's the overnight news for this friday. for some of you the news continues and for others we hope you'll check back with us a little later for the morning news and of course "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center here in new york city, i'm michelle miller. captioning funded by cbs
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it's friday, november 18th, 2016. this is the "cbs morning news." president-elect donald trump picks his national security adviser. the retired army general comes with experience and controversy. >> he now has to transition to governance. >> from rallying cries for change to running a country. president obama lays out how the president-elect could be a unifying leader. >> you cannot do that. a warrant. >> an arizona police officer punches a whooman. now she is out of jail

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