Skip to main content

tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  December 5, 2016 3:00am-4:01am PST

3:00 am
the deadliest fire in oakland's history. authorities confirm dozens were lost when a party inside a warehouse erupted into flames. we're learning more about the young victims and the building many warned was a firetrap. >> also tonight a series of reports from overseas. we're in rome for a european election some say could be bigger than brexit. >> in cuba for the final farewell to fidel castro. and aleppo. the city that could soon be recaptured by assad. >> plus, the saga of the sequoia, during a long legal battle, the former presidential yacht has faded into squalor. what's being done to save this
3:01 am
historic ship? >> what's the status? >> status of the vessel -- we need to protect it immediately and get it through the winter. ♪ ♪ >> announcer: this is the cbs "overnight news." welcome to the "overnight news," i'm elaine quijano. at least 33 bodies recovered from a converted warehouse that burned to the ground in oakland this week end. officials expect to find more as they search what's left of the building. friday night it was packed with artists and musicians at a party. for some, the only way out was a rickety make shift staircase. before the tragedy, there were complaints the warehouse was a cluttered firetrap. carter evans is a the scene. >> reporter: video from inside the warehouse dubbed ghost ship shows the underground party an hour before flames tore through the building. when it was over, the warehouse that was elaborately decorated with eclectic art, persian rugs and musical instruments was
3:02 am
reduced to rubble with what could turn out to be dozens of people trapped inside. from a fire perspective how danger ruz was dangerous was it? >> incredibly. the fire load, i have never seen so much stuff in a building ever. >> battalion chief, melinda draton says firefighters are going through the ashes by hand, one bucket at a time searching for victims. >> when i started we found the first one instantaneously. three grouped together. six grouped together. four grouped together. and then another single. >> what does that tell you? >> we are looking at body on top of each other. it does not appear that they were able to get out of the second floor. >> people who lived here, say the warehouse had been converted into dozens of artists studios with no sprinklers or smoke alarms. advertisement online lists one for $500 a month. oakland city councilman, noel gal low confirmed the building
3:03 am
was never permitted as residents and under investigation. >> councilman, who should be held responsible? >> for one, the prompt owner. heave owns the facility. he clearly, he knows what the permit process is, he knows what the fire code is. >> do you think the city should be held responsible? >> at the same time, yes. absolutely. including all of us should be held responsible. because we all know it. >> cbs news has learned the district attorney has been here to review the scene himself. elaine, the next step would be for him to determine if any charges are to be filed. either criminal or civil against a building owner. >> carter evans in oakland, california. carter thank you. mireya villarreal has more on the agonizing wait for loved ones of the missing. less than a mile from the burned out warehouse, family and friend gather hoping for any news. karen west knew 28-year-old mica danmeier all his life. >> we haven't heard from him through social media or phone calls. >> also missing, 33-year-old,
3:04 am
chelsea faith dolan. >> chelsea faith mentored. >> reporter: standing feet away from the ghost ship warehouse when the fire started. several of his friend were inside. 34-year-old johnny igas posted on facebook friday he was set to perform at the event but hasn't been seen since. >> johnny, made a genuine attempt to, you know, lift everybody abound him up. >> reporter: but watched as flames consumed the building. >> very quickly we realize a lot of people that we knew were not coming out. >> been doing it for like over ten years. >> reporter: 36-year-old joseph matlock, joey casio was featured in the 2012 music segment. reported missing by his mother. >> chase wittenhauer, was reported missing by friends after they saw an image of his car near the warehouse in news reports. so far the alameda sheriff's department reached out to two
3:05 am
dozen families with heartbreaking news. >> we have sat down with them. we have cried with them. we have spent hours and hours with them. >> reporter: as authority work to recover and identify more victims reality has set in. turning hope into reflection. >> all of these folks were, were very warm and gentle and had a really genius spark to, to what they did. that's why they were altogether. >> over the past 24 hours this is where families have come to try to find more information on their loved ones. the coroner is still trying to identify the bodies that have been pulled from the rubble. it is a difficult task for both the law enforcement involved and the families that are still waiting. elaine. >> mireya villarreal, thank you. officials in boston are investigating the cause of a ten alarm fire in cambridge yesterday. 15 structures were damaged or destroyed. up to 80 people are out of their homes. one official said it is a
3:06 am
