Skip to main content

tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  May 15, 2017 3:00am-4:01am PDT

3:00 am
3:01 am
not the only person in my family who was adopted. this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the overnight news. i'm elaine quijano. the global hack attack that started friday is expected to cause monday morning computer problems around the world. a second wave of so-called rans ransom ware could freeze computer as people return to work. mireya villarreal spoke to an expert. >> i would say that this is the worst ransom ware attack that has ever happened. >> reporter: 28-year-old seeker security engineer darian husk says it took him ten minutes to analyze code that helped take down the worldwide ransom ware that hit computers in more than
3:02 am
150 countries. >> reporter: how were you able to find a sample of the code and share it with another researcher? >> a lot of researchers use various methods of sharing samples and codes. sometimes it will be as simple as taking a screen shot from within of the programs that we use to reverse engineer malware such as this. >> reporter: he discovered a kill switch and shared it on twitter. at the same time, halfway around the world, a british researcher that goes by the handle malware tech stumbled on the same solution, stop ng the spread of the attack, but not before it hit computers at banks and hospitals and other agencies. rob wainwright. >> we've seen cyber become being the threat. it is unprecedented. >> reporter: the hackers demanded $300 or their files
3:03 am
would be erased. new code has surfaced that has allowed the ransom ware to work without the kill switch. >> the huge concern is all the computers that are potentially going to be turned on at the beginning of this workweek, and they could be vulnerable to this ransom ware sample that has no kill switch. >> reporter: they used vulnerabilities in microsoft windows to carry out the attacks. they are still searching for whoever is responsible for the ransom ware. experts are urging companies to back up their data and keep their software up to date. president trump said this weekend he expects to nominate a new fbi director by the end of the week. errol barnett has the latest from the white house. >> reporter: president trump spent time at his golf club in virginia today and wished the country a happy mother's day, as did first lady melania trump, tweeting a picture with their
3:04 am
son barron. but john dickerson says mr. trump is now dealing with more serious issues because of how he dismissed comey. what has president trump done by firing the director of the fbi? >> he's put a lot of focus on the russian investigation. if this was a firing done to stop progress, it's getting more scrutiny than ever. and there will be more scrutiny on the fbi director. >> the president has made it clear that he feels it's important that we reengage with russia. >> reporter: the comey controversy emerges just as the trump administration is trying to build stronger ties with the kremlin. secretary of state rex tillerson met with russia's foreign minister wednesday, where the two discussed ways to improve the bilateral relationship. today tillerson left no doubt about the country's election edge feerns but said its impact is an open question. >> yes, i don't think there's any question that the russians were playing nand our electoral processes. again, as those intelligence
3:05 am
reports have indicated, it's inconclusive as to what if any effect it had. >> the attorney general is supposed to have recused himself to anything involving russia and here he is recommending the firing of the top cop on the russian investigation. >> reporter: adam schiff is pushing for an independent inquiry and described the dinner with comey where he asked if he was being investigated as -- >> unethical. at a minimum unethical. if he was trying to yes, ma'imp investigation. but deeply disturbing. >> reporter: the president gave sit-down interviews to fox and nbc. but contradictive statements from his own staff. john dickerson sees that as possibleatic. >> this is something that will come back to hurt him in taking so much of his nerpg as being the communicator. he needs to be the decision maker and let others do the
3:06 am
communicating. >> reporter: he will go on his first overseas tour. he first heads to saudi arabia on friday and from there flies to israel and rome before attending nato summits. seth doane is in damascus where the syrian army is claiming victory as they are evacuating a suburb that has been reduced to rubble. >> reporter: we've been granted access to come to damascus to report from the capital city that is under serious control by president assad. there are checkpoints everywhere, and the city itself is relatively quiet. but in the suburbs, there is a battle taking place. assad's forces are making gains as they try to pry the last pockets of land from rebels who dug in near the capital.
