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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  November 8, 2017 3:12am-4:01am PST

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this was a sponsored presentation artillery range, the president was reluctant to use military force. >> waw >> we have many things happening that we hope, we hope, in fact, i will go a step further, we hope to good we never have to use. >> he notably chose not to repeat his ridicule of kim jong-un. >> rocketman is on a suicide mission for himself. strikingly different tone from his past tough talk. >> they will be met with fire and fury. like the world has never seen. >> the visit appeared carefully scripted to calm concerns in south korea, whose president favors a restrained approach. he asked mr. trump to visit this military base, and said the demiliarized zone on the north korean border. the president expects south korea to buy billions in u.s. made weapons says the u.s. has significant military assets of its own in the region including
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a nuclear submarine. and by the end of the week. three air craft carriers. anthony. >> margaret brennan in seoul. thank you. coming up, new allegations that harvey weinstein enlisted an army of spies to silence his accusers. and later, plans for a high profile, auction, a master stroke? or a crime against the arts? hey honey, how was practice? good. must've been hot out there today, huh? yeah. yeah. why don't you go put that stuff in the laundry room right now?
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cbs news confirmed manhattan district attorney plans to present evidence against harvey weinstein to a grand jury next week. the disgrasd movie mogul is
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facing a wave of sexual assault and misconduct allegations now the new yorker magazine reports weinstein hired an army of spies to silence his accusers. here is jericka duncan. >> reporter: the article, in one case, an investigator posed as woman rights advocate to gain information about mcgowan getting ready to go public. reporter rownan farrow, deceptive, intrusive behavior, terrified women and made them fear for their safety, was being run through legitimate law firms in secrecy. >> reporter: this contract obtained by the new yorker, dated july 11 this year signed by attorney david boise who fought for same-sex marriage. it shows the law firm executed contract on behalf of weinstein
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with blackcube, company made up of veterans of elite israeli intelligence uniits. one of the objectives to provide intelligence which will help the client's efforts to completely stop the publication of a negative article in a leading new york newspaper. last month, "the new york times" reported that weinstein allegedly paid off sexual harassment accusers. today a spokesperson from the times told cbs news, we learned that the law firm of boyce schiller and flexner worked to stop our reporting on harvey weinstein at the same time as lawyers were representing us in other matters. it is inexcusable and we will be pursuing appropriate remedies. in a statement to his employees, boise, addressed perceived conflict of interest saying we made clear we need to be able to continue to representative clients adverse to the times. but he went on to say, contracting with private investigators on behalf of weinstein was a mistake. >> a spokesperson for weinstein says no individuals were
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targeted or suppressed. now some conversations between a private investigator and rose mcgowan were secretly recorded and sent to weinstein, which may have been illegal. >> still ahead, a baltimore officer learns i just want to find a used car without getting ripped off. start at the new carfax.com show me used trucks with one owner. pretty cool. [laughs] ah... ahem... show me the carfax.
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last holdout of the 2015 agreement to curb global carbon emissions and means the u.s. would be the only united nations member outside of the deal if president trump makes good on his threat to pull out. a baltimore police van driver was cleared today of all wrongdoing in the 2015 death of freddie gray. caesar goodson found not guilty of 21 administrative charges. goodson acquitted last year of second degree murder. gray died a week after being injured while being driven to a police station. his death sparked days of riots in the city. >> when we come back, jeff glor has an update from texas, plus can a painting be too valuable to sell?
