Skip to main content

tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  July 14, 2017 3:12am-4:01am PDT

3:12 am
3:13 am
an issue right now, and to me that's become too much of an issue as to what our real job is. if we're more concentrating on the russians interfering with our elections as opposed to the russians interfering with our economy right now and us turning away from our real job of getting people back to work, seeing wages rise again, seeing families be able to be together >> but congressman, the russians attacked our elections, we need to respond to the russians, and we need to do the work you're talking about on the economy. we need to do both. we don't need to come here week after week after week and do nothing. senate republicans today rolled out a retooled healthcare plan. nancy cordes tells us it's already in critical condition. >> how do you feel about the bill, senator? >> reporter: the response from republican hold-outs... >> talk to folks at home... >> reporter: ...to their party's plan "b" was cautious at best. >> we'll read it over the weekend and come up with a decision and see if there is any
3:14 am
improvements. >> reporter: two republicans, moderate susan collins and conservative rand paul, quickly announced their opposition, leaving g.o.p. leaders one vote shy of defeat. do you think the new version is better than the old version? >> no, i think it's worse. the old version repealed most of the obamacare taxes. this repeals about half the obamacare taxes. >> reporter: the new bill reinstates those taxes to help pay for $45 billion in new opioid funding. but it does not reverse the first bill's deep cuts to medicaid. the big sticking point for moderates like ohio's rob portman. >> we're still working on ways to ensure that folks who are currently getting coverage under expanded medicaid have options. >> reporter: the only republican who went from no to yes today was ted cruz of texas, who got a provision inserted allowing insurers to offer low-cost, bare-bones plans. >> if next year, the year after, we have people back home who see their premiums drop 10%, 20%, 30%, that's a big win, and it's
3:15 am
a win for everyone. >> reporter: many republicans told us today they are withholding judgment until the congressional budget office releases its analysis early next week. they're a little gun-shy, anthony, after the c.b.o. projected that the first version would leave 22 million more americans uninsured. >> mason: nancy cordes at the capitol. thank you, nancy. senate majority leader mitch mcconnell's state is expected to be hard hit by the proposed cuts in medicaid. omar villafranca went to kentucky coal country. >> this one is for my immune system. >> reporter: every day kathy collins has to take 27 pills in her fight against the autoimmune disease lupus. >> my legs hurt. >> reporter: 50-year-old collins lives in rural kentucky with her sister carol maggard. collins is on a fixed income and uses medicaid to help pay her mounting healthcare bills. what would your medical bills look like without medicaid?
3:16 am
>> last year they were $945,000. >> reporter: nothing that we've advocated so far would cause anybody currently on medicaid to be taken off of medicaid. >> reporter: that was senate majority leader mitch mcconnell of kentucky, trying to calm fears about the future of medicaid. under obamacare, kentucky expanded medicaid and cut the uninsured rate from 14% to almost 6%. but right now, the bill calls for significant cuts in federal funding of state medicaid programs. to make up for the loss, kentucky governor matt bevin has proposed changing the state requirements to qualify for medicaid, which could cause people to lose coverage. at louisville's shandy christian healthcare center, 70% of dr. brent duncan's patients are on medicaid. >> folks may have to decide between a doctor's visit and being able to put food on the table for their family. >> reporter: collins, a republican who voted for both senator mcconnell and governor
3:17 am
bevin, is now truly worried about losing her coverage. >> i'm sure mitch mcconnell don't have to worry about his medical bills or governor bevin, but real people have to. >> reporter: omar villafranca, cbs news, jenkins, kentucky. ♪ ♪ no, please, please, oh! ♪ (shrieks in terror) (heavy breathing and snorting) no, no. the running of the bulldogs? surprising. what's not surprising? how much money aleia saved by switching to geico. fifteen minutes could save you
3:18 am
fifteen percent or more. every year, kids miss 22 million school days due to illness. lysol disinfectant spray kills viruses that cause the cold & flu.