3:07 am
. the syrian army has been bombarding rebel positions, and recently they discovered a series of tunnels. the government has also been allowing rebels and civilians to leave on buses bound for other rebel-held areas. at least 1500 left one opposition district in damascus today. there are many front lines in syria, and many militias fighting each other. another group, the kurdish-led syrian democratic forces said they're closing in on a different target -- isis. and within a few miles of raqqah, the self-declared isis capital in syria. u.s.-led coalition airstrikes have been paving the way for that advance. here in the capital, we keep hearing from people how they have gotten used to the war as it grinds on into itselfenth year. people say they have opened businesses or found ways to try
3:08 am
to move on as they just don't know how long they'll have to,,,
3:09 am
3:10 am
former fbi director james comey was out on the town in washington saturday. he showed up at the matinee of the musical "fun home." now we have more on the candidates running to replace mr. comey. >> reporter: attorney alice fisher was the first to arrive at the justice department saturday morning to interview for the job of fbi director. one by one, seven other candidates were paraded in full view of cameras, before heading in to interview with attorney general jeff sessions and his deputy, rod senstein. while the interviews were under way, president trump took a moment aboard air force one to praise the people that his administration is considering to replace james comey. but most of the names are not
3:11 am
well-known outside the beltway. adam lee runs the richmond field office, fran townsend was a national security adviser to george w. bush. john cornyn and mike rogers also interviewed. on "face the nation," adam schiff said he would like to see someone apolitical. >> absolute integrity and independence, and for this reason, i would strongly urge the administration to pick someone who is completely aplitd cal, who doesn't come out of the political process, someone who is a retired judge or active judge willing to step down from their judgeship. >> reporter: two judges were interviewed saturday. michael garcia is a former federal prosecutor with extensive experience in immigration enforcement, a top priority for the administration. federal judge henry e. hudson was the first judge to rule against obamacare. acting director andrew mccabe is being considered but is unlikely to remain in the top job. in addition to contradict being the administration during his
3:12 am
congressional testimony last week, he's also under internal investigation over whether he should have recused himself in the clinton investigation. mccabe's wife previously ran for office and accepted money from a clinton-linked donor. elaine? >> paula, thanks. today the united states and japan called for an emergency meeting of the u.n. security council after north korea launched another missile this weekend. it was defiant leadership's seventh missile test this year. >> reporter: according to u.s. intelligence, the medium-range missile classified as a kn-17 was launched near north korea's west coast. japan's million says it reached an altitude of more than 1200 miles before splashing down into the sea of japan. a u.s. official tells reuters it landed about 60 miles off the coast of russia. it was the first successful test after a string of recent
3:13 am
failures. the regime continues to test banned ballistic missiles, despite worldwide condemnation. but the u.s. military says the flight pattern of today's launch was not consistent with an intercontinental ballistic missile or icbm, the type that could reach the u.s. mainland. in january, north korean dictator kim jong un, said an icbm test was imminent, but it hasn't happened yet. this shorter range test comes days after south korea elected a new president who wants to engage pyongyang, not isolate it. but today his spokesman said dialog is only possible if north korea changes course. in a statement, the white house called for stronger sanctions and pointed out that the missile landed near russian territory, adding that president trump cannot imagine that russia is pleased. russia's president expressed concern over the launch in beijing. today china called for restraint and calm. china's north korea's only major
3:14 am
ally and has been pushing for negotiations. theoretically, there could be a path towards dialog. over the weekend, a senior north korean official said that the regime would be open to talks with the u.s. under the right overture recently made by president trump, but elaine, this latest provocation derailed that possibility at least anytime soon. >> adriana diaz, thank you. emmanuel macron was sworn in today as france's new president, following his overwhelming defeat last week ever the far-right candidate marine le pen. he rode to the palace. and he says he will help the country get its confidence back. in southwest england today, another example that it's never too late to try something new. 101-year-old d-day veteran vernon hayes jumped out of an
3:15 am
airplane from 15,000 feet. he did the same thing last year for his 100th birthday. he says he'd like to do it again when he turns 102. coming up, a mother's day look at an important issue in america, guaranteed maternity leave. ♪ sorry about the holdup, folks. we have some congestion on the runway and i'm being told it'll be another 15, maybe 20 minutes, and we will have you on your way. ♪ runway models on the runway?