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want to start a fight among art lovers. try putting a price tag on priceless works. here's jim axelrod. >> reporter: norman rockwell spent much of his life in new england, capturing, sweet, sentimental in smalltown
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america. which paints the protests at the berkshire museum in massachusetts with a certain irony. rockwell donated two works here including his masterpiece. shuffleton's barber shop. >> no question when rockwell donated paintings with the understunde understanding they would be displayed at the museum. >> tom rockwell is norman's grandson. >> he loved that community. so for him, it was clearly an intent to give it to the people of the berkshires and to make it accessible for public view. >> well we are hoping to raise $50 million. >> elizabeth mcgraw, chair the berkshire museum board. >> the rockwell is one of the most valuable pieces that we do have. >> with the museum facing tough times, they decided to auction off the rockwells, which they saw as assets. >> i think it would be a sad state of affairs if this was an empty building which is what we
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are facing. >> is that really the only choice to sell the rockwells or to have an empty building here? >> well it's -- yeah. >> just feels like a tragedy to me. >> the rockwell family sued to stop the sale. >> we kind of feel like it would be rolling over in his grave if he knew about this. >> it is a tough decision the tough decision. we have a trust with our community that we are entrusted with keeping this museum open. >> late this afternoon, the court ruled in favor of -- the museum. leaving them free to sell and to remind us all of the difference between money and treasure. jim axelrod, cbs news, pitsfield, massachusetts. that's the "overnight news" for wednesday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back later for the morning news, and cbs this morning. for jeff glor in sutherland springs, texas. i'm anthony mason in new york. thank you for watching.
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welcome to the "overnight news." i'm don dahler. the investigation of the church massacre in texas continues to dredge up new and troubling information about the killer. turns out that not only was devin kelley court martialed by the air force but the service actually had him committed to a mental facility. he escaped, and according to a police report, threatened to kill superior officers. there is also chilling accounts on how kelly carried out his bloodbath. david martin begins our coverage. >> reporter: a police report of a brief escape from a mental health facility threw an even darker light on the air force career of devin kelley. a 2012 police department report described kelly as a danger to
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himself and others, as he add already been caught sneaking firearms onto holloman air force base in new mexico where he was stationed and attempting to carry out death threats he had made on his military chain of command. five months laltd ter court martialed for beating his wife and sentenced to a year in prison. despite the history of mental health problems and conviction for domestic violence, the air force failed to enter his name into the fbi database that is searched to determine if a person is barred from purchasing firearms. allowing him to buy the assault rifle he used to kill 26 people. air force secretary, heather wilson spoke with the cbs news streaming channel, cbsn. >> it is pretty clear that the checklist that we use was not followed by the local office. and his fingerprints should have been put into the database.
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>> statistics indicate the air force, but the department of defense, all most never files a report unless the offender also received a dishonorable discharge. a arerer punishment. 11,000 dishonorable discharges entered into the database. only one for domestic violence. and one for mental health. >> robert corrigan and his wife, ee pit mietz that devotion at their church ♪ note your happiness is the lord ♪ and in their community. a deeply patriotic one. corrigan moved here two years ago after a decorated 30 year career in the air force. as chief master sergeant of the 55th medical group the offut air force base in nebraska, he led the largest and busiest in the
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air combat command. >> being a musician i really like, paslm 33. >> chief corrigan was everything his killer was not. pointed out on this veterans website. bob and jean summers are his aunt and uncle. >> we lost a young man that loved the military. loved to serve his country. >> scott and karen mar sthal were also in the air force, stationed in north carolina. they met in the barracks. meek norton had known the couple since then. >> i knew that i had a brother and sister that had my back. >> beth families are reminiscent of the deep sense of service that runs through this part of texas. both have sons on active duty. their loss still unfathomable to those who worshipped with them. >> you know, just hard, hard to imagine. >> president trump continues his tour of asia. the latest stop, south korea. where the president was singing a different tune about the
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threat from the north. mr. trump didn't call kim jong-un little rocketman or threaten to rain down fire and fury. as he has in the past. the president told the leaders it would all work out. >> have you seen any success in your diplomatic strategy so far, and do you still believe that direct talks are a waste of time. >> we are making progress. it makes sense for north korea to come to the table and to make a, a deal. good for the people of north korea and the people of the world the i do see certain movement, yes. >> with rex tillerson looking on, the president declined to say whether he still thought direct negotiations were a waste of time as he tweeted last month.