miracle no one was killed. victory in north dakota tonight for native american groups who have been fighting the construction of a controversial oil pipeline. protesters cheered when they heard the army corps of engineers will not grant an easement for the pipeline to cross into the standing rock sioux reservation. the builders will have to reroute the pipeline. former cuban dictator, fidel castro laid to rest. in a private ceremony in santiago, cuba. the ninth final day of mourning on the island nation. we are in havana. >> reporter: for all the pomp and circumstance of the public memorials here on the island, the final ceremony for fidel castro was quiet, and private. his ashes were buried at the cemetery, the resting place of many revolutionary fighters, and the icon of cuban independence of san marte. in attendance mostly family
3:07 am
members. it was a stark contrast from saturday night's massive rally, known as the birth place of castro's revolution. thousand listened to raul castro eulogize his late brother. raul castro said the nation would commit to maintaining socialist ideals and pass a law forbidding the naming of streets. parks or buildings after fidel. he said it is the way his brother wanted it. that may ring insincere to many cuban americans who believe castro's revolution was solely about monopolizing power, imprisoning opponents, taking away freedoms and forcing others into exile in the five decade he ruled. now the question is whether the current castro regime and the incoming trump administration will build on the re-establishment of diplomatic ties between both countries, or revert to distant neighbors. elaine? >> manuel, thank you. coming up next, we are in aleppo, the city that could soon
3:08 am
fall to syrian and russian forces. >> and, later, how the presidential ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
3:09 am
3:10 am
president elect trump returns to the business of filling his administration tomorrow. over the weekend, mr. trump shrugged off a diplomatic problem that started friday when he accepted a congratulatory call from the leader of taiwan. a gesture that broke recent tradition and upset china. last night, mr. trump attended a villains and heroes costume party. his senior aide, kellyanne conway dressed as superwoman. mr. trump went as himself. >> to date pentagon announced the release of a prisoner from guantanamo bay. from yemen and sent to west africa after officials determined after 14 years behind bars, he was a low-level militant. 59 prisoners remain at guantanamo which president obama had promised to shut down. >> voters went to the polls in
3:11 am
two european countries. in austria, a far right presidential candidate was on the ballot. in italy, voters considered a package of reforms that could lead to their prime minister's resignation. seth doane is in rome. >> reporter: in austria's review, the left leaning candidate emerged the winner. up against the far right populist who hoped growing anti-establishment anger was in his favor. we were in vienna during the final days of campaigning and met him. >> i think some of the rather right-winged voters, feel supported by the trump election, they feel like, "oh if the u.s. can do it. we can do it too. we can finally be against the stab lawyerme establishment." she told us trump's surprise win, motivate herd . it was a simple si or no.
3:12 am
constitutional questions were far more complex. italy's prime minister renzi said voting yes would dealt a blow to bureaucracy. among other things would have centralized power and streamlined the lawmaking process. the role of the senate would have been reduced. and number of senators cut. >> you see change happening regardless of how this -- >> yes. >> comes. >> change is going to happen regardless of the winning yes or no. in one way or the other. >> you either change the constitution, or you are looking at possibly a change in government. >> exactly. >> renzi vowed to step down. and tonight he said he would offer his resignation to italy's president tomorrow. the no campaign had been vocal. with the anti-establishment five stars movement leading the opposition. they said it was a power grab. many voters are not convinced either way, yes or no. this woman told us. >> there is an italian expression you either eat this
3:13 am
soup or jump out the window. and have no idea what's next. there are concerns about instability in the markets and politically. tonight as he congarage lated his opponents, renzi said i lost and i say it out loud. though he admitted he did it with a knot in his throat. seth doane, cbs news, rome. >> still ahead, 75 years after the attack on pearl harbor, a survivor's story. (coughs) cough doesn't sound so good.
3:14 am
take mucinex dm. i'll text you in 4 hours when your cough returns. one pill lasts 12 hours, so... looks like i'm good all night! some cough medicines only last 4 hours. but just one mucinex lasts 12 hours. let's end this. i really did save hundreds on my car insurance with geico. i should take a closer look at geico... geico has a long history of great savings and great service. over seventy-five years. wait. seventy-five years? that is great. speaking of great, check out these hot riffs. you like smash mouth? uh, yeah i have an early day tomorrow so... wait. almost there. goodnight, bruce. gotta tune the "a." (humming) take a closer look at geico. great savings. and a whole lot more. ialmost everything. you know, ke 1 i n 10 houses could get hit by an expensive septic disaster. but for only $7 a month, rid-x helps break down waste. avoid a septic disaster with rid-x.
