Skip to main content

tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  June 6, 2017 3:12am-4:01am PDT

3:12 am
the president's tweets, quote, seriously undermine administration agenda. and neal katyal wrote of mr. trump's tweets, "we don't need the help, but we'll take it." >> it is really very sad as to what's going on throughout the world with terror. >> reporter: this is the second time in a week the president's hasty response has caused controversy. last week mr. trump concluded an attack inside a filipino casino was terrorism. it turned out later to be a bungled robbery. h.w. brand studies presidential rhetoric at the university of texas. >> one of the things that makes a president sort of seem presidential is the kind of reserve that usually comes with the office. and president trump has decided to abandon that reserve. >> reporter: some of the president's top advisers are more careful with their words after news of the london attacks broke, defense secretary james mattis responding to reporters' questions said, "i like learning about something before i talk."
3:13 am
i'm elizabeth palmer. today londoners were still struggling to take in the cruelty and the madness of saturday's attacks. eight minutes after it began, it was over. the three terrorists wearing fake suicide belts shot dead by police. but in their wake, they left mayhem and a trail of victims maimed in their stabbing spree. >> you keep going. you keep going. >> reporter: other victims were crushed by the attackers' van on london bridge. imagine the shock and the terror of people walking across this bridge on saturday night when they realized the van was hurtling toward them at 50 miles an hour. the driver determined to hurt or kill as many people as he could. brad myers, on vacation from florida, had a narrow escape. after taking a selfie on the bridge, he walked away, and then
3:14 am
heard the van mount the sidewalk. here is the photo he took afterwards, bodies strewn across the road. >> i do think that everyone needs to see what is going on and what we're up against. >> reporter: all those who gathered at a vigil today know they're probably up against even more terrorists with london in their sights. but led by the city's muslim mayor, sadiq khan, they stand determined to face them down. >> i want to send a clear message to the sick and evil extremists who commit these hideous crimes. we will defeat you. you will not win. >> reporter: scott, mayor sad de -- sadiq khan was asked whether president trump would be welcome on a visit here. he said i don't think we should roll out the red carpet in circumstances where his policies
3:15 am
are against everything we stand for. >> liz palmer at london bri you know your heart loves megared omega-3s... but did you know your eyes, your brain, and your joints really love them too? introducing megared advanced 4in1... just one softgel delivers the omega-3 power of two regular fish oil pills... so give your body mega support with megared advanced 4in1.
3:16 am
3:17 am
today the british police named two of the three attackers. and anna werner went to their neighborhood in east london. >> reporter: 30-year-old rachid redouane had claimed to be moroccan and libyan. he was not known to police.
3:18 am
but police were aware of the other man, 27-year-old khuram shazad butt, a naturalized british citizen born in pakistan. he was even seen in this 2016 documentary that focused on homegrown jihadism, here praying with an isis-style flag. on sunday, police raided this apartment complex on london's east side, arresting a dozen people. some residents told us they recognized butt. they knew him by the nickname "abs." neighbor erica gaspari said she reported him to police for recruiting children. >> they say to me because the kids need to be safe. safe from what? from this world. this world of what? >> reporter: on saturday, neighbor ken chigbo says he approached him asking about a moving van he was renting. >> asking how much. yeah, it wasn't until now it starts sinking in really. >> reporter: and michael mimbo says after the attack, he
3:19 am
realized the possible significance of a white van he had seen speeding away from their apartment complex on saturday. is it upsetting, disturbing, troubling? >> yeah, especially if it's something that you knew, someone that you commonly said hello to. it's really hard to believe, but then all the evidence are there. >> reporter: the 12 people arrested at that complex have now been released. but tonight british media reports a dozen molotov cocktails were found in the back of the attackers' van. and scott, police are still trying to figure out if the three men had help from anyone the in-laws have moved in with us. and, our adult children are here. so, we save by using tide. which means we use less. three generations of clothes cleaned in one wash. those are moms. anybody seen my pants? nothing cleans better. put those on dad! it's got to be tide.
