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tv   CBS Evening News With Scott Pelley  CBS  January 25, 2017 5:30pm-6:01pm PST

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>> that's cool. >> that's a thrill for the students. that's it for kpix 5 news at 5:00. the "cbs evening news with scott pelley" is next. sponsored by cbs >> pelley: shutting the door. at beginning today the united states of america gets back control of its borders. ll pelley: the president orders a wall on the mexican border and hats off funding to cities that harbor illegal immigrants. also tonight, the president says torture works. >> well, i think this would be a aep backward, and i'm not alone in thinking that. >> pelley: the president threatens federal action to stop violence in chicago. >> i think he's talking about federal troops, but we don't really need that in chicago. >> pelley: and she turned the world on with her smile. >> this is our associate producer, mary richards. walter cronkite. >> nice to meet you. >> pelley: remembering mary
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tyler moore. ♪ you might just make it after all ♪ this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: this is our western edition. we were saddened today by the death of one of television's most beloved stars and a long- time member of our cbs family, mary tyler moore. she died today in a connecticut hospital at the age of 80 after a long battle with a number of health problems. cbs chairman and c.e.o. leslie moonves said mary tyler moore was a once in a generation talent, one of the very best to ever grace our airwaves. a little bit later in the rroadcast we'll have a tribute. but first, in a major development in the trump administration's premier week, with the stroke of a pen, the former real estate developer launched the biggest construction project of his life, a wall on the mexican border estimated to cost around $10 billion.
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margaret brennan is at the white house. >> a nation without borders is bet a nation. beginning today the united states of america gets back control of its borders. >> reporter: on his first visit to the department of homeland hcurity, president trump delivered on his signature campaign pledge. >> we'll begin immediate rnstruction of a border wall. >> reporter: the executive order lays out the administration's plan to construct a physical wall along the shared border with mexico. add 5,000 border patrol agents to the 17,000 already policing it, and build detention facilities to jail those who illegally cross it. >> the day is over when they can stay in our country and wreak havoc. >> reporter: mr. trump has blamed the estimated 11 million takgal immigrants already in the u.s. for taking jobs from american workers and driving up crime rates. the day he announced his
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candidacy for president mr. trump singled out mexican immigrants. >> they're bringing drugs. they're bringing crime. they're rapists. and some, i assume, are good people. >> reporter: with the exception of one year, illegal border crossings into the u.s. reached a 40-year low in 2015 according to homeland security, but drug-related violence in central america has triggered a surge of undocumented migrants. >> who is going to pay for the wall? >> mexico! >> reporter: while mr. trump has long said that mexico will finance the wall, its government has balked. the white house proposal does not include a cost estimate, and it will be up to congress to fund the project. today the president told abc news that u.s. taxpayers may have to front the money. >> all it is is we'll be reimbursed at a later date from whatever transaction we make from mexico. >> reporter: scott, mexico is america's third largest trading partner, and today mexican officials came to the white house for their first meeting
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with the new administration. they were greeted with the news that president trump has ordered a review of all u.s. aid to their country. >> pelley: margaret brennan at the white house. most everything mr. trump has done this week has been through executive orders. every president since washington has issued them. sometimes they stick. sometimes not. the emancipation proclamation was an executive order. so was the internment of japanese americans during world war ii. from time to time the supreme court overturns executive orders, and often congress declines to fund them. president obama ordered the closing of the guantanamo bay prison eight years ago, but congress refused to pay. another executive order signed today cracks down on so-called sanctuary cities. there are hundreds of them that use local ordinances and policies to shelter illegal immigrants from federal law enforcement. carter evans is in los angeles.
