Skip to main content

tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  May 24, 2017 3:12am-4:01am PDT

3:12 am
terrorist attacks in this country could have been stopped if only someone had reported suspicious activity. >> jeff pegues, thanks. soon after the blast, ariana grande tweeted, broken, from the bottom of my heart, i am so sorry. i don't have words. the singer knflew home to nord a private jet today, and there are reports that her european tour has been called off. president trump had this reaction while appearing today with the palestinian authority president mahmoud abbas in beth ha hem. >> so many young, innocent, beautiful people living and enjoying their lives, murdered, by evil losers in life. i won't call them monsters, because they would like that
3:13 am
term. they would think that's a great name. i will call them, from now on, losers, because that's what they are. they're losers. and we'll have more of them. but they're losers. just remember that. >> mr. trump and the first lady later flew to rome. tomorrow he will meet with pope francis. while the president is traveling, a senate panel grilled a top intelligence official. to say that there is no evidence his campaign colluded with russia. this was first reported in the "washington post" and has now been confirmed by cbs news. here is our chief congress at correspondent, nancy cordes. >> is that an accurate had reporting, director coats? >> reporter: the trenter of
3:14 am
national intelligence, dan coats was reluck tact to speak out today about the man who appointed him. >> i don't think it's appropriate to kaerkize discussions with the president. >> reporter: cbs has confirmed that the president asked coats to push back on the fbi's russia investigation. mr. trump made the same request of nsa director, mike rogers. >> have you talked about this issue with admiral rogers? >> that is something that i would like to withhold, that question at this particular point in time. >> reporter: across the capitol, former cia director, john brennan described in the greatest detail yet why the trump campaign team first came under scrutiny. >> i was aware of intelligence and information about contacts between russian officials and u.s. persons that raised concerns in my mind whether or not those individuals were cooperating with the russians.
3:15 am
>> reporter: by last july, he says, the volume of contacts was large enough to warrant the creation of a working group, made up of agents from the cia, fbi and nsa. >> having been involved in many counter intelligence cases in the past, i know what the russians try to do. they try to get individuals, including u.s. persons to act on their behalf, either wittingly or unwittingly. and frequently, individuals who go along a treasonous path do not realize they're on that path until it's too late. >> reporter: california democrat jackie spear. >> were you aware they were trying to cultivate then real estate developer donald trump for almost eight years? >> i'm not going to talk about any individuals. >> reporter: republicans like trey gowdy noted that contact alone was not proof of wrongdoing. >> did you see evidence of collusion, coordination, conspiracy between donald trump and russian state actors?
3:16 am
>> i saw information intelligence that was worthy of investigation by the bureau to determine whether or not such cooperation of conclusion was taking place. >> what was the nature of the information? >> as i said, mr. gowdy, i think this committee now has access to the type of information i'm ahuding to here now. it's classified. and i'm happen' y to talk about in a classified session. >> reporter: brennan revealed for the first time today that he reached out to his russian counterpart last year and said that russia would pay a price if it didn't stop trying to meddle in the u.s. election. scott, the russian officials denied the charges but they said they'd take his concerns to vladimir putin. >> nancy cordes on capitol hill. thanks. coming up next in manchester. the sobering truth about drinking and breast cancer. and later, we'll remember
3:17 am
007, sir roger moore. because your carpet never stops working
3:18 am
there's resolve carpet care. with five times more benefits than vacuuming alone... it lifts more dirt, pet hair and removes odours. while softening every fibre because your carpet never stops working, resolve carpet care with five times benefits
3:19 am
with motionsense technology... degree has redefined deodorant so that i can redefine... power... footwork... range... the more i move, the more it works. degree. it won't let you down. clearasil rapid action begins working fast for clearly visible results in as little as 12 hours. but will it stop this teen from being embarassed by her parents? nope. so let's be clear: clearasil works fast on teen acne, not so much on other teen things. we've known for some time there is a link between drinking
3:20 am
and breast cancer. but a new report says that even a little alcohol can increase the risk. here's dr. jon habook. >> the report reviewed data on more than 12 million women from around the world and found that one small glass of wine, beer or alcohol daily was an increase risk for breast cancer. for premenopausal women it increased 5%. for post menopausal women it was 9%. >> it does increase with more alcohol. two drinks a day can give you twice the risk of one drink a day or three drinks a day increases the risk by three times. >> reporter: on the positive side. >> vigorous exercise was associated with a 17% lower risk in premenopausal women and a
3:21 am
lower risk in post menopausal women. >> we wouldn't want people to drink on the weekend and then the next morning go for a jog and it will cure everything. it may not work that way. women who keep their weight in a normal range, limit their alcohol to one drink a day, that can significantly reduce risk for developing breast cancer. >> on the one hand, alcohol increases the risk of breast cancer, on the other hand, in moderation it can decrease the risk of heart disease. it's a balancing act to take into account which disease is the bigger threat for any one woman. >> dr. jon lapook, thank you. still ahead, for your eyes only, we'll remember sir roger moore. this how do you become america's #1?