3:20 am
no matter who was in there last. protection.
3:21 am
new lysol power & fresh 6 goes to work flush after flush for a just-cleaned feeling that lasts up to 4 weeks. lysol. what it takes to protect. at least ten students who were going to harvard in the fall were told to forget it after the university came across
3:22 am
their facebook messages. some were so offensive, we can't show them. here is don dahler. >> according to "the crimson," harvard's student newspaper, the digital images called memes were shared by a handful of freshmen in an invitation only group chat. according to the crimson, they first called the chat harvard memes for horny bourgeois teens and traded imaging mocking sexual assault, the holocaust and murdered children. casually send nudes said another, both rehosted by the tab. it's not clear how the university learned about the chat, but the tab reported that some students in the group created screen grabs and sent them to the admissions office. the school withdrew the acceptance offers in april. harvard declined to comment saying it never addresses the
3:23 am
admission status of any individual, but accepted applicants are warned that any acceptance can be withdrawn if an admitted student engages or has engaged in behavior that brings into question their honesty, maturity, or moral character. >> anything you pose should pass what i call the grandma test. if you don't want grandma to see it, don't post it. >> reporter: kate collin runs the ivy prep company. >> for kids as smart of these kids getting into harvard, it was a pretty stupid thing to do. >> reporter: according to one survey, 35% of college admissions offices examine social media posts as part of the admissions process. and scott, of those nearly half say they've had a negative impact on their decision. >> don dahler, thanks. up next, ariana grande's return to manchester.
3:24 am
3:25 am
3:26 am
3:27 am
this was the funeral today in scotland for 14-year-old aislin mcleod. more than 100 others were wounded. grande held another concert in manchester last night to raise money for victims, and jonathan vigliotti was there. ♪ >> reporter: many of the young girls in the emotional cloud had attended the first concert, and refused to let their fears get the best of them. ♪ 23-year-old grande, not much
3:28 am
older than her young fans hit a defiant tone. >> playing is the medicine of the world we really need right now. >> reporter: robbie williams, who grew up near manchester, instantly won over the crowd when he changed the lyrics to his hit song "strong." ♪ slip inside the eye of your mind ♪ >> reporter: cold play frontman chris martin joined forces with grande to sing "don't look back in anger," manchester's unofficial anthem following the bombing. ♪ ♪ i'd cried enough tears to see my own ♪ >> reporter: but perhaps the night's most poignant moment belonged the a high school choir. ♪ >> reporter: some of whom survived the bombing.
3:29 am
and when grande got choked up during her last song -- ♪ over the rainbow, why, then, oh why can't -- [ cheering ] >> reporter: her fans cheered her on to finish. ♪ why, oh why can't i >> reporter: jonathan vigliotti, cbs news, manchester. >> and that's the overnight news for this tuesday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back with us a little bit later. for the morning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm scott pelley.
3:30 am
this is the cbs overnight news. >> welcome to the overnight news. the city of london paused monday to honor the victims of another deadly terror attack, the third to hit the uk in three months. seven people were killed and nearly 50 others were hurt saturday night in a car and knife attack at the london bridge and in a nearby market. elizabeth palmer is there. >> reporter: today londoners were still struggling to take in the cruelty and the madness of saturday's attack. eight minutes after it began, it was over. the three terrorists wearing fake suicide belts shot dead by police. >> take it with me. >> reporter: but in their wake, they left mayhem and a trail of victims maimed in their stabbing spree.