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[chanting in spanish] >> reporter: when it comes to taking on president trump's immigration policy, california has drawn a line in the sand. >> in california immigrants are an integral part of who we are and what we've become. >> reporter: governor jerry brown's message this week was blunt. >> let me be clear: we will defend everybody, every man, woman and child who has come here for a better life and has contributed to the well-being of our state. >> reporter: california has 18 sanctuary cities. brian barca was born in mexico and brought to the u.s. at age three. are you worried you will get pulled over for speeding one day and end up getting detained? >> yes, that's everyday life. >> reporter: he lives in los angeles where mayor eric garcetti has instructed police f t to enforce immigration laws. even if it threatens federal funding in los angeles? you stand to get up to $500 million this year. >> these are dollars that
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protect our ports and keep homeless veterans off the streets. >> you're saying pulling funding from l.a. could hurt the rest of the country. >> no question. >> there's anxiety going around. there's a lot of worry. >> reporter: pedro trujillo's parents brought him to the u.s. when he was seven. >> are there going to be raids coming our way in the coming months? we don't know that yet. >> reporter: but you're prepared to stand up and fight back? >> well, we have to be prepared because this is our only country. this is our only home. >> reporter: well, l.a.'s mayor has told me city police will turn over serious criminals to immigration authorities, and, dcott, he also said that the city is starting a legal fund right now. so undocumented immigrants can defend themselves from deportation. >> pelley: carter evans in l.a. for us. carter, thank you. mr. trump is also planning a top-to-bottom review of how america conducts its war on terror. and today he endorsed torture.
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here's david martin. >> we will make america safe again. >> reporter: donald trump said it as a candidate, and now he's said it as president. in his first television interview with abc news, the president declared torture rerks. >> i have spoken as recently as 24 hours ago with people at the highest level of intelligence, and i asked them the question: does it work? does torture work? and the answer was yes, absolutely. >> reporter: but the president added that before ordering a resumption of waterboarding and other so-called enhanced interrogation techniques, once used by the bush administration, he would seek the advice of his c.i.a. director, mike pompeo, and his defense secretary, james mattis. >> they don't want to do, that's fine. if they do want to do, then i work toward that end. i want to do everything within ehe bounds of what you're allowed to do legally. but do i feel it works? absolutely i feel it works.
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>> reporter: the first time he met mattis, the then- president- elect asked his future defense secretary what he thought of waterboarding. >> he said, i always found give me a pack of cigarettes and a couple beers and i do better than that with torture. >> reporter: the c.i.a. has promised to abide by a law that limits interrogation techniques to those outline in the u.s. army field manual. >> there is no doubt in my mind about the limitations it places on the d.o.d. and the central intelligence agencies. i'll always comply with the law. >> reporter: but in a written statement he said he would consider seeking a change to the law if experts told him it restricted the c.i.a.'s ability to gather vital intelligence. any change to the law would have to get past senate armed services chairman john mccain, and today he issued a statement vowing, "we are not bringing back torture in the united states of america." scott? >> pelley: david martin at the pentagon tonight. david, thank you. well, the president's false belief in widespread illegal
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voting may soon cost real money. atday he said, "i will be asking mar a major investigation." ot. trump says as many as five stllion illegal ballots were n,st for hillary clinton, which is how he explains her 2.8 million lead in the popular vote. mr. trump won by a total of 77,000 votes in the three states that clinched the electoral college. no state has reported p'gnificant fraud, and even mr. d.ump's own lawyers said there is no evidence of voter fraud. the president is expected to ban new syrian refugees and temporarily suspend visas for iraqis. that puzzles many iraqis who have been american allies for atre than 12 years, including those that charlie d'agata found today fighting isis for control of the city of mosul. [gunfire] >> reporter: today america's war opainst isis came to a dead stop on the banks of the tigris river
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that slices mosul in half. isis holds the high ground on the western side of the river, firing a constant barrage of rtrtars toward iraqi troops on the other. major arkam hashim. where are the mortars coming in from? >> there's a school there. >> reporter: soldiers showed us a house that isis fighters recently fled. in one of the bedroom, forbidden toys that isis militants had d nfiscated. with iraqis and american soldiers fighting a common enemy, one resident told us he couldn't understand why president trump might tighten hestrictions on iraqis traveling to the u.s. "why wound you ban us? is are the victims. in fact, american isis fighters have come here." troops showed us an s.u.v. that militants had stripped, ready to be turned into a car bomb. the most feared weapon in the isis arsenal.