3:22 am
start by taking care of families for 70 years. earn the trust of 32 nfl teams. be there for america's toughest and help, when help is needed america's #1 isn't a status earned overnight. it's earned in every wash, and re-earned every day. tide, america's #1 detergent because your carpet there's resolve carpet care. with five times more benefits than vacuuming alone... it lifts more dirt, pet hair and removes odours. while softening every fibre
3:23 am
because your carpet never stops working, resolve carpet care with five times benefits it was a somber commencement for the class of '17 at bowie state university. the gown of richard collins iii was draped over a chair. he was stabbed at the ufniversiy of maryland where he was killed. actress and heiress, dena merrill has died. a movie star and frequent game
3:24 am
show star. they built a palm beach estate called mar-a-lago, now owned by the president. she was 93. roger moore liked to say that sean connery played james bond as a killer whale he played 007 as a lover, but when necessary, moore showed exquisite aim. >> you've missed, mr. bond. >> did i? as you said, such good sport. >> moore played bond in seven films and often wondered what kind of spy is recognized everywhere he goes. his big break came on tv in the 1960s playing the saint, a kind of latter day robin hood. post-bond, he was active in charity and became a good will ambassador for unicef.
3:25 am
roger moore died today of cancer. he was 89. he was 89. we'll,,,,,,,,,,
3:26 am
3:27 am
why did this terrorist attack targethildren? because isis and al qaeda have not yet found a way to set the world on fire. what they want is for christianity to declare war on islam. but each time they try to heili the fuse, new york, london, nice, manchester, the hate never quite explodes. we think we found out why, right
3:28 am
here. at 6:00 this evening, they filled albert square beneath their great gothic town hall. these are the crusaders isis ridiculed. but they call themselves mankunians, derived from manchester in rome. what we noticed is how young they are and how diverse. islam is manchester's second largest religion. >> the people of manchester will remember the victims forever and we will defy the terrorists by all our diverse communities. >> the communities were too large for most people to see the vigil, but then they weren't here to see, but to be seen. >> why did you come here snotod is this. >> to pay my respects and teach the children what's right and wrong. >> i grew up here, this is my home. and i want to show that even if
3:29 am
i'm on the edge of the crowd, we're here, we are standing against this. >> and essentially send a message through our solidarity that they will not win. we will succeed and we will overcome. >> we're not going to be cowed or put off by some cowards. >> the crusaders in the square were black and white and brown. jewish, muslim, christian, hindu and sikh. it turns out the message is not united we stand but divided we stand, richer, stronger for our diversity. and that's overnight news for this wednesday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back with us a little bit later for the morning news and cbs this morning. from manchester england, i'm scott pelley.