3:31 am
>> you keep going. you keep going! >> reporter: other victims were crushed by the attacker's van on london bridge. imagine the shock and the terror of people walking across this bridge on saturday night when they realized the van was hurtling toward them at 50 miles an hour. the driver determined to hurt or kill as many people as he could. brad myers on vacation from florida had a narrow escape. after taking a selfie on the bridge, he walked away, and then heard the van mount the sidewalk. here is the photo he took afterwards, bodies strewn across the road. >> i do think that everyone needs to see, you know, what is going on and what we're up against. >> reporter: al those who gathered at a vigil today know they're probably up against even more terrorists with london in their sights. but led by the city's muslim mayor, sadiq khan, they stand
3:32 am
determined to face them down. >> i want to send a clear message to the sick and evil extremists who commit these hideous crimes. we will defeat you. you will not win. >> reporter: mayor sadiq khan was asked whether in light of his recent tweets donald trump would be welcome on a state visit here. he said, "i don't think we should roll out the red carpet in circumstances where his policies are against everything we stand for." >> meanwhile, british police have revealed more information about the attackers amid a widening terror track down. anna werner has more on the investigation. >> reporter: 30-year-old rachid redouane had claimed to be moroccan and libyan. he was not known to police. but police were aware of the other man, 27-year-old khuram shazad butt, a naturalized british citizen born in pakistan. he was even seen in this 2016
3:33 am
documentary that focused on homegrown jihadism, here praying with an isis-style flag. on sunday, police raided this apartment complex on london's east side, arresting a dozen people. some residents told us they recognized butt. they knew him by the nickname "abs." neighbor erica gaspari said she reported him to police for recruiting children. >> he say to me because the kids need to be safe. safe from what? from this world. this world of what? >> reporter: on saturday, neighbor ken chigbo says abs approached him, asking about a rented moving van he was using. >> and asked the question how much. yeah. it wasn't until now that it starts sinking in really. >> reporter: and michael mimbo says after the attack, he realized the possible significance of a white van he'd seen speeding away from their apartment complex on saturday. is it upsetting, disturbing,
3:34 am
troubling? >> yeah, especially if it's someone that you knew, someone that you commonly said hello to. it's really hard to believe, but then all the evidence are there. >> reporter: the 12 people arrested at that complex have now been released. but tonight british media reports a dozen molotov cocktails were found in the back of the attacker's van. >> saturday's attack came on the eve of an ariana grande benefit concert in manchester for the victims of a deadly bombing at that singer's show two weeks ago. despite fears of terrorism, tens of thousands gathered to show love and support. jonathan vigliotti was there. >> reporter: i spoke with two young girls outside these gates as they were waiting to get through security, and they told me they had butterflies in their stomach. the fear of another attack was on everyone's mind. and as you can imagine, security here was incredibly tight. but ultimately, those i spoke with said they chose to come out to stand united together. ♪
3:35 am
uplifting pop had a defiant undertone. the more than 50,000 sing fans refusing to let their fears get the best of them. >> the kind of love and unity that you're displaying is the medicine of the world we really need right now. ♪ >> reporter: ariana grande said the joyous atmosphere was intentional. the mother of 15-year-old bombing victim olivia campbell told the pop star her daughter would have wanted to hear the hits. singer robbie williams, who grew up near manchester, changed the lyrics to his hit song strong. ♪ that empowering note was echoed by katy perry. >> love conquers fear and love conquers hate. ♪ this is the part of me never going to take away from me ♪ >> reporter: a sign behind the performers encouraged donations
3:36 am
behind the show. >> we love you so much. the families, we love you so much. >> reporter: grande and coldplay frontman chris martin covered oasis' "don't look back in anger", the unofficial anthem after the bombing. ♪ oasis founder liam gallagher who was born in manchester later made a surprise appearance. perhaps the night's most poignant moment belonged to a high school choir. a few members were at the may 22nd concert and survived the bombing. for the finale, grande brought back all the performers. ♪ and when she got choked up during her last song, "somewhere over the rainbow," her fans cheered her on to finish. ♪ oh why can't i
3:37 am
>> reporter: it was an emotional ending to an incredible event. ariana grande set up this benefit in just a week's time. she canceled other performances throughout europe. >> the cbs overnight news will be right back.
