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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  June 13, 2017 3:12am-4:01am PDT

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where you and your financial future and your life took a giant leap forward. thanks for watching. i look forward to having you at the event. ,$8drw the united area
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emirates and turkish airlines were among the sponsors at this conference at trump international hotel a few blocks from the white house. and the government of kuwait financed their national day sell brals a month after the inauguration. the same site is the hotel in washington. the president still owns his company, so he still benefits from business generated as his properties. but experts say money from foreign governments like turco and kuwait here might run afoul of the constitution. kathleen clark teaches government ethics at washington university law school. >> because donald trump was unwilling to sell his businesses and continues to own them, foreign governments continue to have a way of channeling money to him in an effort to influence him and u.s. policy. >> reporter: the emoluments
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clause was designed to prevent presidential bribery. back in january, one of mr. trump's attorneys spelled out how he'd avoid a violation. >> he is going to voluntarily donate all profits from foreign governments made to his hotels to the united states treasury. >> reporter: they created this glossy handout. but some say the guidance is ridden with loopholes, banking, defense, energy and health care and other sectors may not be easily identifiable as foreign entities and may not be included. >> the pamphlet that the trump organization put together regarding the emoluments clause reads like a road map to foreign governments on how to funnel money to the trump organization. >> reporter: we asked if they considered money from turkish airlines to be from a foreign government, but they didn't get back to us. they say the emoluments clause shouldn't apply to mr. trump's
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in orlando today, >> bianca drayton, eddie jamal justice. >> they read the names of the 49 dead, one year after america's worse mass shooting at the pulse nightclub. mark strassmann spoke to those who have suffered so deeply. >> a girl gets shot right behind me, and she fall the on the floor. >> reporter: two days after the pulse massacre, demetrius nallings tells about the mayhem inside. >> i hear the clip fall on the floor and for hip m to just reld again and the riounds to keep going. >> reporter: the next person to enter the club was gunman omar mateen. >> it was only when you got outside that you said where's eddie?
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>> right, realizing that he's not behind me. >> reporter: a year later, nallings still relives the unthinkable. do you still hear those shots? >> do i hear gunshots? i hear it all the time. because i'm always afraid that, am i next? >> reporter: justice was killed. he was a 30-year-old tax accountant, a jokester and will mena's only son. >> he was smart, loving, he was my world. >> reporter: justice, wounded and hiding in a bathroom texted his mother. >> it was 2:06 that i got the first text that said i love you, mama. and he was saying, tell them to hurry up. i'm going to die. that was it, 2:39, last text. i grieve every moment. some days are better than others. and some days are just not good at all. i'll never be who i was a year ago.
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>> reporter: justice and nallings have a special connection. they find comfort in each other. >> got demetrius, you know, and i can't imagine what he goes through, but i love this guy. i love him. >> reporter: and make no mistake, something similar in orlando also came alive after all the carnage. >> you feel the love here. it's not just disney world and sea world and universal studios anymore. now it's about orlando strong. >> reporter: in the drizzle behind my, ye, you can see peop gathering for the pulse victims. the names of all 49 people who were killed will be read aloud one more time. >> mark strassmann, thank you. coming up next, 10% of the people on our planet are obese. and later, a shakespearean tragedy with a modern controversy.
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>> when 31-year-old carlos left the army reserve, it didn't take long for him to gain 70 pounds. >> i was eating a lot of fried food. >> reporter: his lifestyle of a long-distance truck driver was putting him on the road to diabetes, but his experience is common to many across the globe. an estimated04 million adults and 108 million children were obese. in the u.s., almost 13% of children. the highest rate in the world. the highest in adults was in egypt at about 35%. a professor from imperial college london was one of the researchers. he says diets high in fat are one part, but there's nor change. >> away from high-activity jobs like farming or labor-intensive jobs. >> reporter: excess weight
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accounted for 4 million death the worldwide. 70% from cardiovascular disease. and it turns out almost 40% of those deaths were in people who were overweight, not obese. >> people probably don't know that being obese. [ inaudible ] >> reporter: someone 5'9" weighing 169-202 pounds is considered overweight. 203 pounds or more, obese. dr. bruce lee is a global obesity expert. >> the health effects include die beat ear, heart disease, stroke, many cancers are associated with being overweight or obese. >> this is a global problem that involves more than individual willpower. some communities have been having everybody work together to change the environment, putting in walking paths. getting rid of junk food in schools, offering better choices in restaurants.