3:15 am
rooms come in all sorts of shapes and sizes. with eight times more fragrance control, the air wick® scented oil warmer lets you dial up or down for the perfect amount of fragrance. no matter the size of the room. air wick®. home is in the air.
3:16 am
cough doesn't sound so good. take mucinex dm. i'll text you in 4 hours when your cough returns. one pill lasts 12 hours, so... looks like i'm good all night! some cough medicines only last 4 hours. but just one mucinex lasts 12 hours. let's end this. wednesday is the 75th anniversary of the attack on pearl harbor. which killed more than 2400 americans and drew the united states into world war ii. only five survivors of the attack are still living. including 94-year-old donald stratton of colorado springs. he arrived in hawaii this weekend for the commemorations. john blackstone has his story. >> reporter: the battleship arizona graces the back of donald stratton's classic truck. now at 94, he points out the
3:17 am
anti-aircraft gun. >> right there. >> a 19-year-old he fought the japanese sneak attack on pearl harbor, december 7, 1941. in less than two hours american naval power in the pacific has been paralyzed. >> some of the pilots waved at us and smiled. >> they were waving at you while shooting at you? >> that's right. we fired at them. but we could see our bursts in the sky and they they were way short. >> the arizona one of eight battleships under unrelenting japanese air strikes. >> just blew a fire ball, 600, # 800 feet in the air. that engulfed us. >> i was like, bent over. 60% of my body. actually burning alive. >> reporter: nearly 75 years, stratton said little about how he survived as more than 1,100 others on the arizona perished. but he has finally written a memoir, all of the galliant men. it reveals things even velma,
3:18 am
his wife of almost 67 years had never heard. >> when i read the book i cried. >> of the explosion stratton writes, the flames found us. burning off our clothes, our hair, our skin. men stumbled around on the deck look human torches. each collapsing into a flaming pile of flesh. a makeup artist re-creation of his injuries, its hard to look at. >> how do you go on fighting or trying to survive with that amount of pain? >> well, it's -- self preservation. i just pulled the skin off of my arms and threw it down. it was in the way. >> reporter: you pulled the skn off your arms? >> well, i was burned. it was just hanging down there. >> recovery meant months of searing pain and surgeries. when doctors wanted to amputate his limbs, stratton refused. >> did you thun think you were to make it? >> don't think it ever entered
3:19 am
my mind that i wouldn't. >> reporter: he wouldn't be kept away. a year after pearl harbor, he reenlisted and fought in the pacific. did you think you had a score to settle? >> thought about a little revenge. we had a job to do. >> reporter: over the years he has returned again and again to arizona memorial. >> very sad. very sacred place. lost so many shipmates that day. just look going back and losing them all over again. >> reporter: hatch yve you manao forgive japan? >> 1,169 on the arizona, i wouldn't shake hands with them. i'm not going to do it. >> reporter: wednesday on the 75th anniversary he will attend commemorations with his family including great grandchildren. john blackstone, cbs news. still ahead -- for decades it was the floating white house. now it sits withered and rotted. the saga of the presidential yacht, "the sequoia" is next.
3:20 am
♪living well rise above joint discomfort with move free ultra's triple action joint support for improved mobility and flexibility, and 20% better comfort from one tiny, mighty pill... get move free ultra, and enjoy living well.
3:21 am
cough doesn't sound so good. take mucinex dm. i'll text you in 4 hours when your cough returns. one pill lasts 12 hours, so... looks like i'm good all night! some cough medicines only last 4 hours. but just one mucinex lasts 12 hours. let's end this. we close in a virginia boat yard where an historic yacht used by eight presidents of the last century is rotting away.