3:16 am
surprising. what's not surprising? how much money evan saved by switching to geico. i would not wear that lace. hmm, i don't know? fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. you knmegared omega-3s... but did you know your eyes, your brain, and your joints really love them too? introducing megared advanced 4in1... just one softgel delivers the omega-3 power of two regular fish oil pills... so give your body mega support with megared advanced 4in1. she pretty much lives in her favorite princess dress.
3:17 am
but once a week i let her play sheriff so i can wash it. i use tide to get out those week old stains and downy to get it fresh and soft. you are free to go. tide and downy together. ♪♪ lysol max cover kills 99.9% of bacteria, even on soft surfaces. one more way you've got what it takes to protect. first you start with this. these guys. a place like shhh! no. found it! and definitely lipton ice tea. lots of it. a lipton meal is what you bring to it. and the refreshing taste of lipton iced tea. clearasil rapid action begins working fast
3:18 am
for clearly visible results in as little as 12 hours. but will it stop this teen from chugging hot sauce? ...oh jeremy. so let's be clear: clearasil works fast on teen acne, not so much on other teen things. an expert you're about to hear from says there are only four countries on earth that do not guarantee paid maternity leave. on this mother's day, we asked tony dokoupil to take a look at one of them -- the united states. >> good job. >> reporter: before her daughter brooke was born in november of 2015, alessandra, who asked us not to use her last name, hadn't given much thought to the politics of motherhood. >> a lot of us who aren't in the situation are blind to it. >> reporter: but now, as she's expecting her second child she's speaking out for a guaranteed
3:19 am
maternity leave in america. >> even toward the end of my pregnancy, i find myself crying, why am i bringing a baby into this world when i can't spend enough time with her. >> reporter: in the past two decades, support for paid maternity leave has grown to 82%. but in that same time, there's been zero increase in the number of women actually using parental leave of any kind. >> this is surprising since the united states has grown by two-thirds. >> reporter: 88% of workers have no access to paid leave through their employerins. at the current pace, it would be200 years before all americans are covered. >> there are actually only four countries in the world that don't provide any paid leave. and those four countries are the united states, swaziland, liberia and papua new guinea.
3:20 am
i'm not sure we want to be in that category. >> reporter: alessandra got six weeks of unpaid leave. she bumped it up to nine weeks using vacation days then reluctantly put her daughter into day care. >> i couldn't sleep at night. i cried myself to sleep for days, because i didn't know that i could handle it. i felt like i was having a panic attack about leaving her with someone else. >> reporter: she had every hope of resuming her career, but between her and her husband's work schedules and the cost of child care, the family was in the red emotionally and financially. >> you shouldn't have to win the lottery in order for to you go back to work and do something that you love while still being a mom. >> reporter: president trump has pledged to provide six weeks of maternity leave for all mothers. that is the bare minimum. still ahead, a mother's battle against the most common type of cancer in america. people are stuck
3:21 am
in very old habits of using toothpaste to clean a denture. but dentures are very different to real teeth. they're about 10x softer and may have surface pores where bacteria can grow and multiply. polident is specifically designed to clean dentures daily. it's unique micro-clean formula kills 99.99% of odor causing bacteria and helps dissolve stains. cleaning in a better way than brushing with toothpaste. that's why dentists recommend polident. polident. cleaner, fresher, brighter every day.
3:22 am
and they happen easily. the other side of this... is they can be removed... easily. spray and wash's... powerful formula... removes over 100 stains. spray and wash. better on over 100 stains. two kids barfed in class today. it was so gross. lysol disinfectant spray kills 99.9% of bacteria, even those that cause stomach bugs. one more way you've got what it takes to protect. may is skin cancer awareness month. it's the most common type of cancer in the u.s. with one in five americans developing the disease in their lifetime.
