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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  November 28, 2017 3:12am-4:01am PST

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the kingdom lifted ban on female drivers and women are allowed into sports stadiums. holly williams went to riyadh to
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see the change for herself. >> comiccon arrived in saudi arabia, a celebration of comic book characters that is a sign of the times in this ultraconservative islamic kingdom. just last year it probably wouldn't have been allowed. things are becoming more free? >> yes. more cool. n gender segregation used to be structly enforced in saudi arabia but at comiccon the sexes mixed freely. traditional islamic dress was optional. >> so who changed things? who is making your country a more -- >> yeah! >> mohammad bin salman. >> the favorite son of saudi arabia's ruler, king salman and he wants to modernize. the crown prince is only 32 years old. and he isn't just the king's anointed successor, he is already enormously powerful in his own right.
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prince mohammad used that power to round up more than 200 members of the saudi elite, all accused of corruption, now locked up in this luxury hotel. critics say the prince is targeting his detractors. he has also reined in the religious police. they still patrol the streets and told me to cover my hair with a scarf. >> he said i should cover my hair. these days they can hand out advice not punishments. it seems to be popular. but this is not a democratic revolution. and publicly criticizing the crown prince would be dangerous. this man is a traditional sword seller and a diplomat. >> all people is happy. i like him so much. believe me. >> reporter: the saudi royal family has long depended on support of conservative islamic clerics to rule this country. the question now is whether the
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reforms will spark a backlash. anthony. >> holly williams in riyadh tonight. thanks. women were the targets of the last cigarette ad on american television. ♪ you've got virginia slims now baby you've come a long way ♪ >> we have come a long way since that ad aired in 1971. now big tobacco is advertising on tv again this time by court order. here its dean reynolds. >> outstanding, and they are mild. >> tobacco companies once claimed their smokes not only tasted great. ♪ ♪ it's toasted to give you've the best taste yet the toasted cigarette ♪ >> but were actually good for you. >> it said it right there. against irritation, against coughs. everybody seemed to agree. >> what cigarette do you smoke, doctor? once again, the brand named most was camel. >> even santa shilled for the industry. ♪ camel the nation's favorite
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cigarette ho-ho-ho ♪ >> executives swore they weren't frying to hook anyone all. h in 1999, federal lawsuit finally made big tobacco cough up the truth. so for the next year, in papers and on tv, you will be seeing this. >> smoking kills on average 1200 americans every day. >> or this. >> smoking is highly addictive. nicotine is the addictive drug in tobacco. >> among many corrective statements a federal judge ordered the tobacco companies to make for years of deceptive advertising. the order was issued in 2006 and the industry fought it all the way. >> ever say mea culpa? >> no. >> a research scientist that says relying on newspapers or tv to carry the message will miss the next jen ration generation. >> there is not many young people that watch primetime television or read an actual
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newspaper. and the tobaccoen dus tree knows that too. >> now these corrective statements will cost big tobacco about $30 million which is a rather inconsequential ooe amount for an industry that spend more than $8 billion a year to market its product. anthony. >> dean reynold. thanks, dean. >> coming up next, hey, are you taking the tissue test? yep, and my teeth are yellow. i mean i knew they weren't perfect, but, ugh. oh well, all hope is lost! oh thanks! clearly my whitening toothpaste is not cutting it. time for whitestrips. crest glamorous white whitestrips are the only ada-accepted whitening strips proven to be safe and effective. they work below the enamel surface to whiten 25x better than a leading whitening toothpaste. hey, nice smile! thanks! i crushed the tissue test! yeah you did! crest. healthy, beautiful smiles for life. it says you apply the blue one ok, letto me. this. here?