3:19 am
and they happen easily. the other side of this... is they can be removed... easily. spray and wash's... powerful formula... removes over 100 stains. spray and wash. better on over 100 stains. in new herbal essences it's bio:renew a blend of sea kelp, aloe and antioxidants that help bring your hair back to life. new herbal essences. let life in. it says you apply the blue one ok, letto me. this. here? no. have a little fun together, or a lot. k-y yours and mine. two sensations that work together,
3:20 am
so you can play together. >> mason: the folks who oversee is social security said today recipients will get a cost of living adjustment next year of 2.2%, the biggest increase in six years. it's about $28 a month. there will be no change in medicare premiums. china's most prominent political prisoner died today from liver cancer. liu xiaobo was 61. he was first imprisoned in 1989 for involvement in the pro- democracy protests in tiananmen square. liu was behind bars in 2010 when he was awarded the nobel peace prize. his absence at the ceremony was marked by an empty chair. in essays, he rejected hatred and fear, writing, "i have no enemies," but few in china know his story. the beijing government scrubbed
3:21 am
all references to liu from the internet there. still ahead on the "cbs evening news," a new report says it's time to put the brakes on most high-speed police chases. and we'll remember a broadcasting pioneer. i'm so frustrated. i just want to find a used car without getting ripped off. you could start your search at the all-new carfax.com that might help. show me the carfax. now the car you want and the history you need are easy to find. show me used trucks with one owner. pretty cool. [laughs] ah... ahem... show me the carfax. start your used car search and get free carfax reports at the all-new carfax.com. no matter who was in there last. protection. new lysol power & fresh 6 goes to work flush after flush for a just-cleaned feeling that lasts up to 4 weeks. lysol. what it takes to protect.
3:22 am
this scarf all that's my left to rememb... sayonara. what. she washed this like a month ago! the long lasting scent of gain. now available in matching scents across your entire laundry routine. with motionsense technology... degree has redefined deodorant so that i can redefine... power... footwork... range... the more i move, the more it works. degree. it won't let you down. ♪ new lysol kitchen pro eliminates 99.9% of bacteria without any harsh chemical residue. lysol. what it takes to protect. >> mason: a report this week by a grand jury in california strongly urges the police to ease up on high-speed chases, which put bystanders at risk. jamie yuccas reports from the car chase capital, los angeles.
3:23 am
>> look at that, look at that aggressive hit! >> reporter: it happens here almost daily. high-speed chases, sometimes reaching more than 100mph. >> whoa! >> reporter: up above, just about every police pursuit on the streets of los angeles is kcbs helicopter reporter stu mundel. >> bam! right there! my biggest fear is that somebody is really going to get hurt or die, or there's going to be some extremely innocent person injured. whoa, look at the kid, look at the kid! >> reporter: for good reason. says a new l.a. county grand jury report, which analyzed more than 400 police chases over one year, one in ten resulted in someone being injured. three people died. nationwide, more than 90% were in response to non-violent crime. >> whoa. look at that. >> reporter: each near miss raises the likelihood for what happened to 15-year-old jack phoenix, killed while crossing the street by a suspected car thief fleeing the l.a.p.d. at
3:24 am
90mph. the l.a.p.d. needs to acknowledge what they did and apologize. >> reporter: nick phoenix is jack's father. do you think these pursuits even need to happen? >> i do not. it's incredibly dangerous for a car to drive through town. they're going to chase the car and encourage that? it's crazy. >> reporter: officer humberto jimenez provides air support for the california highway patrol. he says many suspects are out for fame. >> it makes no sense when you're putting your life in danger, other people's lives in danger. >> reporter: they have nothing to lose, so they might as well be famous or notorious in this incident? >> i think some people do think that way, and it's not fair. >> that's it, right there, right there. >> reporter: the grand jury faulted a lack of proper training and found most of these pursuits to be unnecessary. anthony, officers instinctively want to catch criminals, but if
3:25 am
they're not deemed undangerous, it may be best to peel off and not continue that chase.
3:26 am
3:27 am
>> mason: severe thunderstorms are in the forecast tonight for the midwest to the northeast. in central ohio today, a man had to be rescued from his car on a flooded road. women may soon have the right to bear arms and shoulders in the house of representatives. speaker paul ryan said today he's looking at modernizing the century's old dress code. >> a dress code in the chamber in the lobby makes sense, but we also don't need to bar otherwise accepted contemporary business attire. so look for a change on that soon. >> mason: the dress code became an issue last week when a female reporter was barred from an area of the capitol because she was wearing a sleeveless dress. up next, a centennial celebration for a cbs legend.