3:38 am
you know your heart loves megared omega-3s... but did you know your eyes, your brain, and your joints really love them too? introducing megared advanced 4in1... just one softgel delivers the omega-3 power of two regular fish oil pills... so give your body mega support with megared advanced 4in1. ♪ lysol max cover kills 99.9% of bacteria,
3:39 am
even on soft surfaces. one more way you've got what it takes to protect.
3:40 am
late night host and comedian bill maher is facing backlash after using a racial slur on his hbo show. in an interview friday, maher used the "n" word while trying to make a joke. he apologized the next day. here is vladimir duthier. >> reporter: social media erupted on friday night's live broadcast. so far hbo has not announced plans to take action against maher who has been with the network for nearly 15 years. but the latest comments stirred up examples of past statements, and many critics say this isn't the first time his jokes have gone too far. >> hey, senator. >> reporter: bill maher's interview with republican senator ben sasse began with praise for sasse's new book and his home state of nebraska. >> we'd love to have you work in the fields with you. >> work in the fields?
3:41 am
i'm a house [ bleep ]. it's a joke. >> reporter: maher and sasse continued the interview without mentioning the comment. among those expressing their outrage, south carolina senator tim scott. >> honestly, it was ouch. it is so devastating to hear folks use the language in such a flippant way. >> reporter: sasse later tweeted he wished he replied why would you think it's okay to use that word. maher released his own statement on saturday the word was offensive and i regret saying it and i'm very sorry. but maher has a long history of controversial comments on everything from the islamic faith. >> the only religion that acts like the mafia that [ bleep ] kill you if you say the wrong thing. >> reporter: to jokes on racial stereotype. >> what if during black history month we all bought lobster with food stamps? >> reporter: just one week after 9/11, maher said this on his show, "politically
3:42 am
incorrect". >> staying in the airplane when it hits the building. say what you want about it. it's not character. >> reporter: his show was cancelled the following summer after the controversy led many advertisers to pull their spots. this show is on commercial-free hbo and isn't dependent on advertiser, meaning his future could be determined by the show's viewers. >> no question that the first amendment gives us the right to free speech. it also gives us a right to a free response. i would turn the channel. >> reporter: others have come out supporting maher, including journalist larry king who said out supporting maher, including journalist larry king who said he hopes people will accept no matter who was in there last. protection. new lysol power & fresh 6 goes to work flush after flush for a just-cleaned feeling that lasts up to 4 weeks. lysol. what it takes to protect. i'm about to pop a cap of "mmm fresh" in that washer with unstopables in-wash scent boosters by downy.
3:43 am
and if you want, pour a little more, because this scent lasts for 12 weeks, which is longer than any relationship i've ever been in. right, freshness for weeks! unstopables by downy. for a fresh too feisty to quit. you knmegared omega-3s... but did you know your eyes, your brain, and your joints really love them too? introducing megared advanced 4in1... just one softgel delivers the omega-3 power of two regular fish oil pills... so give your body mega support with megared advanced 4in1.
3:44 am
two kids barfed in class today. it was so gross. lysol disinfectant spray kills 99.9% of bacteria, even those that cause stomach bugs. one more way you've got what it takes to protect.
3:45 am
mountain gorillas are one of the most endangered animals in the world, with fewer than one thousand left in the wild. but now their numbers are rising, thanks in large part to a group of veterinarians called gorilla doctors. the team works across a vast african rain forest spanning three countries -- rwanda, uganda and the democratic republic of congo. when lara logan joined them for a story on "60 minutes," the doctors were trying to free a gorilla caught in poacher's trap. >> you've got a 10 cc? >> reporter: with the wounded gorilla close by, the gorilla doctors prepped their medical gear on the floor of the forest. >> martin, if you could get betadine ready too. >> reporter: finding her had not been easy, and they didn't want
3:46 am
to lose this chance the treat her. >> and you're going use that volume. >> reporter: dr. mike cranfield has been running gorilla doctors for 18 years. dr. eddie kambale is his right hand. and dr. martin one of his newest field veterinarians. >> so right now eddie is getting the anesthetic ready. because we know we're going to do a knock-down, he'll dart the first chance he has. >> reporter: are you a good shot, eddie? >> he is an excellent shot. >> reporter: eddie grabbed his shotgun that was loaded with anesthetic and went with the trackers to find the wounded female, who had hurt herself when she picked up a snare poachers had set for a smaller animal. they had to cut a path through the forest as they went. she was with her group, and they were moving fast. thick vegetation gave way to a clearing. where they spotted her.