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remember all the fuss about black friday. $5 billion in sales. well sales on this cyber monday, are projected to top $6.6 billion. up 16.5% from last year. and tony dokoupil was right in the middle of it all. >> reporter: when you shop amazon online, you are really shopping here. at one of the company's 75 fulfillment centers. each dedicated to the beeping, buzzing choreography of modern commerce. >> how does it feel to see convey 'belts whirling like this. >> amazing. a very big day for us. >> reporter: this amazon executive helps run the retail business. >> off to a great holiday starter. we had an amazing thanksgiving, black friday, we are expecting today to be a record year. >> last year, amazon customers worldwide bought more than 64 million items on so-called cyber
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monday. that's 740 items per second. this year is expected to be even busier. and not just for amazon. traditional retailers such as best buy, target, and wal-mart are also pushing deep discounts online. as most americans 58% of them say they plan to make an online purchase today. >> it's part of this long standing trend that people refer to as retail apocalypse. >> reporter: cnet senior editor, dan akerman says cyber monday is a shift away from traditional stores. >> you see this in brick and mortar retailers closing stores going out of business. empty strip malls and shopping malls. but you also see, people are still spending that money. they're not holding on to it. >> at work, heather coulatta snapped up online deals. >> deals today are just as good as black friday. i don't have to wait in line for people who would fight me for a tv. >> reporter: amazon shipping
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depends on high speed convey 'belts, 14 miles in this one facility alone. every package you see right now is an online purchase speeding to somebody's home. anthony. >> amazing. 740 sales a second. tony dokoupil, thanks. still ahead the word of the year. thanks in part to ivanka trump. complicit. i had this chest cold, but my medicine kept wearing off. (coughsah! hey, chad! i missed you. ah! i was in the tree watching you, and then i fell. i'm not eating pizza from the trash. then i discovered mucinex. huge difference. one pill lasts 12 hours, and i'm good. oh, here kitty, kitty...ah! not a cat, not a cat! why take 4-hour medicine? just one mucinex lasts 12 hours. start the relief. ditch the misery.
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100,000 people were ordered to evacuate the air around an eruption volcano on bali. smock and ash shot nearly 10,000 feet into the air. explosions could be heard seven miles away. 59,000 travelers are stranded on the island. dictionari.com named complicit the word of year, lookup were up 300%. they spiked after an snl sketch in which scarlet johanson, portrayed ivanka trump selling a fragrance called complicit. >> she's beautiful. she's powerful. she's complicit. >> the word spiked again after ivanka atrump appeared on cbs this morning. >> i don't know what it means to be complicit. >> now, a word from our sponsor.
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>> dr. stanley: remember this: cannot change the laws of god. when he has visited you in some form of adversity and he brings you through that, that's like he has increased the strength of the foundation of your life and your faith in him. [music]
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finally tonight. a story straight out of hollywood. a handsome prince asks a young actress to marry him. jamie yuccas now on the woman wearing the glass slipper. meghan markel marrying prince harry is a 21st century cinderella story at buckingham palace. fresh faced markel from the humblest of beginnings going from the working class south l.a. homes in windsor hill to windsor castle. here at her childhood home, earlier a note passed out on kensington station stationary asking for privacy. the prom queen started theater career in high school but when it came time to finding roles she would run out of gas on the way to auditions. >> you don't understand how much i love this car. it in the morning would start and sounded like a steamboat engine. >> the first in her family to graduate college. markel believes her mixed race
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may have prevented her from getting roles in a label driven industry but led to her starring role as rachel in the series "suits." >> do attractive women intimidate you, arthur? >> she wed, trevor engelson, the marriage lasted two years. markel as much an activist as actor like her fiance across the pond. >> good evening. >> what may be the most important feature of the royal couple its the two really like each other. andrew morton wrote princess diana's biography. >> you can see the sparkle in each other's yoiz. call me old-fashioned. >> in an interview, markel said i personally love a great love story. she is certainly writing her own. jamie yuccas, cbs news, los angeles. that's the "overnight news" for this tuesday. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back a little later for the morning news and cbs this morning.