3:28 am
>> mason: we want to take note of a special anniversary for us here at cbs coming up tomorrow. >> cbs news presents douglas edwards with up-to-the-minute developments from all parts of the world. >> mason: douglas edwards, network television's first anchor, the first anchor of this broadcast, was born 100 years ago, july 14, 1917, in ada, oklahoma. a radio veteran, edwards was tapped to anchor the first nightly network tv newscast in 1948.
3:29 am
put together, he would later say, "with spit, bailing wire, and high spirits." >> each night i was welcoming a new station until one night early in the '50s i said, good evening, everybody, coast to coast, douglas edwards. >> mason: douglas edwards anchored this newscast for 14 years. >> reporting once again from paris. >> mason: reporting the biggest stories of his time. >> and down goes the "andrea dorea." i thank you so very much. >> mason: edwards holds a record not likely to be broken. he anchored a daily network television newscast for 40 years. >> douglas edwards, cbs news, new york. more news later on this cbs station. and that's the overnight news on this friday. for some of you the news continues for others check back later from new york thanks for watching.
3:30 am
this isset "cbs overnight news." president trump running backs to washington after a short trip to france where they are celebrating bastile day. emmanuel macron rolled out the red carpet, despite disagreements over climate change and russia the two leaders spoke of their visits fxz >> reporter: if this paris visit was supposed to be an easy little sightseeing getaway for president trump, he brought along a lot of baggage. >> as far as my son is concerned, my son is a wonderful young man. >> reporter: the controversial meeting during the election campaign between donald trump, jr., and a russian lawyer said to be offering dirt on hillary clinton hung over this visit like a cloud. but the president was sticking
3:31 am
to his story, that it was all part of the nasty game of politics. i've had many people... i have only been in politics for two years, but i've had many people call up, "oh, gee, we have information on this factor or this person, or frankly, hillary." >> reporter: any way, he insisted, the story was being overblown, not because the meeting shouldn't have taken place, but apparently because it produced nothing useful. >> zero happened from the meeting. >> reporter: the president came to paris at the invitation of french president emmanuel macron, to whom he gave a lift home in the presidential limo. the invitation was offered to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the entry of american troops into the first world war. that began a century of u.s. involvement in european affairs, a policy many in europe feel president trump is retreating
3:32 am
from. the hope is this visit might cement what seemed to be a fractious relationship between the two presidents that began with that who-lets-go-first white-knuckle handshake at their first meeting. at his guest's discomfort, though, president macron took the diplomatic high road. >> i will not interfere with interfere in the other's domestic life. >> what a good answer that is. >> reporter: the answers the president provided won't likely satisfy those who say that donald trump, jr., should never have taken that meeting. instead, they say, he should have reported the approach to the f.b.i. despite the smiles and hand shakes, the ongoing russian investigation over shadows the president's trip to france. major garrett joins us now from the white house. the president said today most people would have taken that
3:33 am
meeting with the russian lawyer, is that the consensus >> reporter: anthony, consensus in our divided country is probably elusive, but the president's own nominee to lead the f.b.i., christopher wray, appears to disagree. here is wray yesterday before the senate judiciary committee. >> to the members of this committee, any threat or effort to interfere with our elections from any nation state or any non-state actor is the kind of thing the f.b.i. would want to know. >> reporter: we've also learned the senate intelligence committee will request documents from trump, jr., and jared kushner about that meeting, and it wants to interview, as you might expect, anyone in the trump campaign who had contact >> mason: major, the president talked to reporters aboard "air force one" last night, and did not rule out inviting vladimir putin to the white house. what exactly did he say? >> reporter: indeed. he said at some point in the future he will invite president putin to the white house, just not now. he said this political moment is too hot, but he said to rule it out completely would be, in the president's words, "stupid." >> mason: he also talked about design for the wall on the southern border. what did he reveal if anything?