3:22 am
paula reid has the saga of the "sequoia." >> reporter: for more than 40 years it was the floating white house. u.s. presidents going back to 1933, order the sequoia to get away. here is herbert hoof hoover. fdr with a smaller catch. nextson us nixon used the vessel. he discussed the nuclear arms race with leon id brezhnev. >> he asked the crew. he played god bless america at the piano. >> reporter: the ship's captain since 2010 when the boat was hired for private charters. he says ownership of the sequoia changed several times since 1977 when president jimmy carter decided the government no longer needed a high maintenance luxury yacht and sold it. >> i think it is very beautiful. glad i as a taxpayer no longer
3:23 am
have to help support it. >> reporter: the ship puttered along the potomac in retire. until hauled out of the water for maintenance when the saga of the sequoia ran aground. slowly with each passing season she withered. >> we need to protect it immediately. get it through the winter. >> reporter: the sequoia marooned in dry dock in southern virginia for two years. as you can see it is exposed to the elements and every drop of rain contributes to decay. the damage isn't just on the outside. the interior faded into squalor. inside, where jfk celebrated his last birthday, captain discovered a family of squatters. >> five raccoons. third stateroom. sitting on the american flag. >> what kind of damage did they do? >> well there was -- a few rooms, where the animals defecated on carpets. you know, presidential carpets that our presidents spent time with their families. >> reporter: how did america's most famous yacht descent into a
3:24 am
rotted raccoon nest. the past several years, at the center of a legal battle to decide its rightful owner and who should bear the cost to repair it. last month a judge ruled a company that already sunk a fortune into the ship could purchase it for zero dollars. the company is are gaug this boat load of troubles its worth millions less than 0. and this historic yacht deserves better. >> i spent hours, days, evenings, with and without family on board, when you spend that time on her, you know, it becomes an extension of yourself. >> reporter: the captain is determined to see the sequoia sail again once litigation is settled. he says it will take more than money to return this loan locked ship to its former glory. >> restoration of this vessel at this point will take 15, 20 ship wrieg wrights, 10,000 hours. >> the plan is to bring the sequoia to new port, rhode
3:25 am
island to begin restoration, a process that could take up to three years.,,,,,,,,
3:26 am
over 1,000,000 californians have gotten something that's been out of reach for far too long: health insurance. how? they enrolled through covered california. it's the health insurance marketplace where you'll find a range of plans from leading health insurance companies that offer you the best combination of quality, rates, and benefits. and, through covered california, you may get financial help to pay for coverage. to have health insurance starting january 1st, you need to enroll by december 15th. visit covereca.com today.
3:27 am
syria's long, brutal civil war may be reaching a turning point. syria's largest city, aleppo, which was taken over in 2012 by ant anti-government rebels backed by the united states is slowly falling back into the control of the assad regime. debora patta is there. >> reporter: here in aleppo explosions can be heard day and night across the city. but it is increasingly a one sided war with civilians and
3:28 am
rebel controlled east trapped under constant fire. for those that manage to escape to the government side, there is relief from the shelling, a hot meal and medical care. very different from the rebel held east where hospitals have been systematically destroyed, and the government siege has resulted in desperate food shortages. the syrian government has been quick to bus people back home to recently recaptured areas, it might look like a standard rush hour commute, but green buses drive through waste hands of destruction. for the residents this is the first time they have returned to eastern aleppo in years. mohammad abra abandoned his home four years ago. i can't find anything he says, my house is in ruins and i really don't know what to do. but with the world's eyes on
3:29 am
aleppo, it is easy to forget that the syrian war is not confined to this city alone. syria and its ally russia, unleash the full might of their air power killing dozens of civilians. the terror and the cape yos are captured here on amateur video moments after the attack. air fire also rained down on them, with terrified children. badly injured were evacuated in panic. >> reporter: we speck to a syrian general, elaine, who said this is a fight to the bitter end. but opposition fighters are staying put. he said those who refuse to leave, face an inevitable death. debora patta, thank you. that's the "overnight news" for this monday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with the us a little later for the morning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm elaine quijano.
3:30 am
welcome to "overnight news." i'm elaine quijano. at least 33 bodies recovered from a warehouse that burned to the ground in oakland this weekend. officials expect to fiend more as they search what's left of the building friechlt d. friday night packed with artists and musicians at a party. for some the way how the was a rickety make shift staircase. before the tragedy there were complaints the warehouse was a cluttered firetrap. carter evans is at the scene. >> reporter: video from inside the warehouse, dubbed ghost ship shows underground party an hour before flames tore through the building. when it was over the warehouse that was reduced to rubble with
3:31 am
what could turn out to be dozens of people trapped inside. >> how dangerous was it? >> incredibly dangerous. the fire load i have never seen so much, we'll just call it stuff, in a building. ever. >> reporter: battalion chief says firefighters are going through the ashes by hand, one bucket at a time searching for victims. >> when i started we found the first one, single victim. three grouped together. six grouped together. four grouped together. then a single. >> what does that tell you? >> we are looking at bodies on top of each other. it does not appear that they were able to get out of the second floor. >> reporter: people who lived here say the warehouse had been converted into dozens of artists studios with no sprinklers or smoke alarms. an advertisement on line lists one for $500 a month. oakland city councilman confirmed today that the building was never permitted as a residence. and was under investigation.