3:30 am
this is the "cbs overnight news." >> hi, everyone, and welcome to the overnight news. i'm dimarco morgan. shock, sadness and anger have descended on northern england after the deadly terrorist bombing at a pop concert. sadness that 22 50epeople were killed and dozens hurt, and anger that a local man would target crowds of children with his murderous rage. scott pelley is in manchester. >> reporter: the prime minister raised the terror threat to critical. that means another attack is considered imminent. soldiers are being deplayed. a makeshift memorial is growing for victims of the suicide
3:31 am
bombing last night at the manchester arena. at least 22 were killed and 59 wounded. an unknown number are still unaccounted for. this attack was different. the targets included many young children and teenagers attending a concert. among the dead, saffie rose roussos, just 8 years old. her principal said she'll be remembered for her warmth, kindness and creative flair. georgina callen der was 18 and a huge fan of ariana grande. and this dancer, describe as an amazingly happy, gentle person. "the sun" posted a photo of the man who took their lives, and mark phillips has the latest now on how it happened. >> reporter: it was an attack, not on a crowd of concert-goers,
3:32 am
but on innocence itself. first, a thud. then confusion. >> oh, my god! >> reporter: then panic. the audience for ariana grande is young, often in their early teens, often female. sometimes of elementary school age. this was the deliberate targeting of children. an arena for sinful parties, isis called it in their admission of responsibility. >> we were in the arena, and we heard a bang, and i just run for me life. >> a big bang, smelled smoke and everyone was screaming and crying. >> reporter: the bomber had come to the concert from a manchester neighborhood a few miles away, where police were searching today. an s.w.a.t. team blew its way into the home of a 22-year-old local man police say was known to them and who had himself died in the murderous blast he set
3:33 am
off. manchester police chief, ian hawkins. >> i can confirm that the man suspected of carrying out last night's atrocity is 22-year-old salman abedi. however, he has not yet been formally named by the coroner, and i wouldn't westeish to there comment sany further about him. >> reporter: a major antiterrorism investigation is trying to determine whether he acted alone or whether he had help in planning his attack and building his bomb. either way, this attack was another example of home-grown terror. police made at least one arrest today, of a 23-year-old man they said was in connection with the bombing. the bomb had been built to kill and maim. packed with nuts, bolts and nails and it even left those who survived traumatized. >> you don't think that something would happen to you.
3:34 am
and then when it happens to you, it's so unreal. it really hits you. >> crying, still trying to get in contact with everybody that we haven't seen. >> reporter: manchester, a proud, working-class town now joins london and berlin and nice and brussels and madrid and all the other places where innocents have died in europe's current reign of terror. some details are emerging about the suspect, salman abedi. he was a local man who dropped out of college, attended a moderate, not radical mosque, how was he radicalized? where did he learn to build such a lethal bomb, did he have any help? and if he was known to police, was there a security failing that contributed to this tragedy? closer to home, officials were on capitol hill testifying about the investigation of russian influence on the 2016
3:35 am
presidential election. nancy cordes has this story. >> is that an accurate reporting, director coats? >> reporter: the director of national intelligence, dan coats was reluctant to speak out about the man who appointed him. >> i don't think it's important to krarkize conversations with the president. >> reporter: cbs has confirmed that the president ask the coats to push back on the fbi's russia investigation. mr. trump made the same request of nsa director meike rogers. >> have you talked about this issue with admiral rogers? >> that is something that i would like to withhold. that question. at this particular point in time. >> reporter: across the capitol, former cia director, john brennan described in the greatest detail yet why the trump campaign team first came under scrutiny. >> i was aware of intelligence and information about contacts
3:36 am
between russian officials and u.s. persons that raised concerns in my mind about whether or not those individuals were cooperating with the russians. >> reporter: by last july, he says, the volume of contacts was large enough to warrant the creation of a working group, made up of agents from the cia, fbi, and nsa. >> having been involved in many counter intelligence cases in the past, i know what the russians try to do. they try to subborne individuals and try to get u.s. persons to act on their behalf either wittingly or unwittingly, and frequent la frequently people who are on the path don't realize they're on that path until it's too late. >> were you aware they were trying to cultivate then real estate developer donald trump for eight years? >> reporter: republicans like trey gowdy noted that contact alone was not proof of
3:37 am
wrongdoing. >> did you see evidence? of collusion, coordination, conspiracy, between donald trump and russian state actors? >> i saw information intelligence that was worthy of investigation by the bureau to determine whether or not such cooperation of collusion was taking place. >> what was the nature of the information? >> as i said, mr. gowdy, i think this committee has access to the type of information i'm alluding to, it's classified, and i'll be happy to talk about it in a classified session. >> reporter: he said he reached out to his russian counterpart last year and said that russia would pay a price if it conditions stop trying to meddle in the u.s. election. they denied it and said they would take the concern to vladimir putin. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. stains happen...