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telling top diplomat to save your energy, rex. we have many things happening, that we hope to god, >> he notably chose not to repeat his ridicule of kim jong-un. >> rocketman is on a \suicide mission for himself. strikingly different tone from his past tough talk. >> they will be met with fire >> they will be met with fire and fury. like the world has never seen. >> the visit appeared carefully >> the visit appeared carefully scripted to calm concerns in south korea, whose president favors a restrained approach. he asked mr. trump to visit this military base, and said the demiliarized zone on the north korean border. the president expects south korea to buy billions in u.s. made weapons says the u.s. has
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significant military assets of its own in the region including a nuclear submarine. and by the end of the week. the plot continues to thicken around disgraced movie mogul harvey weinstein and his alleged sexual misdeeds. a published report says weinstein paid an army of detectives, lawyers and former spies, to try to side line the investigation. jericka duncan has that. >> the article exposes how top private investigators tried to discredit alleged rain victim, rose mcgowan. in one case, an investigator posed as a woman's rights advocate to gain information about mcgowan getting ready to go public with her story. reporter rownan farrow, deceptive, intrusive behavior, terrified women and made them fear for their safety, was being run through legitimate law firms in secrecy. pobtained by the new yorker, dated july 11 this year signed
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by attorney david boise who fought for same-sex marriage. it shows the law firm executed contract on behalf of weinstein with blackcube, company made up of veterans of elite israeli intelligence uniits. one of the objectives to provide intelligence which will help the client's efforts to completely stop the publication of a negative article in a leading new york newspaper. last month, "the new york times" reported that weinstein allegedly paid off sexual harassment accusers. today a spokesperson from the times told cbs news, we learned that the law firm of boyce schiller and flexner worked to stop our reporting on harvey weinstein at the same time as lawyers were representing us in other matters. it is inexcusable and we will be pursuing appropriate remedies. in a statement to his employees, boise, addressed perceived conflict of interest saying we made clear we need to be able to continue to representative clients adverse to the times. but he went on to say, contracting with private investigators on behalf of weinstein was a mistake. >> a spokesperson for weinstein
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this the cbs "overnight news." aerial photography was reserved for the pros, pilots and shooters. now all you need is your cell phone and enough money to hire a helicopter. jeff glor took to the skies for the story. >> looking up across america's largest city it is impossible to beat the views. unless you try looking down. from central park to one world trade and the statue of liberty, new york is even more impressive from elevation. >> that is an unbelievable shot. you can't get that anywhere else. you can't do it through mobile helicopter. >> one of the businesses taking advantage of a rapidly rising aerial photography market.
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by offering tours without the doors. >> another view. nothing between you and the city. >> tim ohr is the company's coo. [ indiscernible ] >> buzz to day people don't just want to look at great photos they want to take them, themselves. >> indeed an experience. the city, actually is an experience. from the air. nothing like it. >> when it launched in 2013 it was geared to professionals. >> all of this for you are a lot is seshl social media. >> 100%. posting photographs, sharing what we see with the world. it was coming back, ten-fold. how can i do this? i want to do that. where did you get the picture. just the lightbulb went off. and it was like, i don't see why you can't come either. so we, we opened the doors. people started jumping on board. >> quickly expand to las vegas, miami, san francisco, and los angeles. >> this makes it accessible to
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everybody. you buy a seat. you go up when you want to. and you take your photos. you post them on instagram, facebook. and, your friends are going, whoa, i want to do that. >> everybody is a photographer today. >> it is true. >> is that bad? >> no, i think it is great. >> reporter: a long way from where alex mclane started 42 years ago. mclane published 11 books on aerial photography over his career. >> i would go up and go, shoot, come back, get my film back. three days later. all overexposed. you wanted to shoot yourself. it was really expensive. now you can get to see how you are doing right on the spot. it is just, it's very simple. >> reporter: his views of landscapes range from tobacco farms to rows of cut flous to b-52 bone yards. >> but the first thing i had to do was learn to fly. that was stuff in itself. terrified of flying. we joined him for a recent flight outside boston. >> i'm curious to see how you do
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this. in a cessna 172. >> there its nothing fancy about this. >> nah. >> huh. >> what is that? >> these are wetlands, the river, this is a famous farm right here. it's -- it is an old farm that has been here forever. >> okay. so there is the farm right there. >> we flew over the famed walden pond. mclane pointed out the water level its so low, nearly surrounded by beach. much of his work today focuses on the environment. >> it's, you know the most, immediate threat and so many different ways. every where you look, you can see, climate issues. at play. you know from agriculture, coastal areas. heat, fire, fire, that we have now. >> google is also in the game. earth lets users, aerially explore the planet in 3 d. now in an update you can trace the path of hurricanes see how our world has been affected.