3:32 am
>> who should be held responsible? >> the property owner. he knows what the fire code is. >> do you think the constituenty should be held responsible? >> at the same time, yes. absolutely. including all of us should be held responsible. we all know it. >> reporter: cbs news learned that the district attorney has been here to review the scene himself. elaine, the next step would be for him to determine itch any charges are to be filed. criminal or civil against the building owner. >> carter evans in oakland, california. carter, thank you. president elect donald trump is making no apologies for his telephone conversation with the leader of taiwan. the u.s. has had no diplomatic relations with taiwan since 1979 when it accepted mainland china as the sole representative of the chinese people. newspapers in taiwan ran banner headlines and beijing has launched a for mall diplomating
3:33 am
protest. vice president elect mike pence called it a simple courtesy call. income offing chief of staff, discussed the issue on face the nation. >> president elect, had a conversation with the president of taiwan, did he belief he was talking to the leader of a sovereign state in that conversation? >> of course not. he knew exactly what was happening. look, we have a lot of problems to solve in this country. we are not going to solve them by making, believe that people don't exist. this was a two minute congratulatory call. he tacked to president xi over two weeks ago. sure he would be willing to talk to him again. this is not a massive deef yags of our policy. but president trump has made it clear, that he is going to work with china, prc, to make sure that we have a better deal, that we have better trade agreements, and that we do a better job in protecting the american worker. and he is going to continue to do it. >> courtesy call, not a change in policy. >> exactly.
3:34 am
>> courtesy call or not, the conversation between president elect trump and leader of taiwan touched off political shock waves across the pacific. errol barnett reports. >> reporter: china's foreign minister described this controversial call as a little trick by taiwan. and the chinese government has already contacted the obama white house to file an official complaint. meanwhile, the president elect and his transition team are on defense. deflecting criticism and experiencing the delicacy of di policemen see. no u.s. president elect has spoken with a taiwanese head of state since diplomatic ties were severed in 1979 until friday. mr. trump's transition team said the two discussed the close economic political and security ties between taiwan and the united states. and their president congratulated the president elect on his victory. after hearing criticisms, mr. trump tweeted, the president of taiwan called me today.
3:35 am
pointing out inconsistencies in u.s. dealings with taiwan, mr. trump continued. interesting how the u.s. sells billions of dollars of military equipment but i should not accept a congratulatory call. >> i think president elect trump may not be fully aware of all of the details of the history of our relations with taiwan. >> an expert on u.s. china relations, bonnie glasser said america's unofficial relationship with taiwan exists because of the 1972, one china policy. a u.s. agreement to accept the island nation of taiwan as part of china's territory and not a sovereign nation. >> the notion that the united states incoming president of the u.s. might be supporting a pro independence agenda will be very, very worrisome to china. and it will cause some problems in the u.s./china relationship. >> senior transition adviser, kellyanne conway said mr. trump
3:36 am
took the call. a >> during the campaign, mr. trump accused choen of waging economic war on the u.s. through currency manipulation. >> we can't continue to allow china to rape our country. that's what they're doing. >> reporter: but also promised better relations with the communist government. >> i have a grit relationship with china. china is terrific. >> reporter: upon hearing of the call, the white house said there has been no change of their long standing policy on issues and they're firmly committed to the one china policy. alex. >> adrianna diaz in beijing has more. >> reporter: not just that donald trump spoke to taiwan's leader he spoke to this leader in particular. a member of taiwan's independence leading party. since she took office, china has cut off communications with what it considers a renegade province. the call lasted just ten minutes. but broke decades of precedent.