3:38 am
and they happen easily. the other side of this... is they can be removed... easily. spray and wash's... powerful formula... removes over 100 stains. spray and wash. better on over 100 stains. because your carpet there's resolve carpet care. it lifts more dirt and pet hair versus vacuuming alone. resolve carpet care with five times benefits
3:39 am
clearasil rapid action begins working fast for clearly visible results in as little as 12 hours. but will it stop this teen from chugging hot sauce? ...oh jeremy. so let's be clear: clearasil works fast on teen acne, not so much on other teen things.
3:40 am
a new exhibition by the championship ease disdepths artist, ai wei wei will open in new york. it's his first show in years. dedicated to act vests and prisoners of conscience. >> reporter: they thought your intention was to subvert state power. >> which is true. >> reporter: which is true. you want to bring down the chinese government? >> not bring down. >> reporter: but you want it to change. >> yes. of course. >> reporter: those are dangerous words in china. where even after decades of modernization the government has little tolerance for dissent. but that's never bothered ai wei wei.
3:41 am
this is the work he's perhaps most famous for. what you're seeing in the back fwoupd is a portrait of their revered dictator, now smao tse-tung. are we creating a new ai wei wei as we stand here? >> everybody can do it. >> reporter: easy? certainly not subtle, and maybe a little silly, but the chinese authorities took them very seriously. they thought it was subversive. why was the regime frightened of art? >> because they're afraid of freedom. and art is about freedom. >> reporter: they're afraid of freedom. >> yes. >> reporter: are you an artist? or are you an activist? >> i think i'm artist, and activist is the same thing. as artist, you're always an activist. >> reporter: you have to be political to be a good artist
3:42 am
in. >> i think every art, if it's relevant, is political. >> reporter: as a writer for "the new yorker" who spent years in beijing and chronicled ai wei wei's confrontations with the authorities, he called him an entrepreneur of provocation. what does that mean? >> it means that no matter what he's doing he's figuring out a way not to cooperate with the prevailing wisdom or the people in charge. and this can make a lot of people very angry. >> what's wrong with how things are to ai wei wei's mind? >> in china you are being constantly told that the world today is so much better than it was 20 or 30 or 40 years ago when chinese people were literally starving that you should be satisfied. and what ai wei wei is saying is absolutely not. you should demand more. >> reporter: it's not good enough to be rich. >> exactly. it's not good enough to be retch. you need to be friee as well.
3:43 am
>> reporter: in 2008, his one-man rebellion turned into a war after 90,000 people were killed, including several thousand children. many of whom were crushed in po poorly built, government school. it was a national trauma. and the authorities tried to put a lid on the public's anger by covering up the number of children who died. it was a state secret how many children had died in these schools. >> yes, they always use that as some kind of, you know, excuse not to tell, not to reveal the current numbers. >> reporter: ai wei wei assembled a team of activists to interview the parents, many of whom had lost their only child. he called it a citizens investigation. china had never seen anything like it.