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making it so people just trip over a healthy lifes
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delta airlines and bank of america have exited stage left, dropping their support for a new york theater company's production of julius caesar. in this version, caesar looks a lot like donald trump, with a business suit, a tie too long and of course gets stabbed to death on stage. the public theater says it stands completely behind its production. today in montana, congressman elect gianforte was sentence the for attacking a reporter the day before his election. no jail time, but he will pay a fine, perform 40 hours of community service and take an anger management course. the east is sweltering, but in the west, there is snow in june. sierra nevada got up to 6 inches
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over the weekend. and mammoth mountain resort says it will keep the ski slopes open till august. up next, we will remember what should never be forgotten. >> reporter: this portion is sponsored by farmers insurance. we know a thing or two because we've seen a thing or two. we were reminded today of america's longest war. the pentagon gave us pictures of three americans killed last week in afghanistan. 22-year-old dillon bald ridge,
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eric houck who leaves two children. his wife wrote, i promise i will do all i can for our babies, and i will make him proud. william bays leaves a wife and three children. ball drinl's stepmother wrote, he was the best of all of us. what struck us is how young they were. on 9/11, which pulled america into afghanistan, baldridge was 6 years old, bays, 13. our troops are now fighting in a cause they learned about in a history book. a war we never saw coming. a war for which we cannot see the end. that's the overnight news for this tuesday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back with us a little bit later for the morning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm scott pelley.
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this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the overnight news. i'm don dahler. there were mass protests and hundreds of arrests as antigovernment anger spread across russia. tens of thousands of demonstrators in more than 100 cities across 11 time zones marched against government corruption, and, as you might guess, a lot of them were hauled off to jail. elizabeth palmer reports from the billingest protest of all in moscow. >> reporter: this is exactly what the government was trying to head off when it ban the protest from moscow's city center, but huge crowds of demonstrators ignored the ban and crashed the holiday
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celebration, chanting, "putin is a thief." dozens were arrested. thousands stood their ground. this is the front line of what's become a standoff. the protesters managed to get into an area that was banned to them. then the riot police have showed up. now they're trying to stop anybody else from joining the mass of protesters. as for the leader of this movement, alexei navalny, police arrested him at home before he could go anywhere. but across russia more than 100 protest the inspired by him went ahead. this one's 150 miles from moscow. it may not look like much, but in fact, it's a triumph. when we visited organizers a few days ago, they and their only promotional booth had been banished to a remote parking lot by hostile local government. this 15-year-old was helping to spread the word. why did you get involved in the
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movement to support navalny? russia is an authoritarian regime, he told me, and i want to change it into a democracy. it's a tall order, but there's no question, navalny has touched a nerve. a protester being led away by the police today summed it up. russia, he said, will be free. as for the man who set all this in motion, alexei navalny, scott, he was whisked through his court hearing today, and he's been handed a sentence of 30 days. closer to home, russian meddling in the lek election to center stage at capitol hill. attorney general jeff sessions will testify. and sessions himself requested that the hearing be open to the public. >> i did not have communications with the russians. >> reporter: the last time sessions testified was at his
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confirmation hearing in january. since then, he has acknowledged meeting with the russian ambassador in 2016. >> two meetings. one very brief after a speech. >> reporter: and has recused himself from his own agency's russia probe. >> i should not be involved investigating a campaign i have been involved in. >> reporter: but the former fbi director suggested last week that there might be more to it than that. >> we were also aware of facts that i can't discuss in an open setting that would make his continued engagement in a russia-related investigation problematic. >> reporter: senators on the intelligence committee will push sessions for details tomorrow, mainly, angus king outlines the other key questions. >> what role did he play if any, again, in the comey firing, basta point, because, at that point, he was supposed to be recused from the investigation, and to the extent that comey had something to do with the investigate, that's an area we need to explore. >> reporter: sessions may also
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get asked if the president really does have a recording system in the oval office as mr. trump suggested in a tweet last month but refused to confirm again today. >> are there tapes of you and james comb eey in the oval offi? >> thank u. >> reporter: his press secretary was no more forthcoming. >> what is he waiting for? >> he's not waiting for anything. a land mark study shows that the obesity epidemic is now a worldwide problem. one out of every ten people on earth were found to be obese, and more than 2 billion are said to be simply overweight. dr. jon lapook looks behind the numbers. >> reporter: when 31-year-old carlos left the army reserve, it didn't take long for him to gain 70 pounds. >> started eating more fried foods. a lot of fried foods. >> reporter: his lifestyle as a long-distance troub long-distance truck driver was putting him on the road to diabetes, but his experience is
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shared by millions across the globe. worldwide in 2015, an estimated 604 million adults and 108 million children were obese. in the u.s., almost 13% of children. the highest rate in the world. the highest in adults was in egypt at about 35%. this professor from imperial college london is one of the study authors. he says diets high in calories are a major reason, but there's another culprit. >> there's been a change in employment, away from high-physical activity jobs like farming or laboring toward jobs in offices. >> reporter: excess weight accounted for 4 million death the worldwide. 70% from cardiovascular disease. and it turns out more than 40% of those deaths were in people who were overweight, not obese. >> i think people know being obese is bad for your health.