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welcome to the "overnight news." there is a turf war raging at the consumer finance shall protection bureau being fought with dough nuts and duelling e-mails. on one side is an acting director around since the obama administration. on the other, an acting director chosen by president trump. it has led to confusion at the agency, which was created in the weak of the financial meltdown of 2008. julianna goldman is following this. >> good morning. >> yes, yes, i do. >> reporter: this morning, mick mulvaney, president trump's acting director, brought dough
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nuts for new staff. in a bureau wide e mail he encouraged them to say hello and grab them and to disregard directions from leandra english who sent her own staff e-mail. english also met with massachusetts senator elizabeth warren, who spearheaded correction of the cfpb in the wake of the 2000 financial crisis. english was appointed to head the agency by richard cordray. >> the law says that i shall apin the a deputy director. i did that before i departed. the law says the deputy director shall serve as acting director. i thought that was probably the, end of the story. >> reporter: english is suing president trump to try and block him from appointing mulvaney who had this to say about the cfpb in 2014. >> it turns up being a joke. that's what the cfpb has been. in a sick, sad kind of way. >> reporter: asked today if he stands by those comments? >> my opinion of the cfpb has has not changed.
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i still thing it is an awful example of a bureaucracy that has gone wrong. >> reporter: president trump consistently criticized the bureau. since its inception, the cfpb has been ate punching bag for republican whose say it saddled anks with unnecessary regulations, oversees financial institutions and refunded near three $12 billion to tens of millions of consumers. the bureau has been aggressive in its enforcement, its highest profile case last year against wells fargo. the cfpb fined the bank $100 million for opening millions of unauthorized bank accounts and credit cards. president trump invited native american veterans of world war ii to the white house. but the ceremony took a turn for the worse when mr. trump cracked what some are calling a racist joke about senator liz beth warren. nancy cordes reports.
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>> you are very, very special people. >> it wasn't just what president trump said about elizabeth warren, it is where he said it. at an event to honor elderly native american code talkers, who used their tribal languages during world war ii to help confound u.s. enemies. >> you were here long before any of us were here. although we have a representative in congress who they say was here a long time ago. they call her pocohontas. >> democrats quickly called it a racial slur. warren called it disturbing. >> i guess he thinks it is going to shut me up. all i can say its, hadn't worked in the past. not going to work in the future. >> president trump has the used that name to peg his progressive foe many times before. >> pocohontas is not so good. >> what an insult to pocohontas. look at her cheek bones. a big con game we have going in washington. >> reference to the massachusetts senator's past claims of cherokee as ses tree. >> but the truth is the truth. i believe my mother. >> white house press secretary sarah sanders insisted there is
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nothing offensive about nicknaming a u.s. senator pocohontas. >> i think what most people find offensive is senator warren lying about her heritage to advance her career. >> late this afternoon, the navaho nation put out a statement calling the president's comment culturally insensitive. and the national congress of american indians called it, a slur. that overshadowed the native american war heroes, the president was there to honor. overseas the kingdom of saudi arabia is in the middle of a political and all churl transformation that could change the face of islam. holly williams is in riyadh.
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>> comiccon arrived in saudi arabia, a celebration of comic book characters that is a sign of the times in this ultraconservative islamic kingdom. just last year it probably wouldn't have been allowed. things are becoming more free? >> yes. more cool. gender segregation used to be strictly enforced in saudi arabia, but at comicon, the sexes mixed freely. traditional islamic dress was optional. >> so who changed things? who is making your country a more -- >> yeah! >> mohammad bin salman. >> mohammad bin salman. >> yeah! >> reporter: crown prince mohammad bin salman is the favorite son of saudi arabia's ruler, king salman, and he wants to modernize. the crown prince is only 32 years old. and he isn't just the king's anointed successor, he is already enormously powerful in his own right. prince mohammad used that power to round up more than 200 members of the saudi elite, all accused of corruption, now locked up in this luxury hotel. critics say the prince is targeting his detractors. he has also reined in the country's religious police. they still patrol the streets and told me to cover my hair
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with a scarf. >> he said i should cover my hair. these days they can hand out advice not punishments. if you didn't indulge in the frenzy, don't worry, experts say the discounts will likely be with us throughout the holiday season. tony dokoupil its at an amazon warehouse in new jersey. >> reporter: when you shop amazon online you are really shopping here, at one of the company's 75 fulfillment centers. each dedicated to the beeping, buzzing choreography of modern commence. >> how does it feel to see the convey 'belts whering like this? >> it is amazing.