3:34 am
>> he revealed that he's serious about placing solar panels on that wall, and he wants it to be in his words "transparent." let me quote from the president directly as to why. "when they throw large sacks of drugs over, and if you have people on the other side of the wall, you don't see them. they hit you on the head with 60 pounds of stuff. it's over." the house has drafted a spending bill providing more than $1 billion for construction of that wall. there's a long, long way to go before it gets to the president's desk, but mr. trump says he's encouraged. closer to home, g.o.p. leaders in the senate rolled out their revised health care over haul bill, majority leader mitch mcconnell plans to hold a
3:35 am
plan "b" was cautious at best. >> we'll read it over the weekend and come up with a decision and see if there is any movement. >> reporter: two republicans, moderate susan collins and conservative rand paul, quickly announced their opposition, leaving g.o.p. leaders one vote shy of defeat. do you think the new version is better than the old version? >> no, i think it's worse. the old version repealed most of the obamacare taxes. this repeals about half the obamacare taxes. >> reporter: the new bill reinstates those taxes to help pay for $45 billion in new opioid funding. but it does not reverse the first bill's deep cuts to medicaid. the big sticking point for moderates like ohio's rob portman. >> we're still working on ways to ensure that folks who are currently getting coverage under expanded medicaid have options. >> reporter: the only republican who went from no to yes today was ted cruz of texas, who got a provision inserted allowing insurers to offer low-cost, bare-bones plans.
3:36 am
>> if next year, the year after, we have people back home who see their premiums drop 10%, 20%, 30%, that's a big win, and it's a win for everyone. >> the revised g.o.p. health care bill still contains deep cuts to medicaid and will fall especially hard on rural communities. spoke with woman in mitch mcconnell's home state. >> this one is for my immune system. >> reporter: every day kathy collins has to take 27 pills in her fight against the autoimmune disease lupus. >> my legs hurt. >> reporter: 50-year-old collins lives in rural kentucky with her sister carol maggard. collins is on a fixed income and uses medicaid to help pay her mounting healthcare bills. what would your medical bills look like without medicaid? >> last year they were $945,000. >> reporter: nothing that we've advocated so far would cause anybody currently on medicaid to be taken off of medicaid.
3:37 am
>> reporter: that was senate majority leader mitch mcconnell of kentucky, trying to calm fears about the future of medicaid. under obamacare, kentucky expanded medicaid and cut the uninsured rate from 14% to almost 6%. but right now, the bill calls for significant cuts in federal funding of state medicaid programs. to make up for the loss, kentucky governor matt bevin has proposed changing the state requirements to qualify for medicaid, which could cause people to lose coverage. at louisville's shandy christian healthcare center, 70% of dr. brent duncan's patients are on medicaid. >> folks may have to decide between a doctor's visit and being able to put food on the table for their family. >> reporter: collins, a republican who voted for both senator mcconnell and governor bevin, is now truly worried about losing her coverage. >> i'm sure mitch mcconnell don't have to worry about his medical bills or governor bevin, but real people have to. >> reporter: omar villafranca,
3:38 am
>> reporter: omar villafranca, cbs news, jenkins, kentucky. best friends share everything protection. >> reporter: omar villafranca, cbs news, jenkins, kentucky. every year, kids miss 22 million school days due to illness. lysol disinfectant spray kills viruses that cause the cold & flu. and since lysol is the only disinfectant with box tops, you can earn cash for your school with every purchase. lysol. what it takes to protect. breathe easier with your vicks vaporub. soothing cough relief that starts working instantly. and they happen easily. the other side of this... is they can be removed... easily. spray and wash's... powerful formula... removes over 100 stains.
3:39 am
spray and wash. better on over 100 stains. it says you apply the blue one ok, letto me. this. here? no. have a little fun together, or a lot. k-y yours and mine. two sensations that work together, so you can play together.
3:40 am
president trump returns from france today where he took part in the celebration of bastile day and he was also marking the 100th anniversary anniversary of the entry of american troops into the first world war. that began a century of u.s. involvement in european affairs, a policy many in europe feel president trump is retreating from. the hope is this visit might cement what seemed to be a fractious relationship between the two presidents that began with that who-lets-go-first white-knuckle handshake at their first meeting. at his guest's discomfort, though, president macron took the diplomatic high road.