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[explosion] you see huge craters like this in areas that saw some of the worst of the fighting. u.s. and coalition air strikes specifically targeted big intersections in order to disrupt the path of suicide car bombs. general ali al lami said he'd lost many men, and he's disappointed that trump might make it near impossible for his soldiers to start a new life in the u.s. "if america bans muslims, it's not the right thing to do," he told us. "america is a multiethnic and religious nation, a country of freedom." e e general told us the next and final phase against isis in western mosul may be the toughest, scott. it's the old part of the city. the streets are too narrow for military vehicles, and there are still 750,000 civilians trapped there. >> pelley: charlie d'agata covering the war on isis. charlie, thank you. well, wall street reached a milestone today.
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the dow gained 155 points and closed above 20,000 for the first time. since election day, the dow is up more than 1,700 points or 9.5%. investors believe that the new president will be good for business. we asked barry petersen to look into the economic impact of two oil pipeline projects that mr. trump signed off on this week. >> reporter: president trump touted the benefits of building the pipeline. >> a lot of jobs. 28,000 jobs. great construction jobs. >> reporter: according to a report by the state department, the keystone xl pipeline could create about 16,000 full and part-time construction jobs. energy transfer partners, the company backing the dakota pipeline, says up to 12,000 llnstruction jobs will have been created for the project. however, the dakota pipeline is roughly 90% complete, and the majority of those jobs are finished.
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together the two pipelines will leave behind only about 100 full and part-time maintenance jobs once construction ends. and mr. trump's order is not a restart of the project, more like a reset. transcanada, the firm in charge of keystone xl, will resubmit its application. on dakota, the army corps of engineers was ordered to review ad approve in an expedited manner. either pipeline's approval could still take months or years. the standing rock sioux tribe has fought the pipeline construction, saying it crosses what they call "traditional tribal land." >> the whole world is watching you. >> reporter: it might lead the a catastrophic leak in the missouri river. >> we have to start building awareness. >> reporter: chairman dave archambault ii says his efforts to reach out to the new administration were ignored. were you surprised at this move? >> i wasn't surprised. hfigured that he was going to
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ecy to do something, because i know what drives this man. it's all about money. a reporter: these activists vow to stay here and block the pipeline. mr. trump owned up to $50,000 of stock in the company building the pipeline. sspokesman said he sold it last year, but, scott, we won't know that for sure until he files financial disclosure statements in may of 2018. >> pelley: barry petersen in north dakota. barry, thank you. coming up next on the "cbs evening news," what did the president mean when he threatened to send the feds to e.icago? and later, mary tyler moore. moore. ♪ if you have moderate to severe plaque psoriasis
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ago. 42 of them were homicides. 34 were a year ago. mayor rahm emanuel. >> i'm very concerned. i'm very upset about it. >> reporter: and so too, apparently, is the president, who tweeted last night, "if chicago doesn't fix the horrible carnage going on, i will send in eee feds." the tweet came a day after esanuel had criticized the new president's priorities. >> this is unsolicited advice. you didn't get elected to debate the crowd size of your inaugural. yo reporter: which left people wondering whether the mayor had prompted the tweet or whether the president is signaling martial law. pat dowell is on the city council. >> i think he's talking about federal troops, but we don't need that in chicago. >> reporter: what chicago needs, ie says, is federal funds for redevelopment, for education and job training. al if he's talking about federal investment in chicago, in terms of money, we're all for that.
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more jobs, not jails. se reporter: at the white house, press secretary sean spicer said the president was talking about more than money. ex there's other aid that can be extended, as well, through the u.s. attorney's office or other means that will ensure that the people of chicago have the resources to feel safe. >> reporter: the federal emvernment already has a large law enforcement presence in chicago, more violent crime fighting man power is something lce city and the police would welcome. aticer also indicated that the wants ent wants to start a dialogue with the city, scott, as a way the chart a new path forward, and then he added this: "i think what the president is inset about is turning on the television and watching americans get killed by shootings." >> pelley: dean reynolds, thanks. coming up, butch trucks, the driving force for a legendary rock band. rock band. and sometimes i struggle to sleep at night, and stay awake during the day.