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>> it is such a unique vantage point to see a place from that altitude and to kind of understand of how more the earth is connected between the oceans and mountains and different land masses. and there is really no wit to do that without having that kind of perspective. >> this year, google added a voyager feature. part tourist guide, part teacher. you can tour everything from the kennedy space center to lost civilizations. >> if google earth is a place to get lost, google voyager is a police to learn. >> voyager is a bit of your guide to help you navigate some of the places. >> to have that kind of ability to spin the globe, zoom into a place that you think might be interesting, and, and, go along for the ride. and, see where it takes you. >> addicting? >> it is a little bit addicting. it also doesn't cost anything. so, the beauty of it is, you can, see all the places from wherever is most comfortable for you. >> all this said, ohr says the most important place to capture a memory its still in the mind. >> are there times when people are so focused on taking
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pictures that they're not, paying attention to what they're actually seek with their eyes. >> they're shooting so fast, trying to capture everything, some times we actually tell them, put the camera down. look at what you are seeing. picture the memories, actually some times a lot more valuable. >> jeff glor, n
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murder mystery of all time returning to the silver screen. seth doane behind the scenes of "murder on the orient express." ♪ >> reporter: whether the baby grand piano, white tablecloths and fine china, or the art deco details it is clear this is no ordinary train. it's the venice simpllon orient express made up of 1920s carriages, reminiscent of the legendary train dating back to 1800s which transported passengers between paris and istanbul in very high style. we hopped on board in paris. >> it's quite beautiful. >> it is incredible. >> our traveling companion was james pritchard. if his name is not recognizable, his great grandmother's certainly is, agatha christy. >> probably feel as close to my great grandmother as i have. >> do you really?
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>> you can feel what she must have felt. you feel sense of history here. >> avid traveler, christy was a regular on the orient express. >> the orient express. >> which she called the train of her dreams. no wonder it was the setting for her most famous tale of murder. >> think when you walk along the carriages you can imagine the way her mind worked. just presumably lay there at night and kind of thought about, how, someone might die in one of the carriages and then how it might all -- pan out. you can kind of see how hear imagination developed. >> christy's imagination pours on to the pages of her 66 novels. 150 plus short stories. and, more than 20 plays. perhaps none is more beloved than murter on the orient express. >> a passenger has died on the train. >> it has been told, retold several times. >> he was murdered. >> dear god, murder here? >> my name its hercule perot and
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probably the greatest detective in the world. >> kenneth brannagh, direct and stars in the lateest aadaption. >> she is such a master at laying out in this case, very, very fascinating interesting group of characters. >> that made brannagh's job of directing and casting the film all the more interesting. >> we spent a lot of time, making sure. >> he may be a towering figure in hollywood, but was dwarfed next to the hulking train he had built for his film. >> we wanted very much to be away from friendly trains, the world of thomas the tank engine. >> this is not thomas the tank engine. >> at a movie studio lot outside london. >> it's the restaurant car. >> brannagh took us on board. in his role as the the legendary investigator. >> the world famous detective. >> hercule perot. >> he sports the trademark mustache. >> envisioning you behind the camera with the big mustache?