3:41 am
>> were you misled not knowing about this meeting. >> first i believe we will have a great fbi director. i think he's doing really well and we're very proud of that choice. think i've done a great service to the country by choosing him. he will make us all proud and i think some day we'll see that. and hopefully some day soon. so we're very proud of him. as far as my son is concerned. my son is a wonderful young man. he took a meeting with a russian lawyer. not a government lawyer but a russian lawyer. it was a short meeting, a meeting that went very, very quickly, very fast, two other people in the room, one left almost immediately the other was not really focused on the meeting. i do think this from a practical standpoint most people would have taken that meeting.
3:42 am
it's called opposition meeting or research into our opponent. i've only in politics for two years and years, but i've had many people call up, "oh, gee, we have information on this factor or this person, or frankly, hillary." that's very standard. in the case of don he listened. they talked about adoption and things. adoption wasn't even part of the campaign. but nothing happened from the meeting. zero happened from the meeting and honestly i think the press made a very big deal over something that really a lot of people would do now the lawyer who went to the meeting was in the halls of congress also. somebody said that her visa or passport to come into the country was approved by attorney
3:43 am
general lynch now maybe that's wrong i just heard that a while ago so surprised to hear that so she was hear because of lynch. so again, i have a son who is a great young man. he's a fine person. he took a meeting from a lawyer from russia. it lasted for a very short period and nothing came of the meeting. and i think it's a meeting that most people in politics probably would have taken. >> there are new concerns about a rare cancer possibly linked to breast implants. last year nearly 300,000 women opted for breast augmentation surgery. most suffered few problems. but a report by the fda links this rare cancer to implants in 157 1 and 31 patients i spoke to one of the patients. >> she was shocked to find a tumor under her arm.
3:44 am
>> i could feel a mass the size of an egg to a lemon. it was very large. >> then she learned it was cancer possibly connected to the cosmetic breast implants she had put in 17 years ago. >> i was never informed that i could possibly get cancer. basically they said they are 100% safe. >> it's called breast implant associate yapted aneplastic large sell lymphoma that could develop following breast implants something doctors at mdm cancer center in houston have been studying for five years. >> this is a type of lymphoma it is a cancer that develops in the scar tissue around breast implants. >> breast implants come with a smooth or textured outer surface. surgeons use these textured
3:45 am
implants to limit the movement of an implant. 15% are textured. fda says most women who developed lymphoma 203 of 231 received around textured implant. >> why is that do you know? >> so we know it's something triggering the limb pomo lympho to an allergic reaction in these patients and it stimulates part it's of their immune system and in certain patients developed into lymphoma. >> there are three breast manufacturers in the u.s. >> how big of a potential problem pr or otherwise is this lymphoma for a breast implant
3:46 am
manufacturer? >> we are taking it very seriously and want to make sure there's education. >> in particular telling doctors and patients that the cancer has a high cure rate often simply taking the implants out. >> it's rare and also very treatable as long as it is caught and implants removed. >> the risk is low but nine women have died and national cancer treatment guide line says anyone who gets the lymphoma should have her implants removed as soon as possible. kim roger says her insurer blue shield blue cross montana three times denied removal of her implants telling her it was contract exclusion because her implants were cosmetic. >> i was furious. the first line of defense was to remove the source. the source was still in my body. >> after repeated repeals they
3:47 am
decided to help with the removal not reconstruction. they said they do cover medley necessary cancer treatment. the company would not happen what happened in rogers case. but dr. clemens say. >> we can't wait months or years until an insurance company says we're going to cover it. >> these women could die. >> that's correct. >> rogers says she's continuing to fight for full insurance coverage on behalf of other women. >> i want to be the leader of the pack and for all the women behind me i want them not to do this battle that i'm doing. >> rogers says the cost of her removal and reconstruction could be up to $12,000. now for the other two manufacturers mentor told us
3:48 am
long term 2k59 support the safety and efficacy of its products and airgone works to help bring awareness. rogers won't know who made hers until they are removed but it is until they are removed but it is confirmed they are not every year, kids miss 22 million school days due to illness. until they are removed but it is confirmed they are not lysol disinfectant spray kills viruses that cause the cold & flu.
3:49 am
3:50 am
no matter who was in there last. protection. new lysol power & fresh 6 goes to work flush after flush for a just-cleaned feeling that lasts up to 4 weeks. lysol. what it takes to protect.