3:23 am
on this mother's day, a mom from new york shares her story with meg oliver. >> reporter: how much do they weigh? >> they're getting heavy. >> reporter: melissa hernandez is the mother of twin boys. she has a lot to be thankful for. at seven months pregnant she was diagnosed with a large basal cell melanoma. >> the treatment i have to have is a little more because i will to wait. >> reporter: 5.5 million non-melanoma skin cancers are caught in the u.s. melissa worried about scarring. >> i was very nervous, because it was on my forehead. >> we can look at every detail of the tumor. >> reporter: she found this doctor at mt. sinai hospital in new york who uses non-invasive devices to diagnose and use
3:24 am
treatment. she was treated with a laser. >> we're able to monitor with non-invasive imaging to watch the tumor disappear and definitely to shrink it and hopeful any her case we'll be able to eradicate it completely. >> reporter: melissa's had two treatments since her sons were born. you can barely see the scars up close and it's expected to fade even more. a self-described sun worshipper, she's pledging to protect her sons. >> keeping their skin as porcelain white as long as it can be. >> reporter: meg oliver, cbs news, new york. up next, a mother's remarkable story. she was adopted as a baby in vietnam, then paid it forward. ,,,,
3:25 am
3:26 am
3:27 am
we end tonight in san francisco with a remarkable adoption story on this mother's day. john blackstone caught up with a woman who was adopted as a baby in vietnam and paid it forward. >> reporter: she has shattered a glass ceiling, earlier this year named ceo of the chamber of commerce. the first woman to lead the 167-year-old organization. but the title she cherishes most is mother. i see lots of pictures on the wall. >> yeah, tons of pictures of lola. >> reporter: her daughter lola is now 9 years old. did you ever hesitate to tello
3:28 am
la her story, the story of how her life began? >> never hesitated at all. i think it's a really special, incredible journey to be adopted. >> reporter: we first met talia in 2007 after they returned from vietnam with their newly adopted daughter. the baby girl had been abandoned, left in a basket outside an orphanage. for talia, looking at her was like looking in a mirror. she was left in a basket near an orphanage in vietnam who was adopted by a family in america. you thought about the mother who left you for a better life. >> yes. >> reporter: and you have to think about lola's. >> i kind of wish i could reach out to her somehow and let her know that lola's thriving and is really well taken care of. >> reporter: lola is growing into an athlete who loves gymnastics.
3:29 am
>> sometimes i do backhand springs, cartwheels, handstands. >> reporter: growing up, talia was also a dedicated gymnast. they have so much in common. >> i feel special because i'm not the only person in my family would as adopted. >> reporter: who's the lucky one? are you the lucky one or are you the lucky one? >> no, me. >> probably both of us, huh? >> reporter: in her career, talia has tried to make the best of what she's been given america and with her daughter. that's the overnight news for this monday. check back with us for the morning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm elaine key ah know.
3:30 am
this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the overnight news. i'm elaine quijano. the global hack attack that started friday is expected to cause monday morning computer prms world. security officials say a second wave of so-called ransom ware could freeze computers as people return to work. over the weekend, president trump's security adviser had meetings about the hack. mireya villarreal smoke poke to expert. >> i would say this is the worst ransom ware attack that has ever happened. >> reporter:28-year-old darian huss says it took him ten minutes to analyze codes that
3:31 am
took down computers in 150 countries. how were you able to find a sample of the attack code and share it with researchers? >> a lot of researchers use various methods of sharing samples and codes. sometimes it will be as simple as taking a screen shot from one of the programs that we use to reverse engineer malware such as this. >> reporter: huss uncover add kill switch and shared it on twitter. at the same time, halfway around the world, a british researcher that goes by the handle malware tech stumbled onto the same solution, stopping the spread of the cyber attack, but not before it affected at least it 200,000 computers, at hospitals, banks and government agencies. europe's policing director, rob wainwright. >> we've seen the rise of ransom ware becoming the threat. this is unprecedented.