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redness, pain, itching, swelling, hard lump warmth or bruising at the injection site and headache. it's important to talk to your doctor about what situations you may need to avoid since zostavax contains a weakened chickenpox virus. remember one in three people get shingles in their lifetime, will it be you? talk you to your doctor or pharmacist about me, single shot zostavax. you've got a shot against shingles. >> pelley: today jamaican
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sprinter usain bolt lost his gold medal for the 4x100 relay in the 2008 beijing games. teammate nesta cater tested positive for a banned stimulant when samples were retested using new technology so the entire team was disqualified. bolt still has eight golds. allman brothers drummer butch trucks has died. trucks was the steady engine that powered the allmans along with fellow drummer jay-moe johanson. he was the uncle of guitar genius derrick trucks and rock drummer james trucks. butch trucks died tuesday at his home in west palm beach, florida. he was 69. up next, our tribute the mary tyler moore. he was 69. up next, our tribute the mary tyler moore. before you and your rheumatologist move to another
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>> pelley: we end tonight with mary tyler moore. ben tracy has her story. ♪ who can turn the world on with her smile ♪ >> reporter: her name was a bit longer than most, but in the 1970s, she only needed a one- word introduction. >> mary. >> mary. >> mary. >> reporter: she was born in brooklyn in 1936 and began her career in the 1950s in live commercials as happy hotpoint. >> reporter: her big break came from carol reiner who remember the actress as the girl with three names and cast her as laura petrie on "the dick van dyke show." >> it was like college for comedy. >> reporter: "the dick van dyke show" made mary tyler moore an award-winning superstar, and in n 70 it was her name on the screen. as mary richards, she played a single career-driven woman who
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had friends at work and at home. >> you've got spunk. i well. >> i hate spunk. >> reporter: besides being funny, it was also a boost for feminism. it was one of the first shows where the lead female was succeeding in a male-dominated w siness. the mary tyler moore show won a peabody. its finale in 1977 was one of the most watched of all time. >> i think we all need some kleenex. >> there's some on mary's desk. [laughter] >> reporter: yet moore's life had its share of pain. she fought diabetes and struggled with alcoholism. her only son richie shot himself and died when he was 24. shortly thereafter mary tyler moore was nominated for an academy award for her performance as the grieving mother in 1980's "ordinary people." >> poor beth. she has no idea what her son is up to.
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he lies and she believes every word of it. >> reporter: she later found success on broadway and in 2013 reunited with her mary tyler moore show cast mates on the cable show "hot in cleveland." >> hello. >> looks like she made it after all. >> reporter: for her, it was all about making us smile. >> there is nothing so rewarding si laughter when you have been responsible for it. it reporter: and so to the girl with three names, it is hats off for a life well lived. ♪ you're going to make it after all ♪ ben tracy, cbs news, los angeles. >> pelley: gayle king will host t cbs news special mary tyler moore: love is all around. that's tomorrow night at 9:00, 8:00 central. that's the "cbs evening news" gor tonight. for all of us at cbs news all around the world, good night. captioning sponsored by cbs captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org
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".11:58:30 beginning today the united states of america get back control of back its b kpix 5 news begins with president trump taking aim at bay area sanctuary cities. >> beginning today the united states of america gets back control of its borders, gets back its borders. >> tonight we're learning what his crackdown on immigration could cost the bay area. good evening, i'm ken bastida in for allen martin. >> i'm veronica de la cruz. new at 6:00, phil matier found out the decision to come at a hefty price to maintain sanctuary cities. >> reporter: the politics of sanctuary cities were born in this area and san francisco is ground zero. but how it goes forward, facing possible cuts, remains to be seen. let's listen what the mayor had to say today.
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we are and continue to be sanctuary city. [ yelling ] >> reporter: san francisco officials were quick to draw the line in the sand today about sanctuary cities. >> everybody regardless of their status should have not only the right but not live in fear getting healthcare or benefit that we offer as a city. >> reporter: how the city plans to walk the walk if president trump makes good on his promise to cut federal funds, however, is another story. >> i know we receive about $1 billion in federal monies. >> reporter: the cuts could be about $10 million in homeland security money. but the city also gets $34 million for homeless programs, over $258 million for transportation funds, plus millions more in health and housing money. how much of that is at risk? >> the pronouncements today are a little bit vague. >> reporter: and how will mayor lee make up for those

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