3:44 am
you were trying to get to the truth. why did that make the chinese government so angry? >> to control the information, to limit the truth as most efficient tactics for a totalitarian society, for the rulers. >> reporter: he gathered the names of more than 5,000 dead children and published a list on the internet, shaming his government. and across china, people took notice. there was a challenge to the government's authority. >> and they couldn't accept it. it was an act of radical transparency. nobody had ever done that before. and they didn't immediately know how to respond. they had never really encountered a person like ai wei wei. >> reporter: what were they worried that he might do? >> inspire people. inspire people to do and live the way that he did. >> reporter: the chinese authorities responded brutally, ai wei wei says police beat him
3:45 am
up, and he later had to be hospitalized. doctors discovered bleeding in his brain, which he says could have killed him. he documented it all on social media for his followers around the world. infuriating the government and escalating the confrontation. >> he weaponized social media. he figured out in a country that controls information so carefully that seizing the tools of information distribution is a very powerful thing to do. >> reporter: what did the chinese government think about that? >> they began to think he was a very dangerous person. >> reporter: ai wei wei was groomed to be a disdepths since childhood. his father was a celebrated poet who was denounced as a traitor and exiled to the edge of china to the gobi desert, where ai wei wei watched his father's humiliation as he was forced to clean public toilets. you were an outsider from the beginning.
3:46 am
>> yes, i'm a natural outsider. i've always been pushed out. but that also give me very special angle to look in a sense. >> reporter: it made you an independent thinker. >> it made me an individual. and i always have to make my judgment end peptly, because the mainstream will never accept somebody hilike me. >> reporter: ai wei wei got out of china in the first opportunity and moved to new york in the '80s. he was intoxicated by the city, chronicling everything in pictures, gathering inspiration from andy warhol and gaining a living by doing street art. you were selling them for how much? >> 15? $ $15. >> reporter: some of his work now sells for millions, but in america he discovered something you can't put a miss on.
3:47 am
you once said once you experienced freedom, it stays in your heart, is that true? >> it's true. you taste the most important thing in life, and you will never forget it. >> reporter: after a decade in the u.s. he moved back to china and set up a studio in beijing, breaking new ground and challenging old sensibilities with mischievous art, with him destroying a 2,000 year old urn. i wants to shatter the official version of history. you smashed a priceless urn. >> it's not priceless. >> reporter: for a lot of chinese people, it's a priceless part of their history. >> for me to smash it is valuable act. >> reporter: if you buy that, and the art world certainly did. look what he did to these urns,
3:48 am
doused in bright paint or emblazoned with the coca-cola logo, paying tribute to his idol, andy warhol. by 2010, new commissions were rolling in, and ai wei wei's work was more ambitious. not all of it was political. he cast giant animal heads in bronze and sent them on tour around the world. he hired 1600 artisans to hand craft porcelain sunflower seeds. then carpeted the floor of a giant atrium in london with 100 million of them. it captivated the public. and helped turn ai wei wei into an art scene super star. you're the darling of the art world. >> i am a'm the darling of the world, i don't really care. >> reporter: you don't care. >> no, i don't really care. they can just forget about me, i
3:49 am
don't care. >> reporter: but they're not forgetting about you. >> that's their problem. they should, they should learn how to forget about it. >> reporter: the chinese government wanted everyone to forget about ai wei wei, blocking his name on the internet in china and making it impossible to search for home. but that didn't stop ai wei wei from needling the authorities relentlessly. when they put his studio under surveillance, he decorated the cameras with lanterns. when officers were ordered to follow his every move, he got his own cameramen to film them filming him, ridiculing the state in a way no one else in china ever did. >> i mean, in a way, people learn to be, keep your head down, and ai wei wei doesn't, he's, no, i'm not going to keep my head down. i'm going to wave my big head with my beard and my crazy haircut all over the place, and you'll have to deal with it. >> reporter: he was making the
3:50 am
chinese government look ridiculous. >> yeah, he was mocking it. he was mocking it. and the chinese government is many things, but it does not possess an abundant sense of hume i humor. and i think at a certain point, they said we're not going to take it anymore. >> reporter: and they didn't. early one morning in 2011 as he was about to board a plane, they put a hood over his head and took him away. it was the beginning of 81 harrowing days of solitary confinement. >> ai wei wei was eventually released but barred from leaving china for two because your carpet never stops working there's resolve carpet care. with five times more benefits than vacuuming alone... it lifts more dirt, pet hair and removes odours. while softening every fibre
3:51 am
because your carpet never stops working, resolve carpet care with five times benefits clearasil rapid action begins working fast for clearly visible results in as little as 12 hours. but can ot fix this teens skateboarding mishap? nope. so let's be clear: clearasil works fast on teen acne, not so much on other teen things.