3:32 am
>> reporter: the hackers demanded $300 or risk their data being erased. new code has surfaced that allows the ransom ware to work without the kill switch. >> the huge concern right now are all the computers that are potentially going to be turned on at the beginning of this workweek, and those could still be vulnerable to this new ransom ware sample that has no kill switch. >> reporter: hackers used v vulnerabilities in microsoft windows to carry out the attack. experts are urging companies to update their operating software and regularly backup their data to protect themselves. >> mireya villarreal, thank you. president trump said this weekend he expects to nominate a new fbi director by the end of the week. errol barnett has the latest from the white house. >> reporter: president trump spent time at his golf club in virginia today and wished the country a happy mother's day, as
3:33 am
did first lady melania trump dwighting a picture with their son barron. but john dickerson says mr. trump is dealing with more serious issues because of how he dismissed james comey. what has he done by firing the director of the fbi? >> he's put a lot of focus on the russian investigation. if this was a firing done to stop the progress of that investigation, it's now getting more scrutiny than ever. there will be scrutiny of who the next fbi director will be when i bring that back to the fore. >> the president has made it clear that he feels it's important that we reengage with russia. >> reporter: it emerges as the trump administration tries to build stronger ties with the creme len. secretary of state rex tillerson met with russia's foreign minister wednesday where they discussed how to improve the bilateral relationship. tillerson level tillerson left no doubt about the country's election
3:34 am
interference but the impact is in question. >> the intelligence reports have reported that it's inconclusive what effect if any it has had. >> he has recused himself and here he is recommending the firing of the fbi director. >> reporter: he described mr. comey's dinner as -- >> highly unethical. if he was trying to impede the investigation any way may be beyond unethical, but deeply disturbing. >> reporter: in dealing with the comey fallout, the president gave sit-down interviews to fox and nbc but contradicted statements from his own vice president and white house staff. john dickerson sees that as problematic. >> this is something that will come back to hurt him in terms of just taking up so much of his
3:35 am
energy being the communicator. he really needs to be the decision-maker and let other people do the communicating. >> reporter: in the week ahead, president trump will venture on his first overseas tour and shape his america-first foreign policy. he first heads to saudi arabia on friday and from there flies to israel and rome before attending nato and g-7 summits. elaine? >> errol, thank you. the united states and japan have called for an emergency meeting of the u.n. security council tomorrow after north korea conducted another missile test. it was the seventh such launch in less than a year. the latest missile could not have reached the united states, but it did land just 60 miles from a russian naval base. adriana diaz has the latest from beijing. >> reporter: according to u.s. intelligence, the medium range missile classified as a kn-17 was launched near north korea's west coast. japan's military says it reached an altitude of more than 1200 miles before splashing down into the sea of japan.
3:36 am
a u.s. official tells reuters it landed about 60 miles off the coast of russia. it was the first successful test after a string of recent failures. the regime continues to test banned ballistic missiles, despite worldwide condemnation. but the u.s. military says the flight pattern of today's launch was not consistent with an intercontinental ballistic missile often icbm, the type that could reach the u.s. mainland. in january, north korean dictator kim jong un said an icbm test was imminent, but it hasn't happened yet. this shorter-range test comes days after south korea elected a new president, who wants to engage pyongyang, not isolate it. but today his spokesman said dialog is only possible if north korea changes course. in a statement, the white house called for stronger sanctions. and pointed out that the missile landed near russian territory, adding that president trump quote, cannot imagine that
3:37 am
russia is pleased. russia's president expressed concern over the launch in beijing. today china called for restraint and calm. china's north korea's only major ally and has been pushing for negotiation. theoretically, there could be a path towards dialog. over the weekend, a senior north korean official said that the regime would be open to talks with the u.s. under the right circumstances. echoing a similar overture made recently by president trump, but elaine, this latest provocation derails that possibility at least anytime soon. >> adriana diaz, thank you. emmanuel macron was sworn in today as france's new president following his overwhelming defeat of the far-right candidate marine le pen last week. he says he will help the country get its confidence back. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
3:38 am
♪ lysol max cover kills 99.9% of bacteria, even on soft surfaces. one more way you've got what it takes to protect. clearasil rapid action begins working fast for clearly visible results in as little as 12 hours. but can ot fix this teens skateboarding mishap? nope. so let's be clear: clearasil works fast on teen acne,
3:39 am
not so much on other teen things. 60% of women are wearing the w...experience leaks. introducing always my fit. find the number that's right for your flow and panty size on the top of any always pack. the better the fit, the better it protects. always. because your carpet there's resolve carpet care. it lifts more dirt and pet hair versus vacuuming alone. resolve carpet care with five times benefits
3:40 am
the golden retriever is one of the most popular dog breeds in america. in turkey, not so much. hundreds of goldens are roaming the streets as strays where they're often preyed upon by more aggressive breeds. now there's an organization that's rounding up these street retrievers and sending them to new homes in the united states. barry peterson and holly williams have been following the story. we begin with holly in istanbul. >> reporter: it's been a long, hard winter in istanbul. especially if you're a stray dog. one of thousands in this sprawling, middle eastern city. they live on the streets. dodging traffic and begging for scraps. dogs like valentine, a 1-year-old golden retriever who was found weak and
3:41 am
undernourished. these two help run a rescue center in istanbul. where many of the dogs are golden retrievers. they told us they are bought as puppies, then people discard them after they discover they're big and energetic. >> they end up throwing hem away or giving them to shelters. >> reporter: how do the goldens do on the street? do they cope very well? >> they don't. >> reporter: golden retrievers are famously friendly and playful. i need the microphone. ah! the dog took the microphone! on the streets though, jess minujessamin told us they're often attacked by more aggressive dogs. these dogs are being sent to america and finding new homes.