3:51 am
most of the lobsters caught in the united states are pulled off the coast of maine. last year maine's lobster fleet brought in a record catch. you would think that would drive prices down. but demand is so high they can barely keep up. don reports from the dock in maine. >> over the past few hours six lobster boats headed out to pull up hundreds of lobster traps in search of that tasty treasure of the sea but it was once so disdained as food it was fed only prisoners. no longer. now when it comes to covenant seafood lobster is king. >> if there's an official food of summer the lobster roll is the epic contenlder. >> it always makes me feel i'm at the beach.
3:52 am
>> you can get an authentic maine lobster roll anywhere around the u.s. >> anywhere you can have lobster i like to have lobster. >> and find seafood treat at mcdonald's. >> i think it's a lobster of the sea. >> i'm a big lobster fan so thinking if anything is good. >> as it's demand has gone up so has its price. >> right now it's back to a luxury. >> when people come here they want a lobster and it's important we capture that feeling. >> matt jacobson leads an organization touting lobster around the world. >> it's a vacation on the plate. >> the journey to that plate begins here in the waters off maine with the perfect temperature to nurture lobsters. this man one of 6,000 who are
3:53 am
benefiting from under water lobster explosion putting up 100 million pounds nearly double than ten years ago. >> the demand keeps going up. and it's good for the fisherman. haven't seen a strong catch yet this season but that could change any day now. >> we got to find more markets for the fish more mouths to eat it. >> and they have. >> looking forward to this. >> as demand has exploded worldwide especially asia so have prices. >> when we started back in 009 we wherebying lobster meat for $14 a pound and are now up to $13 a pound for lobster meat. >> luke is third generation lobster man and he and his partner started with one lobster shack in new york and now 25 in the united states and six in
3:54 am
japan. >> the demand has continued to grow at an exponential rate and we have demand this excess of suppose so we have a very stable price. >> capes seafood expects to ship 5 million pound. contributing more than $1 billion a year in the state's economy and a way of life that goes back generations and a new culinary experience for many. >> it was expensive but once a month you got to splurge every now and then. >> this season has started more slowly than past but should pick up in next few days. maine's lobster beds thrive because there's strict limits of the size to keep. they want to be three and quarter inch the back part of
3:55 am
the lobster.
3:56 am
3:57 am
in our series living stronger we're celebrating older americans whose zest for life is an inspiration for people of all ages. this story coming from the gym. >> at this high intensity workout in new york city this man is redefining what it means to be physically fit keeping up for an hour with the rep tishs cross fit routine. jumping on a 24 inch box. doing upside down push ups and climbing 15-foot rope alongside gym members half him age. >> at 77 years old why push
3:58 am
yourself this hard. >> i like it. i love it. i want to stay out of the nursing home. >> he is the oldest man to compete in the cross fit games going up against men a decade younger. cross fit is the fastest growing fitness movement in the world. in 2008 he stopped training for two months to take on his biggest challenge yet, he was fighting prostate cancer. >> i get emotional with this. >> why? >> i always been in healthy shape. i always watched what i ate. and i came down with prostate cancer. and i had it taken out and then i started coming back. >> now cancer-free, he's challenged cross fitters around the world. each year they mark his birthday by doing six exercises like push ups, squats and kettle bell
3:59 am
swing to match his age. in one sitting. >> two years ago when no one would give him a job he built a gym in his basement and got his own clients including navy seal luke mason. >> he has years of experience on me, he's 77 years old he's got something to teach. >> would you say this is your own fountain of youth? >> yes, i love being strong. i love being able to do a lot of young things that young people are not able to do or not willing to do. >> motivation inspiration, pirs, peration his of recipe for staying young.
4:00 am
>> that'ss going to do it for te ovovovt captioning funded by cbs it's friday, july 14th, 2017. this is the "cbs morning news." president trump enjoying the city of light, but the russian controversy is overshadowing mr. trump's paris visit. murder confession. the pennsylvania man suspected of being involved in the disappearance of four men is talking to police. and venus williams is heading to the wimbledon final, becoming the oldest finalist in more than two decades.

107 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on