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>> amazing. a very big day for us. >> reporter: this amazon executive helps run the retail business. >> off to a great holiday starter. we had an amazing thanksgiving, black friday, we are expecting today to be a record year. >> last year, amazon customers worldwide bought more than 64 million items on so-called cyber monday. that's 740 items per second. this year is expected to be even busier. and not just for amazon. traditional retailers such as best buy, target, and wal-mart are also pushing deep discounts online. as most americans 58% of them say they plan to make an online purchase today. >> it's part of this long standing trend that people refer to as retail apocalypse. >> reporter: cnet senior editor, dan akerman says cyber monday is part of a deepening shift away from traditional stores. >> you see this in brick and mortar retailers closing stores going out of business. empty strip malls and shopping malls. but you also see, people are still spending that money. they're not holding on to it. >> at work, heather coulatta snapped up online deals. >> deals today are just as good as black friday. i don't have to wait in line for people who would fight me for a
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tv. >> reporter: amazon shipping depend on around here, i'm lucky to get through a shift without a disaster. my bargain detergent couldn't keep up. it was mostly water. so, i switched to tide pods. they're super concentrated, so i get a better clean. i mean, i give away water for free. i'm not about to pay for it in my detergent. #1 trusted. #1 awarded it's got to be tide. and for a plant-based clean, try tide purclean it says you apply the blue one ok, letto me. this. here? no. have a little fun together, or a lot. k-y yours and mine. two sensations that work together, so you can play together.
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the avalanche of sexual misconduct allegations against the rich and powerful began with the case against former movie mogul harvey weinstein. well erin moriarti spoke with the investigative reporter who helped break the story. >> they anger us, offend us. sometimes they make us sad. actors, politicians, journalists, producers, accused of behavior that ranges from simply creepy to criminal. in the case of movie mogul harvey weinstein, the accusations go back years. but his accusers have only come forward in the past two months. why now?
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>> this was the first point in history when women could look at allegations against bill cosby, allegations against roger ailes, against bill o'reilly and see for the first time okay, as scary as this is, there is a precedent. i can come forward and be heard. >> but this young reporter also played a part in what many describe as a moment of reckoning. his name is ronan farrow, at 29 he wasn't born when weinstein is alleged to have begun sexually harassing and assaulting women. yet farrow was able to stand up to the legal and pr machine. >> when harvey weinstein threat tuned sue me it was like harry potter where an invitation to hogwarts is coming through every window, fireplace, opening in the house. farrow working for nbc news when he was assigned the story. he obtained an incriminating police recording of harvey weinstein, with actress
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gutierrez. >> he also had other accusers on the record. but nbc executives said the story still needed work. and decided not to proceed with it. >> there wasn't a thought like i should just give up on this? >> in terms of the gravity of the evidence, it would have been impossible for me to live with myself or answer to any of the many women i had already interviewed if i had stopped. >> so, ronan farrow went to the new yorker magazine. >> from the moment he walked in the doors here you were deter menned to get this in print. >> you are damn right. >> the editor of the new yorker says he knew all about the claims against weinstein. 15 years ago, one of his writers, working on a profile of the movie producer, connecticut vince accusers to go public. it was who brought farrow to the
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new yorker, much like aletta, farrow had a battle. >> once said of bill bradlee, exhibited the governments a jewel thief. not not that he did theefg, he did work. this is not some body doing this for 20 years, stakes are high, the new yorker, personal reputation to say nothing of mine. >> farrow's first story of weinstein detailing allegations of sexual assault made by a dozen actresses including mira sorvino and, roseanna arquette appeared on line in early october the same week a similar story appeared in "the new york times." >> how much did that help you the fact that the times came out that same week? was there strength in numbers? >> for sure. for sure. i mean for months i was working alone. >> the impact was immediate. >> when something this major happens, when you have the fallout, 50 women coming for ward, that, it is a watershed