3:42 am
what would happen to them if they, if you guys didn't take them off the streets and find new homes for them? >> i don't even want to think, but we can't take all of them. there's so many every day. >> reporter: last year this group sent around 600 dogs to america for adoption, including some disabled animals like violet here who's blind and captain who's lost a leg. we don't want you to get the idea that dogs aren't loved here in turkey. volunteers feed hundreds of stray dogs every day. and in this wealthy neighborhood, tommy has been fed by so many residents, he's become obese. "don't feed the dog" says the sign. tommy is now on a strict diet. but still, there are too many dogs on istanbul's streets. so last month, valentine along with 7-year-old romeo who needs an operation on his hips and 16 other golden retrievers embarked on a journey to have' different
3:43 am
life. and that's where barry peterson picks up the story. >> reporter: 6,000 miles later, journey's end, in denver. >> valentine! >> reporter: at a cargo warehouse, hugs from sponsors who donated $2,250 for each dog's airfare. penny morris found a very skinny romeo. what do you think? >> i think he's adorable. and he needs a lot of hamburger. >> reporter: then across town for the golden retriever rescue of the rockies, where every dog will eventually have a home. families like dick and robin valure, looking to adopt suddenly fasd doggie disorder. >> i kept lookin' around and here's sundance, and i'm going you know what? that's a sign. >> reporter: in just minutes, a lifetime decision. >> okay, we're going home. >> tell him speak english. >> reporter: and off to his
3:44 am
first night in america. >> we got our sleeping bags out and threw them on the floor, took our pillows down, and that dog got to sleep right in between us. >> reporter: so you went to sleep on the floor. >> oh, my god. mm-hm. >> reporter: why? >> because i think they need to realize that you're there for them. >> reporter: back at golden retriever rescue of the rockies, valentine listened in as director kevin shipley said the turkish dogs who've come here have a nickname. >> turkey dogs. >> reporter: turkey dogs. >> operation turkey dog colorado. i've got a turkey dog, and their neighbors look at them sideways. >> reporter: dick and robin's neighbors have a new friend on their streit. is he now part of your family? >> yeah, he definitely is. >> reporter: unconditional love? >> it has to be. if you're going to bring a dog like this into your life, i mean, it has to be. >> reporter: and about their dog who came from istanbul, a
3:45 am
question the valures couldn't answer. did they pick sundance? ♪ you know how painful heartburn can be. for fast-acting, long-lasting relief, try doctor recommended gaviscon. it quickly neutralizes stomach acid and helps keep acid down for hours. relieve heartburn with fast- acting, long-lasting gaviscon. and helps keep acid down for hours. two kids barfed in class today. it was so gross. lysol disinfectant spray kills 99.9% of bacteria, even those that cause stomach bugs. one more way you've got what it takes to protect. clearasil rapid action begins working fast for clearly visible results in as little as 12 hours. but will it stop this teen from being embarassed by her parents?