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>> reporter: someone 5'9" weighing 169-202 pounds is considered overweight, 203 pounds or more, obese. dr. bruce lee is an expert at johns hopkins university. >> it includes heart disease, stroke, many different cancers are associated with increased weight or being overweight or obese. >> reporter: the biggest celebrity trial since o.j. is now winding down. bill cosby refused to take the stand in his own defense, and his lawyers wrapped up their case in six minutes. the disgraced comedian faces sexual assault charges that could land him in jail for decades. jericka duncan reports. >> reporter: for the first time in the trial, bill cosby's wife camille walked arm in arm with her husband as he entered court today. cosby chose not to take the stand. instead, his attorney called just one witness before delivering closing arguments.
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mcgonagal told jurors the accuser andrea constand told a bold faced lie, and cosby cheated on his wife but did not commit a crime. he said when you dance outside your marriage -- and you dance -- and he pointed at mrs. cosby and shouted and you deserve better. and then cosby's own words were used where he described giving quaaludes, a hypnotic drug, to women. he went on to say, drugging somebody and putting them in a position where you can do what you want with them is not romantic, it's criminal. cosby is accused of drugging and molesting constand at his pennsylvania home in 2004. last week, constand told the jury, cosby gave her three blue pills that left her feeling paralyzed and unable to fight him off. cosby's spokesperson andrew
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kmr commercial fishing is one of the most dangerous jobs in america. most deaths and injuries occur because of a disaster on board. but nearly half of the fishermen killed on the job fall overboard. we report on one man lost at sea and his it story of survival. >> reporter: john aldridge and anthony sasinski, best buddies since second grade, are co-owners of the anna mary, a 44-foot fishing boat. they've pulled up lobsters and crabs off the sea floor off the coast of montauk. >> we've got food, fuel, the boat's running right. we're off on another adventure.
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>> reporter: but these two lobster men could have done without a little less adventure one july evening four years ago. 40 miles offshore at 2:30 in the morning, anthony asleep below deck. john wanted to fill the tanks where they would soon store their catch. >> and i had to move the cooler off the hatch. >> reporter: a 125-pound cooler sat on top of the tank's hatch. john picked up a metal hook to move it. >> and i put it in the handle here and pulled with all my might and when i did it just snapped and pushed me right out the back of the boat. >> reporter: the boat was on automatic pilot, and john, wearing no life vest, watched helplessly as the anna mary boated away.