3:47 am
then eddie stepped forward and prepared to take his shot. as soon as it hit, she took off. and the team followed. they knew she had to be close. it was an unforgettable sight. now they had less than 40 minutes to assess their wound and treat it before the anesthetic wore off. they call this an intervention. >> eddie and i and martin have done probably 15 interventions together. it's a team. it's always the team. we have some of the most important patients in the world,
3:48 am
right? if something doesn't go right, basically, you can almost count on it being known almost worldwide. >> reporter: how would you rate the quality of your work as an organization? >> i think it's very good. >> reporter: hen they're not doing emergency interventions, mike said his doctors are out making house calls. and in the ten days we spent with them, we went on a few, this one in the drc, where eddie and martin are based. >> activity. >> all the signs are normal. so that means she is still healthy. >> active, moving. she is using all limbs. i can just see she is breathing. i can try to count the breathing rates like now, you see? one. you can see how the abdomen is raising. two.
3:49 am
three. >> reporter: these gorillas live in verunga, the oldest national park in africa. and from the air, some of the most forbidding landscape you'll ever see. when the doctors began working here, the mountain gorillas were almost extinct. today they're the only population of great apes that's growing. >> they're increasing at 4% a year, which is about the maximum that they could. that's as fast as the human population is growing on the face of the earth. and veterinarians are credited with 50% of that growth, or 2% a year. >> reporter: you're talking about gorilla doctor, your veterinarians and you. >> we're the only veterinarians that are working on the gorillas in the clinical sense. >> reporter: over the years, mike told us he has had a few run-ins with his patients. >> he came flying towards me for about 30 years and just punched me right in the face. >> reporter: did it hurt? >> a little bit.
3:50 am
>> reporter: this is umoja, michael's miracle baby. part of her incest stins were hanging out of her body when the gorilla doctors got to her. now eight years later, mike wanted us to meet her, which meant hiking through a bamboo forest, layers of vegetation and up to more than 9,000 feet. there on the steep volcanic slopes in northern rwanda, we found umoja's family. and here she, a new mother, her baby boy only a month old. >> umoja is probably the most spectacular case that we've ever had. and that brought a lot of pride for gorilla doctors. >> reporter: so it's not just the animal that you save, it's the future generations? >> correct. you're actually influencing not one life, but multiple lives. >> reporter: in rwanda where we
3:51 am
met one of mike's senior veterinarians, the mountain gorillas have become a national symbol. he was 14 when his country was torn apart by genocide in 1994. more than 800,000 people were slaughtered in 100 days. so what do you remember of the genocide? >> darkness in the whole country. at that age, you know, you don't have much thinking, but you can see that this is over. the whole country is over. >> reporter: in 22 years, rwanda has risen from the ashes, and the gorillas are at the center of that transformation. close to 30,000 tourists come every year for the gorillas, and tourism is the biggest source of foreign income for this tiny nation. >> the connection makes everybody feel, okay, these guys are very important to us. >> reporter: these gorillas are. >> these gorillas are important us to. everyone feels that.