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moment. >> farrow's follow-up report was equally explosive revealing the length that weinstein would allegedly go to quash negative stories including using private investigators, and former israeli spies, to dig up dirt to discredit his accusers, as well as the the journalist whose told their stories. >> i don't think most people are aware of the exotic and extreme tools at the disposal of the most powerful and wealthy men in america when they are bent at silencing accusations against them. >> do you think that there was an investigation to see if there was anything in your background or anything that could, make you back off from this story? >> i know that that is the case. >> but anyone looking into farrow's background would quickly discover he is not easily rattled. he is a lawyer, was chosen a rhode scholar, and maybe most important, he grew up under a media microscope. as the son of actress and
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activist, mia farrow. >> it was perhaps an unexpected advantage in one sense that any dirt that could be uncovered on me had already lived in the tab lid for my entire life. which is a painful and unpleasant thing, but, in this case, it meant that, there were really no surprises to of uncover when there were efforts to discredit me. >> farrow born in 1987 during his mother's long term relationship with woody allen. he was 4 when in the middle of his parents's any custody battle his 7-year-old sister dylan accused allen of sexually abusing her. after two different state investigations, allen was never criminally charged. >> those are painful family experiences that i for many years tried to outrun and avoid. >> wood yy allen denied it. denied it powerfully. >> has always denied it. has gone very directly after any woman, proximate to it.
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huge, huge public relations apparatus designed to do that. >> in 2014, farrow's sister then an adult decided to repeat her accusation against her father publicly. >> you tried to talk her out of it. >> tried to talk her out of it vigoro vigorously. saying, stay quiet. you have already lived through this trauma. why bring it up again? why hurt your career? why hurt the rest of our careers? >> why did she decide to go forward? >> the logic that she, articulated to me had a lot in common with the logic raised by women speaking out against harvey weinstein. she wanted to make sure that other women were protected. >> in a statement to cbs news, a representative for woody allen said the sexual abuse allegations have been investigated thoroughly and repeatedly, and have consistently been found to lack any basis in fact. but ronan farrow says he now believes his sister did the right thing by speaking out.
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and, as he interviewed women making accusations against weinstein, he says, dylan was on his mind. >> she, made a very brave choice to, to go public because she thought it could help others. that is the same choice that each and every one of these women accusing harvey weinstein had to make. this was all downside for the women coming forward. there was nothing to gain. everything to lose. >> but while some women say they were too terrified to speak about harvey weinstein, others simply couldn't. weinstein who denies all claims of nonconsensual sex had been paying for their silence. as much as $1 million in the case of gut tichlt errez has farrow reported this past week. >> the nondisclosure agreements. what part did those play? >> over 20 years he signed, secret settlement after secret settlement, binding will tune silence. >> mimi filet has come forward
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in order to support others who have been brave enough to break the silence about what they allege that they suffered as a result of meeting harvey weinstein. >> famed lawyer, gloria a allrepresents a number of women, a former movie production assistant who have gone public with accusations against harvey weinstein. >> i have known about allegations against him for some time. more than a year, years? >> for a significant period of time. >> i remember, harvey rolling on to his back saying, don't you feel we're so much closer to each other now. to which i replied, no. >> but allred admit she has also had clients she has advised in the past to remain silent in exchange for money. >> isn't that exactly why we didn't hear about any of these cases till now? >> there is a legitimate concern. what about public safety? if this victim cannot speak, might he do it again?
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and again and again? on the other hand, my duty as an attorney, is to my client. i will not sacrifice my client for any cause, even a cause that i believe in. >> but the days of silencing victim maze be over. harvey weinstein not long ago among the most powerful men in h hollywood has lost his job and so have more than two dozen other men accused of inappropriate work place behavior. all because of a few dogged reporters, and the women who trusted them. >> harvey weinstein himself, and this allegations against him are, are extreme. it's important to say that. but, he is hardly alone. and if this moment, lead to -- to a greater awareness to men, particularly men in position of powers and influence, ok, let's try this. it says you apply the blue one to me.