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>> i could see the boat, but then it comes down in the wave, and i couldn't see the boat, comes up on the crest and you see it and then it's gone. >> reporter: were you screaming? >> i was screaming. but knowing there's though way he can hear me. >> reporter: you know you're done. >> today's the day i'm going to die. >> reporter: with his mind consumed with impending death, some instinctive part of john aldridge stayed focussed on life. what did you do? >> i realized that my boots were very buoyant. >>. >> reporter: like a life preserver? >> my legs came up to the surface. it clicked. that's a sign right there. i got my briteath and go, maybe should push it back under the water and get an air pocket, and i put it under my arm. >> reporter: that is crazy fast thinking. >> you got to think quick or you die. >> reporter: afloat in the moon lit water, john aldridge turned
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his focus to the next-pressing issue the ocean provided. >> you're sitting there, spinning, is something coming around me? you don't know. you're freaking out. >> reporter: 15 feet away, i see two shark fins come up, and i'm like. >> reporter: you saw two shark fins? >> yeah, so i had this whole mantra in my head of breathe, breathe easy. stop panicking. just go with the thing and not focus on that they're right there. >> reporter: staying calm worked. the sharks swam off. what are you thinking of? >> i'm thinking of my family. i'm thinking that nobody in the world knows i'm missing. >> reporter: four hours later, anthony woke up in his bunk and could not find john. >> i was in disbelief. straight up disbelief. he can't be not here. >> u.s. coast guard, u.s. coast guard, anna mary. >> reporter: he radioed the
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coast guard. >> anna mary, go ahead. >> i lost a crew member overboard. i'm in shock. >> i never thought that he was dead. right now he's alive, and i'm looking for him. >> reporter: at the coast guard station in new haven, connecticut, commander john field was in charge. if i give you truth serum, you're not betting me that you're going to find this guy. >> my fire is that we're not going to find anything. >> reporter: immediately, he puts search and rescue protocols in place. >> we have all kinds of inputs we put in there as far as how tall he is, whether he was wearing a flotation device or not, what the winds are doing, the currents. it mathematically spits out anywhere from 5,000 to 10,000 computations. >> reporter: the computer produced a zone of probability where aldridge would most likely be. it was roughly the size of rhode island. on board the anna mary, a critical include.
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anthony found a busted-off cooler handle, helping the coast guard and a volunteer fleet o fishing boats narrow the search. >> different fishing friend the out on the ocean started calling me asking me where i was. >> and he's talking to fishermen about well, it doesn't make sense, we wouldn't fill the tanks until the 40,000 curve. >> reporter: when the anna mary reached a depth evof 240 feet i when john and anthony would start filling the tanks. >> john was likely moving the cooler. probably the handle broke. >> reporter: you've got that kind of detective work going on? >> i set goals for myself. i said i just got to live till morning, i just got to live till morning. >> reporter: back in the water, the sun was coming up. >> after a little while, i come up on a swell and see a buoy way in the distance. >> reporter: it was just what john needed. a shot of hope when his supply
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had nearly run out. >> helicopters are going by to the west of me. >> reporter: you waving? yelling? >> all of it. i know they're too far to even see. >> reporter: with those boots keeping him afloat, aldridge made it to that buoy and hung on for his life. >> and i guess within about 40 minutes later, all of a sudden it's like, here comes this helicopter. big, giant thing out of the sky, and i start flaying my boots and splashing and waving and everything. and all of a sudden, the thing turns over the top of me and then i know, oh, my gosh. unbelievable. you know, you can't believe, wow, i am going to be saved. >> reporter: coast guard swimmer bob hoefy was lowered into the water and helped john into the basket 12 hours after he fell into the atlantic ocean, sure he was a dead man. john aldridge was safe. >> the pilot put his adviser back and looks back and says,
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man, you've got some will to live. i said i've got a lot of people who love me to die like that. he goes, man, you're one tough dude. we don't find live people. we find bodies. >> reporter: after the rescue, john didn't sigh bob hoefy again until we brought them together on the dock in montauk. >> good to see you, man. good to see you. >> wow. when i approached him in the water, i told him how long we've been looking for him. >> he said holy cow, we've been looking for you for nine hours today. and i said i've been looking for you for 12. >> reporter: today they use the aldridge rescue as a teaching tool. nice when if goes right. >> nice when it all works out. kathy how are you? >> hi. >> reporter: john's sister kathy was also there when we brought the two together. >> thank you so much for saving
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my brother. >> you're very welcome. >> reporter: john aldridge's ordeal and miraculous outcome have turned into a new book, a movie deal and a lot of treasured souvenirs. >> this is the actual handle that snapped that anthony found on the back of the boat. >> reporter: none more treasured than those boots. they saved your life. >> these are the ones that saved my life. my life. positive thinking saved my life. ♪ my life. positive thinking saved my life. ♪ five-second rule protection. new lysol kitchen pro eliminates 99.9% of bacteria
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if you didn't get a chance to see legendary band fleetwood mac back in their heyday, you have another chance, sort of. lindsey buckingham and christine mcvie have a new album out and they're going on tour with a couple band mates. ♪ >> reporter: lindsey buckingham and christine mcvie began working on new songs together when she rejoined fleetwood mac after a long absence in 2014. band mates john mcvie and mick fleetwood provide much of the rhythm section, which makes it an almost fleetwood mac record.