3:46 am
nope. so let's be clear: clearasil works fast on teen acne, not so much on other teen things. this clean was like pow! everything well? my teeth are glowing. they are so white. step 1 cleans. step 2 whitens. crest [hd]. 6x cleaning*, 6x whitening*á i would switch to crest [hd] over what i was using before. no matter who was in there last. protection. new lysol power & fresh 6 goes to work flush after flush
3:47 am
for a just-cleaned feeling that lasts up to 4 weeks. lysol. what it takes to protect. i just saved a bunch of money on my car insurhuh. with geico. i should take a closer look at geico... geico can help with way more than car insurance. boats, homes, motorcycles... even umbrella coverage. this guy's gonna wish he brought his umbrella. fire at will! how'd you know the guy's name is will? yeah? it's an expression, ya know? fire at will? you never heard of that? oh, there goes will! bye, will! that's not his name! take a closer look at geico. great savings. and a whole lot more. legendary crooner johnny mathis has been performing and recording on stage for more than 60 years. he's still got "the voice," not
3:48 am
to mention a new album. >> do you prefer john or johnny? >> john. ♪ chances are >> the thing that i do is sing because i can't tell a lie. i want them to know exactly what i'm feeling. ♪ chances are you think my heart's your valentine ♪ >> reporter: chances are, if you're john mathis, you've been revealing your feelings for a long time. "chances are" was his first number one hit. he's been singing it since he made the recording back in 1957. >> i can't tell you how lucky i am. the songs i sing i like. ♪ wonderful, wonderful >> reporter: this classic is also 60 years old. ♪ it's beginning to look a lot like christmas ♪ >> reporter: and being john mathis means you sing a lot of christmas songs.
3:49 am
at first to please your mom. >> my move loved my christmas music, so i did a lot of it. >> reporter: but mathis felt it was time to enter this century. >> i'm happy that i'm finally doing some contemporary music that was written shorter than 50 years ago. ♪ nothing crazy >> reporter: n >> now that i'm 81 years old i can bust a move and have some fun. >> reporter: though known for his lush balanclads he does bus move. ♪ with hair like i don't care >> reporter: guided by "baby face." >> johnny's always had one of "the voice"s that you will never forge forget. ♪ i believe i can fly >> it's part of american music,
3:50 am
american history. ♪ i believe i can fly >> reporter: john mathis was born in texas, the fourth of seven children. the family moved to san francisco when he was a small boy. was hethere racism? segregation? >> it was heaven. i never felt denied in any way. >> reporter: he admired his father, a chef who played piano. >> he and i bonded because music. the first time i heard him sing, that's it. you and me, pop. >> reporter: what do you sing in the shower? ♪ >> reporter: his father sent him to a voice teacher whose lessons obviously included classical training. mathis also excelled at basketball, hurdling and the high jump. >> i have a bad back. and every time i jumped, i felt it. >> reporter: so instead of pursuing a place at the olympics, he was invited to new york in 1956 to make his first
3:51 am
record. ♪ it's not for me to say >> reporter: his greatest hits album from 1958 was on the billboard charts for, get this, nearly ten years. it was only when mathis achieved fame that he discovered the world was not like his idyllic san francisco childhood. >> when i went to vegas,ly i ho stay over there. you have this big hotel, why can't i stay there. other no, you have to stay over the railroad tracks over in the colored section. >> reporter: did it make you angry? >> no. i laughed at it, i said don't be so stupid. what am i going to do? i'm not going to marry your daughter, come on. and it was very funny, because people thought i was white. people tell me that all the time. i'm not. >> reporter: your picture was on your album. >> yeah. there was a time when i was in the south. someone came to me before the
3:52 am
show and said there's been a threat on your life. i was singing ♪ chances are and i kept moving so that they wouldn't have a shot at me. it was a few years ago i felt comfortable going back to atlanta. ♪ once i had >> reporter: in 1982, mathis told "us" weekly something personal he has rarely discussed since. he said homosexuality is a waive life that i've grown accustomed to. you got death threats once that happened as well when you spoke about your private life. >> that was a revelation for me. i come from san francisco. it's not unusual to be gay in san francisco. >> reporter: mm-hm. >> i've had some girlfriends and boyfriends, just like most people. but i never got married, for instance. i knew that i was gay. i didn't want to do anything about that. >> reporter: right. >> my dad had a wonderful, wonderful way about accepting things as they are.