3:52 am
♪ new lysol kitchen pro eliminates 99.9% of bacteria without any harsh chemical residue. lysol. what it takes to protect.
3:53 am
a lot of states won't allow kids to use sunscreen at school without a doctor's note. there's a movement afoot to change that. jericka duncan reports. >> reporter: on sunny days, susan and her son paul enjoy spending time in the back yard of their smithfield, rhode island home. but before they head out, they always lather on the sunscreen. >> i have three bits of carcinomas and precancerous moles. >> reporter: it is a wakeup call to protect herself and her son who burns easily.
3:54 am
but when at school, he and other students cannot apply sunscreen without a doctor's note, because the food and drug administration classifies it as an over-the-counter drug like cough syrup. they are among the states pshing for legislation to exempt sunscreen. dermatologist jeff ashley. >> we'd like every school in the country to have an allowance for children to use sunscreen. >> reporter: according to the cdc, one sunburn in childhood nearby doubled the person's lifetime risk of getting melanoma, the most dangerous kind of skin cancer. >> it there was widespread use of sunscreen and it was used properly we would see decline in skin cancer rates. >> reporter: susan says shedding a light on sun safety may save
3:55 am
lives. >> all the damage is done when you're young, but you're,,
3:56 am
3:57 am
there's traffic jam at the top of the world, and it could prove deadly. so many people are trying to scale mt. everest that it could prove deadly. six climbers have already died. one of them was a doctor from alabama, row land yearwood. his goal was to climb the highest peak. >> followed by an earthquake in 2015, everest climbing turned to some sense of normalcy last year, but this new normal can be
3:58 am
chaotic, with more guides kpeetding for business and more aspiring climbers competing to hire them. many thought this was the right weather window this year, but the extreme danger on everest never goes away. it is a record year on mt. everest. nepalese authorities have issued more than 370 climbing permits to foreigners, the most accept they started regulating the climb in 1953. one of those was 50 year old rowland yearwood. he reportedly survived a disaster in 2015. he was less than 2,000 feet from the summit in an area known as everest's death zone. this climber summited in 2012. >> this is an area where the oxygen drops to less than 35%. because of the lack of oxygen, the body starts to consume
3:59 am
itself. and when that happens. >> the body will shut down. >> reporter: he knows the large number of climbers cause traffic jams near the top. for dozens of people, they stack up single file, waiting to reach the peak. >> people can be up there standing in line three hours, then they run out of oxygen and the weather moves in. so you have all these factors that kind of compound into tragedy. >> what's the plan today? >> reporter: climbers adrian and corey are documenting their climb on social media. earlier this month they described how they coped with the danger of death. >> it's a reminder to make sure it's worth it, that our values are in the right place, it that beer' doi we're doing it for the right reason and willing to accept that risk. that's the overnight news for this wednesday. you can check back later for the
4:00 am
morningness and c momomone [ speaking foreign language ] it's wednesday, may 24th, 2017. this is the "cbs this morning." breaking overnight. the president meets the pope. the two come face-to-face for the first time after trading barbs over the president's policies. and following the suicide bombing at a concert that left 22 people dead including children. this morning britain e's at hig alert. they prove they're manchester united. >> in manchester,

68 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on