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everybody's on this album except stevie and some people are wondering if it started as a fleetwood mac album. >> no, there was no idea that we were trying to do a fleetwood mac album. it was let's get together and have some fun with it. but it only took about a week to start getting territorial about it being a duet album. >> reporter: right. ♪ >> reporter: last month, they took over sound stage 22 on the sown e sony lot in los angeles to begin rehearsing for a summer tour. ♪ ♪ ooh, you make lovin' fun >> reporter: mcvie has been singing harmonies with buckingham since he first joined fleetwood mac back in 1975 with his then girl friend, stevie nicks. do you remember the first time you sang together? >> it was at rehearsal probably.
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>> i was playing "say you love me", and you had fantastic background vocals. there were goose bumps. i could not believe it. ♪ when the lovin' starts and the lights go down ♪ ♪ there's not another little soul around ♪ >> reporter: they formed the classic lineup of fleetwood mac. their first album together went to number one. their second, "rumors" would sell more than 40 million copies. but in 1998, tired of the travel and the feuding, mcvie quit the band and moved to the english countryside where she'd stay for 16 years. >> it was a great few years, and then i became quite isolated, really. >> reporter: you did do a solo album. >> i did. some forget, in the garage, we call it a dirge album. i was in a dark place.
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>> reporter: did you decide you're not a solo artist after all? >> i know i'm not. >> reporter: you're not. >> i'm not. >> reporter: she took her first tentative steps back into fleetwood mac in 2013 when mack fleetwood invited her to join them for one concert, a reunion captured on one fan's cell phone video. >> that's what i did. ♪ don't stop thinking about tomorrow ♪ i'm looking around at these our four individuals. it was just a mind-blowing experience. >> reporter: did you know right away you wanted to come back after that. >> absolutely. ♪ >> reporter: there is nothing like this extended family that is fleetwood mac. and i think you have to say for all the perceived and real dysfunction that there has been,
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underneath that, there is
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father: here we go. we're gonna go out there in the rain. you're gonna get wet. alright, here we go! baby: [squealing with joy] father: oh, yeah. yes! so much fun! you're so wet.
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broadway honored its brightest stars this weekend at the tony awards. in case you missed the show, we're here with the winners. >> without one show to run the table like "hamilton" did last year, it was time to celebrate the biggest season at the box office. first-time host kevin spacey kicked off the tonys with the kind of range that helped him win his first tony over 25 years ago. and he brought out a cast of his favorite characters. there were impersonations of bill clinton. >> i knew they needed a host. >> johnny carson. >> here's the envelope. >> and a special appearance by
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president frank underwood from ""house of cards"" steven kol bash perform bear appeared in the opening. >> we have three amazing nominees, "hello dolly." this features an up and comer, bette midler. >> reporter: they decided to spread the love. a dozen shows shared the major award. >> this is a ton eny, hello. >> reporter: ben flat won a tonny. and their show "dear evan hanson" was the big winner of the night with six awards. when you started with this project and it was so small, did you see it getting as big as it became? >> certainly i didn't think it
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would get as big as it has, but yeah, it's a phenomenon. >> bette midler. >> reporter: the tony night may have belonged to bette midler. she took home her first competitive tony, more than 50 years after making her broadway debut. >> i have so many people to thank, the american theater wing, and all the tony voters. many of whom i have actually dated. >> reporter: not even the band could play her off the stage. >> cut that crap off! i just want to say, i just want to say, i just want to say, i just want to say -- >> that's the overnight news for this tuesday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back a little later for the morning news and cbs this morning. from the bruoadcast center in nw york city, i'm don dahler. >> revival is an interesting word. it means that something is near death, and it was brought back to life. "hello dolly" never really went
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away. it has been here all along. it is in our dna. . it's tuesday, june 13th, 2017. this is the "cbs morning news". oh, no. oh, no. terrifying tornadoes whip across the plains. at least one person has been hurt in the severe storms with damage to homes and buildings and more of the same system on the way. the president's attorney general heads to the hill today. what to expect from jeff sessions public testimony on the russia investigation and the

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