3:53 am
as opposed to the way we wish they would be. he said, son, there are a lot of people ain't going to like you. >> reporter: that's an amazing thing that he was so loving and accepting. >> he was my pal. i could tell him anything. and i did. >> reporter: former first lady nancy reagan was also a pal. >> hello, johnny. >> hi. >> it's nancy. >> nancy. >> nancy who? >> i recognize that voice. >> she invited me to sing at the white house on several occasions. ♪ many men with lofty aims >> reporter: mathis says mrs. reagan saved his life. she saw you performing and was a little concerned about you. >> we were sitting around, i was, drinking, and she suggested that i might have a problem. i said probably not, but what have you got in mind? and so she sent me to a place in maryland. i was there with a bunch of jesuit priests, three weeks of finding out why i drank, how i
3:54 am
could stop. and it was the greatest thing that ever happened to me in my life. >> reporter: in november 2015, his hollywood hills home of 56 years was severely damaged in a fire. >> i'm okay. nobody got hurt. ♪ i get misty >> reporter: by now you've probably noticed that when times turn tough -- >> oh, what a terrible putt. >> reporter: mathis remains determined, even upbeat. if your house is being repaired, just have crew and correspondents catch up with you at the golf course. although i discovered his favorite sport doesn't really calm him. does this relax you? >> no. >> reporter: what do you mean no? >> it's very stressful. you god t to get this little ba in the hole all,,,,,,,,,,,,
3:55 am
3:56 am
3:57 am
steve hartman with a mother's day story that's heaven sent. >> reporter: to tell the strangest story of my career, i had to go back to the beginning of it. good to see you, man. my first job in news was with brad brown. >> wtol-tv. >> reporter: it was at the cbs affiliate in toledo, ohio. brad was the serious investigative reporter who once worked for the "washington post." and i was his wayward feature-loving intern. give me a kiss. point is, brad comes to me with a lot of credibility, which is the only reason i even heard him out when he called me up with this unbelievable tale. >> if god wanted to give a sign, what better way to do it than through the instrument that
3:58 am
dominates people's lives today. >> reporter: the iphone. >> right, the smartphone. >> reporter: brad's odyssey with his iphone began after his mom died in february. janet brown. at one point, one of the highest-ranking women at the pentagon was buried just this week in arlington. brad says he was making these arrangements when three days after she died he hit the mail icon on his phone, and for the first time in his life, his mail didn't come up. >> and it wasn't just a blank screen, like the phone had gone dead. there was an image there. >> reporter: he took this screen shot and recognized it immediately as a cloudy version of a different picture on his phone. of his mom. the phone started working normally again a few hours later, but the image still appears today in the background of some e-mails. >> there she is. right? that's weird. >> reporter: we talked to several phone experts.
3:59 am
some were able to recreate this effect, but none could explain how it randomly appeared in the first place. >> this is what i got. have you seen this before? >> i haven't seen that at all. it's like a lovely thing. >> so you wouldn't fix it? >> i wouldn't fix it. >> reporter: the whole experience has left this retired investigative reporter with the biggest mystery of his life. >> and sometimes now as i think about, is there a technical explanation, one side of the ledge earn of reality, i look at the other side of the ledger of reality, is this the blessing that god is giving to me? >> reporter: this mother's day, lots of people will be missing their moms. when all of a sudden, maybe a rainbow will appear, or a blue bird will land on the window sill, mere coincidence to many, but brad brown says, until proven otherwise, it's okay to believe. it's your mother calling. steve hartman, on the road. in arlington, virginia. that's overnight news for
4:00 am
this monday. from the cbs broadcast center in captioning funded by cbs it's monday, may 15th, 2017. this is the cbs mor"cbs mornin." the world braces for a monday morning meltdown. experts say another round of the massive ransom ware cyberattack could hit millions more today forcing victims to pay up. and this morning new reports president trump is about to boot several top staffers, and while a new poll shows few americans support his firing of fbi director james comey. and another test firing from north korea. the damage the missile could be capable of and what our agent al a

107 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on