3:37 am
no u.s. president is believed to have spoken with the leader of taiwan since 1979 when the u.s. officially recognized the people's republic of china instead of taiwan. the two have had a complicated relationship since 1949, when communists took power and china's former leaders fled to the island. since elected in january, elations have stall, because the cornell graduate who studied in lon done has not endorsed one china principle. a pivot and caused beijing to suspend contact with taiwan in june. ironically, former secretary of state, henry kissinger was here in beijing to meet with china's president when the call between trump and the leader took place. kissinger the architect of the one china policy and recently consulted with president elect trump. the cbs "overnight news" will be right back.
3:38 am
delsym helps control the impulse to cough for 12 hours. which means, you're controlling your cough on your morning commute. and later when you're joking with beth... even when most cough medicines stop, delsym is still working. delsym. the #1 12-hour cough medicine. rooms come in all sorts of shapes and sizes. with eight times more fragrance control, the air wick® scented oil warmer lets you dial up or down for the perfect amount of fragrance.
3:39 am
no matter the size of the room. air wick®. home is in the air. oh, that's lovely...so graceful. the corkscrew spin, flawless... ...his signature move, the flying dutchman. poetry in motion. and there it is, the "baby bird". breathtaking. a sumo wrestler figure skating? surprising. what's not surprising? how much money heather saved by switching to geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more.
3:40 am
wednesday marks 75 years since the japanese attack on pearl harbor. president franklin roosevelt called it a date which will live in infamy. u.s. service members are gathering in hawaii for a memorial. among them the oldest known american survivor. >> reporter: as the first bombs fell on the uss arizona in pearl harbor, then seaman first-class ray chavez finished a shift. he rushed over to help. >> the harbor was on fire. and the ships were smoking, black smoke, because the japanese had torpedoed and bombed. >> more than 2400 americans died that day. at 104 years old, chavez is
3:41 am
known as the oldest living survivor of the attack. the veteran didn't talk about what he witnessed until 50 years later. >> because i saw what all of the men that were lost, all of the ships that were sunk. today, chavez has not lost his fighting spirit. three years ago, at 101 years old here, started coming to this gym. >> very good, ray. >> chavez weighed 93 pound and after six months of working out with his trainer, sean thompson he gained 20 pounds of muscle. >> stretches me. pulled me. turns me around. and, oh, my gosh, it's great. >> chavez is determination inspired the gym and rotary club to raise $13,000 to send chavez, his daughter, anne thompson to hawaii to attend pearl harbor 75th anniversary ceremonies wednesday. >> i am very proud to serve and help, and, quite a few people that has, have told me that they, i inspire them.
3:42 am
>> reporter: chavez knows this may be his last trip back. he only has one reap quest. to go to dinner. >> more than 2400 americans died in the attack on pearl harbor. all most half of them, 1,177 perished on the uss arizona. now one of arizona survivors is telling his story in a book called -- "all the gallant men." john blackstone has the story. >> reporter: the battleship arizona graces the back of donald stratton's classic truck. now at 94, he points out the anti-aircraft gun. >> right there. >> a 19-year-old he fought the japanese sneak attack on pearl harbor, december 7, 1941. in less than two hours american naval power in the pacific has been paralyzed. >> some of the pilots waved at us and smiled. >> they were waving at you while shooting at you? >> that's right. we fired at them.
3:43 am
but we could see our bursts in the sky and they they were way short. >> the arizona one of eight battleships unde unrelenting japanese air strikes. >> just blew a fire ball, 600, 800 feet in the air. that engulfed us. >> i was like, bent over. 60% of my body. actually burning alive. >> reporter: nearly 75 years, stratton said little about how he survived as more than 1,100 others on the arizona perished. but he has finally written a memoir, all of the galliant men. it reveals things even velma, his wife of almost 67 years had never heard. >> when i read the book i cried. >> of the explosion stratton writes, the flames found us. burning off our clothes, our hair, our skin. men stumbled around on the deck look human torches. each collapsing into a flaming pile of flesh. a makeup artist re-creation of
3:44 am
his injuries, its hard to look at. >> how do you go on fighting or trying to survive with that amount of pain? >> well, it's -- self preservation. i just pulled the skin off of my arms and threw it down. it was in the way. >> reporter: you pulled the skn off your arms? >> well, i was burned. it was just hanging down there.