3:52 am
>> reporter: mike, who works with the uc davis wildlife health center, was at the gorilla doctors headquarters in rwanda when he got the call about that wounded gorilla in the drc. >> oh, dear. okay. and how long has the snare been on? >> reporter: before long, we were rushing for the border. from the moment you get that phone call, is there a pressure to move as fast as you can? >> yeah, speed. speed is everything. 24 hours can make a difference to having function, full function in the hand. >> reporter: that's kind of tough here sometimes. >> it is. >> reporter: because speed matters. but to get there you have to take the slow boat. >> right. >> reporter: dr. eddie was waiting for us at the slow boat on the other side of the border on the shores of lake kivu. amidst the crowd and the chaos and struggling to hold on to our gear, we boarded with minutes to spare and settled in for the long journey. a 12-hour odyssey across one of
3:53 am
africa's great lakes. we woke as the sun was rising and pulled into the harbor with the hustle and bustle of the early morning. and then we still had to get to the animal. >> that's -- that's sometimes the most different. part. >> reporter: a bumpy ride and a broken bridge took us to the edge of the national park. from here we went on foot, hiking deep into one of the largest forests in the drc. every time we went down, we have to come back up. and the hills were steep. we walked and walked, with no sign of the gorillas, stumbling and falling into the night. >> not easy to find the trail at night. >> it was hard walk manage the dark. >> yeah. >> reporter: even for you? but that wasn't normal.
3:54 am
>> that was not normal. it was really hard. >> reporter: with worn feet and low expectations, we tried again the next day. this time the trackers got lucky and led us right to them. >> and you can watch the full report on our website, cbsnews.com and click on "60 minutes." we'll be right back. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
3:55 am
3:56 am
3:57 am
among the broadway stars receiving tony awards this sunday will be a high school drama teacher from oregon. jamie wax shows why she is being honored for excellence in theater education. >> reporter: affectionately known as crumb, rachel harry has been showing theater students how to find their mark and light a stage for 31 years. what led you to teaching heater in high schools specifically? >> i love teenagers. i love everything they're going through, the drama. >> she is going to come out and strike a pose. >> she really changes people's lives, and that's incredible. >> reporter: students agree she is much more than a teacher. >> she is definitely a mother figure. >> i can't imagine what it would have been like growing up outside of here. >> reporter: kaylynn is a former student and one of crumb's two children. >> she never wanted us far from her. so we were never far from the
3:58 am
theater. >> reporter: before crumb took to the stage as a teacher, she had other plans. >> i wanted to be a dancer. and i went to university of utah as a ballet major. and i loved dancing all day. but i didn't really fit. but i fit in with the theater kids. >> reporter: strong teachers are often a beacon in and out of the classroom. and sometimes they'll need to rely on that strength themselves. in 2006, you went through a really rough year. >> yeah, yeah. that was bad. >> reporter: she faced divorce and a cancer diagnosis at once. >> i said, you know, i'm looking at this as a giant, huge, teachable moment. how does someone cope with cancer? and -- i'm sorry. the kids were awesome. >> reporter: do you remember watching your mother go through that? >> i do. my brother and i shaved all our hair off. she never showed a sign of weakness. she just kept going. >> my teaching is my art is who
3:59 am
i am. there are people who said you need to take time off from work. i can't. don't ask me to do that, please. because this is my life. this is my world. >> go, go, go! >> reporter: more than ten years later, and crumb is still feeling her community's love, support, and on this day, recognition from the tony awards for excellence in theater education. >> you were selected as the educator of the year. congratulations! [ cheering ] >> reporter: we surprised her with the news in front of her students, and she couldn't leave the stage without offering all of us another lesson. >> i had to work really hard. and lots of times i felt like giving up, but i didn't. so you guys, keep at it. follow your dreams. okay, will you do that for me? >> and that's the overnight news for this tuesday. for some of you, the news continues. for over, check back a little bit later for the morning news. and cbs this morning from the
4:00 am
broadcast center in new york city. i'm tony dokoupil. it's tuesday, june 6, 2017. this is the "cbs morning news". president trump promised to track down leakers. and this morning an intel contractor faces espionage charges. the war of words continues. london's moore pushes back after being attacked by the president. >> we won't allow anybody whether it's donald trump or anybody else to divide our communities. >> bill cosby heads to trial on sexual assault charges with his tv daughter by his side. and a man jumps into action to save a life by diving through the window of a moving car.

65 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on