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would you feel safe living in a wooden sky scraper? turns out all timber buildings are newt thing. tony dokoupil has that story from portland. >> this is the tallest wood building in the united states. >> right now. >> right now. >> wow. >> it is hard to tell from the outside. but inside, portland developer, eric wily walked us through the
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milestone in wood construction. a nearly finished eight story condominium. complete with million dollar apartments and picturesque views. >> these beams, that is in fact what is holding the building up? >> correct. >> the building then as carbon 12 is part of a global boom in wood construction. including major projects in minneapolis, vancouver, and london. but glen corbett fire science professor thinks wood could fuel an inferno that firefighters can't fight like the deadly fire in london which climbed the aluminum cladding. >> you think some of the new wood high rises could go of in flames the way grthe building i london? >> it is unstoppable. >> any projects we are looking at primarily wood based? >> well they're wood models. >> none of the models are for a wood based building. >> the architect who helped
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design the world's tallest building in dubai, worries more wood could mean more fire if codes aren't strictly enforced. >> we have got a responsibility to think about the unthinkable things. i'm glad there are advocates for timber, need to be reasonable control and understanning applied to it. >> when you are working out of a wood office? >> we are. >> thomas robinson lead architect for framework a building in portland. at 148 feet, it is expected to surpass carbon 12 as tallest wood building in america. >> this is the three fly. >> designed with cross laminated timber, robinson says is fire resistant. to get a building permit the materil had two survive two hours in a furnace at 2,000 degrees. >> what happened here? >> he showed us what remand of the wood. >> the fire burned it done to there. but at this, this level. would it still hold? >> it would still hold. shows you how the structure is
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durable. >> so durable in fact. >> you think there will be an explosion in this?
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starbuck's has 27,000 stores in 70 countries around the world. but so far there are no starbuck's in italy. the one set to open is milan is sparking controversy. seth doane is there. in italy, this is the daily ritual. you don't hear the words grande, venti or frap. coffee is sell pull. straight forward. >> it is our way to, to, enjoy the day. >> but ask this barista about
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starbuck's plan to open and the tone changes. >> can we cut it. can we cut it? >> the seattle coffee giant makes for awkward con strer sags here. >> i like starbuck's, i like starbuck's. but it's like, a big invasion. >> an invasion? >> yeah. >> tradition runs deep here in italy. and coffee is no exception. but with starbuck's planning to open its first store here in milan next year, is italian coffee culture under threat? after all, the cookies and cream frozen cappuccino is already here? even before starbuck's arrives, several american style coffee shops are catering to changing tastes. >> can you make us a unicorn in the cookies and cream. >> david nathaniel has eight of the 12 ounce coffee joints and plans to open 100 in five years. here customers can sit and drink from disposable cups.
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>> we don't want people to stay at the counter. >> isn't there something beautiful about that? >> absolutely. there is plenty in italy like that. so, why not give, give italians the opportunity of having an alternative? >> we found some americans, including bob hodge from ohio, lamenting the u.s. import. >> i am not a huge fan of starbuck's myself. they have run a lot of the mom and pop, coffee shops out of the u.s. >> now the 150,000-plus small coffee shops here may n to concoct something else strong, to hold their ground. >> seth doane, cbs news, milan. well that's the "overnight news" for this tuesday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back with us a little later for the morning news and of course, cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm jericka duncan.
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it's tuesday, november 28th 2017. this is the cbs morning news. showdown in washington. two people are fighting for control of the nation's top financial watchdog agency leaving a judge to decide who is in charge. a ceremony to americans who served in world war ii is overshadowed by a remark by the president. >> we have a representative in congress who they say was here a long time ago. they call her pocahontas.

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