3:45 am
>> recovery meant months of searing pain and surgeries. when doctors wanted to amputate his limbs, stratton refused. >> you wore coming across the rope. >> yeah, everything. >> did you think you were going to make it? >> don't think it ever entered my mind that i wouldn't. >> reporter: he wouldn't be kept away. a year after pearl harbor, he reenlisted and fought in the pacific. did you think you had a score to settle? >> thought about a little revenge. we had a job to do. >> reporter: over the years he has returned again and again to arizona memorial. >> very sad. very sacred place. lost so many shipmates that day. just look going back and losing them all over again. >> reporter: have you managed to forgive japan?
3:46 am
>> 1,169 on the arizona, i wouldn't shake hands with them. i'm not going to do it. >> reporter: wednesday on the 75th anniversary he will attend return with his whole family, including great grandchildren. >>ing into probab ing inting ii probably be the last time. that's hard. >> the stratton family vows never to forget. like granddaughter nicky each wears a locket holding a fragment of the uss arizona. >> to constantly remind us where my grandfather came from. the arizona is in our blood. literallien our blood. >> reporter: for most who visit now, this sacred place is part of distant history, but not distant at all for donald stratton. as he writes in all the galliant men. i had lost a part of myself in the ruins of that ship. and a big part of my family in the men who died there.
3:47 am
a part of myself, that now would be forever entombed with them. john blackstone, colorado springs. >> we will have more whenever i try to grow out my hair, strands always break off. but pantene is making my hair practically unbreakable. the pro-v formula makes every inch stronger. so i can love my hair longer. strong is beautiful. pantene. ialmost everything. you know, ke 1 i n 10 houses could get hit by an expensive septic disaster. but for only $7 a month, rid-x helps break down waste. avoid a septic disaster with rid-x.
3:48 am
rise above joint discomfort with move free ultra's triple action joint support for improved mobility and flexibility, and 20% better comfort from one tiny, mighty pill... get move free ultra, and enjoy living well. cough doesn't sound so good. take mucinex dm. i'll text you in 4 hours
3:49 am
when your cough returns. one pill lasts 12 hours, so... looks like i'm good all night! some cough medicines only last 4 hours. but just one mucinex lasts 12 hours. let's end this. rooms come in all sorts of shapes and sizes. with eight times more fragrance control, the air wick® scented oil warmer lets you dial up or down for the perfect amount of fragrance. no matter the size of the room. air wick®. home is in the air. the japanese attack on pearl harbor 75 years ago this wednesday, dragged the united states into the war in the
3:50 am
pacific. the general who led the allied forces to victory douglas macarthur is still remembered in that part of the world. mark albert paid a visit to the macarthur museum in briz bane, australia. >> reporter: on the eighth floor of what was once the sturdiest building in downtown brisbane, echos of history reverberate off the wood panelled walls. >> in the office of douglas macarthur. >> where he worked? >> reporter: for more than half of world war ii, u.s. general douglas macarthur ran the allied fight in the southwest pacific. from this suite in australia's third largest city. it is now part of the macarthur museum here. john wright is its executive officer. >> do you feel when you walk in here that you are following the footsteps of -- general ak arthur? >> there is an aura of history about it. >> just 15 days after pearl harbor, stunned by the sudden arrival of war, u.s. troops began arriving in brisbane.