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>> one of the most difficult things popping behind the camera, literally, getting the mustache caught in bits of, what was holding up the eye piece. that provided a few, unfortunate moments. >> it was a fair share of mustache maintenance on set not to mention, some wrangling of the all stash cast. >> agatha christy loved that performance magic. so she absolutely invites you to get an elite team. and if you get that elite team, which we had here, you see them coming at this material understanding all of the subtle ways in which they can make an impression with the character. >> well, hello. >> brannagh calls actors thur rebreds. >> eyes linger any longer, i'll have to charge rent. >> i'll pay. >> nothing to say to penelope cruz, johnny depp, michelle pfeiffer, judy dench. when you see them arrive on the set, there is certainty and
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assurance which is thrilling to see. >> also interesting he says to watch them watch each other. >> on the first day they all worked together. it was like the first day of school. they were bringing. >> judy dench. >> hello, johnny depp. michelle pfeiffer. hello, johnny. very shy. respectful. and quite a built nervous. >> nervous. >> why would you be nervous? they were so impressed by the others? >> i think johnny depp doesn't want to do anything less than perfect work in front of judi dench. and doesn't want to do anything other than perfect work. don't want to be any one that drops the ball. >> to go on the set of a proper hollywood movie just takes your breath away. >> james pritchard was on set making sure the spirit of christy's writing was protected. he sees his great grandmother as a trail blazer. she reportedly sold more than 2 billion books. and a number believed to be surpassed only by shakespeare and the bible. >> she was the breadwinner for
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the family. some would say she still is the breadwinner for the family. she really was a very extraordinary woman. >> in an era where women had limited options she long saw writing as more of a hobby. >> books and stories. they were published. >> but a writer its what she was. >> it looks like it was written in 192. >> at the rather refined bar on board, pritchard showed us copies of notes, christy penned. detailing fellow travelers on the orient express. >> an old gentleman of 85 with the most amusing wife of 70 with a hideous but very attractive face. i think that last description its just extraordinary.
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>> in a way it seemed christy was a silent fellow passenger for those riding the train today. >> i have always been a fan of agatha christy. i read all of her books. this is like, really old. >> you have it right here. >> samantha collins told us the atmosphere evoked that of the book. and another passenger, amy pole, traveled from alaska to celebrate her 20th wedding anniversary here. >> have you been thinking about the journaly? >> yes, yes. for 57 years. >> no. >> yeah. yeah. >> since you first read the book. >> since i first read the book. >> murder on the orient express. >> we kept hearing, agatha christy stories were timeless, classics. which kenneth brannagh said demanded to be told and told again. >> with some one look agatha christy, the longevity to do with the in ate quality of the original material. it seems to me her genius is not confined to one telling of the story.
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>> a genius for murder. that never see ,$8drw
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we end this half-hour with steve hartman. a couple years ago i, confessed to after the kids were in bed. the fact was that i could not stop pulling the things. some of my favorites. i realize the extent of my addiction only after my cameraman interviewed my wife andrea about it. >> he goes out at 7:00 at night and weeds until dark. some times out there past dark. >> her point is? >> it's not weeding a garden. it's weeding five acres. >> 4 1/2 technically. see, a few years earlier i had this idea. to turn this weedy hillside into a beautiful prairie full of
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native wildfires and grasses. i contacted this man, who would eventually become my dealer. >> we started with prairie plants. >> ee ohe got me hooked on weed through gateway plants. purple coneflower, compass plant and smooth aster. >> yeah, my product is highly addictive. it's called love of nature. awe bought here's the problem. before you see those flowers in the magazine, you often need to spend a great deal of time, weeding a new prairie meadow. and neil made no mention of how addicting that could be. >> i would come out here every night and dread it. then a switch flipped i started coming out here. and loving it. >> weeding can induce a meditative state. that its therapy for all of us in this crazy world. you can tune everything out and focus on one single-minded purpose. >> also, just as a practical matter, after investing hundred of hours out here. what else can you do, just give
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up on the whole project. >> it would -- >> andrea? >> i could live without it. >> you want your husband back, don't you? >> no, i don't know if i could live with how, defeated my husband would feel if we gave it up. >> after this story first aired in 2015, i thought a lot about her hesitation. i realized you can take a hobby too seriously. which is why, i am now a recovering weedaholic. oh, i will clip the occasional spotted nap weed. i don't obsess like used to. choosing instead to focus on these three blossoms. growing like weeds in the only garden we tend, that truly matters. steve hartman, at home, in catskill, new york. and that's the "overnight news" for this wednesday. for some of you the news continues. for others. check back with us a little later for the morning news and you don't want to miss "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new
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york city. i'm do i'm don dahler. captioning funded by cbs it's wednesday, november 8th, 2017. this is the "cbs morning news." president trump touches down in china this morning, but before he left south korea, he had a warning for north korea's leader. >> america does not seek conflict or confrontation, but we will never run from it. ♪ winning in the trump era. democrats score decisive victories in governors' races in virginia and new jersey.

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