3:51 am
first of 1 million who would pass through australia. in time for the 75th % anniversary, the museum has finished restoring the general's office. the bronze door handles returned. the tim bework revived. >> why was it important to restore his office to the way that it was? >> this is a museum which is in a position to actually show the enormous impact that -- that decisions made in that office had on australia. and on the conduct of the war. when macarthur arrived in australia in the spring of 1942, he did not land as a conquering hero. he was forced to flee the philippines with his family. issuing his famous promise, i shall return. but not for two years. >> was he sort of licking his wound. >> he was definitely licking his wound. >> he wrote "macarthur at war." >> how does a general on a
3:52 am
losing streak go to australia by theened of world war ii become someone extremely popular throughout the country. >> macarthur fills the need in the american psyche for a hero. to macarthur's credit by the time 1944 comes along, he is doing a lot of island hopping, he is really bought into the whole concept of, of air power, he is doing miraculous amphibious landings all over. he doesn't evolve as a military commander. >> three quarters of a century later, 1250 u.s. marines are deployed in the northern australia city of darwin for training. a sign australian army captain adele cats, tells cbs this morning saturday of an enduring partnership. >> i think that the collaboration that occurred with u.s. troops in world war ii under general macarthur has laid the ground work for the u.s. and australian joint operations that exist now. >> reporter: today macarthur's legacy lives on here in other
3:53 am
ways. his old headquarters building named after him. an apple store on the ground floor right next to macarthur central, a mall. in greater brisbane, there are streets, roads, drives, circles, bus stops named after the general who still touches 84 resident dell hicks. >> macarthur. just see neal there. this its me. hicks played with arthur macarthur, the general's son. >> dear dell, arthur wants me to send you this little note to tell you how much he maz missed you. gene macarthur, the general's wife even sent hicks a letter after the faly left. she has kept it for 71 years. >> how many letters did you exchange with macarthur? >> six. >> reporter: ron reece says macarthur gave him the lou ton ant's pin when he was 6 years old and this letter after a chance reunion new york over tea. reece is now a volunteer at
3:54 am
macarthur museum. >> some small manner of repaying, you know what, and what the united states and allies, australians did for me. >> reporter: despite the adore asian and status as one of the most famous generals, macarthur apparently never let go of certain insecurities. >> instead he has skrogeorge washington. as john wright tells us back inside macarthur's office. >> you would expect the president of the day, franklin roosevelt to be up there, he made the comment that, that he wasn't having any democrat looking down on him. >> he was a republican? >> he was a republican with -- with, probably ambitions to, 1944 presidential nomination. >> macarthur didn't end up campaigning for president. instead on september 2nd, 1945, he accepted japan's surrender on the deck of the uss missouri. that day he famously told the american people in a radio address.
3:55 am
awe we must go forward to ,,,,,,
3:56 am
3:57 am
steve hartman with a heart warming story he found "on the road." >> it had all the makings of a bad situation. >> that's not very well lit out here. late at night in an industrial section of california, officer kirk keffer spotted a shadowy figuren a dark hoody. >> he kind of caught me off-guard the i normally don't see scenebody. no sidewalks, kind of walking on the side of the street. >> reporter: you knew it wasn't right. >> it was the right. >> reporter: or was it? jordan duncan said he was minding his own business. i notice it was a police car. i am not going to move. don't want hem to think i have any weapons. jordan explained to the officer he was just walking home from work. there was no crime. the kid didn't need help. by all rights, officer keffer
3:58 am
could have and many officers would have just left hem alone. but, keffer isn't that kind of cop. he gave jordan a ride. and more importantly, he gave him a listen. what struck you? >> just his -- his drive, work ethic. and to me that, that speaks volumes. >> reporter: as keffer took jordan from where he works on the line at pro form laboratories, he started to really appreciate the young man sitting next to him. because this wasn't just a trip around the block. this was a 7 mile trek, a 2 1/2 hour walk to jordan any house, a whole town away in vallejo, california. >> he said and you're walking? i said, yeah. i'm walking. >> reporte >> not many 18-year-olds have that mind set. they dent want to walk down to the store. let alone walk seven miles just to got to work. >> reporter: jordan says he started walking to work after his car ]. down last may. he says people have offered him ride, but he wants to make it on
3:59 am
his own. and when keffer heard that, he heard enough. he immediately made plans to visit jordan again. >> he said, jordan, remember me, right? i was like. >> reporter: how could i forget. >> i said jordan you are not in trouble. we just want to give you something. >> reporter: to ease his commute, keffer got the police association to buy jordan a new bike. >> i was looking at the bike like this bike is going to be cherished. >> reporter: keffer raised $38,000 to help him buy a car and pursue his career goal which is to be a police officer. >> it is an honorable job. >> reporter: jordan got to ride along on a shift. >> i wanted to show him what law enforcement does. >> you are not going to shake this kid. he is yours. >> he is mine. >> what started with a tense encounter may end with a perfect partnership. steve hartman, on the road. in california.
4:00 am
that's the "overnight news" for this monday. join us a little later for the morning news and cbs this morning. captioning funded by cbs captioning funded by cbs it's monday, december 5th, 2016. this is the "cbs morning news." >> i don't know how many more people are left in there. we have no idea. >> the search for victims continues this morning in oakland. more than 30 people were killed in a massive warehouse fire, while those who made it out alive assess the devastation. >> oh, my god. i almost died. oh, my god. i lost everything, too. oh, my god. all of these people died in our home. a standoff success. protesters in north dakota get a major victory in their fight against a proposed pipeline. a judge's late night decision sets a michigan recount in motion.

58 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on